CHAPTER XXXVI

FOURTEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(20 August 1981 to 20 March 1983)

Part 1 – (20 August 1981 to 3 March 1982)

Part 2 – (4 March to 31 August 1982)

Part 3 – (1 September to 31 December 1982)

Part 4 – (1 January to 20 March 1983)

 

 

 

US Navy photo (DVIC id: DNSC8201441): A port bow view of USS Constellation (CV-64) and the destroyer USS Fife (DD-991) underway off the coast of California, August 1981. On August 20, during this workup cycle, President Ronald Reagan visited "Connie" and proclaimed the carrier "America's Flagship" while presenting the crew a presidential flag. NS026448.

Defense Visual Information Center http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026448.jpg

 

President Ronald Reagan visits USS Constellation (CV-64) during a workup cycle

(President's Visit – Ref. 1132)

 

“During USS Constellation (CV-64) 1981 workup cycle, President Ronald Reagan visited Constellation on 20 August, and proclaimed the carrier “America’s Flagship” while presenting the crew a presidential flag” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 embarked departs NAS, Alameda, Ca. on “WestPac” and Indian Ocean

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with Commander Richard A. Wilson, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 14 (CVW-14) (tail code NK) Rear Admiral Thomas F. Brown, III, Commander Carrier Group One and Captain H.  Lewis, Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Group One embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, California, 20 August 1981, with Captain Jerome Lamarr ("Jerry") Johnson, as Commanding Officer and Captain John A. Moriarty, as Executive Officer, relieving Captain Curtan, on her 14th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, operating in the Sea of Japan, on her 12th South China Sea deployment. She will under go her second Indian Ocean deployment. Prior to her deployment the crew welcomed Captain Johnson, Jerome L. at Alameda Naval Air Station on 2 August 1981, relieving Captain Richard M Dunleavy, USN, completing an availability period, involving a $30 million modernization repair period to restore the ship to first-rate operating condition in all systems, and increase her value as a deployable carrier asset for years to come, commencing on 14 July 1981, proceeded by Refresher Training and CarQuals in the mid-Pacific conducting operations near Hawaii during early 1981 and local operations upon return from her thirteenth “WestPac,” during Operation Evening Light and Operation Eagle Claw, the Iran hostage crisis; involved in two Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh on 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam peace coast patrol cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea from 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She will under go her 14th foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956). She will under go her 25th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72 & 1275X5, 1275X6, 1275X7, 1275X8, 12275X81 & 1275X10-/10-/10).

 

WestPac Cruise Book 1981-82 - Ref. 1275X

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Thirty Five Year History - Ref. 1275X1

The Cruise and Ports of Call - Ref. 1275X2

The Cruise Map - Ref. 1275X21

Command and Staff - Ref. 1275X3

Johnson relieving Dunleavy - Ref. 1275X4

 

USS CORAL SEA (CV-43) with CVW-14 (NK)

(20 August 1981 to 23 March 1982) 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Pacific & 7th

14th WestPac 11th SCS       2nd IO

CVW-14

NK

20 Aug 1981

23 Mar 1982

Indian Ocean

25th FWFD

216-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-154

Black Knights -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NK100

F-4N

VF-21

Freelancers -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NK200

F-4N

VA-97

Warhawks -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NK300

A-7E

VA-27

Royal Maces -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NK400

A-7E

VA-196

Main Battery or

Devil Spades -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NK500

A-6A / KA-6D

VAW-113

Black Eagles - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

NK600

E-2B

VFP-63 Det. 2

Eyes of the Fleet - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

NK    115-117

 

RF-8G

HC-1 Det. 3

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

NK610

SH-3G

VFP or VF(P) - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (Light) or Light Photographic Squadron.

“The CO of CAG CVW-14 was Cdr.Richard A. Wilson” (Ref. 34)

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 76

 

     “Rear Admiral Huntington Hardisty, Commander Battle Force U. S. Seventh Fleet CTF 70 and or Commander Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet CTF 77, Captain C. Neil Ammerman, Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Striking Force Seven Seven and members of his staff visited USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on numerous occasions during this deployment – in the Indian Ocean, South China Sea, Sea of Japan, Gulf of Oman, Philippine Sea and on port visits to Hong Kong and Sasebo. From Coral Sea, the CTF Staff directed operations of carrier battle groups throughout the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean areas ensuring that U.S. commitments were honored throughout the Seventh Fleet” (Ref. 1275X7, 1275X8 & 1275X9).

 

 

A stern view of the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43) underway approaching Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in 1981. US Navy photo by PH2 Vick (DVIC id: DNSC9300769). NS024326 54k. Defense Visual Information Center.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024326.jpg

 

     “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 16 July to 3 September 1981” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 3 September 1981, with Captain Robert Spencer Owens, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, her 27th WestPac and her 22nd deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 25th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 31st deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 44th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(3 September to 6 October 1981)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (22nd Forward Deployed)

27th WestPac

CVW-5

NF

3 Sep 1981

6 Oct 1981

Western Pacific

44th FWFD

34-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 115-120

RF-4B

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VA-93

Ravens -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

NF500

A-6E /                     A6-E/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2B

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HC-1 Det.2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system

 

 

USS Midway (CV-41) entering Subic Bay, Philippines, 14 September 1981. US Navy photo by PHCS Steven Harris. NS024106. USN. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024106.jpg

 

    “Steaming via Pearl Harbor USS Coral Sea (CV-43) headed for Subic Bay, R. P” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) visited a succession of familiar ports - Pattaya, Thailand, Subic Bay on 24 September 1981 (for upkeep) and Hong Kong-before she operated in the Sea of Japan and subsequently visited Sasebo, Hong Kong” (Ref. 43).

 

    “By October 1981, John Paul has fully recovered” (Ref. 5A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) 10,000th trap of cruise was made of 4 October 1981, conducting ADEX with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) from 3 to 4 October 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “On 6 October 1981, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Robert Spencer Owens, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 27th WestPac and her 22nd deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 25th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 31st deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 44th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (3 September to 6 October 1981)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

 03/09/80 to 06/10/81

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Battle Efficiency Award (Navy "E" Ribbon), marking her as the outstanding carrier in the Pacific Fleet

Jul 1980 to Dec 1981

25th, 26th & 27th WestPac

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

27th WestPac

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

 

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “USS Constellation (CV-64) (Connie) with CVW-9 and Commander, Carrier Group Seven, Rear Admiral George A. Aitcheson and Chief of Staff, Captain William C. Carson embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California 20 October 1981, with Captain Dennis M. Brooks, USN, as Commanding Officer and Captain Philip S. Anselmo, as Executive Officer, on her 13th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the far east, on her fourth Indian Ocean deployment; reclassified to CV-56 on 1 July 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises in Vietnam, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, received a Presidential Unit Citation from President Nixon in 1973. She will under go her 15th deployment since her commission at New York Naval Shipyard on 27 October 1961, with Captain T.J. Walker in command” (Ref. 1- Constellation, 72 & 76).

 

WestPac Cruise Book 1981-82 – Ref. 1131

The Cruise and Ports of Call – Ref. 1133

Chain of Command and Staff – Ref. 1134

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) with CVW-9 (NG)

(20 October 1981 to 21 May 1982)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Constella-tion (CV-64) - 7th

13th WestPac        4th IO

CVW-9

NK

20 Oct 1981

21 May 1982

Western Pacific

15th FWFD

213-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-211

Checkmates -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NG100

F-14A

VF-24

Fighting Renegades -         Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NG200

F-14A

VA-146

Blue Diamonds -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II-

Jet attack aircraft

NG300

A-7E

VA-147

Argonauts -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NG400

A-7E

VA-165

Boomers -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NG500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-112

Golden Hawks - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-134

Garudas - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-38

Griffins - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

 

 

 

A bow view of the aircraft carrier USS Ranger (CVA-61), equipped with part of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program system. Although the photo is dated 23 November 1981, Air Wing composition indicates it was actually taken circa 1974–75. Official photograph, available from DefenseImagery.mil, # DF-ST-83-02600. S026181 322k. DefenseImagery.mil

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026181.jpg

 

    “Captain Jerry Creighton ("Felter") Breast, NROTC 1959 assumed command of USS Independence (CVA-62) on 5 December 1981, relieving Captain Thomas Edward Shanahan, 20th Commanding Officer, serving from 28 May 1980 to 5 December 1981” (Ref. 1156A).

 

    “The fifth Independence (CVA-62), former CVA-62), the 62nd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 50th, commissioned at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard, New York, on 10 January 1959; reclassified to CV-62 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" 28 February 1973 conducted Overhaul at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia from 10 June to 19 December 1981, steaming down the Elizabeth River and proceeded to Pier 12 at Norfolk, Virginia, Naval Base and shortly after will conduct Sea Trials and Refresher Training, departing the shipyard through its Southern Branch and the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, a gateway to points to the south for the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, an inland path to the ocean upon conclusion. A fire aboard Independence damages the air operations and carrier control approach spaces, resulting in no injuries on 15 August 1981” (Ref. 1-Independence, 72, 76, 84A, 325, 1148B, 1149A, 1157 & 1158).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65)  received many VIPs during her long sojourn at Bremerton, culminating in visits by Vice Admiral De Poix on 6 September 1980, Secretary of the Navy Edward Hidalgo on 25 September 1980, Admiral Thomas B. Hayward, CNO, on 24 October 1980, Vice Admiral R.F. Schoultz, AirPac, on 3 September and 6 November 1980, 26–27 January, 22–23 April, 15 July and 1 December 1981, and Admiral J.D. Watkins, CinCPac, on 3 September 1981” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “On 17 December 1981, USS Constellation (CV-64) crossed the line and welcomed King Neptune and his Royal Court aboard. It became more and more obvious that this great warship was sure to incur the Ruler of the Raging Main’s awesome and terrible wrath. For when Connie requested permission to enter Neptune’s scared domain, he discovered that within America’s Flagship were 2,870 pollywogs. Davey Jones King Neptune’s official emissary came aboard at 4 p.m. on December 17th to deliver a message from the Ruler of the Raging Main to the captain. It was feared that King Neptune’s message would forego any trivial pleasantries and demand a suitable aswer to why Connie was manned by a wog infested crew and only 2,255 Shellbacks” (Ref. 1135 & 1136).

 

    “On 19 December 1981, an F-14 of VF-24 missed the arresting cables during the landing onboard USS Constellation (CV-64) and as a result the aircraft ran off the deck edge and was lost in the Indian Ocean” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “12 gorgeous, high-kicking Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders checked visited USS Constellation (CV-64) on December 30th and made the Christmas and New Years season most enjoyable for the crew. As part of a sixteen day USO tour of the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean, the travelling squad of this renowned organization visited five ships in Battle Grup Delta. In the space of time between their arrival and January 2nd, their departure date, the cheerleaders dazzled their way through six shows, two aboard “America’s Flagship”” (Ref. 1138).

 

1982 WEST COAST DEPLOYMENTS –

Includes Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan)

Chapter XXXVI

Appendix I

 

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet 1981 Aircraft Carriers scheduling of deployments resulted in 2 CV deployments extending into 1982:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) - 7th     (2nd Arabian Sea)

14th WestPac 11th SCS

2nd IO

CVW-14

NK

20 Aug 1981

23 Mar 1982

Europe

Middle 216-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

 

“Coral Sea visited a succession of familiar ports including Pearl Harbor, Hawaii;  Pattaya, Thailand; Subic Bay on 24 September 1981 (for upkeep) and Hong Kong-before she operated in the Sea of Japan and subsequently visited Sasebo, Hong Kong” (Ref. 43).

 

CVW-14 Squadrons include: VF-154 “Black Knights,” F-4N; VFP-63 DET.2 (*1) “Eyes of the Fleet,” RF-8G; VF-21 “Free Lancers,” F-4N; VA-97 “Warhawks,” A-7E; VA-27 “Royal Maces,” A-7E; VA-196 “Main Battery,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-113 “Black Eagles,” E-2B; HC-1 DET. 3 and “Pacific Fleet Angels,” SH-3G.

USS Constellation (CV-64) - 7th

13th WestPac        4th IO

CVW-9

NK

20 Oct 1981

21 May 1982

Western Pacific

213-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

NATO Exercise "Daily Double," with the amphibious assault ship USS Nassau (LHA-4), as well as with Greek and Italian Navy units, operated in the Indian Ocean, on "Gonzo Station," for the first time between 12 May and 3 June 1981 and "Weapons Week."

 

Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Alava Pier, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Kenya, Mombasa, East Africa; Perth, sea port of Fremantle, Australia; Singapore; Diego Garcia and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

Squadrons: VF-211, F-14; VF-24; F-14; VA-146, A-7E; VA-147, A-7E; VA-165, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-112, E-2C; VAQ-134, EA-6B; HS-6, SH-3H; VS-38, S-3 A and VQ-1 Det. B EA-3B.

 

Constellation battle group consisted of CVW-9 and Commander, Carrier Group Seven, Rear Admiral George A. Aitcheson and Chief of Staff, Captain William C. Carson. “USS California (CGN-36) and USS Preble (DLG-46) are part of USS America (CV-66) task force as escorts.

USS John F. Kennedy     (CV-67) -2nd, 6th & 7th

(1st North Arabian Sea)

(1st & 2nd Red Sea, Gulf of Aden)

NorLant

9th Med

1st Suez Canal

1st IO

2nd Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-3

AC

4 Jan 1982

14 Jul 1982

Europe

Middle East

192-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier

National Week XXXI and Daily Double, and stand by operations for the potential evacuation of American citizens from Beirut, in the wake of Israeli forces entering Lebanon in Operation Peace for Galilee.

 

Ports of call include: Malaga; anchoring outside Perth at the port of Fremantle; first port visit in Africa, anchoring at Mombasa, Kenya; Haifa; Malaga, arriving on 28 June 1982, making a port call from 28 June to 3 July 1982, departing on 3 July 1982, conducting a Tiger Cruise on her way home.

 

CVW-3 Squadrons include: VF-11 “Red Rippers,” F-14A; VF-31 “Tomcatters,” F-14A; VA-37 “Bulls,” A-7E; VA-105 “Gunslingers,” A-7E; VA-75 “Sunday Punchers,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-126 “Seahawks,” E-2C; VAQ-138 “Yellow Jackets, EA-6B; HS-7 “Dusty Dogs,” SH-3H AND VS-22 “Checkmates,” S-3A.

USS Forrestal (CV-59) – 2nd & 7th

NorLant

17th Med

3rd Suez Canal

1st IO

4th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-17

AA

7 Jun 1982

16 Nov 1982

Europe

Middle East

163-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier

 

CVW-17 Squadrons include: VF-74 “Be-Devilers,” F-4S; VF-103 “Sluggers,” F-4S; VA-83 “Rampagers,” A-7E; VA-81 “Sunliners,” A-7E; VA-85 “Black Falcons,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-125 “Tigertails or “Torchbearers,” E-2C; VAQ-130 “Zappers,” EA-6B; HS-3 “Tridents,” SH-3H and VS-30 “Diamondcutters,” S-3A.

USS Ranger (CV-61) - 7th

16Th WestPac 3rd IO

CVW-2

NE

7 Apr 1982

18 Oct 1982

Western Pacific

Middle East

195-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier

 

CVW-2 Squadrons include: VF-1 “Wolf Pack,” F-14A; VF-2 “Bounty Hunters,” F-14A; VA-113 (*1) “Stingers,” A-7E; VA-25 (*2) “Fist of the Fleet,” A-7E; VA-145 “Swordsmen,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-116 “Sun Kings,” E-2C; VAQ-137 “Rooks,” EA-6B; HS-2 “Golden Falcons,” SH-3H; VS-21 “Redtails,” S-3A; VQ-1DET. “World Watchers,” EA-3B and VRC-50 DET. “Foo Dogs,” C-2A/US-3A. (*1) redesignated VFA-113 on Mar.25, 1983 and (*2) redesignated VFA-25 on Jul.1, 1983.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (23rd Forward Deployed)

28th WestPac

CVW-5

NF

26 Apr 1982

18 Jun 1982

Western Pacific

54-days

Ports of call not reported.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

 

CVW-5 Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system.

USS Enterprise (CVN-65)Pacific & 7th (1st North Arabian

Sea dep. & 2nd Arabian Sea Voy.)

10th WestPac       9th & 10th Indian Ocean        1st NorPac

CVW-11

NK

1 Sep 1982

28 Apr 1983

Middle East

240-Days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier - Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet

A joint Ship ASW Readiness Evaluation Measuring (SHAREM) and Air Readiness Evaluation Measuring (AIREM) exercise, an Air Readiness Evaluation Measuring exercise en route to Hawaiian waters; TRANSITEX - eight days of operations in the Hawaiian OPAREA including a major ASW Exercise (BGAREM), HARPOONEX, MISSILEX and live and inert ordnance delivery; CRAE 83-1, a four cycle dual CV ordnance exercise with USS Midway (CV-41). All sorties were conducted a s Mini ALFA Strikes; while in Philippine waters, she conducted MissilEx 83-2, providing CVW-14 “valuable air to air weapons work,” off Poro Point; Weapons Department reported that NORPAC 82 exercise was completed along with dual battle group operations; Carrier Readiness Ammunition Exercise was completed. GMMC Randall and FTG2 Smith of FOX division were designated Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialists and awarded ESWS insignia; Enterprise Communications Department participated in Small Pipe 1-83 while operating in the Indian Ocean.This exercise tested Enterprise’s HF Communications capability. As in previous Small Pipe exercises, the evolution was excellent training for circuit operators. Newly arrived junior personnel derived benefit from the HF operations. Southbound en route Diego Garcia for participation in Weapons Week 83 While with BG Foxtrot, Enterprise participated in exercises Jade Tiger 82 while operating in the North Arabian Sea from 2 to 8 December 1982 and Beacon Flash, a two-day event, the former involving CAS, CAP surface surveillance, anti-boat patrol and ASW missions flown in support of amphibious landings, and the latter allowing “aircrews to hone their low level and navigations skills;” Carrier Battle Group (CVBG), Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot conducted Weapons Week 83; CVW-11 embarked aboard Enterprise with training in air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons delivery and Rainbow Reef (a convoy transitex with merchant ships from the Rapid Deployment Force Detachment (RDJTF Det.) (at Diego Garcia)) in the vicinity of Diego Garcia; Beacon South, a joint exercise with the Australians provided Enterprise aircrews with low level and weapons delivery training. Units of the BG Foxtrot, Enterprise battle group, departed their respective ports and reformed on 26 January 1983 for a transit north through the Sunda Strait, encountering some difficulty regarding Indonesian intransigence to allow the ships through, pressing “right of free passage,” transiting northbound on 1 February 1983, en route to Subic Bay via the Java Sea, and into the South China Sea. Enterprise and her BG Foxtrot consorts steamed north through the Tsushima Strait and into the Sea of Japan for Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83, a 16 day joint amphibious exercise with ROK forces, in the Sea of Japan with USS Midway (CV-41) and connecting seas, supporting the landings and provided interdiction support en route Sasebo, Japan (Carrier Air Wing Eleven wing provided support to amphibious task force during simulated assault. Interdiction support also provided Operations Department reported that Enterprise provided support for Amphibious Operations in the Okinawa and Japan OPAREAs) and operating independently before rendezvousing with Midway on 30 March 1983 for the transit north through the Sea of Japan and out the Tsugaru Strait en route Fleextex 83-1 in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Enterprise BG Foxtrot and Midway Battle Group participated in FleetEx 83-1 (rendezvousing with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 9 April 1983). All three carriers then completed a “counterclockwise sweep” of the northwestern Pacific. Engineering and Reactor Departments annual Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE).

 

Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hi., Subic Bay, Philippines, Perth, Australia, Singapore, Mombasa, Kenya and Sasebo, Japan.

 

During the cruise CVW-11 had flown approximately 29,000 hours and recorded over 11,000 traps. CVW-11 Squadrons include: VF-114, Aardvarks, Fighter Squadron, Grumman, F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter; VF-213, Black Lions, Fighter Squadron, Grumman,  F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter: VA-22, Fighting Redcocks, Attack Squadron, Vought, A-7E Corsair II, Jet Attack Aircraft; VA-94, Shrikes, Attack Squadron, Vought, A-7E Corsair II, Jet Attack Aircraft; VA-95, Green Lizards, Attack Squadron, Grumman, A-6E / KA-6D Intruder, Jet Attack Bomber, Tanker; VAW-117, Wallbangers, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, Grumman, E-2C Hawkeye, Electronics; VAQ-133, Wizards, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, Grumman, EA-6B Prowler, Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation; HS-6, Indians, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, Sikorsky, SH-3H Sea King - Anti-submarine; VS-37, Sawbucks, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, Lockheed, S-3A Viking - Anti-Submarine.

 

USS Bainbridge (CGN-25) and USS George Philip (FFG-12) joined Enterprise as part of her task force.

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with COMCARGRU THREE, RADM Joseph J. Barth, Jr. (being relieved by Rear Admiral Edwin R. Kohn, Jr., on 30 October 1982) and CVW-11 embarked operated for the remainder of the year in the North Arabian Sea with Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot, also comprising USS Bainbridge (CGN-25); USS Ocallahan (FF-1051); USS Hepburn (FF-1055); USS Hull (DD-945); USS Waddell (DDG-24); USS Shasta (AE-33); USS Sacramento (AOE-1); USS White Plains (AFS-4); USNS Ponchatula (TAO-148); USS Harry W. Hill (DD-986) (Detached to shadow Soviet carrier Minsk, which was transiting the Indian Ocean for her first deployment to the Far East, a matter of considerable interest to U.S. planners - rejoined 19/20 January 1983); USS Reasoner (FF-1063) (Detached on ASW duty - rejoined 10 January 1983) and FNS Kersaint (D-622) (Operating with BG until 10 January 1983)” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (24th Forward Deployed)

29th WestPac

1st NorPac

CVW-5

NF

14 Sep 1982

11 Dec 1982

Western Pacific

North Pacific

89-days

Ports of call not reported.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

 

CVW-5 Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system.

USS America (CV-66) -           2nd, 6th & 7th

(3rd & 4th Red Sea, Gulf of Aden voy. & 2nd North Arabian Sea dep.)

NorLant.

10st Med

MPF

3rd Suez Canal

BF 83

2nd Indian Ocean

WW

4th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant.

CVW-1

AB

8 Dec 1982

2 Jun 1983

Europe

Strife-torn Lebanon

Middle East

North Arabian Sea

177-days

Multinational Peacekeeping Force in strife-torn Lebanon, Exercise "Beacon Flash 83-4" and "Weapons Week" Exercise in the vicinity of Diego Garcia.

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier

 

Visited Palma de Mallorca, Spain; Athens, Pireaus, Greece; Port Said, Egypt; Colombo, Sri Lanka; Masirah Island, Oman; Mombasa, Kenya; Masirah Island; Souda Bay and Malaga, Spain.

 

CVW-1 Squadrons include: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33, F-14A; VA-46, A-7E; VA-72, A-7E; VA-34, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; VAQ-136 (*1), EA-6B; HS-11, SH-3H AND VS-32, S-3A.

South China Sea deployment (SCS)

*East Coast

 

Chapter XXXVI

 

 

    “Beginning in January 1982, CVW-11 transitioned from carrier America to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Incorporated into the wing were five new squadrons: VAs-22 and 94 (A-7Es), VS-37 (S-3As), VAW-117 (E-2Cs), and HS-6 (SH-3Hs). Already assigned were: VF-114 and VF-213 (F-14As), VA-95 (A-6Es), and VAQ-133 (EA-6Bs)” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Independence (CV-62) began January 1982 at Pier 12, Norfolk, Virginia training cycle to prepare for another deployment. Schedule 1982” (Ref. 1148B).

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv62-82/index_006.htm

 

Schedule 1982

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv62-82/index_006.htm

 

USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) with CVW-3 embarked departs Mediterranean Sea, Indian Ocean and North Arabian Sea

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) with CVW-3 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 4 January 1982, with Captain D. Bruce Cargill in command, on her ninth Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet participating in National Week XXXI and Daily Double, and what would turn out to be stand by operations for the potential evacuation of American citizens from Beirut, in the wake of Israeli forces entering Lebanon in Operation Peace for Galilee, on her first Indian Ocean and North Arabian Sea deployment with the 7th Fleet, transiting the Suez Canal, Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea for the first time. Prior to her deployment remained moored alongside Pier 12 from 30 October 1981 to 31 December 1981; reclassified CV-67 on 1 December 1974; ending her second Caribbean Sea deployment, on her North Atlantic voyage operating under the direction of the 2nd Fleet participating in ReadiEx 1-82 near Puerto Rico; ending her Caribbean Sea voyage to conduct her operation readiness inspection ORI operating under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, which was slated to be a two-week training cruise in the Caribbean, on her second Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet, and her North Atlantic voyage participating in NATO exercises; ending her Shakedown cruise out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in the Caribbean Sea operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. She will under go her 12th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since she was commissioned 7 September 1968” (Ref. 1-John F. Kennedy, 72, 76, 84A & 549).

 

USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) with CVW-3 (AC)

(4 Jan to 14 Jul 1982)

National Week XXXI and Daily Double

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

          ROLE

 AIRCRAFT DESIGN

     NICK NAME &

   PRIMARY ROLE

  TAIL

 CODE

 Modex

   AIRCRAFT

 DESIGNATION

VF-11

Red Rippers -                Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AC100

F-14A

VF-31

Tomcatters -                Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AC200

F-14A

VA-37

Bulls -                         Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AC300

A7-E

VA-105

Gunslingers -                         Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AC400

A7-E

VA-75

Sunday Panchers -                         Attack Squadron

Grumman   Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AC500

A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D

VAW-126

Seahawks -                          Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-138

Yellow Kackets -                     Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-7

Dusty Dogs -  Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-22

Checkmates -                   Carrier Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

 

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) commenced her voyage to the Mediterranean Sea deployment with a three-day period of Carrier Qualifications for her air wing off the Virginia capes” (Ref. 549). 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 (NE)

(January to February 1982)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Ranger (CVA-61) – 3rd

West/EastPac

CVW-2

NE

Jan 1982

Feb 1982

Eastern & Western Pacific

Hawaii Operating Area

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-1

Wolf Pack -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NE100

F-14A

VF-2

Bounty Hunters -            Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NE200

F-14A

VA-113

Stingers -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NE300

A-7E

VA-25

Fist of the Fleet -            Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NE400

A-7E

VA-145

Swordsmen -            Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NE500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-116

Sun Kings - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

VAQ-137

Rooks - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

HS-2

Golden Falcons - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-21

Redtails - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

 

 

 

A starboard bow view of USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) en route to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA, for a year-long overhaul, January 1982. US Navy photo by PHC Chesterfield (DVIC id # DN-SC-87-11542). NS026382 98k. Defense Visual Information Center. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026382.jpg

 

    “Vice Admiral Schoultz was on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) as well, from 18 to 19 January 1982, his seventh visit” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Under Secretary of the Navy James F. Goodrich visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 21 January 1982” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced fast cruise on 25 January 1982” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted cruise fast cruise from 25 January to 1 February 1982” (Ref. 362D).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departs Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for Sea Trials

 

    “To the sounds of country and western singer Willie Nelson’s “On the Road Again” piped through the ship’s 1MC communication system, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) got underway from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, at 0959:58 on 2 February 1982, for a week of Sea Trials, marking an end to her 30-month Comprehensive Overhaul (COH) and her second extensive refit, centered on improvements to the electronics and detection systems - the entire island was effectively rebuilt (9 January 1979 to 8 February 1982)” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72 & 76).  

 

    “I know I promised you a week ago to be underway from Pier 2 at 1000 on 2 February 1982,” the skipper afterward joked with the crew, “Well, we didn’t meet that schedule. We were two seconds early”” (Ref. 362D).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returns to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard from Sea Trials

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash. on 8 February 1982, conducting Sea Trials from 2 to 8 February 1982, marking an end to her 30-month Comprehensive Overhaul (COH) and her second extensive refit, centered on improvements to the electronics and detection systems - the entire island was effectively rebuilt (9 January 1979 to 8 February 1982). I  know I promised you a week ago to be underway from Pier 2 at 1000 on 2 February 1982,” the skipper afterward joked with the crew, “Well, we didn’t meet that schedule. We were two seconds early. To the sounds of country and western singer Willie Nelson’s “On the Road Again” piped through the ship’s 1 MC communication system, got underway from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, at 0959:58 on 2 February 1982” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72 & 76).  

 

   “This was considered the “most extensive and highly complex overhaul” of the ship’s history to date. To enable Enterprise crewmembers relatively safe and clean berthing during overhaul, the auxiliary (former MSC transport) General Hugh J. Gaffey (IX-507) (ex-T-AP-121) was made available to them as an “off-ship berthing facility.”

 

    During overhaul, Enterprise was required to assign a “10-man dedicated maintenance crew” to the ship, which also stood watches and performed similar duties while so assigned.

 

    The deck department undertook the maintenance, preservation and improvement of over 330 spaces, primarily the hull, forecastle, quarterdeck, sponsons, heads, passageways and ceremonial spaces, many heavily used by the crew.

 

     During the overhaul, the Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) focused the rehabilitation of departmental spaces, expanding/improving a validated/effective individual material readiness list, the overhaul/operational readiness of “assigned activity assets,” and improving the operational availability and material condition of the ship’s C-1A (BuNo 146057), the latter maintained by a detachment of six men at Kitsap County Airport, Bremerton.

 

     Additional avionics packages installed enabled support of the forward looking infrared radar (FLIR) systems, at this point principally on A-6Es and A-7Es. Ground support equipment overhaul and calibration and testing of precision measuring equipment, and the checking of production efforts, were the responsibility of the ground support equipment rework det, established on 9 January 1979, at NAS Alameda.

 

     New instrumentation was emplaced on the jet engine test cell control booth, relocated from the port side of the fantail to the ship’s centerline, facilitating the installation of three MK 15 Mod 1 Phalanx Close-In Weapon Systems (CIWS).

 

     Developed in response to the ongoing threat poised by sea-skimmer and anti-ship cruise missiles, CIWS was a last-ditch “fast-reaction” defense system against those missiles, combining on a single mount fire control radars and a six barrel M61A1 Vulcan (Gatling) gun firing tungsten alloy projectiles at a rate of up to 4,500 rounds per minute. Additional defensive improvements included installation/modifications of three eight-celled MK 29 launchers for Raytheon AIM-7F Sea Sparrow surface-air-missiles, and three single MK 68 20 mm guns.

 

     The Engineering Department oversaw the removal, refurbishment and modification of the high pressure propulsion turbines, the emergency diesel generators, the electric driven firepumps, and the main feed pumps, together with the installation of the reboiler system, the latter to separate the main propulsion steam system from the ship’s service steam system, be utilized to supply “hotel and selected reduced pressure steam services” normally supplied by the main steam system.

 

     Air Conditioning and Refrigeration were overhauled, with a new 300-ton air conditioning plant installed, together with additional sea water and chilled water pumps.

 

     The former was necessary not only for crew habitability, but also for the electrical equipment, to maintain radar and similar high voltage systems at temperatures preventing damage from overheating.

    

     In addition to engineering and crew needs, the pumps were also required for potential damage control. The ships’ four degaussing motor generator sets were removed and overhauled. Degaussing “demagnetized” Enterprise, protecting her from magnetic mines and similar threats.

 

     The “beehive” ECM structure atop Enterprise’s island, long a unique and prominent recognition feature of the ship, was replaced by a heavy pole mast, mounting improved radar, TACAN and communications equipment.

 

     The AN/SPS-12, 32 and 33 air search radars were replaced by the AN-SPS-48, 49 and 65, improving “reliability in the functional areas of three dimensional radar and long and short range air target acquisition.”

 

     The AN/SPS-48 also provided an automatic weapons system interface between NTDS and NATO Sea Sparrow. The AN/SPS-10 surface search radar was modified to work with the AN/SPS-65 to provide a low level air target acquisition capability in conjunction with CIWS. The AN/WLR-1 EW system was removed, and the AN/WLR-8 (V) 4 also was overhauled.

 

     The Carrier Air Traffic Control Center/Direct Altitude and Identification Readout system was installed, enhancing air traffic control capabilities through the departure, marshal, and approach phases.

 

    The Fleet Satellite Secure Voice Communication System replaced the STEAM VALVE system. The Carrier Intelligence Center (CVIC) received a number of equipment exchanges and additions, enhancing its capabilities by increasing data capacity, reducing data processing time and improving data retrieval time.

 

     Among these innovations were computer and graphic devices for improved mensuration and interpretation of reconnaissance imagery. The RA-5C support system from the Airborne System Support Center (ASSC) was removed, and Tactical Air Reconnaissance System (TARPS) POD maintenance support equipment installed” (Ref. 362D).

 


NS026383 99k A stern view of USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) (ground level, looking up) while in dry dock. Puget Sound NS, Bremerton, WA, February 1982. US Navy photo by PH2 R. Plunkett (DVIC id # DN-SN-86-00114). NS026383 99k.
Defense Visual Information Center. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026383.jpg

 

 

An F-14A Tomcat from Fighter Squadron 211 (VF-211), "Fighting Checkmates," lands aboard USS Constellation (CV-64) during flight demonstrations for Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger. Indian Ocean, February 10, 1982.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026465.jpg

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departs Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for NAS Alameda, Ca.

 

    “Embarking “dependents, pets and automobiles” (422, 76 and 944, respectively), USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced Operation Southwest Passage, the return to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 11 February 1982. Glibly dubbed Noah’s Ark by her crew, the carrier sported a “pet motel” on the fantail to accommodate the animals” (Ref. 362D).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) arrives NAS Alameda, Ca. from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) completed Operation Southwest Passage, returning to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 13 February 1982 from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash. with “dependents, pets and automobiles” (422, 76 and 944, respectively) embarked. Glibly dubbed Noah’s Ark by her crew, the carrier sported a “pet motel” on the fantail to accommodate the animals.

 

     On hand to greet the crew when they returned to their homeport for the first time in almost three years were Mayors Dianne Feinstein, Lionel Wilson and C.J. Corica, of San Francisco, Oakland and Alameda, respectively” (Ref. 362D).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departs NAS Alameda, Ca. Refresher Training for CVW-11 in the SOCAL AOR

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 21 February 1982, for workups in the southern California operating area, on her first underway period conducting flight operations for squadrons since CVW-11 flew on board on 6 December 1978, conducting refresher operations” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made her first post-overhaul aircraft landing during work ups in the southern California operating area on 22 February 1982, since CVW-11 flew on board on 6 December 1978” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

 

A starboard quarter view of USS Ranger (CV-61). Sailors man the rails as the carrier enters Pearl Harbor, HI. Photo is dated March 1, 1982 but it might have been actually taken in April. US Navy photo (DVIC id: DN-SC-82-07170). NS026133 125k.

Defense Visual Information Center. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026133.jpg

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returns to NAS Alameda, Ca. after completing Refresher Training for

CVW-11 in the SOCAL AOR

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 3 March 1982, conducting of workups in the southern California operating area from 21 February to 3 March 1982, accomplishing her first post-overhaul aircraft landing on 22 February, and her first catapult launch on the 27th, since CVW-11 flew on board on 6 December 1978, conducting refresher operations” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

 

A bow view of the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43) underway near Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines, March 1982. NS024337 100k. US Navy photo by PH1 Dave MacLean (DVIC id: DNST8500273). Defense Visual Information Center.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024337.jpg

 

CHAPTER XXXVI

FOURTEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(20 August 1981 to 20 March 1983)

Part 1 – (20 August 1981 to 3 March 1982)

Part 2 – (4 March to 31 August 1982)

Part 3 – (1 September to 31 December 1982)

Part 4 – (1 January to 20 March 1983)

CHAPTER XXXVII

Part 1 – (20 August 1981 to 3 March 1982)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4