CHAPTER XXXV

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, Ca. conducting a $30 million modernization SRA (14 July to 10 October 1980) - U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (1980) - CV-43 Hawaiian Training Cruise (3 May to 6 June 1981)

Iran History, Air Arm & Iran hostage crisis and the Iraq and Iran War

(1 July 1980 to 19 August 1981)

Part 1 – (1 July 1980 to 21 December 1980)

Part 2 – (22 December 1980 to 3 May 1981)

Part 3 – (4 May to 19 August 1981)

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Refresher Training and Carrier Qualifications (CarQuals)

 

    From November 1980 to May 1981, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) conducted Independent Steaming Exercises, Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) in February 1981, Refresher Training and CQ’s (CarQuals) in the SOCAL AOR keep everyone busy and away from home weeks at a time.

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 embarked departs NAS, Alameda, Ca. on a Hawaiian Training Cruise

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 (tail code NK) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, California 4 May 1981, on her Hawaiian Training Cruise in the Eastern Pacific, with Captain Richard M Dunleavy, USN, as Commanding Officer and Captain John A. Moriarty, Executive Officer,  for Refresher Training and CarQuals in the mid-Pacific; made two Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh on 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam peace coast patrol cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She made her 13th foreign water deployment on her 13th “WestPac,” during Operation Evening Light and Operation Eagle Claw, the Iran hostage crisis, since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956). Coral Sea commissioned on 1 October 1947” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72 & 1275X5).

 

USS CORAL SEA (CV-43) with CVW-14 (NK)

(4 May to 6 June 1981)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Pacific

EastPac

CVW-14

NK

4 May 1981

6 Jun 1981

Training Ops

Hawaiian Training Cruise

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-154

Black Knights -            Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

  NK100

F-4N

VF-21

Freelancers -                 Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

  NK200

F-4N

VA-97

Warhawks -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

  NK300

A-7E

VA-27

Royal Maces -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

  NK400

A-7E

VA-196

Main Battery or

Devil Spades -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

  NK500

A-6A / KA-6D

VAW-113

Black Eagles - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

  NK600

E-2B

VFP-63 Det, 2

Eyes of the Fleet -         Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

 NK    115-117

 

RF-8G

HC-1 Det. 3

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

  NK610

SH-3G

VFP or VF(P) - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (Light) or Light Photographic Squadron.

“The CO of CAG CVW-14 was Cdr.Richard A. Wilson”  (Ref. 34)

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 76

 

    “USS Independence (CV-62) operated on “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea from 20 April to 5 May 1981” (Ref. 1148B).

 

 

NS024325 52k A rear view of an A-6E Intruder aircraft being launched and an A-7 Corsair II aircraft awaiting launch from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43), May 1981. US Navy photo by PH2 Robert S. Swinland (DVIC id: DNST8200679). NS024325 52k. Defense Visual Information Center. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024325.jpg

 

    “On 5 May 1981, USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked arrived San Francisco Bay, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain Daniel Arthur Pedersen, as Commanding Officer, relieving Captain Roger Elden Box, USNA 1956, 21st Commanding Officer, serving from 28 May 1979 to 20 October, ending her 15th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet, her second Indian Ocean deployment and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. Connie was awarded the Navy Expeditionary Service Sea (30 October 1980 - 12 March 1981) Service Ribbon (August 1974 thru January 1993) and Humanitarian Service (20 March 1981 - Undetermined end). Reclassified to CV-61 on 30 June 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War, earning 13 battle stars for service in Vietnam. Her 17th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 10 August 1957 (10 September 1980 to 5 May 1981)” (Ref. 1-Ranger, 72, 84A, 1094A, 1095 & 1096). 

 

    “Following Refresher Training and Carrier Qualifications (CarQuals), USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 7 May 1981, for mid-Pacific operations near Hawaii, returning to the Southern California OpArea” (Ref. 43).

 

    “Following turn over with USS America (CV-66) on 9 May 1981 in the Indian Ocean en route to the Gulf of Aden” (Ref. 1148B).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) encountered a Bear Ds and Il-38 Mays which shadowed the ship while operating in the Indian Ocean on 12 May 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

Pope John Paul II shot -- May 13, 1981

 

     “While waving to a crowd from an open convertible in St. Peter's Square in May 13, 1981, Pope John Paul II is struck by two bullets and wounded in the abdomen, right arm and left hand. Two bystanders are also shot. Police immediately arrest the assailant, identified as Mehmet Ali Agca, an escaped Turkish killer. An ambulance rushes the pontiff from the scene to a hospital. He undergoes a five-hour operation in which parts of his intestines are removed. By October, John Paul has fully recovered” (Ref. 5A).

 

    “Soviet Tu-95 Bears reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) off Luzon, Philippines on 15 May 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) embarked 30 Vietnamese boat people, rescued by “other elements of the battle group,” on 17 May 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) embarked 30 Vietnamese boat people, rescued by “other elements of the battle group,” on 17 May 1981, transferring the refugees to replenishment oiler USS Wabash (AOR-5) two days later, to be debarked in Singapore on the 20th. The latter rescued an additional 44 people the previous day, sinking their small vessel to preclude her becoming a hazard to navigation. Following further “consolidation” of boat people rescued by other ships, Wabash had 150 packed on board, her crew later being awarded the Humanitarian Service Medal” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) commenced operations in the Northern Arabian Sea on 1 June 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “On 5 June 1981, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Robert Spencer Owens, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 26th WestPac, her 19th South China Sea, on her sixth Indian Ocean deployment, her 21st deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet,.on her third North Arabian Sea and second Arabian/Persian Gulf. On 16 March 1981, an A-6 Intruder from VA-115 aboard Midway sighted a downed civilian helicopter in the South China Sea. Midway immediately dispatched HC-1 Det 2 helicopters to the scene. All 17 people aboard the downed helicopter were rescued and brought aboard the carrier. The chartered civilian helicopter was also plucked out of the water and lifted to Midway's flight deck. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 24th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 30th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Her 43rd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (23 February to 5 June 1981)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

 23/02/81 to 05/06/81

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Navy Expeditionary Service Medal

Iran, Yemen & Indian Ocean

 

19 Aug to 13 Nov 1980*h

26th WestPac

19th SCS

7th IO

Middle East

3rd North Arabian Sea & 2nd Arabian / Persian Gulf

Battle Efficiency Award (Navy "E" Ribbon), marking her as the outstanding carrier in the Pacific Fleet

Jul 1980 to Dec 1981

25th, 26th & 27th WestPac

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

same

 

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces” (Ref. 1081D).

Iran/Indian Ocean (21 NOV 79 - 20 OCT 81)*h

Ref. 1081 & 1081/C

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) operated in the Northern Arabian Sea during which time the ship was shadowed by Soviet Il-38 Mays on 13 June 1981. Intercepted and escorted by the ship’s Tomcats, the Russians nonetheless flew so aggressively as to warrant the carrier filing Incident at Sea reports” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) operated in the Northern Arabian Sea during which time the ship was shadowed by Soviet Il-38 Mays on the 18 June 1981. Intercepted and escorted by the ship’s Tomcats, the Russians nonetheless flew so aggressively as to warrant the carrier filing Incident at Sea reports” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “Fetch 613, NL 611, an SH-3H Sea King (BuNo 148967), HS-4 attached to CVW-11, made a “forced water landing,” at 22º3’N, 65º44’E, at 0930, 19 June 1981. The crew was rescued without injuries” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) operated in the Northern Arabian Sea during which time the ship was shadowed by Soviet Il-38 Mays on the 25 June 1981. Intercepted and escorted by the ship’s Tomcats, the Russians nonetheless flew so aggressively as to warrant the carrier filing Incident at Sea reports” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 5 June to 26 June 1981” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 26 June 1981, with Captain Robert Spencer Owens, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her underway period as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(26 June to 16 July 1981)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (Forward Deployed)

WestPac

CVW-5

NF

26 Jun 1981

16 Jul 1981

Cruise

21-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps – Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 115-120

RF-4B

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VA-93

Ravens -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E /

A6-E/KA-6D /  *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

HC-1 Det.2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system

 

    “Aircraft No. 204, an F-14A Tomcat Jet Fighter (BuNo 160674), LCDR Daniel R. McCort, and LT David L. Pittman, VF-111 attached to CVW-11, crashed into the sea while landing, two miles astern of USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), 20º12’8N, 60º2’E on 27 June 1981. Helo No. 613 recovered McCort and Pittman uninjured” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) operated in the Northern Arabian Sea during which time the ship was shadowed by Soviet Il-38 Mays on the 30 June 1981. Intercepted and escorted by the ship’s Tomcats, the Russians nonetheless flew so aggressively as to warrant the carrier filing Incident at Sea reports” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) operated in the Northern Arabian Sea from 1 June to 1 July 1981, being shadowed by Soviet Il-38 Mays on the 13th, 18th, 25th and 30th. Intercepted and escorted by the ship’s Tomcats, the Russians nonetheless flew so aggressively as to warrant the carrier filing Incident at Sea reports” (Ref. 331A).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 embarked returns to Alameda, Ca. from a Hawaiian Training Cruise

 

    “On 6 June 1981, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 (tail code NK) embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, California, ending her Hawaiian Training Cruise in the Eastern Pacific, with Captain Richard M Dunleavy, USN, as Commanding Officer, conducting Refresher Training and CarQuals in the mid-Pacific. Squadrons: VF-154, F-4N; VF-21, F-4N; VA-97, A-7E; VA-27, A-7E; VA-196, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-113, E-2B; VFP-63 Det. 2, RF-8G and HC-1 Det. 3, SH-3G; made two Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh on 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam peace coast patrol cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She made her 13th foreign water deployment on her 13th “WestPac,” during Operation Evening Light and Operation Eagle Claw, the Iran hostage crisis, since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956). Coral Sea commissioned on 1 October 1947 (4 May to 6 June 1981)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 & 72).

 

 04/05/81 – 06/06/82

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  “EASTPAC”

none

1982

 Training

Reference 34, 35 & 43 reflect Chart info.

 

    “On 10 June 1981, USS Independence (CV-62) with CVW-6 and Carrier Group Eight, Rear Admiral James E. embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain Thomas Edward Shanahan, as Commanding Officer and Cdr/Captain James D. Joyner as Executive Officer, ending her second Indian Ocean and first North Arabian Sea deployment in support of the Iranian Crisis, operating with the 7th Fleet, steaming through the Southern Atlantic around the tip of Africa around Cape of Hope, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Indian Ocean. Upon conclusion of Indian Ocean operations Indy steamed from the Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea, making her third Gulf of Aden voyage, on her third Red Sea voyage, steaming through the Bab el Mandeb by westerly and northerly courses from the Gulf of Aden and anchored just outside the Suez Canal, becoming the first aircraft carrier to make a south-to-north transit of the Suez Canal since it was reopened in response to the Israel and Syria Crisis, taking up station on “Bagel Station,” off the coast of Israel and Lebanon, ending her 15th Mediterranean Sea deployment, conducting Board and Survey Inspection (INSURV), operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming through the Atlantic operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. Independence crossed the Equator and conducted Polywog to Shellback Initiation on 29 November 1980, with over 4,000 polliwogs and only a few hundred shellbacks, it was hard to say who really had control over the initiation. Hundreds of American sailors gathered on the flight deck in the strangest of costumes. Some had on pirate costumes; others wore their pants inside out and backwards, all wore T-shirts sporting various shellback and pollywog slogans. Thousands of enlisted men, officers and civilians crawled through a gauntlet of hose-wielding shellbacks, met with King Neptune’s Court, Royal Doctors, barbers and thee totally indescribable. It was all in good fun, and when it was over, Indy was entirely in the hands of Shellbacks. Independence rounded the tip of Africa around Cape of Good Hope on 8 December 1980 and Indy relieved USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) the same day and a assumed duty patrolling “Gonzo Station.” Though the crew had been at sea for some time, by the time Ike reached Norfolk, Virginia, would be gone a record 252 days. The crew didn’t really want to break Ike’s record. Independence arrived “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea, steaming through the Indian Ocean on 18 December 1980. Christmas would prove difficult to endure at sea for USS Independence on “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea, Chief of Chaplin’s, Rear Admiral Ross H. Trower brought kind and reassuring words as he toured thee ship, greeting and talking with sailors in all departments. Christmas services on thee hangar deck brought the crew together singing, thanksgiving and prayers for families at home. By far the best diversion from loneliness was a visit by the Department of Defense sponsored band “Baseline,” consisting of four band members and two dazzling young ladies were the combination that came to rock, sing, dance, and otherwise delight the hangar bay crowds throughout the Christmas holidays. Independence was on “Gonzo Station” in the Indian Ocean when Iran released the American hostages on 20 January 1981, arriving on 18 December 1980, standing by ready to provide air support. Although it seemed to relieve a great amount of pressure from Indy crew members, they still knew there presence was required in the Indian Ocean to keep the world’s trade lines open, but at least now they would be able to seek a liberty port, while in January a port call to Singapore was canceled. The promise of “Two beers for 60 days at sea” was nice, but the promise of liberty was much nicer. After 76 days at sea, Independence arrived in Perth, Australia on 2 February 1981 for some long awaited liberty. Independence departed Perth, Australia and after several days of liberty, in port from 2 to 7 February 1981, Independence returned to “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea, steaming through the Indian Ocean on 22 February 1981. Independence operated on “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea from 22 February to 25 March 1981. Forty-five days out of Perth, Australia, to break the routine the crew was given there second ration of beer. There were also visits from the USO band “Happiness” and the Seventh Fleet band “Orient Express.” Independence anchored at Port Louis, Mauritius on 2 April 1981, for the crew’s second port visit of the deployment. Independence made a port call at Port Louis, Mauritius from 2 to 6 April 1981. Although high winds made it impossibly for liberty the first day in, the weather was beautiful the rest of the port visit. Special Services offered various tours. On 7 April 1981, Indy lifted anchor and headed back to “Gonzo Station” in the Indian Ocean after a brief to trip for weapons exercises near Diego Garcia. For its role in the Iran / Afghanistan operations, Indy was awarded the Navy Expeditionary Medal. Independence crossed the Equator and conducted Polywog to Shellback Initiation on 14 April 1981. Independence returned to “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea, steaming through the Indian Ocean on 20 April 1981. Back on “Gonzo Station” in the Indian Ocean, the crew had little time to relax, as the crew no only had to perform regular flight operations but prepare for the up coming Board and Survey Inspection (INSURV). All over the ship, men were grinding, scraping, painting and correcting discrepancies to make Indy ready for inspection, by not only the INSURV Team, but the crew’s families and loved ones upon return home to Norfolk, Virginia. Indy operated on “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea from 20 April to 5 May 1981. Following turn over with USS America (CV-66) on 9 May 1981 in the Indian Ocean en route to the Gulf of Aden. Independence transited the Gulf of Aden, the Red Sea, steaming through the Bab el Mandeb by westerly and northerly courses from the Gulf of Aden and anchored just outside the Suez Canal on the evening of May 14, 1981 just 13 days away from Indy’s Scheduled arrival home. Early the next morning Indy began its transit of the Suez Canal, becoming the first aircraft carrier to make a south-to-north transit of the Suez Canal since it was reopened. That afternoon the festive mood, and all thought of going home were shattered by news that the presence of Indy was necessary in the Mediterranean Sea. Indy was the closet, most battle ready carrier to the impending crisis between Israel and Syria. So, after leaving the Suez Canal, instead of heading home, Indy took up station on “Bagel Station,” off the coast of Israel and Lebanon, to wait the outcome of the Middle East situation. The crew took it well, knowing there was nothing they could do, but work hard and wait for better news. After 11 days on “Bagel Station” from 15 to 26 May 1981, better news arrived and the crew was notified USS Independence (CV-62) was released to head home to Norfolk, Virginia. Passing through the Straits of Gibraltar a visit from the Chief of Naval Operations Thomas B. Hayward reminded us that the ever changing situation in the Middle East might still require Independence’s presence there, but the ship and crew had played a vital role in our Nation’s defense. As Indy crossed the Atlantic, the crew turned there attention to the task of preparing Indy for its INSURV. On the way home, the INSURV Inspectors were embarked at Bermuda and the ship continued to Norfolk, Virginia. Indy passed INSURV with flying colors, remaining second to none. Ports of call included Perth, Australia, the capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia. It is the fourth most populous city in Australia and Port Louis, Mauritius, a city in Mauritius, located in the Port Louis District, the western part also lies in the Rivière Noire District. The Cruise and Ports of Call. Squadrons: VF-102, F-4J; VF-33, F-4J; VA-15, A-7E; VA-87, A-7E; VA-176, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-124, E-2C; VAQ-130, EA-6B; HS-5, SH-3H; VFP-63 DET.4 (*1), RF-8G; and VS-28, S-3A (*1). (*1) VFP-63 disestablished on Jun.30, 1982; reclassified to CV-62 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" 28 February 1973; made one Vietnam Combat cruise during the Vietnam Conflict/War and first deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, earning 1 battle star for service in Vietnam on her eighth deployment. Her 19t Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission as a Forrestal Class Attack Aircraft Carrier at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard, New York, 10 January 1959 (19 November to 10 June 1981)” (Ref. 1-Independence, 72, 76, 325, 1148B & 1156A).

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv62-81/index_006.htm

 

 19/11/80 to 10/06/81

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

Navy Expeditionary Medal

Iranian Crisis

 

Europe

Middle East

2nd Indian Ocean

1st North Arabian Sea

Ref. - 1148B

 

    “Rear Admiral Jerry O. Tuttle assumed duty as Commander Carrier Group Eight in June 1981, reliving Rear Admiral James E. Service, serving from June 1980 to June 1981” (Ref. 1148B).

 

    “Rear Admiral James E. Service assumed duty as Commander, Battle Force Sixth Fleet in June 1981, serving as Commander Carrier Group Eight from June 1980 to June 1981, and broke his flag in aboard USS Forrestal (CV 59)” (Ref. 1148B, 1150 & 1156A).

 

    “The fifth Independence (CVA-62), former CVA-62), the 62nd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 50th, commissioned at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard, New York, on 10 January 1959; reclassified to CV-62 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" 28 February 1973 commenced Overhaul, steaming up the Elizabeth River, a 6-mile-long (10 km) tidal estuary forming an arm of Hampton Roads harbor at the southern end of Chesapeake Bay in southeast Virginia in the United States, located along the southern side of the mouth of the James River, between the cities of Portsmouth and Norfolk to the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia on 10 June 1981. Through its Southern Branch and the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, the Elizabeth River also is a gateway to points to the south for the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, an inland path from the ocean providing a more sheltered navigable waterway to Florida for commercial and recreational boating” (Ref. 1-Independence, 72, 76, 84A, 325, 1148B, 1149A, 1157 & 1158).

 

Colonel Mohammed Mo'ezi, Iran's most distinguished combat pilot and President Abol Hasan Bani-Sadr split Iran in a F-4

 

     “Colonel Mohammed Mo'ezi, Iran's most distinguished combat pilot and most famous early war hero, took his leave of the Islamic Republic for good, taking his F-4 and deposed President Abol Hasan Bani-Sadr with him in June 1981” (Ref. 24).

 

       “The Mujahedin stepped up a campaign of sporadic and highly demoralizing bombing throughout the country that killed many clerics and government leaders, including the bombing on June 28, 1981, of the headquarters of the ruling Islamic Republican Party, in which 73 people were killed. Bani-Sadr's successor, former Prime Minister Mohammad” (Ref. 22).

 

     “Rear Admiral William F. McCauley assumed command of Cruiser-Destroyer Group Eight on 16 July 1981” (Ref. 1148B).

 

    “On 16 July 1981, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), ending her underway period as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system (26 June to 16 July 1981)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

 26/06/81 to 16/07/81

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET

Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

WestPac

Cruise

21-days

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces” (Ref. 1081D).

Ref. 1081 & 1081/C

 

New Commanding Officer of the Coral Sea arrives

 

     “Captain Jerome Lamarr ("Jerry") Johnson assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on 2 July 1981, relieving Captain Richard Michael Dunleavy, 31st Commanding Officer, serving from 22 December 1979 to 2 July 1981 at Alameda Naval Air” (Ref. 35A). 

 

    “On 6 August 1981, USS Ranger (CV-61) suffers a Fire in Pri-Fly area while at San Diego dock” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) operated in the Northern Arabian Sea during which time the ship was shadowed by Soviet Il-38 Mays on 7 August 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “A fire aboard USS Independence (CV-62) damages the air operations and carrier control approach spaces, resulting in no injuries on 15 August 1981” (Ref. 1148B).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) operated in the Northern Arabian Sea during which time the ship was shadowed by Soviet Il-38 Mays on 15 August 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Operations Department Yeoman conducts a Top Secret visit to XEROX Corporation, San Francisco, Ca.

 

    The Availability period following Coral Sea’s 79/80WestPac” was busy for the crew and ship wide office IBM Mag Card Type Writers were replaced with New Xerox computers. The Operations Department Office and the Intelligence Division had many documents, most Top Secret recorded on Mag Cards. The Operations Department would have to have someone re-type countless files and manuals that were created during the last three years, mostly Secret to Top Secret Manuals, Messages, Letter of Instructions, Green Sheets, Personnel Evaluations, Forums and how to manuals for equipment, etc.

 

    As the Yeoman responsible for all the typing, YN3 Bruce Wayne Henion was scheduled for discharge in August 1981 or re-enlistment and shore duty in San Diego, California.  An assignment was given Petty Officer Henion which involved going to the Xerox Corporation to copy files from one disk to another floppy disk. His assigned mission took several days and was successful but eventful as told in Henion’s own words:

 

    I didn’t have the time or desire to re-type all these files do to the amount of responsibilities already given me, to include up coming evaluations and Officers FITREPS, so re-typing manuals, etc., just wasn’t feasible, so the order was given that something had to be done and I went to the Xerox Corporation with a Second Class Petty Officer from one of Operations Department Divisions, who was responsible for security, armed with a pistol. In took several days to transfer information from the Mag Cards to floppy disks and deleting information on Mag Cards.

 

    We met with the senior representative of Xerox Corporation in San Francisco and I went to work. In a café both days, the Xerox representative romanced this Second Class Petty Officer. The first day after work we both went as guests but only stayed a few minutes before heading back to the ship. The second day when we were finished, we went to the café for dinner After dinner the Second Class on security detail wanted to stay at the café for a few hours visiting with his new girlfriend and I assumed the security of the floppy disks from a distance, placing them in the trunk of my car in an under ground parking lot at the Xerox Corporations Office.

 

    This situation was not of my making and I was really scared and pissed because the Second Class Petty Officer didn’t leave with me as soon as the job was finished. The Second Class Petty Officer and Senior Xerox Corporation representative told me everything would be fine in this under ground parking lot.

 

    The only thing I could do was exchange the keys for the pistol. I would have shot someone had they broken into my car. Several hours later we left for the ship. I never reported the Second Class Petty Officer but to this day I’ll never forget the event. His reasoning was different then mine but it wouldn’t make either one of us look great had I reported the incident as everything turned out ok.

 

    I didn’t like the position I was left in by this Second Class Petty Officer nor was I impressed with this senior Xerox Corporation representative who romanced my security guard. It could have resulted in a serious incident had someone knew what we were doing and reported it to those seeking to under mine the security of the U. S. of America. I would have been dead and the floppy disks would have been in our enemies’ hands had I been over powered. Highly sensitive information which could have done severe damage to the U.S. Navy, had it fallen in the wrong hands was both our responsibility.

 

    This incident in my life made me more independent and less trusting of Leading Petty Officers. Today in a world of uncertain futures for so many throughout the world, and so many seeking to destroy us and our allies citizens, this event hidden in history, should suggest to all, the importance of being professional in the handling of sensitive materials on or off military installations. Today there are those who so easily sell sensitive information to anyone for a price, we defiantly need our service members and agents of the U. S. government handling sensitive information better then some of us in the past have done, although I was armed and in an under ground parking lot.

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) arrives NAS, Alameda, Ca. from an underway period and

YN3 Henion was appointed Operations Department Duty Officer

 

    Several days before it was time to leave, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) had returned from a work up period the Friday before 19 August 1981, and Petty Officer Henion was appointed the Operations Department Duty Officer. Henion wasn’t thinking that day and would get in trouble for an act initially viewed as theft by NAS Alamedas, California Master-At-Arms. Petty Officer Henion you would think buy now, four years in the navy and reenlisting to boot, would have better sense then what he had at the time of an incident that involved the Master-At-Arms.

 

    As told in Henion’s own words: “I thought I would get ready for my next command, so I carried a box of Yeoman supplies from my office to my car at the end of the pier. I opened the trunk and placed the box inside when a Chief Petty Officer and a Second Class Petty Officer attached to the NAS Base Master-at-Arms stopped me. They checked the contents and arrested me. They took me to the ship’s Master-at-Arms where I stayed for around thirty minutes. My Division Officer, LCDR Inverso rescued me, and there were no chargers. I really thought I needed those supplies to do my job as a Yeoman. Once my Division Officer explained to me my next command would supply me the necessary articles in order for me to do my job, I felt pretty stupid.”

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Operations Department Yeoman heads home and then to his new duty station of NAVPHIBSCOL, Coronado, California.

 

    On 19 August 1981, Petty Officer Henion departs USS Coral Sea (CV-43) and heads home to Jefferson, Oregon in his Chevy Camaro for a thirty-day Leave before arriving NAVPHIBSCOL, Coronado, California. YN3 Henion had spent 3 ½ years aboard and rose from 4th Division, Deck Department Yeoman to the Ops Yeoman and was recommended for Yeoman Second Class, reenlisting for two years.

 

CHAPTER XXXV

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, Ca. conducting a $30 million modernization SRA (14 July to 10 October 1980) - U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (1980) - CV-43 Hawaiian Training Cruise (3 May to 6 June 1981)

Iran History, Air Arm & Iran hostage crisis and the Iraq and Iran War

(1 July 1980 to 19 August 1981)

Part 1 – (1 July 1980 to 21 December 1980)

Part 2 – (22 December 1980 to 3 May 1981)

Part 3 – (4 May to 19 August 1981)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXV

 Part 3 - (1 My 1981 to 19 August 1981)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4