CHAPTER XXXVII

FIFTHEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

15-MONTH COMPLEX OVERHAUL & ALTERATIONS AT NORFOLK NAVY YARD VA. – SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS – LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(21 March 1983 to 31 December 1984)

Part 1 – (21 March to 27 April 1983)

Part 2 – (28 April 1983)

Part 3 – (29 April to 1 December 1983)

Part 4 – (2 December 1983 to 23 April 1984)

Part 5 – (24 April to 31 December 1984)

 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with Captain Roy Cash, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 14 (CVW-14) (tail code NK) and Rear Admiral Paul F. McCarthy, Jr., Commander Carrier Group One and Rear Admiral K. E. Moranville, Commander Carrier Group Four (onboard together or relieved by COMCARGRU FOUR) embarked departed Alameda, California 21 March 1983, on her home port transfer to Norfolk, Va., with Captain Johnson, Jerome L. in command and Captain L. H. Price, Executive Officer. on her 15th “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment, on her first World Tour, her first Gulf of Aden, Red Sea and Suez Canal transit her tenth voyage in the Mediterranean Sea, and Global Plate Change on her third cruise to the Caribbean Sea (first two under the direction of the 6th Fleet). Prior to her deployment underwent a cycle of upkeep and local operations that would carry her into the following year while 1982 saw a cycle of upkeep and local operations during which time Hollywood used Coral Sea as a movie "prop" in filming of portions of the motion picture "The Right Stuff in July 1982, about early astronauts articles and Coral Sea and CVW-14 were written about in magazines like HOOK Summer (82 - 31 October 1981) “CVW-14/CV-43 RETURNS FROM WESTPAC” and San Francisco, and the 81-82 Cruise Book illuminated “THIRTY-FIVE YEARS OF CORAL SEA; reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975; involved in two Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh on 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She will under go her 15th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 26th deployment since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72, 1275Y5, 1275Y6 & 1275Y8-/8).

 

World Cruise Book 1983 - Ref. 1275Y

World Cruise port of call dates - Ref. 1275Y1

The Cruise and Ports of Call - Ref. 1275Y7

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Cruise Statists - Ref. 1275Y9

Command and Staff - Ref. 1275Y2

Captain J. D. “Beer” Taylor, CO, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) - Ref. 1275Y3

 

USS CORAL SEA (CV-43) with CVW-14 (NK)

(21 March to 12 September 1983) 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Pacific & 7th

15th WestPac 12th SCS

3rd IO

2nd North

Arabian

Sea

1st Suez

Canal

10th Med

3rd Carib

CVW-14

NK

21 Mar 1983

12 Sep 1983

Home Port

transfer to

the East

Coast

Middle East

26th FWFD

176-days

World Cruise (Alameda, Calif. to Norfolk, Va.) on her first Gulf of Aden, Red Sea and Suez Canal Transit.

Global Plate Change on her third cruise to the Caribbean Sea.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-154

Black Knights -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NK100

F-4N

VF-21

Freelancers -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NK200

F-4N

VA-97

Warhawks -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NK300

A-7E

VA-27

Royal Maces -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NK400

A-7E

VA-196

Main Battery or

Devil Spades -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NK500

A-6A / KA-6D

VAW-113

Black Eagles -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye

Electronics

NK600

E-2B

*VFP-63

  Det. 2

Eyes of the Fleet -           Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

NK110

RF-8G

HS-12

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

NK610

SH-3G

VFP or VF(P) - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (Light) or Light Photographic Squadron.

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 76

 

    “USS Ranger (CV-61) entered the history books on 21 March 1983 when an an all-woman flight crew flying a C-1A Trader from VRC-40 "Truckin' Traders" landed aboard the carrier. The aircraft was commanded by Lt. Elizabeth M. Toedt and the crew included Lt.(j.g.) Cheryl A. Martin, Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Gina Greterman and Aviation Machinist's Mate Airman Robin Banks” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

    “Upon completing Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port call at Sasebo, Japan on 21 March 1983, to conduct the first visit to that port by a nuclear-powered ship since we last called there in 1968” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port call at Sasebo, Japan from 21 to 25 March 1983 (Underway the morning of the 26th), but unlike her first visit (1968), no major incidents occurred other than “a few” peaceful demonstrations by Japanese opposed to her brief stay. The previous visit had caused widespread riots, but this time Enterprise crewmembers found the Japanese people very friendly, with only a few large but peaceful demonstrations. In fact, in true Enterprise tradition no major incidents occurred, and our very successful visit helped clear the way for future nuclear-powered ship visits to Japan. Damage Control and Repair Department reported that Enterprise is the first nuclear surface combatant visiting a Japanese port in 15 years” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Pusan, the largest port city in South Korea and is located on the southeastern-most tip of the Korean peninsula on 25 April 1983” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) conducted power projection training over Korea and Okinawa (Ref. 45 & 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port call at Sasebo, Japan from 21 to 26 March 1983, but unlike her first visit (1968), no major incidents occurred other than “a few” peaceful demonstrations by Japanese opposed to her brief stay” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “After standing out of Sasebo on 26 March 1983, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) operated independently before rendezvousing with USS Midway (CV-41) on 30 March 1983 for the transit north through the Sea of Japan and out the Tsugaru Strait en route FleetEx 83-1 in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. March 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Air Department V-3 Division reported that there were 1,386 total crunch free moves. (2) Damage Control and Repair Department reported that Enterprise is the first nuclear surface combatant visiting a Japanese port in 15 years. (3) Weapons Department Marine Detachment held an award ceremony which included the presentation of 3 Navy Achievement Medals” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

 

A great aerial view of USS Coral Sea (CV-43) and USS Sylvania (AFS-2) during an underway replenishment, circa 1981–83. A CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter can be seen between the two ships (right of the photo) transferring stores. NS024377 292k. James E Lockard USN Retired. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024377.jpg

 

    “After standing out of Sasebo, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) operated independently before rendezvousing with USS Midway (CV-41) on 30 March 1983. The two ships then steamed northerly courses across the Sea of Japan and through the Tsugaru Strait into the northern Pacific” (Ref. 362D).

 

Distinguished visitors to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) for March 1983 – Ref. 329B-1983

 

The Honorable Young Sun Kim

Chairman, Defense Sub Committee, Republic of Korea (ROK)

GEN Sonh Tae Kim

Korea (ROK)

GEN Joon Yul So

Chief of Staff, ROK Air Force

The Honorable Suk Min Yoon

Commanding General, ROK Army

The Honorable Myung Soo Hwang

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Young Soc Kim

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Jin Kil Chung

Member Defense Sub Committee ( ROK)

The Honorable Kun Hwan Ryu

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Kan Dong Lee

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Jung Yeon Cho

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Duk Kyu Kim

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Noh Sik Kim

DCINC UNC

LTGEN Winfield W. Scott, Jr.

ROK Army

LTG Hong Han Kim

DIR Joint Staff, JCS, ROK

LTG Sang Hoon Lee

1st Vice CNO, ROK Navy

VADM Tae Yong Kim

Assistant Chief of Staff

MAJGEN James V. Cox

Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, Pacific Command

RADM James G. Stroms, III

Commander, Naval Forces Korea

RADM Hogg

Commander, Task Force 75

BGEN Pointer

U. S. Army

H i s Excellency Song Hyup Kim

Prime Minister, ROK

The Honorable Sung Min Yoon

Minister of Defense, ROK

The Honorable John Chan Lee

Member Defense Sub Committee, ROK

GEN Yoon Ho Kim

Chairman, JCS, ROK

GEN Robert W. Sennewald

CINC UNC CFC

GEN Hwang Yung Si

Chief of Staff, ROK Army

ADM Ch, Kyung Whan

CNO ROKN

GEN Noh Yong Park

DCINC CFC

The Honorable Kap Jong Ji

Member, Defense Sub Committee, ROK

RADM ( Ret) Yong Kil Cho

SECGEN to Prime Minister, ROK

 

Distinguished visitors to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) for March 1983 – Ref. 329B-1983

 

LTGEN In Ki Kim

Vice Chief of Staff, ROK Air Force

LTGEN June Byung Park

CDR, Def Sec Committee, ROK

LTGEN Jae Yoon Kim

CDR, CAC

LTGEN Hee Jae Park

Second Vice CNO, ROK Navy

VADM Song Hwa Choe

Commander ROK Fleet

MAJGEN Chul Ho An

DCOFS CFC

Mr. Paul M. Cleveland

MIN COUN/DCM U. S. Embassy

VADM Holcomb

Commander, SEVENTH Fleet

MGEN Haebel

Commander, TF 79

RADM Brown

Commander, TF 70

Mr. H. Kimura

Former Secretary of Lower House Member, Japan

Mr. I. Masuoka

Former Secretary of Lower House Member, Japan

Mr. H. Funada

Diet Member, Japan

Mr. K. Yosano

Diet Member, Japan

Mr. K. Obuchi

Diet Member, Japan

Mr. N. Shirahama

Diet Member, Japan

Miss P. Clapp

U. S. Embassy

Mr. M. Nakayama

Diet Member, Former LDP Foreign Ploicy Chairman

Mr. Terazono

Chairman MBC, Former Governor Kogoshima

Mr. J. Kishi

MBC

CAPT E. E. Lindsey

Commander, Fleet Activity, Sasebo, Japan

Mr. M. Ysuji

President, Tsuji Industries

Mr. Y. Tsuji

President, Nishi-Kyushu Warehouse Co.

Dr. T. Nanakuma

President, Nishu-Nippon Food Service Center

VADM Esterling

Commander, Naval Air Force, Pacific

C. J. Corica

Mayor of Alameda

Ann Diament

Mayor-Elect of Alameda

George Tekai

Mr. Sulu (Starship Enterprise)

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hi. on 1 April 1983” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) joined up with USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Midway (CV-41), participated in FleetEx 83-1, rendezvousing with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 10 April 1983. All three carriers then completed a “counterclockwise sweep” of the northwestern Pacific. A “rare opportunity” was provided for both naval and Air Force crews via aerial refueling with the latter’s KC-10 tankers, which refueled KA-6s, in turn refueling naval aircraft. The large Extender fuel loads “provided tactical flexibility” and thus permitted naval air intercepts “at realistic speeds and extended cycle times.” Soviet aerial reconnaissance was “heavy,” but unusually, Russian surface surveillance was “nearly non-existent”” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) 1983 Command History Report finds the ship stateside the entire year under going training in the Southern California operating area” (Ref. 331B-1983). http://www.history.navy.mil/shiphist/k/cv-63/1983.pdf

 

 

Photo taken on 13 April 1983, during exercise FleetEx 83-1, in the North Pacific Ocean. The three carriers are, clockwise from left, USS Enterprise (CVN-65), USS Midway (CV-41), and USS Coral Sea (CV-43). Then LT Jim Petroski was aboard the Big E in the Reactor Dept., as RC division officer, and comments: "I spent some time up on the signal bridge during this photo op and got some great pictures of aircraft flying over us. Our air wing was the only one which could fly that day as the sea was quite rough—wave splashes were coming over the hurricane bow—and neither the Coral Sea nor Midway could launch/recover a/c. The frigate to starboard of "E" went up to 1/2 under in the waves, and the Coast Guard cutter to port came about 2/3 out of water. Quite a sight that day." "The April 13 date sounds correct. We were crossing and re-crossing the international date line a lot at that time. So some days were 46 hours long, and others were 2 hours long. It was easy to forget what day it was!" NS024331 96k. Darrell Young (RM3), USS Coral Sea, 1983-1987. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024331.jpg

 

    “Upon conclusion of Exercise "Beacon Flash 83-4," USS America (CV-66) steamed in the Arabian Sea for a port visit to Masirah Island, Oman and thence to the Indian Ocean for a five-day port visit to Mombasa, Kenya on 14 April 1983” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “En route to Alameda, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Engineering and Reactor Departments commenced their annual Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) on 17 April 1983 ORSE (Ref. 329B-1983).

 

    “At midday on 18 April 1983, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) detached for home. Admiral Foley noted that FleetEx 83-1 “…fully integrated three carrier battle force operations; theater wide operations in support of the battle force; integration of the full range of air force maritime capabilities into battle force and theater naval operations, and incorporation of both Canadian and Coast Guard units into the battle force.” On board for Enterprise’s return to Alameda was actor George Takei, who had portrayed Lieutenant Commander Sulu, the “helmsman” of the “starship Enterprise” in the television and film series Star Trek” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

 

America Battle Group, Indian Ocean, 1983. Photo by PH2 Bunge. Robert Bunge, PHAN-PH2, USS America (CV-66). 1981-1985. NS026642. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026642.jpg

 

 

America in Indian Ocean, 1983 (see below). Photo by PH2 Bunge. Robert Bunge, PHAN-PH2, USS America (CV-66). 1981-1985. NS026643. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026643.jpg

 

    “USS America (CV-66) departed Mombasa, Kenya for a week of intense flight operations, followed by participation in Exercise "Beacon Flash 85" on 19 April 1983” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG), Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot participated in FleetEx 83-1 (rendezvousing with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 10 April 1983) from 26 March to 20 April 1983. All three carriers then completed a “counterclockwise sweep” of the northwestern Pacific. March 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Air Department V-1 Division supported 24 hour flight ops in Northern Pacific. (2) Air Department V-2 Division conducted FleetEx 83-1 in the Northern Pacific with 100 percent availability of catapult/arresting gear and plat/lens equipment. (3) Carrier Air Wing Eleven provided excellent training in anti-air and anti-submarine warfare. (4) Operations Department reported that Soviet air reconnaissance is heavy while surface surveillance in nearly non-existent. USAF KC-10 tankers provide a rare opportunity to derive extremely beneficial training for Navy Aircrews. FleetEx 83-1 operations used KA-6 aircraft to refuel from KC-10, and then redistributed fuel to CVBF aircraft during composite CVBF/USAF strike training exercises. KC-10's provided tactical flexibility by maintaining large volumes of airborne fuel. This flexibility permitted the conduct of intercepts at realistic speeds and extended cycle times. (50 Safety Department applied lessons learned from a previous excursion to the North Pacific, Safety personnel were involved in all phases of the ship's operation, while encountering adverse weather, and pitching decks from January to April. A “rare opportunity” was provided for both naval and Air Force crews via aerial refueling with the latter’s KC-10 tankers, which refueled KA-6s, in turn refueling naval aircraft. The large Extender fuel loads “provided tactical flexibility” and thus permitted naval air intercepts “at realistic speeds and extended cycle times.” Soviet aerial reconnaissance was “heavy,” but unusually, Russian surface surveillance was “nearly non-existent” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

 

A bow view of USS America (CV-66) underway in the Indian Ocean, April 21, 1983, as 16 aircraft from Carrier Air Wing 1 (CVW-1) fly overhead. NS026662. Presented by Omar Rubido, former member of the Armada Espańola.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026662.jpg

 

    “USS America (CV-66) returned to the Arabian Sea for a visit to Masirah Island, Oman, anchoring on 22 April 1983 and after a port visit, the carrier and her battle group operated in the northern Arabian Sea before going back to the Indian Ocean and thence to Mombasa, Kenya for a five-day port visit en route to the Suez Canal” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

 

An aerial port bow view of the aircraft carrier USS America (CV-66) underway in the Indian Ocean, 24 April 1983. Photo by PH2 Bunge. NS026640. Presented by Alex Tatchin. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026640.jpg

 

 

An aerial port bow view of the aircraft carrier USS America (CV-66) underway in the Indian Ocean, 24 April 1983. US Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Robert D. Bunge (# 050420-N-0000X-001). NS026651. Presented by Chester Morris.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026651.jpg

 

 

An aerial bow view of the aircraft carrier USS America (CV-66) underway in the Indian Ocean, 24 April 1983. US Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Robert D. Bunge (# 050420-N-0000X-002). NS026652. Presented by Chester Morris.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026652.jpg

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

FIFTHEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

15-MONTH COMPLEX OVERHAUL & ALTERATIONS AT NORFOLK NAVY YARD VA. – SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS – LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(21 March 1983 to 31 December 1984)

Part 1 – (21 March to 27 April 1983)

Part 2 – (28 April 1983)

Part 3 – (29 April to 1 December 1983)

Part 4 – (2 December 1983 to 23 April 1984)

Part 5 – (24 April to 31 December 1984)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

Part 1 – (21 March to 27 April 1983)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4