CHAPTER XXXVI

FOURTEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(20 August 1981 to 20 March 1983)

Part 1 – (20 August 1981 to 3 March 1982)

Part 2 – (4 March to 31 August 1982)

Part 3 – (1 September to 31 December 1982)

Part 4 – (1 January to 20 March 1983)

 

 

 

A port quarter view of the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43) underway near Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines, March 1982. US Navy photo by PH1 Dave MacLean (DVIC id: DNST8500275). NS024338 111k. Defense Visual Information Center.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024338.jpg

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 15 March 1982, conducting refresher training (REFTRA) from 15 to 19 March 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departs & returns to NAS Alameda, Ca., conducting Training

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, Ca., San Diego, California on 22 March 1982, for training on 22 March 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982).

 

 

NS024339 63k A port view of the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43) approaching the Golden Gate Bridge en route to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, after a Western Pacific (WESTPAC) deployment, March 23, 1982. Crewmen spell out "San Francisco's own" on the flight deck. US Navy photo by PH3 Curt Fargo (DVIC id: DNST8205158). NS024339 63k. Defense Visual Information Center. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024339.jpg

 

 

Crewmen line the rails on the island of USS Coral Sea (CV-43). The aircraft carrier was returning to her home port, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, after a Western Pacific (WESTPAC) deployment, March 23, 1982. Note the large "dish" antenna of the SPS-30 height-finding radar (top right corner). US Navy photo by PH3 Curt Fargo (DVIC id: DNST8205145). NS024340 100k. Defense Visual Information Center. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024340.jpg

 

 

The large harbor tug USS Acconac (YTB-812) nudges the starboard bow of USS Coral Sea (CV-43) during docking operations. The aircraft carrier was returning to Naval Air Station Alameda, CA, after a Western Pacific (WESTPAC) deployment, March 23, 1982. US Navy photo by PHAA Kathy Moss (DVIC id: DNST8205152). Note Coral Sea was, at the time, fitted with Phalanx CIWS, SPS-30 and SPS-43A radars. NS024307 85k. Defense Visual Information Center.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024307.jpg

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 embarked returns to NAS, Alameda, California, Ca. from “WestPac” and Indian Ocean deployment

 

    “On 23 March 1982, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with Commander Richard A. Wilson, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 14 (CVW-14) (tail code NK), Rear Admiral Thomas F. Brown, III, Commander Carrier Group One and Captain H.  Lewis, Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Group One embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain Jerome Lamarr ("Jerry") Johnson, as Commanding Officer and Captain John A. Moriarty, as Executive Officer, ending her 14th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, operating in the Sea of Japan, on her 12th South China Sea deployment, on her second Indian Ocean deployment. Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hi.; Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines; Singaporee, officially the Republic of Singapore, is a Southeast Asian island city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometres (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south); Phattaya Beach, a city in Thailand, a beach resort popular with tourists and expatriates. It is located on the east coast of the Gulf of Thailand, about 165 km southeast of Bangkok within but not part of Amphoe Bang Lamung (Banglamung) in the province of Chonburi; Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; and Sasebo, a city in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Squadrons: VF-154, F-4N; VF-21, F-4N; VA-97, A-7E; VA-27, A-7E; VA-196, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-113, E-2B; VFP-63 Det. 2 (*1), RF-8G and HC-1 Det. 3, SH-3G. (*1) VFP-63 disestablished on Jun.30, 1982; made her thirteenth “WestPac,” during Operation Evening Light and Operation Eagle Claw, the Iran hostage crisis; involved in two Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh on 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam peace coast patrol cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea from 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She will under go her 14th foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956). Her 25th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72 & 1275X5, 1275X6, 1275X7, 1275X8, 12275X81 & 1275X10-/10-/10).

 

     “Rear Admiral Huntington Hardisty, Commander Battle Force U. S. Seventh Fleet CTF 70 and or Commander Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet CTF 77, Captain C. Neil Ammerman, Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Striking Force Seven Seven and members of his staff visited USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on numerous occasions during this deployment – in the Indian Ocean, South China Sea, Sea of Japan, Gulf of Oman, Philippine Sea and on port visits to Hong Kong and Sasebo. From Coral Sea, the CTF Staff directed operations of carrier battle groups throughout the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean areas ensuring that U.S. commitments were honored throughout the Seventh Fleet” (Ref. 1275X7, 1275X8 & 1275X9).

 

 21/08/81 – 23/03/82

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  “WESTPAC”

Engineering

 Excellence

1982

 14th

Reference 34, 35 & 43 reflect Chart info.

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked departs Alameda, Ca. “WestPac” and Indian Ocean deployment

 

    “USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked departed San Francisco Bay, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 7 April 1982, on her 16th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet, on her third Indian Ocean deployment and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East; reclassified to CV-61 on 30 June 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War, earning 13 battle stars for service in Vietnam. She will under go her 18th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 August 1957” (Ref. 1-Ranger, 72, 1094A, 1095 & 1096). 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 (NE)

(7 April to 18 October 1982)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-1

Wolf Pack -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NE100

F-14A

VF-2

Bounty Hunters -            Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NE200

F-14A

VA-113 (*1)

Stingers -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NE300

A-7E

VA-25 (*2)

Fist of the Fleet -            Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NE400

A-7E

VA-145

Swordsmen -            Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NE500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-116

Sun Kings - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-137

Rooks - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-2

Golden Falcons - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -  Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-21

Redtails - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

VQ-1 Det.

World Watchers

 

(PR)

xxx

EA-3B

VRC-50 Det.

Foo Dogs - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound

(RG) 4xx

C-2A/US-3A

 (*1) redesignated VFA-113 on Mar.25, 1983

(*2) redesignated VFA-25 on Jul.1, 1983

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61)

Fly-by. NS026135e 177k. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026135e.jpg

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 6 October 1981 to 26 April 1982” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 26 April 1982, with Captain Robert Spencer Owens, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 28th WestPac and her 23rd deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 26th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 32nd deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 45th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(26 April to 18 June 1982)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (23rd Forward Deployed)

28th WestPac

CVW-5

NF

26 Apr 1982

18 Jun 1982

Western Pacific

45th FWFD

54-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 115-120

RF-4B

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VA-93

Ravens -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E /                     A6-E/KA-6D /  *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2B

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HC-1 Det.2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departs NAS Alameda, Ca. for CQs in the SOCAL AOR

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 27 April 1982, for Carrier Qualifications” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

 

 

Aerial starboard bow view of part of Task Group 70 underway in the Philippine Sea, May 1982, during Exercise Readex '82. Ships are, left to right: a Knox-class frigate; the combat stores ship USS San Jose (AFS-7), see photo NS024159; the aircraft carrier USS Ranger (CV-61); a Spruance-class destroyer; the guided missile destroyer USS Joseph Strauss (DDG-16), see photo NS024159; a Mispillion-class "jumboized" fleet oiler, possibly USNS Mispillion (T-AO-105) herself; the command ship USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19); the aircraft carrier USS Midway (CV-41); a Leahy-class guided missile cruiser, possibly USS Reeves (CG-24); a Spruance-class destroyer; and a Knox-class frigate. US Navy photo by PH1 Barbante (DVIC id: DN-ST-82-07480). NS026134 77k.

Defense Visual Information Center http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026134.jpg

 

 

A port beam view of the aircraft carriers USS Midway (CV-41), closest to camera, and USS Ranger (CV-61), background, with the guided missile destroyer USS Joseph Strauss (DDG-16) and the combat stores ship USS San Jose (AFS-7), underway in the Philippine Sea, May 1982, during exercise Readex '82. US Navy photo by PH1 Barbante (DVIC id: DNSN8207484). NS024159. DefenseImagery.mil. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024159.jpg

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returns to NASNI, San Diego, Ca. for CQs

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) arrives Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 7 May 1982, conducting carrier qualifications (during which, in April an A-7 Corsair II made the ship’s seventh successful barricade arrestment), exercised her TARPS capabilities for the first time from 27 April to 7 May 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61)

Preparing to launch the ship's COD (Carrier On-board Delivery) plane. NS026135d 161k.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026135d.jpg

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61)

Launching an E-2C Hawkeye (squadron VAW-116 "Sun Kings"). NS026135c 151k

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026135c.jpg

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61)

Launching an A-6E Intruder (squadron VA-145 "Swordsmen"). Carrier Air Wing 2 (CVW-2), tail code "NE." NS026135a 154k

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026135a.jpg

 

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61)

Launching an A-7E Corsair II (squadron VA-113 "Stingers"). NS026135b 165k.

 

    “On 12 May 1982, USS Constellation (CV-64) reentered Neptune’s scared domain and the entire ceremony on the flight deck over again. But, in the end King Neptune was pleased and the Connie, with the essential blessing of the Ruler of the Raging Main and Manned by trusty crew of shellbacks, proceeded due north, destined for Gonzo station to carry on with its assigned mission” (Ref. 1137).

 

    “After a four day port visit, USS Constellation (CV-64) departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 16 May 1982, embarking Tigers for the 7 day trip to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California” (Ref. 1139).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Carrier Qualifications in the southern California operating area from 10 to 17 May 1982, visiting Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 17 May 1982, for a one day port visit” (Ref. 329B-1982).

 

 

US Navy photo (DVIC id: DF-SN-82-03604): An air-to-air right side view of a Soviet Tupolev Tu-95 (NATO designation is Bear) aircraft and a U.S. Navy F-14A Tomcat fighter, top. The F-14A is from Fighter Squadron 211 (VF-211), "Fighting Checkmates," embarked aboard USS Constellation (CV-64). Western Pacific Ocean, early 1982. NS026464.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026464.jpg

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returns NASNI, San Diego, Ca. from CQs in the SOCAL AOR

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 19 May 1982, conducting Carrier Qualifications in the southern California operating area from 10 to 19 May 1982, visiting Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 17 May 1982, for a one day port visit” (Ref. 329B-1982).

 

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9, circa 1980–1982. NS026481 92k. Robert Hurst.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026481.jpg

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) with CVW-9 embarked returns to NASNI, San Diego, Ca.

from WestPac and Indian Ocean deployment

 

    “On a Sunday Morning, 21 May 1982, USS Constellation (CV-64) (Connie) with CVW-9 and Commander, Carrier Group Seven, Rear Admiral George A. Aitcheson and Chief of Staff, Captain William C. Carson embarked arrived Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, with Captain Dennis M. Brooks, USN, as Commanding Officer and Captain Philip S. Anselmo, as Executive Officer, ending her 13th “WestPac,” on her fourth Indian Ocean deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the far east. On 17 December 1981, Constellation crossed the line and welcomed King Neptune and his Royal Court aboard. It became more and more obvious that this great warship was sure to incur the Ruler of the Raging Main’s awesome and terrible wrath. For when Connie requested permission to enter Neptune’s scared domain, he discovered that within America’s Flagship were 2,870 pollywogs. Davey Jones King Neptune’s official emissary came aboard at 4 p.m. on December 17th to deliver a message from the Ruler of the Raging Main to the captain. It was feared that King Neptune’s message would forego any trivial pleasantries and demand a suitable answer to why Connie was manned by a wog infested crew. On 19 December 1981, an F-14 of VF-24 missed the arresting cables during the landing onboard Connie and as a result the aircraft ran off the deck edge and was lost in the Indian Ocean. 12 gorgeous, high-kicking Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders checked visited USS Constellation (CV-64) on December 30th and made the Christmas and New Years season most enjoyable for the crew. As part of a sixteen day USO tour of the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean, the travelling squad of this renowned organization visited five ships in Battle Group Delta. In the space of time between their arrival and January 2nd, their departure date, the cheerleaders dazzled their way through six shows, two aboard “America’s Flagship.” On 12 May 1982, Constellation reentered Neptune’s scared domain and the entire ceremony on the flighty deck over again. But, in the end King Neptune was pleased and the Connie, with the essential blessing of the Ruler of the Raging Main and Manned by trusty crew of shellbacks, proceeded due north, destined for Gonzo station to carry on with its assigned mission. After a four day port visit, Constellation departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 16 May 1982, embarking Tigers for the 7 day trip to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California. Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Alava Pier, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Kenya, Mombasa, East Africa; Perth, sea port of Fremantle, Austrilla; Singapore; Diego Garcia and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Squadrons: VF-211, F-14; VF-24; F-14; VA-146, A-7E; VA-147, A-7E; VA-165, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-112, E-2C; VAQ-134, EA-6B; HS-6, SH-3H; VS-38, S-3 A and VQ-1 Det. B EA-3B; reclassified to CV-56 on 1 July 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises in Vietnam, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, received a Presidential Unit Citation from President Nixon in 1973. Her 15th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at New York Naval Shipyard on 27 October 1961, with Captain T.J. Walker in command” (20 October 1981 to 21 May 1982)” (Ref. 1-Constellation, 72, 7684A, 1131, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1138 & 1139).

 

 20/10/81 to 21/05/82

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

None reported

 

13th WestPac

Ref. - 406A

 

    “On 3 June 1982, USS Constellation (CV-64) became the first carrier ever to hold a Father and Daughter Night” (Ref. 1140).

 

USS Forrestal (CV-59) with CVW-17 embarked departs Mayport, Fla. on her Mediterranean and Indian Ocean deployment

 

    “USS Forrestal (CV-59) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Fla. 7 June 1982, on her 17th Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet in the eastern Mediterranean in support of the Lebanon Contingency Force of 800 U.S. Marines in Beirut and her first Indian Ocean deployment with the 7th Fleet, transiting the Suez Canal, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden for the third time in her 28-year history, Prior to her deployment under gone a repair period upon return from her 16th Mediterranean deployment and second quarter century of naval service operating with the 6th Fleet; reclassified to CV-59 30 June 1975; made one Vietnam Combat cruise during the Vietnam Conflict/War and first deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, returning from the South China Sea, via the straits of Malacca, Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea on her second Suez Canal transit steaming through the Gulf of Aden, Red Sea, to and from the Mediterranean Sea 14 September 1967. She will under go her 21st deployment or 22nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD), if you count her east coast and Caribbean operations operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet in the Caribbean Sea, upon return from her third Mediterranean deployment operating with the 6th Fleet 31 August 1960, since her commission 1 October 1955, having the destination of being the first lead ship of a new class of “supercarriers” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

USS Forrestal (CV-59) with CVW-17 (AA)

(7 June to 16 November 1982)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-74

Be-Devilers -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

AA100

F-4S

VF-103

Sluggers -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

AA200

F-4S

VA-83

Rampagers -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AA300

A7-E

VA-81

Sunliners -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AA400

A7-E

VA-85

Black Falcons -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AA500

A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D

VAW-125

Tigertails or
Torchbearers - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-130

Zappers - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-3

Tridents - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-30

Diamondcutters - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departs NAS, Alameda, Ca. for ORSE

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 9 June 1982, for Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE)” (Ref. 329B-1982).

 

    “Captain Anthony Albert ("Tony") Less, NAOC 1960 assumed command of USS Ranger (CVA-61) on 11 June 1982, relieving Captain Daniel Arthur Pedersen, 22nd Commanding Officer, serving from 20 October 1980 to 11 June 1982” (Ref. 1095 & 1096).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returns to NAS, Alameda, Ca. from ORSE

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 16 June 1982, conducting Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE) from 9 to 16 June 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982).

 

    “On 18 June 1982, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Robert Spencer Owens, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 28th WestPac and her 23rd deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 26th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 32nd deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 45th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (26 April to 18 June 1982)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

 26/04/82 to 18/06/82

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Battle Efficiency Award (Navy "E" Ribbon), marking her as the outstanding carrier in the Pacific Fleet

Jan 1982 to Jun 1983

28th, 29th WestPac/ 1st NorPac

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

28th WestPac

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

 

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

Hollywood used USS Coral Sea (CV-43) as a movie "prop" in filming of portions of the motion picture "The Right Stuff”

 

    “Hollywood used USS Coral Sea (CV-43) as a movie "prop" in filming of portions of the motion picture "The Right Stuff in July 1982, about early astronauts articles and Coral Sea and CVW-14 were written about in magazines like HOOK Summer (82 - 31 October 1981) and “CVW-14/CV-43 RETURNS FROM WESTPAC” and San Francisco, California" (Ref. 34). 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departs NAS, Alameda, Ca. for two large-scale training evolutions FleetEx 1-82, NWAI and ReadiEx/MSR 82-4 and ORE

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 6 July 1982, to participate in two large-scale training evolutions FleetEx 1-82, Nuclear Weapons Acceptance Inspection (NWAI) and ReadiEx/MSR 82-4 from 6 to 28 July 1982, and Command Inspection and Operational Readiness Exam (ORE) in the southern California operating area” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) with CVW-3 embarked returns from the Mediterranean Sea,

Indian Ocean and North Arabian Sea

 

    “On 14 July 1982, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) with CVW-3 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain D. Bruce Cargill in command, ending her ninth Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet participating in National Week XXXI and Daily Double, and stand by operations for the potential evacuation of American citizens from Beirut, in the wake of Israeli forces entering Lebanon in Operation Peace for Galilee, her first Indian Ocean and North Arabian Sea deployment with the 7th Fleet. Commenced her voyage to the Mediterranean Sea deployment with a three-day period of CarQuals for her air wing off the Virginia capes, in-chopped the Mediterranean Sea on 17 January 1982 and began a four-day port visit to Malaga. Late on 21 January 1982, John F. Kennedy got underway, and participated in National Week XXXI in the Mediterranean, transiting the Suez Canal on 3 February 1982, making her first passage with numerous Egyptian and U.S. Embassy staff members embarked, spending the rest of the month of February in the Indian Ocean and North Arabian Sea, crossing the equator for the first time on 6 March 1982, entering the “Realm of King Neptunus Rex.” Only ten percent of the crew had crossed the equator previously and by the end of the day, 4,500 “Pollywogs” had become “Shellbacks,” setting course for Australia, en route to Perth. Following loss of control an F-14 ("AC 101") from VF-11, the F-14 crashed into the Red Sea while engaged in an ACM flight from the John F. Kennedy on 6 February 1982. On 11 March 1982, each man of the John F. Kennedy, whether he was ship’s company, air wing, or staff, in a departure from the “dry” nature of U.S. Navy ships in the wake of the 1914 general order abolishing other than medicinal alcohol on board, was authorized two cold beers in a cookout on the flight deck. The entire crew took the afternoon off to relax following 45 days of arduous toil, anchoring outside Perth at the port of Fremantle on the morning of 19 March 1982, and received warm hospitality for the duration of the stay that ultimately came to an end on 25 March. John F. Kennedy conducted routine operations and exercises for the next five weeks, evolutions punctuated by her first port visit in Africa, anchoring at Mombasa, Kenya, on 2 May 1982, departing on 7 May 1982 and steamed toward the North Arabian Sea, where, the following day, she hosted the first visit aboard a United States ship by a Somali head of state, and achieved its 150,000th arrested landing when President Mohamed Siad Barre of the Somali Democratic Republic, arrived to full honors, including marine honor guard and a 21-gun salute from the guided missile cruiser Josephus Daniels (CG-27). On 19 May 1982, Commodore John Gunning, Commander, Sultan of Oman’s Navy and Captain John De Winton, Chief of Staff (Designate), Sultan of Oman’s Navy visited John F. Kennedy. The carrier had been operating closely with the Sultan of Oman’s air forces, and the visit was intended to foster closer relations with his military representatives. John F. Kennedy transited the Strait of Bab-El-Mandeb on 1 June 1982 and headed north in the Red Sea.  She arrived at Port Suez that afternoon. By 2 June 1982, John F. Kennedy made her northerly transit of the Suez Canal, and expected to make a port visit to Haifa from 6 to 11 June, where many of the John F. Kennedy’s crew had dependents waiting for them. However, another crisis in the Middle East would put those plans on hold, in the wake of Israeli forces entering Lebanon in Operation Peace for Galilee on 6 June 1982. Israel had attacked Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) fortifications throughout southern Lebanon, and John F. Kennedy, her anticipated port visit to Haifa cancelled, received orders to proceed to a position off the Lebanese coast. On 8 June 1982, the Secretary of Defense ordered the Marine Amphibious Ready Group at Rota to the eastern Mediterranean Sea for potential evacuation of American citizens from Beirut, Lebanon. John F. Kennedy crew was relieved to hear that their loved ones were all safe and returning home, as they prepared to aid in the possible evacuation of U.S. and other foreign nationals from Beirut, remaining on station in the eastern Mediterranean Sea until relieved on 17 June 1982 by USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) and then proceeded to Toulon, arriving on 21 June 1982, departing John F. Kennedy sailed to take part in Daily Double, an anti-surface warfare (ASW) and air defense exercise with the French Air Force and Navy, concluding on 27 June 1982, John F. Kennedy transited to Malaga, arriving on 28 June 1982, making a port call from 28 June to 3 July 1982, departing on 3 July 1982, conducting a Tiger Cruise on her way home. Her 12th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since she was commissioned 7 September 1968” (1-John F. Kennedy, 72, 76, 84A & 549).

 

    “Sadly, during FleetEx 1-82, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) lost radar and radio contact with NH-300, an A-7E from VA-22, on 15 July 1982. A major SAR effort utilizing aircraft from Enterprise and ships in company found no trace of the pilot or of his Corsair II” (Ref. 362D). 

 

    “Vice Admiral W. Lawrence, Com3rdFlt visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 17 July 1982” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Vice Admiral Schoultz visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 26 to 27 July 1982” (Ref. 362D).

 

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61)

FOD (Foreign Object Damage) walkdown. NS026135f 235k. HTC Reith D. Walls II (Ret.)

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026135f.jpg

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) return to NAS, Alameda, Ca. from two large-scale training evolutions FleetEx 1-82, NWAI and ReadiEx/MSR 82-4 and ORE

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 1 August 1982, participating in two large-scale training evolutions FleetEx 1-82, Nuclear Weapons Acceptance Inspection (NWAI) and ReadiEx/MSR 82-4 from 6 to 28 July 1982, and Command Inspection and Operational Readiness Exam (ORE), with the Communications Department receiving a grade of outstanding from 29 July 1 August 1982 in the southern California operating area from 6 July to 1 August 1982 Sadly, during FleetEx 1-82, Enterprise lost radar and radio contact with NH-300, an A-7E from VA-22, on 15 July 1982. A major SAR effort, utilizing aircraft from Enterprise and ships in company found no trace of the pilot or of his Corsair II. Visitors during this period included Vice Admiral W. Lawrence, Com3rdFlt, on 17 July, Vice Admiral Schoultz, 26 to 27 July 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

 

25th Anniversary Program, USS Ranger (CV-61), 10 August 1957–10 August 1982. NS026138 191k. Robert M. Cieri.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026138.jpg

 

 

Silver Anniversary Plaque, USS Ranger (CV-61), 10 August 1957–10 August 1982. NS026138a 112k. HTC Reith D. Walls II (Ret.)

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026138a.jpg

 

 

A starboard bow view, taken at night, of USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) moored at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA, August 1982. US Navy photo by PH1 C. Hinkle (DVIC id # DN-SC-85-06816). NS026384 90k. Defense Visual Information Center. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026384.jpg

 

    “Attorney General William French Smith visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 11 August 1982” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Captain Charles Reynolds McGrail, Jr. , USNA '57, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 21 August 1982, relieving Captain Robert Spencer Owens, NAVCAD, 33rd Commanding Officer, serving from February 17, 1981 - August 21, 1982” (Ref. 1178-G). 

 

    “Rear Admiral C.A. Easterling, AirPac visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 26 August 1982” (Ref. 362D).

 

CHAPTER XXXVI

FOURTEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(20 August 1981 to 20 March 1983)

Part 1 – (20 August 1981 to 3 March 1982)

Part 2 – (4 March to 31 August 1982)

Part 3 – (1 September to 31 December 1982)

Part 4 – (1 January to 20 March 1983)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

Part 2 – (4 March to 31 August 1982)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4