CHAPTER XXXVI

FOURTEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(20 August 1981 to 20 March 1983)

Part 1 – (20 August 1981 to 3 March 1982)

Part 2 – (4 March to 31 August 1982)

Part 3 – (1 September to 31 December 1982)

Part 4 – (1 January to 20 March 1983)

 

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 and COMCARGRU THREE, RADM Joseph J. Barth, Jr. (being relieved by Rear Admiral Edwin R. Kohn, Jr., on 30 October 1982) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 1 September 1982, with Captain Robert J. Kelly as the Commanding Officer, on her tenth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Western and first Northern Pacific, demonstrating U.S. resolve to maintain free and un restricted access to international seas for all countries, showing the flag, presenting military presence, conducting humanitarian and search and rescue operations, and continued training to ensure preparedness to conduct prompt and sustained operations, on her ninth and tenth Indian Ocean voyage and first North Arabian Sea deployment and second Arabian Sea voyage since her commission, conducted a joint Ship ASW Readiness Evaluation Measuring (SHAREM) and Air Readiness Evaluation Measuring (AIREM) exercise, an Air Readiness Evaluation Measuring exercise en route to Hawaiian waters; TRANSITEX - eight days of operations in the Hawaiian OPAREA including a major ASW Exercise (BGAREM), HARPOONEX, MISSILEX and live and inert ordnance delivery; CRAE 83-1, a four cycle dual CV ordnance exercise with USS Midway (CV-41). All sorties were conducted a s Mini ALFA Strikes; while in Philippine waters, she conducted MissilEx 83-2, providing CVW-14 “valuable air to air weapons work,” off Poro Point; Weapons Department reported that NORPAC 82 exercise was completed along with dual battle group operations; Carrier Readiness Ammunition Exercise was completed. GMMC Randall and FTG2 Smith of FOX division were designated Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialists and awarded ESWS insignia; Enterprise Communications Department participated in Small Pipe 1-83 while operating in the Indian Ocean. This exercise tested Enterprise’s HF Communications capability. As in previous Small Pipe exercises, the evolution was excellent training for circuit operators. Newly arrived junior personnel derived benefit from the HF operations. Southbound en route Diego Garcia for participation in Weapons Week 83 While with BG Foxtrot, Enterprise participated in exercises Jade Tiger 82 while operating in the North Arabian Sea from 2 to 8 December 1982 and Beacon Flash, a two-day event, the former involving CAS, CAP surface surveillance, anti-boat patrol and ASW missions flown in support of amphibious landings, and the latter allowing “aircrews to hone their low level and navigations skills;” Carrier Battle Group (CVBG), Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot conducted Weapons Week 83; CVW-11 embarked aboard Enterprise with training in air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons delivery and Rainbow Reef (a convoy Transitex with merchant ships from the Rapid Deployment Force Detachment (RDJTF Det.) (at Diego Garcia)) in the vicinity of Diego Garcia; Beacon South, a joint exercise with the Australians provided Enterprise aircrews with low level and weapons delivery training. Units of the BG Foxtrot, Enterprise battle group, departed their respective ports and reformed on 26 January 1983 for a transit north through the Sunda Strait, encountering some difficulty regarding Indonesian intransigence to allow the ships through, pressing “right of free passage,” transiting northbound on 1 February 1983, en route to Subic Bay via the Java Sea, and into the South China Sea. Enterprise and her BG Foxtrot consorts steamed north through the Tsushima Strait and into the Sea of Japan for Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83, a 16 day joint amphibious exercise with ROK forces, in the Sea of Japan with USS Midway (CV-41) and connecting seas, supporting the landings and provided interdiction support en route Sasebo, Japan (Carrier Air Wing Eleven wing provided support to amphibious task force during simulated assault. Interdiction support also provided  Operations Department reported that Enterprise provided support for Amphibious Operations in the Okinawa and Japan OPAREA’s and operating independently before rendezvousing with Midway on 30 March 1983 for the transit north through the Sea of Japan and out the Tsugaru Strait en route Fleextex 83-1 in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Enterprise BG Foxtrot and Midway Battle Group participated in FleetEx 83-1 (rendezvousing with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 9 April 1983). All three carriers then completed a “counterclockwise sweep” of the northwestern Pacific. Engineering and Reactor Departments annual Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE). She will under go her 17th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on November 25, 1961” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1982, 362D & 1270). 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 (NH)

(1 September 1982 to 28 April 1983)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-114

Aardvarks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NH200

F-14A

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks -                  Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NH300

A-7E

VA-94

Shrikes -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NH400

A-7E

VA-95

Green Lizards -                  Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NH500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-133

Wizards -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-37

Sawbucks - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with COMCARGRU THREE, RADM Joseph J. Barth, Jr. (being relieved by Rear Admiral Edwin R. Kohn, Jr., on 30 October 1982) and CVW-11 embarked operated for the remainder of the year in the North Arabian Sea with Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot, also comprising USS Bainbridge (CGN-25); USS Ocallahan (FF-1051); USS Hepburn (FF-1055); USS Hull (DD-945); USS Waddell (DDG-24); USS Shasta (AE-33); USS Sacramento (AOE-1); USS White Plains (AFS-4); USNS Ponchatula (TAO-148); USS Harry W. Hill (DD-986) (Detached to shadow Soviet carrier Minsk, which was transiting the Indian Ocean for her first deployment to the Far East, a matter of considerable interest to U.S. planners - rejoined 19/20 January 1983); USS Reasoner (FF-1063) (Detached on ASW duty - rejoined 10 January 1983) and FNS Kersaint (D-622) (Operating with BG until 10 January 1983)” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

http://www.chinfo.navy.mil/navpalib/ships/carriers/histories/cv65-enterprise/ent820901.jpg 

 

http://www.chinfo.navy.mil/navpalib/ships/carriers/histories/cv65-enterprise/ent820901.jpg

 

    “USS Bainbridge (CGN-25) and USS George Philip (FFG-12) joined USS Enterprise (CVN-65) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61)

Replenishing a Knox-class frigate. NS026135j 214k.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026135j.jpg

 

    “Admiral S.R. Foley, CinCPac, was on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 8 to 9 September 1982” (Ref. 362D).

 

     “While en route to Hawaiian waters, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted SHAREM 48, a joint Ship ASW Readiness Evaluation Measuring exercise, and AIREM X-ray, an Air Readiness Evaluation Measuring exercise from 7 to 12 September 1982” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Captain Lyle F. Bull, USN assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Constellation (CV-64), relieving Captain Dennis M. Brooks, USN, 17th Commanding Officer, serving from April 1981 to September 1982” (Ref. 406A).

 

    “On 12 September 1982, after transiting the Suez Canal for the Second time in her 28-year history, USS Forrestal (CV-59) entered the Indian Ocean. This marked the first time that Forrestal had operated with 7th Fleet since the 1967 Vietnam cruise” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

   “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 13 September 1982. Enterprise transited from Alameda to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 1 to 12 September 1982, conducting a joint Ship ASW Readiness Evaluation Measuring (SHAREM) and Air Readiness Evaluation Measuring (AIREM) exercise from 7 to 12 September 1982 while en route. September-October 1982- CVW-11 deploys aboard Enterprise for an extended eight month cruise. TRANSITEX - eight days of operations in the Hawaiian OPAREA including a major ASW Exercise (BGAREM), HARPOONEX, MISSILEX and live and inert ordnance delivery” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “Captain Lyle F. Bull, USN assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Constellation (CV-64), relieving Captain Dennis M. Brooks, USN, 17th Commanding Officer, serving from April 1981 to September 1982” (Ref. 406A). 

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61)

Underway replenishment. NS026135i 127k. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026135i.jpg

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked departs Yokosuka, Japan on her 1st North Pacific and “WestPac”

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 14 September 1982, with Captain Charles Reynolds McGrail, Jr. , USNA '57, as Commanding Officer, on her 29th WestPac, her first North Pacific and her 24th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 27th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 33rd deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 46th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(14 September to 11 December 1982)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (24th Forward Deployed)

29th WestPac

1st NorPac

CVW-5

NF

14 Sep 1982

11 Dec 1982

Western Pacific

North Pacific

46th FWFD

89-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 115-120

RF-4B

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VA-93

Ravens -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

NF500

A-6E /                     A6-E/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2B

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HC-1 Det.2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system

 

    “Following a visit to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 13 to 16 September 1982, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) stood out on the morning of the 17th for “several days of flight operations.” In Hawaii, the free bus shuttle service between the base and Waikiki was provided by Special Services at a cost of $5,000, and according to the bus company's records Enterprise personnel took approximately 10,500 rides on the bus. Airops / Quals reported no fires; Pearl Harbor upkeep availability. Enterprise reopened its Brig on 14 September 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “While still in the vicinity of Hawaii, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) CVW-11 aircraft utilized the opportunity to deliver a wide variety of ordnance, both live and inert, including AGM-84A Harpoons during which time aircrews sighted a sail boat in distress and coordinated a successful rescue effort aircrews sighted a sailboat in distress and coordinated and successful SAR rescue on 19 September 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “Transiting to the North Pacific (NorPac), USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted “freedom of the seas” operations with the USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG). The two groups steamed in an area roughly centered upon. MODLOC position was 51N/171E, approximately 300 miles southeast of the extensive Russian facilities at Petropavlosk, the Soviet Banner Pacific Fleet’s major submarine base. From the time she neared her NorPac operations area on 23 September 1982, until she departed the Sea of Japan, Enterprise proved “the subject of extensive Soviet air, surface, and subsurface surveillance”” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “During Cyclic Operations on 23 September 1982, Sideflare 74, a CH-46 from HC-11’s USS Sacramento (AOE-1) Det. ditched at sea due to fuel starvation, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) assuming on scene SAR command. Enterprise assumed SAR on scene command. Prompt action by the Air Traffic Control Center aboard Enterprise to vector indigenous SH-3 assets from HS-6 to the scene of action resulted in the recovery of all personnel from frigid northern Pacific waters with no casualties. Additionally, a pair of Tomcats from VF-213 were diverted to Adak, Alaska, due to reduced ceiling visibility in the carrier operating area. The F-14s returned to Enterprise the following day, believed to be the first time that F-14s landed or took off from Adak” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “On 30 September 1982, the USS Enterprise (CVN-65) CVBG inchopped to the 7th Fleet, proceeding with the USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG) southward, to the east of the Kuril Islands. September 1982 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Supply Department reported that Enterprise operated in the Northern Pacific and utilized for the first time a previously untested logistic channel. Materials were moved from Travis AFB, to McCord AFB and ultimately to Naval Station Adak. From this point material was moved to the Enterprise via US-3A. The airhead at Adak proved successful and demonstrated that this facility could be expanded to support the requirements of a CV Battle Group. (2) Training Department, for the first time in over three years, maintained Temporary Additional Duty Outside U.S. (TEMADD OUTUS) Funds for Emergency Leave. Training Department started utilizing the Defense Activity for Nontraditional Educational Support (DANTES) Examinations and has administered over two hundred exams in CLEP, SAT, ACT, and GED. (3) Airops/Quals reported no fires; Pearl Harbor upkeep availability; extended deployment commences. (4) Deck Department rigged four stations for the first time, used fueling-at-sea station nine for the first time and conducted seven UNREPS. (5) Engineering Department E Division reported that after extensive troubleshooting of the bridge microphone station, a failed relay in the 1 MC circuitry was discovered and replaced. (6) Engineering Department M-Division reported they experienced a major casualty to number 4 main Engine reduction gears during the transit from Pearl Harbor to Subic Bay. A wiped bearing and sheared bearing cap stud were found inside the reduction gear casing. The shaft was uncoupled at sea by Machinery Division personnel in less than four hours. Puget Sound Naval Shipyard dispatched a Tiger Team to meet the ship in Subic Bay and repairs were completed in the five day in port period. Recovery of the main engine including recoupling of the shaft, an operational check, vibrational analysis and final reduction gear inspection was successfully completed during the six day transit to Singapore. (7) Weapons Department conducted HARPOON exercise, with air wing aircraft, expending one AIM84A HARPOON. This is the first HARPOON expended by CVN-65 and CVW-11. Weapons Department reported that numerous ordalts were installed in the Close-In Weapon System by a team from general dynamics. MT.23 became qualified after successfully engaging a towed target in Hawaii Pacific Missile Range. Since leaving CONUS on 1 SEP 82, Marine Detachment provided honor guards, color guards and rifle details on eight separate occasions adding the “professional touch” to change of command and other ceremonies/ services  or both the ship and embarked air wing and also the accompanying ships of the Battle Group FOXTROT. Marine detachment implemented and managed the ship's visit or control and physical security bill while in foreign ports. Marine detachment also added a Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) training syllabus; a well rounded, all encompassing training program to prepare Marines for later assignment to the Fleet Marine Force (FMF). (8) Operations Department reported the installation of the closed-loop, chilled water cooling system for the AN/SLQ-17(V)2 system significantly improved system reliability. The Carrier Intelligence Center (CVIC) Fleet Imagery Support Terminal (FIST) system was installed with EDP technicians designated for partial maintenance. This equipment has proved to be 100% reliable with no failure. A representative from Naval Broadcast Service Detachment San Diego conducted extensive system training for OE-04 Division technicians. Sony DXC1800H color cameras were installed in KENT-TV and CVIC, significantly improving camera, and system reliability to the benefit of both embarked squadrons and ship's entertainment. Naval Sea Support Center Pacific provided Refresher Training on dehydrator maintenance for the MM1’s attached to OE-04 Division during the ship's visit to Pearl Harbor. Environmental support for all Battle Group Foxtrot units was commenced in association with the “WestPsc” deployment. Acquisition of facsimile charts via satellite as part of a COMTHIRDFLT/NAVCAMS EASTPAC feasibility test was conducted” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “Of particular note was the “unprecedented” use of Backfire bombers, on 30 September and 2 October 1982, to “reconnoiter” both USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG). The tension between the two superpowers provided both with opportunities to test the other’s resolve and naval competency, and planes from both carriers conducted simulated dual wing coordinated strikes that were frighteningly real in the circumstances” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) CVBG inchopped to the 7th Fleet, proceeding with the USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG) entered the Sea of Japan via the Tsugaru Strait, between Hokkaid, and Honshū, Japan, on 3 October 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “Vice Admiral M.S. Holcomb, Com7thFlet visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 5 October 1982” (Ref. 362D). 

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61)

Pearl Harbor. NS026135g 156k.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026135g.jpg

 

    “RADM R. F. Brown, III, COMCARGRU FIVE visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 9 October 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982).

 

    “CRAE 83-1 was a four cycle dual carrier exercise between USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG), with all sorties practiced by their aircraft being conducted as Mini Alpha strikes. Four days later the “Big E” departed the Southern Sea of Japan via the Tsushima Straits on 9 October 1982. An international group of consul generals, led by British General Sir John Archer, Commander in Chief, U.K. Land Forces, visited the ship on 12 October 1982. “Northern Pacific and Sea of Japan provided CVW-11 with excellent opportunities to train against Soviet surveillance aircraft, submarines, and surface combatants, conducted dual CV operations including dual airwing coordinated strikes. All sorties were conducted as Mini ALFA Strikes. Missilex 83-2- conducted off Poro PT RP, this successful exercise provided the airwing valuable air to air weapons work” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “The Honorable Sir Denys Robeccton KBE, Chief Justice, Hong Kong; Mr. Alfred Preissil, Consul General of Austria; Dr. Hans Dietrich, Consul General of the Federal Republic of Germany; Dr. Pedro M. R. A. Catarino, Consul General of Portugal; Lord Kadoorie, CBE, JP, China Light and Power Company; General Sir John Archer, KCB, OBE, Former Commander and British Forces (HK); Commander-in-Chief, UK Land Forces and Mr. Clemencio F. Montesa, Consul General of the Philippines visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 12 October 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Northern Pacific conducting operations en route Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 17 September to 13 October 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port call, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 14 October 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked arrived Alameda, California, ending her 16th “WestPac” deployment

 

    “On 18 October 1982, USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked arrived Alameda, California, ending her 16th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet, on her third Indian Ocean deployment and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East; reclassified to CV-61 30 June 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War, earning 13 battle stars for service in Vietnam. Her 18th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 August 1957 (7 April 1982 to 18 October 1982)” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port of call at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 14 to 18 October 1982. Ultimately standing out for the South China Sea en route to Singapore, she encountered and rescued a boatload of six Vietnamese refugees, later disembarking them in Singapore. Airops / Quals reported no fires; Ship's Repair Facility (SRF) Subic Bay upkeep availability” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) while on her 1982 WestPac-Indian Ocean deployment, 7 April–18 October. Scanned from the 1983 Command calendar (original size is 8" x 11"). Crew members form the words "Top Gun 25" on the flight deck of Ranger, underway in the Pacific Ocean, August 1982, to commemorate the carrier's 25th Anniversary. "Top Gun" was Ranger's nickname. NS026135 192k. HTC Reith D. Walls II (Ret.). http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026135.jpg

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61)

Pearl Harbor. NS026135g 156k. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026135g.jpg

 

 

USS Ranger (CV-61)

Underway. NS026135h 142k. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026135h.jpg

 

    “On 18 October 1982, USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked arrived San Francisco Bay, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain Anthony Albert ("Tony") Less, NAOC 1960, as Commanding Officer, relieving Captain Daniel Arthur Pedersen, 22nd Commanding Officer, serving from 20 October 1980 to 11 June 1982, ending her 16th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet, on her third Indian Ocean deployment and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East; reclassified to CV-61 on 30 June 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War, earning 13 battle stars for service in Vietnam. Her 18th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 August 1957 (7 April to 18 October 1982)” (Ref. 1-Ranger, 72, 1094A, 1095 & 1096). 

 

 07/04/82 to 18/10/82

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

Sea Service Ribbon

August 1974 thru January 1993
(11 Awards)

16Th WestPac

3rd IO

Middle East

18th FWFD

195-days

Ref. 1094

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port of call at Singapore on 25 October 1982, en route Singapore from 19 to 24 October 1982. The six Vietnamese refugees, or “boat people” rescued at sea were disembarked in Singapore” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “USS Constellation (CV-64) visited San Francisco, California in October 1982 for Fleet Week, hosting 35,000 residents” (Ref. 1185).

 

    “Upon arrival at Singapore on 25 October 1982, a party led by Harold E.T. Thanyer, U.S. Ambassador, Singapore, Yeap A.B.C. Rose, Deputy High Commissioner, Malaysia, the Filipino Ambassador Privado G. Jimenez, Republic of the Philippines;  and Ambassador Sudjatmiko, Indonesia to Singapore and Mr. Morton S. Smith, Deputy Chief of Mission, American Embassy visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65). Operations Department reported that COMNAVAIRPAC conducted their annual 3M inspection during 18 to 25 October 1982, awarding the Operations Department an overall grade of 92.6%. The installation of the SSQ-80 HF/VHF/UHF radar receiver was affected by FES Subic, to enhance Indian Ocean operations” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port of call at Singapore from 25 to 29 October 1982. Singapore upkeep availability conducted. Successful 3-M Inspection conducted. Damage Control Department scores were the highest for the ship. The six Vietnamese refugees, or “boat people” rescued at sea were disembarked in Singapore” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “Following her visit to Singapore, from 25 to 29 October 1982, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transited north through the Straits of Malacca and entered the Indian Ocean on 30 October 1982. Commander Carrier Group THREE, RADM J. J. Barth, embarked on board Enterprise on 12 March 1982. He was relieved on 30 October 1982 by RADM E. R. Kohn. Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN embarked on board Enterprise beginning in January, Commander F. L. Tillotson commanding. October 1982 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Deck Department conducted six UNREPS. (2) V-4 Division completed 4519 crunchless moves (1000 mishap free moves since overhaul). (3) Weapons Department reported that NORPAC 82 exercise was completed along with dual battle group operations. A Carrier Readiness Ammunition Exercise was completed. GMMC Randall and FTG2 Smith of FOX division were designated Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialists and awarded ESWS insignia. Department successfully passed the annual 3-M Inspection that was conducted by COMNAVAIRPAC San Diego, CA. Weapons Department expended ORE package MK82 bombs 487 each, MK84 bombs 4 each, MK45 Para Flare 16 each, conducted missile firing exercise, expended one AIM9G and SIDEWINDER, four AIM9H SIDEWINDER three AIM9L SIDEWINDER” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “While in the Indian Ocean the first Navy Alcohol Safety Action Program/Navy Drug Safety Action Program Classes were conducted aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65), utilizing on board assets, graduated 29 and 23 personnel, respectively. Enterprise Communications Department participated in Small Pipe 1-83 while operating in the Indian Ocean. This exercise tested Enterprise’s HF Communications capability. As in previous Small Pipe exercises, the evolution was excellent training for circuit operators. Newly arrived junior personnel derived benefit from the HF operations. Enterprise proceeded to the North Arabian Sea on 30 October 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “On 9 November 1982, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was visited by Rear Admiral C.E. Gurney, III, Commander, Middle East Force” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “On 6 November 1982, Commander F. L. Tillotson was relieved as CVW-11 CAG by Commander R. P. Hickey” (Ref. 329B-1982).

 

    “RADM C. E. Gurney, III, COMIDEASTFOR visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 9 November 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982).

 

USS Forrestal (CV-59) with CVW-17 embarked returns to Mayport, Fla. from her Mediterranean and Indian Ocean deployment

 

    “On 16 November 1982, USS Forrestal (CV-59) with CVW-17 embarked completed a five and one-half month deployment with a night time arrival at Mayport Fla., ending her 17th Mediterranean Sea deployment in support of the Lebanon Contingency Force of 800 U.S. Marines in Beirut, her first Indian Ocean deployment with the 7th Fleet, her fourth transit through the Suez Canal, steaming through the Gulf of Aden, Red Sea, to the Mediterranean Sea and the Eastern Atlantic, in her 28-year history, marking the first time that Forrestal had operated with 7th Fleet since the 1967 Vietnam cruise; reclassified to CV-59 30 June 1975; made one Vietnam Combat cruise during the Vietnam Conflict/War and first deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, returning from the South China Sea, via the straits of Malacca, Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea on her second Suez Canal transit steaming through the Gulf of Aden, Red Sea, to and from the Mediterranean Sea 14 September 1967. Her 21st  deployment (7 June 1982 to 16 November 1982), or 22nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) if you count her east coast and Caribbean operations operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet in the Caribbean Sea, upon return from her third Mediterranean deployment operating with the 6th Fleet 31 August 1960, since her commission 1 October 1955, having the destination of being the first lead ship of a new class of “supercarriers” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

    “Upon arrival from USS Forrestal (CV-59) 17th Mediterranean Sea deployment, she immediately began preparing for the Service Life Extension Program (SLEP)” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) operated in the North Arabian Sea from October 30 to 19 November 1982. This was especially important owing to the recent outbreak of war between Iraq and Iran. Following the radical Islamic revolution in Iran in 1979, Saddam Hussein took advantage of the ensuing chaos and ordered the Iraqi Army to invade Khuzestan province in southwestern Iran on 22 September 1980. The invasion was both an attempt to inspire a populist revolt against the fundamentalist Shia regime in Teheran and to gain control of the vast petroleum reserves of the region. Although Hussein anticipated a quick victory that would allow him to install a friendly government in Tehran, the invasion provoked a determined, nationalist resistance by the Iranians that stopped the Iraqi offensive dead in its tracks. Despite enjoying a significant military advantage -- the Iraqi Army was well supplied with Warsaw Pact tanks, artillery and other weapons -- the campaign bogged down into a stalemate, with both sides suffering heavy losses in a war of attrition among the fortifications and trenches along the border. Both sides soon escalated the conflict through air, artillery and missile strikes against enemy cities, later extending these attacks against oil tankers and other ships carrying enemy commodities in the Northern Arabian Gulf. By the early 1980s, neutral ships in the region could anticipate missile or gunboat attacks from either side, and Enterprise was needed to monitor activity, and to respond to ships damaged or in peril from attack” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “On 20 November 1982, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) came about for a visit to Mombasa, initiating 3,994 pollywogs by entering Realm of Neptunus Rex and crossed the equator at 044º33’E, on 20 November. Also in Mombasa was USS Samuel Gompers (AD-37), enabling some upkeep to be completed on board the carrier” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the North Arabian Sea conducting operations from 30 October to 21 November 1982, entering the Indian Ocean, en route to Mombasa from 21 to 23 November 1982, arriving at Mombasa on the 24d” (Ref. 329B-1982-Command History Report has conflicting dates as 22 to 27).

 

    “Mombasa, Kenya Provincial Commissioner; Mayor of Mombasa; Commander, Kenya Navy and Provincial Police Officer visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 23 November 1982, anchoring at Mombasa on 24 November 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port call at Mombasa from 24 to 28 November 1982 and headed for the Indian Ocean. September to November 1982 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Western Pacific deployment resulted in increased use of boat and aircraft crane and anchor windlass equipment. Machine shop instrumental in virtually all facets of ship operation, manufacturing parts for radar units, F-14, A-6, A-7 aircraft, steam generators and various pumps and motors. Captain’s elevator began to show effects of extended use, requiring new motor bearings and renewal of winch shaft oil rings. First use of utility boats for liberty craft. Boat Engineer qualification program completed. Utility boat III ran aground in Mombasa requiring major rudder, screw and strut repairs by ship’s force. Successfully completed COMNAVAIRPAC 3-M inspection with a grade of excellent for the 02N2 plants. October to November 1982 accomplishments reported by departments/divisions/Air Wing: (1) Engineering Department E Division reported that the rewind shop provided extensive support to battle group units. Extensive support was provided. November 1982 accomplishments reported by departments/divisions/Air Wing: (1) Deck Department conducted eight UNREPS. Rigged five stations for the first time. Transferred over 400 lifts by CONREP. Refueled three escorts one after the other. Took a double ROBB at number nine station for the first time and conducted twelve UNREPS. (2) Engineering Department A-Division (3) Engineering Department E Division reported that the rewind shop provided extensive support to battle group units. Extensive support was provided to USS Omaha (SSN-692) during the Singapore visit. (4) Airops/Quals reported no fires; upkeep in Mombasa, Kenya with USS Samuel Gompers (AD-37). (5) Supply Department was selected as runner up in the annual COMNAVAIRPAC Food Service Excellence Award and advanced into the second round of the NEY Food Service Award competition” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

“After clearing Mombasa, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) operated for the remainder of the year in the North Arabian Sea with Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot, also comprising

USS Bainbridge (CGN-25); USS Ocallahan (FF-1051); USS Hepburn (FF-1055); USS Hull (DD-945); USS Waddell (DDG-24); USS Shasta (AE-33); USS Sacramento (AOE-1); USS White Plains (AFS-4); USNS Ponchatula (TAO-148); USS Harry W. Hill (DD-986) (Detached to shadow Soviet carrier Minsk, which was transiting the Indian Ocean for her first deployment to the Far East, a matter of considerable interest to U.S. planners – rejoined 19/20 January 1983); USS Reasoner (FF-1063) (Detached on ASW duty – rejoined 10 January 1983) and FNS Kersaint (D-622) (Operating with BG until 10 January 1983)” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the Indian Ocean on 28 November 1982, returning north to operate for the remainder of 1982 in the North Arabian Sea, taking part in exercises Jade Tiger 82 and Beacon Flash” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

 

A port quarter view of the aircraft carrier USS Midway (CV-41) underway in the Pacific Ocean, 2 December 1982, while participating in Hong Kong Exercise Search and Rescue '82. The Midway was being used as a base of operations for aircraft involved in the exercise. US Navy photo by LT Douglas Dotson (DVIC id: DFST8309958). NS024160 100k. DefenseImagery.mil.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024160.jpg

 

    “On New Years Eve USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was southbound en route Diego Garcia for participation in Weapons Week 83 and was highlighted by the arrival of the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders for a much-awaited performance onboard” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “While with BG Foxtrot, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) participated in exercises Jade Tiger 82 commencing on 2 December 1982 and Beacon Flash, a two-day event, the former involving CAS, CAP surface surveillance, anti-boat patrol and ASW missions flown in support of amphibious landings, and the latter allowing “aircrews to hone their low level and navigations skills” while operating in the North Arabian Sea” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

.

    “During exercises Jade Tiger 82 while operating in the North Arabian Sea from 2 to 8 December 1982 and Beacon Flash, a two-day event, the former involving CAS, CAP surface surveillance, anti-boat patrol and ASW missions flown in support of amphibious landings, and the latter allowing “aircrews to hone their low level and navigations skills,” Lieutenant General Robert Kingston, U.S.A., Commander, Rapid Deployment Joint Task Forced (RDJTF), Rear Admiral Stanley Arthur, Commander, RD Naval Force and Arthur Lowrie, RDJTF Political Advisor, consulted with officers on USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 2 to 3 December 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

USS America (CV-66) departs NOB, Norfolk, Virginia for the Mediterranean and Indian Ocean

 

USS America (CVA-66) with CVW-1 (AB)

 (8 December 1982 to 2 June 1983)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-102

Diamondbacks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AB100

F-14A

VF-33

Starfighters -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AB200

F-14A

VA-46

Clansmen -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AB300

A-7E

VA-72

Blue Hawks -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AB400

A-7E

VA-34

Blue Blasters -                   Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AB500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-123

Screwtops - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-136 (*1)

Gauntlets - Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-11

Dragon Slayers -           Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-32

Maulers - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

(*1) deployed aboard CV-66 until Apr.22, 1983 from Feb.6, 1983

 

    “In December 1982, Constellation sailed north to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash., to begin a 14-month Complex Overhaul (COH) to allow the carrier to operate the new F/A-18AI” (Ref. 1-Constellation).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked returns to Yokosuka, Japan from her 1st North Pacific and “WestPac”

 

    “On 11 December 1982, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Charles Reynolds McGrail, Jr. , USNA '57, as Commanding Officer, ending her 29th WestPac, her first North Pacific and her 24th  deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 27th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 33rd deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 46th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (14 September to 11 December 1982)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).   

 

 14/09/82 to 11/12/82

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation

Western Pacific, NorPac and Indian Ocean

*28 Dec 1983 to 1 May 1984

28th, 29th WestPac/

1st NorPac

Battle Efficiency Award (Navy "E" Ribbon), marking her as the outstanding carrier in the Pacific Fleet

Jan 1982 to Jun 1983

29th WestPac

1st NorPac

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

same

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location” (Ref. 1181D).

*Ref. - 1181 reported July 1982 to May 1984 consisting of 29th WestPac/ 1st NorPac, 2nd NorPac, 30th, 31st & 32nd WestPac.

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked commenced Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) on 11 December 1982” (Ref. 72).

 

    “Ambassador Peter A. Southland, U. S. Ambassador to Bahrain and Colonel Sam Hall, USAF, Defense Attaché, Oman visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 19 December 1982” (Ref. 329B-1982).

 

    “Rear Admiral Stevenson, Deputy Chief of Chaplains visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 21 December 1982” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) pulled in for a port call at Palma de Mallorca on 22 December 1982, remaining there through the Christmas holiday” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) weighing anchor at Palma de Mallorca on 28 December 1982, arriving on the 22nd, America sailed for the Lebanese coast, where she was to take up duty in support of the Multinational Peacekeeping Force in strife-torn Lebanon” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

     “In December 1982, USS Constellation (CV-64) sailed north to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash.” (Ref. 1-Constellation). 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) November to December 1982 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing

 

Chapter XXXVI,

Appendix II

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was underway in the North Arabian Sea from 28 November to 31 December 1982. November to December 1982 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Exercise Jade Tiger, six day exercise provided the airwing the opportunity to participate in a joint forces exercise from November to December 1982. Close air support, combat air patrol surface surveillance, anti-patrol boat, and anti-submarine missions were flown in the amphibious operations area in support of an amphibious assault. Beacon Flash, a two day exercise allowing aircrews to hone their low level and navigations skills and conducted real world surveillance of the Soviet Naval units operating in the Indian Ocean. December 1982 accomplishments reported by departments/divisions/Air Wing: (1) Airops/Quals reported no fires, construction of a stage assembly for Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders visit and DC competitive exercises conducted that included Z-52-D and Z-32-D. During 1982, Airops/Quals reported the ship completed 11,372 arrested landings and made 33 UnReps. (2) Quality Assurance (QA) Division capabilities continue to expand to magnaflux testing. (3) Engineering Department E Division Electrical Division overhauled #2 Special Frequency Turbine Generator slip rings and again refurbished the  slip rings on 114 Special Turbine Generator. The stabilizer gyro on the forward Mark 19 Gyrocompass failed and was replaced. Additionally, the standby power supply for the forward gyro was overhauled. (4) Deck Department received over 600 lifts by CONREP in December 1982. (5) Operations Department reported that two Enterprise personnel from the carrier’s Intelligence Division augmented USS Harry W. Hill (DD-986) to assist in reporting information regarding the Soviet carrier MINSK.(6) Engineering Department M-Division 4-A main feed pump experienced a catastrophic failure of its turbine journal bearing that required replacement of the turbine rotor at sea. These repairs were accomplished rapidly by ship’s force with no outsider assistance. Virtually all steam-out repairs have been completed at sea. Equipment reliability has remained extremely high during first half of the “WestPac” deployment. During 1982, M-Division transferred over one million gallons of Distillate Fuel Marine (DFM) and distilled over 36 million gallons of water. (7) Training Department – During 1982 the Shipboard Indoctrination Course welcomed on board 1140 new Enterprise crewmembers. The Training Department requested and administered over 2409 quotas for Class II “A” and Class “C” School, Shipboard and Aircraft Fire fighting and OJT or job related training during 1982. The Petty Officer Academy was started in December and graduated 776 new Third Class Petty Officers during 1982. (8) Safety Department – The beginning of 1982 signaled the end of a long overhaul period at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. The Enterprise Safety Department had to adjust rapidly from an industrial shipyard environment to that of a carrier flying aircraft at sea. The safety awareness of the crew has played a major role in the prevention of accidents and materials related damage during 1982. From the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard to becoming the mainstay of Battle Group Foxtrot, the end of 1982 found Enterprise safely completing operations under the most trying weather conditions of the Northern Pacific and extended blue water operations in the Indian Ocean. During this period Enterprise flew in excess of 18,600 flight hours. Enterprise carefully and methodically developed and implemented a safety oriented work plan designed to ensure full combat readiness with an embarked air wing within seven months. As a result, no flight related mishaps in which the ship was considered a contributing factor were encountered in 1982. Reportable ground mishaps and aircraft crunches were also nil. Several inputs, and contributions were submitted and received for ongoing safety programs. All Command Inspections, ORE, INSURV, 3-M, etc., received grade’s ranging from excellent to outstanding. No deaths were recorded due to automobile or motorcycle accidents. There were no major injuries which resulted in partial disability to the victims, although some minor injuries occurred as a result of motor vehicle accidents, recreational related mishaps and liberty incidents. Two ship’s company deaths were recorded during 1982. One death resulted from a man overboard on 7 November, and the second death was due to an accidental fall on 20 November 1982. Three air wing deaths occurred in 1982. A flight deck maintenance accident resulted in the death of a man from VS-37 on 5 November. Two A-7 incidents each resulted in the death of the pilots; one from VA-94 on 14 June and the other from VA-22 on 15 July.

 

 (9) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) –

 

 Production Statistics –

 

Date

Item Processed

 

Effectiveness Percent

Processed RFI Percent

JAN

282

49.9

88.5

FEB

294

48.8

95.2

MAR

248

29.9

68.2

APR

1230

66.2

80.8

MAY

2214

74.6

48.0

JUN

61

18.6

69.1

JUL

3971

80.6

73.2

AUG

1188

14.0

21.3

SEP

4052

76.0

81.1

OCT

3721

79.1

72.8

NOV

4146

81.6

68.9

DEC

4884

79.4

73.8

 

(10) Air Department – During 1982 Air Department completed 11,372 arrested landings without accident. All catapults and arresting gear have been available 100% of the time. Since the beginning of the cruise 10,298,420 gallons of JP-5 have been expended.

 

The following statistics from 1982 are recorded:

 

 NCLS Approaches:

 

Mode I A

Mode II

Mode III

SPN-4 1

ASR

89

2390

717

1780

181

 

(b) Arrested Landings: 11,372

 

(c) Significant Arrested Landings:

 

189,000

20 March

LCDR Gorrell

VAW-117

E-2C

190,000

28 April

LT Nutter

VA-22

A-7E

191,000

10 May

LCDR Herrel

VAW-117 i

in an E-2C

192,000

7 July

CDR Wolter

VA-95

A-6E

193,000

21 July

LT Gray

VA-22

A-7E

194,000

3 September

CDR Wolter

VA-95

A-6E

195,000

26 September

LT Semcken

VF-213

F-14A

196,000

19 October

CDR Hezlep

VA-22

A-7E

197,000

12 November

LCDR Greene

VA-95

A-6E

198,000

4 December

LT Dillard

VA-94

A-7E

199,000

19 December

CDR Hickey

CVW-11 CAG

A-6E

 

d. CATCC Qualifications: After three years of air traffic inactivity the following CATCC PQS watchstation qualifications have been attained in 1982:

 

Case I – 27 watchstation qualifications

Case I1 – 24 watchstation qualifications

Case I11 – 32 watchstation qualifications

 

e. Air Transfer Office Statistics:

 

Passengers: 2,488

Mail: 334,910 lbs

Cargo: 127,870 lbs

 

(11) Dental Department in 1982 became fully operational following the extended overhaul period. All phases of dentistry to ship’s company and embarked airwing and staff personnel, as well as emergency care to our battlegroup were provided. Subsequent to the expected increases in clinical demand during deployment, schedules developed were opened to maximize clinic utilization including extended evening sick call and oral prophylaxis availabilities. The prosthetic lab became fully operational and provided excellent support. Noteworthy contributions were made by all dental personnel in general quarter’s battle dressing station assignments and mass casualty drill. Accomplishments: 1) All dental records converted to terminal digit. Dental PMS program restructured resulting in greater efficiency and compliance by ship’s personnel; 2) Planning for Central Oral Evacuation System installation completed and included in 1983 SRA period and continued material and equipment upgrades made to clinical and administrative spaces (i.e LIFEPAC 5 Portable Cardiac Monitor and Defibrillator Unit, etc.). (12) Medical Department – During 1982 the Enterprise Medical Department transitioned to providing a road range of operational medical support following three years of limited services in overhaul. Mass casualty training evolutions and a complete update of ship’s stretchers, first aid boxes and battle dressing stations during Refresher Training and the Operational Readiness Exam highlighted the preparations for a Western Pacific deployment. A major medical supply onload in August 1982 resulted in authorized medical allowances plus six months supply in all major categories of consumables. Major events and developments: Pilot Test Module Laboratory (MODULAB) installed in the Medical Department to evaluate availability of advanced shipboard laboratory facilities. Cognizant agency-Naval Ocean Systems Center, San Diego, Biomedical engineering Branch. The Medical Department was certified by Commander Naval Air Force Pacific Force Medical Officer. For the first time a permanently assigned ship’s company general surgeon and nurse anesthetist reported on board for duty, and a state of the art Ohio Modulus Anesthesia Unit was installed.

 

 Statistical Data:

 

Laboratory procedures

22,040

Patient Visits

21,301

Immunizations

15,730

X-Ray procedures

4,490

Electrocardiograms

329

Audiograms

1,844

Pharmacy units

25,706

Physicals

1,535

 

 Navigation Department 1982 Travelog:

 

Date

Location

In port Days

At Sea Days

01 JAN - 01 FEB

(25 JAN - 01 FEB

In port Bremerton Fast Cruise)

32

----

02 - 08 FEB

Sea Trials

----

7

09 - 10 FE

In port Bremerton

2

----

11 - 12 FEB

To Alameda - SW Passsage

----

2

13 - 20 FEB

In port Alameda

8

----

21 FEB - 03 MAR

SOCAL OPAREA

----

11

04 - 14 MAR

SOCAL OPAREA

11

----

15 - 19 MAR

SOCAL OPAREA (REFTRA)

----

5

20 - 21 MAR

In port San Diego

2

----

22 - 26 MAR

SOCAL OPAREA

----

5

27 - 28 MAR

In port San Diego

2

----

29 MAR - 08 APR

SOCAL OPAREA/to Alamed

----

11

09 - 26 APR

In port Alameda

18

----

27 APR - 07 MAY

SOCAL OPAREA

----

11

08 - 09 MAY

In port San Diego

2

----

10 - 16 MAY

SOCAL OPAREA

----

7

17 MAY

In port San Diego

1

----

18 - 19 MAY

En route Alameda

----

2

20 May - 08 JUN

In port Alameda

20

----

09 - 16 JUN

SOCAL OPAREA (OHSE)

----

8

17 JUN - 05 JUL

In port Alameda

19

----

06 - 28 JUL

San Diego OPAREA (FLEETEX 1-82)

----

23

29 JUL - 01 AUG

San Diego OPAREA (ORE)

----

4

02 - 31 AUG

In port Alameda

30

----

01 - 12 SEP

En route Pearl Harbor

----

12

(07 - 12 SEP

SHAREM 48/AIREM XRAY)

 

 

13 - 16 SEP

In port Honolulu

4

----

17 SEP - 13 OCT

NORPAC OPS/en route Subic Bay

----

27

(30 SEP

INCHOP SEVENTHFLT)

 

 

14 - 18 OCT

In port Subic Bay

5

----

19 - 24 OCT

En route Singapore

----

5

25 - 29 OCT

In port Singapore

6

----

30 OCT - 21 NOV

1.0. OPS/en route Mombasa

----

24

(20 NOV

Realm of Neptunus Rex)

 

 

*24 - 28 NOV

In port Mombasa

5

----

28 NOV - 31 DEC

1.0. OPS/en route Perth

----

34

(02 - 08 DEC

JADE TIGER 82)

 

 

 

YEAR END TOTAL

167 / 45.75%

198 / 54.25%

 

1982 Days in Alameda

----

95 / 26%

 

1982 Days away from Alameda

270 / 74%

 

*329B-1982-Command History Report has conflicting dates as 22 to 27 was also reported

 

 

A VA-34 "Blue Blasters" A-6E Intruder is moved onto a bow cat. Sometime in 1982. Photo by PH2 Bunge. Robert Bunge, PHAN-PH2, USS America (CV-66). 1981-1985. NS026641. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026641.jpg

 

CHAPTER XXXVI

FOURTEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(20 August 1981 to 20 March 1983)

Part 1 – (20 August 1981 to 3 March 1982)

Part 2 – (4 March to 31 August 1982)

Part 3 – (1 September to 31 December 1982)

Part 4 – (1 January to 20 March 1983)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

Part 3 – (1 September to 31 December 1982)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

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EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

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EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4