SEVENTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CARRIER QUALIFICATIONS

off the Virginia Capes to Mayport, Florida and

into Cuban waters and the West Indies

(7 July 1954 to 4 March 1955)

CHAPTER XI

 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVG-10 embarked and Rear Admiral Edgar Allen Cruise, Carrier Division Six (serving since mid 1953), relieving Rear Admiral Charles R. Brown who assumed command on 9 April 1952 embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. 7 July 1954, with Captain Harry E. Sears as Commanding Officer, Commander S. B. Strong, USN, as Executive Officer, relieving Commander R. E. Riera, USN, October 1953, on her seventh Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, scheduled to participate in NATO exercises, with Captain Caldwell, Henry Howard as the Commanding Officer due to be relieved once deployed by Captain Sears, Harry E. Prior to her deployment conducted local operations off Norfolk, Va., and upon return from her sixth Mediterranean Sea deployment, carried out tests for the Bureau of Aeronautics and trained members of the Naval Reserve at Mayport, Florida, and Guantanamo Bay; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will undergo her Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 34, 35, 43, 72, 1275H4-/-4, 1275H6 & 1275H7-/-7).

 

Mediterranean Cruise Book 1954 - Ref. 1275H

1954 Mediterranean Cruise port of call map - Ref. 1275H1

1954 Mediterranean Cruise and Ports of Call - Ref. 1275H2

Carrier Air Group 10 - Ref. 1275H3

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVG-10 embarked major air group change was the addition of VF-103 nuclear-capable F9F-8B Cougars.  Remained a ‘jet air wing,’ hut was a mix of newer McDonnell F2-H4s, F2H-2s” (Ref. 43).

 

USS CORAL SEA (CVA-43) with CVG-10 (P)

(7 July to 20 December 1954)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) 2nd & 6th

Lant

7th Med

Lant

CVG-10

P

7 Jul 1954

20 Dec 1954

Europe

8th FWFD

167-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-11

*Red Rippers -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell - Banshee -  Jet Attack Fighter -

All Weather

P100

F2H-4 (F-2D)

VF-62 (*1)

Gladiators -              Fighter Squadron

McDonnell - Banshee -  Jet Attack Fighter

P200

F2H-4 (F-2D)

VF-103

Clubleafs -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Cougar -

Jet Fighter

P300

F9F-6 (F-9F)

VA-104

Hell's Archers -

Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider - Attack

P400

AD-6 (A-1H)

VC-9 Det. (*2)

Hooters -             Composite Squadron

North American - Savage - Attack

FG00

AJ-1 (A-2A)

VC-62 Det. 31 -54

Fighting Photos - Composite Squadron

McDonnell - Banshee -  Jet - Photographic Reconnaissance/Survey

TL000

F2H-2P

VC-12 Det. 31

Fighting Omars - Composite Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider -  Airborne Early warning

NE700

AD-4W

VC-33 Det. 31

Night Hawks -

Composite Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider -  Attack - Night fighter

SS800

AD-4N

VC-5 (*3)

The “Heavies”

North American -

Savage - Attack

 

AJ-1 (A-2A)

HU-2 Det. 31

Fleet Angels/Service- Helicopter Utility Squadron

Piasecki -

‘Retriever’ Chopper

UR00

HUP-2 (UH-25B)

*Red Rippers Commissioned 1927

(*1) Redesignated VA-106 on 1 July 1955

(*2) Redesignated VAH-9 on 1 November 1955

(*3) were late arrivals to the Coral Sea on this Med Cruise. These twin engine heavy attack bombers saw action both as tankers for the “gulpers” of VF-11 and as deliveres of special weapons, mining and radae reconnaissance. The crew of the “Savage” consists of pilot, bombardier-navigator and radioman. These long range carriers of destruction greatly increased Coral Sea’s battle effectiveness.

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-54/161.htm

CVG-10 embarked major air group change was the addition of VF-103 nuclear-capable F9F-8B Cougars.  Remained a ‘jet air wing,’ hut was a mix of newer McDonnell F2-H4s, F2H-2s” (Ref. 43).

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 and 76

 

    “The first of the ‘supercarriers,’ Forrestal (CVA-59) was launched on 11 December 1954 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. Newport News, Va., sponsored by Mrs. James V. Forrestal, widow of Secretary of Defense. Forrestal represented more than one step in the evolutionary chain of modern carrier aviation. Besides her sheer size and weight, she was the first built with an angled flight deck, which allows simultaneous takeoffs and landings. She also featured four catapults and four deck edge elevators to move aircraft from the hangar bay to the flight deck” (Ref. 1- Forrestal).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Gibraltar, a British overseas territory located on the southern end of the Iberian Peninsula at the entrance of the Mediterranean from 24 to 25 July 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia and the second largest city in Spain and Malaga, a city and a municipality, capital of the Province of Málaga, in the Autonomous Community of Andalusia, Spain from 3 to 8 August 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Thessaloniki, (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη esaloˈnici], also known as Thessalonica or Salonica, is the second-largest city in Greece and the capital of Greek Macedonia, the administrative region of Central Macedonia and the Decentralized Administration of Macedonia and Thrace from 20 to 24 August 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Athens, Greece from 25 to 30 August 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Cannes (French pronunciation: ​[kan], in Occitan Canas) is a city located on the French Riviera (It is a commune of France located in the Alpes-Maritimes department, a busy tourist destination and host of the annual Cannes Film Festival, Midem, and Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity) from 10 to 17 September 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Lisbon, the capital city and largest city of Portugal and is the westernmost large city located in Europe, as well as its westernmost capital city and the only one along the Atlantic coast. It lies in the western Iberian Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and the Tagus River from 20 to 27 September 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Valaencia, the capital of the autonomous community of Valencia and the third largest city in Spain after Madrid and Barcelona; Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy from 2 to 7 October 1954; hosting Generalissimo Francisco Franco when he visited Coral Sea as she lay off Valencia, Spain from 2 to 7 October 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy from 13 to 21 October 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Marseille (UK /mɑrˈs/; French: [maʁ.sɛj], locally: [mɑχˈsɛjə]; Occitan: Marselha [maʀˈsejɔ, maʀˈsijɔ]; also Marseilles in English), known in antiquity as Masalia, Massalia or Massilia (from Greek: Μασσαλία; [probably adapted from an existing language related to Ligurian) is the second largest city in France, after Paris, with a population of 850,636 (January 2011) on a land area of 241 km2 (93 sq mi) from 13 to 27 October 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Marseille (UK /mɑrˈs/; French: [maʁ.sɛj], locally: [mɑχˈsɛjə]; Occitan: Marselha [maʀˈsejɔ, maʀˈsijɔ]; also Marseilles in English), known in antiquity as Masalia, Massalia or Massilia (from Greek: Μασσαλία; [probably adapted from an existing language related to Ligurian) is the second largest city in France, after Paris, with a population of 850,636 (January 2011) on a land area of 241 km2 (93 sq mi) from 27 October to 4 November 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Beirot, the capital and largest city of Lebanon from 11 to 16 November 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Athens, Greece from 18 to 22 November 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Genoe or Genoa pron, the capital of Liguria and the sixth largest city in Italy from 29 November 1954 to 6 December 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Gibraltar, a British overseas territory located on the southern end of the Iberian Peninsula at the entrance of the Mediterranean from 10 to 11 December 1954” (Ref. 1275H2).

 

    “On 20 December 1954, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVG-10 (tail code P) embarked arrived Naval Station, Norfolk, Va., with Captain Harry E. Sears, as Commanding Officer, ending her seventh overseas deployment her seventh Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, participating in NATO exercises, with Captain Sears, Harry E. as the new commanding officer, relieving Captain Caldwell, Henry Howard once deployed on 14 June 1954. Ports of call include: Gibraltar, a British overseas territory located on the southern end of the Iberian Peninsula at the entrance of the Mediterranean from 24 to 25 July 1954; Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia and the second largest city in Spain and Malaga, a city and a municipality, capital of the Province of Málaga, in the Autonomous Community of Andalusia, Spain from 3 to 8 August 1954; Thessaloniki, (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη esaloˈnici], also known as Thessalonica or Salonica, is the second-largest city in Greece and the capital of Greek Macedonia, the administrative region of Central Macedonia and the Decentralized Administration of Macedonia and Thrace from 20 to 24 August 1954; Athens, Greece from 25 to 30 August 1954; Cannes (French pronunciation: ​[kan], in Occitan Canas) is a city located on the French Riviera (It is a commune of France located in the Alpes-Maritimes department, a busy tourist destination and host of the annual Cannes Film Festival, Midem, and Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity) from 10 to 17 September 1954; Lisbon, the capital city and largest city of Portugal and is the westernmost large city located in Europe, as well as its westernmost capital city and the only one along the Atlantic coast. It lies in the western Iberian Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and the Tagus River from 20 to 27 September 1954; Valaencia, the capital of the autonomous community of Valencia and the third largest city in Spain after Madrid and Barcelona; Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy from 2 to 7 October 1954; hosting Generalissimo Francisco Franco when he visited Coral Sea as she lay off Valencia, Spain from 2 to 7 October 1954; Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy from 13 to 21 October 1954; Marseille (UK /mɑrˈs/; French: [maʁ.sɛj], locally: [mɑχˈsɛjə]; Occitan: Marselha [maʀˈsejɔ, maʀˈsijɔ]; also Marseilles in English), known in antiquity as Masalia, Massalia or Massilia (from Greek: Μασσαλία; [probably adapted from an existing language related to Ligurian) is the second largest city in France, after Paris, with a population of 850,636 (January 2011) on a land area of 241 km2 (93 sq mi) from 27 October to 4 November 1954; Beirot, the capital and largest city of Lebanon from 11 to 16 November 1954; Athens, Greece from 18 to 22 November 1954; Genoe or Genoa pron, the capital of Liguria and the sixth largest city in Italy from 29 November 1954 to 6 December 1954 and Gibraltar, a British overseas territory located on the southern end of the Iberian Peninsula at the entrance of the Mediterranean from 10 to 11 December 1954. Squadrons: VF-11, F2H-4 (F-2D); VF-62 (*1), F2H-4 (F-2D); VF-103, F9F-6 (F-9F); VA-104, AD-6 (A-1H); VC-9 Det. 31 (*2), AJ-1 (A-2A); VC-62 Det. 31-54, F2H-2P; VC-12 Det. 31, AD-4W; VC-33 Det. 31, AD-4N; VC-5 (*3), AJ-1 (A-2A) and HU-2 Det. 31, HUP-2 (UH-25B). (*1) VF-62 redesignated VA-106 on Jul. 1, 1955; (*2) VC-5 redesignated VAH-5 on Nov. 1, 1955 and (*3) were late arrivals to the Coral Sea  on this Med Cruise. These twin engine heavy attack bombers saw action both as tankers for the “gulpers” of VF-11 and as deliveres of special weapons, mining and radae reconnaissance. The crew of the “Savage” consists of pilot, bombardier-navigator and radioman. These long range carriers of destruction greatly increased Coral Sea’s battle effectiveness. http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-54/161.htm; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Her eighth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947 (7 July to 20 December 1954)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 34, 35, 43 and 72).

 

 07/07/54 – 20/12/54

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

 MED CRUISE

Battle Efficiency Award 6th Fleet in the Atlantic Fleet - FY 1954

 30 September 1954

 7th

Navy Occupation Service medal for ops in

 European waters

 11 December 1954

 7th

Reference 34 and 35 reflect Chat info.

 

     “Captain David L. McDonald assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), on 22 December 1954, relieving Captain Harry E. Sears, 9th Commanding Officer, serving from 14 June 1954 to 22 December 1954” (Ref. 34 & 35A).

 

 

EIGHTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

Operated out of Norfolk, ranging from the Va. Capes

to Mayport, Florida and into Cuban waters and the West Indies

Iran History & Air Arm

(5 March 1955 to 12 August 1956)

CHAPTER XII

 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVG-17 (tail code R) embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. 5 March 1955, with Captain David L. McDonald, as Commanding Officer, on her eighth Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea to  participate in NATO exercises. Prior to her deployment she operated out of Norfolk, ranging from the Virginia Capes to Mayport, Fl., and into Cuban waters and the West Indies during which time Captain McDonald, David L. became the new commanding officer on 22 December 1954. She will participate in NATO exercises; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will undergo her ninth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 34, 35, 43 & 72).

 

USS CORAL SEA (CVA-43) with CVG-17 (R)

(5 March to 29 September 1955)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) 2nd & 6th

Lant

8th Med

Lant

CVG-17

R

5 Mar 1955

29 Sep 1955

Europe

9th FWFD

209-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-171 (*1)

Aces -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell - Banshee -Jet - Photographic Reconnaissance/Survey

R100

F2H-3P

VF-172 (*2)

Blue Bolts -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell - Banshee - Jet Attack Fighter

R200

F2H-2

VMF-122

Marine - Candystripers Fighter Squadron

North American -

Savage - Attack

LC300

FJ-2

VA-175 (*3)

Devil’s Diplomats - Winged Man

Bomb Rocket -

Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider -Attack

R500

AD-6 (A-1H)

VC-8 Det. (*4)

Fire Ballers - Composite Squadron

North American -

Savage - Attack

NC00

AJ-1 (A-2A)

VC-62 Det. 31 (*5)

Fighting Photos - Composite Squadron

McDonnell - Banshee -  Jet - Photographic Reconnaissance/Survey

TL000

F2H-2P

VC-33 Det. (*6)

Night Hawks -

Composite Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider -Night fighter & Electronic countermeasures

SS000

AD-5N (A-1G) / AD-3Q

VC-12 Det. 31 (*7)

Fighting Omars - Composite Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider -  Airborne Early warning

NE000

AD-4W

HU-2 Det. 31

Fleet Angels/Service - Helicopter Utility Squadron

Piasecki -

Retriever Chopper

UR000

HUP-2 (UH-25B)

(*1) VF-171 disestablished on Mar.15, 1958

(*2) Redesignated VA-172 on 1 November 1955

(*3) Deestablished on 15 March 1958

(*4) Redesignated VAH-11 on 1 November 1955

(*5) Redesignated VFP-62 on 2 July 1956

(*6) Redesignated VA(AW)-33 on 2 July 1956

(*7) Redesignated VAW-12 on July 1956

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 and 76

 

 

Maneuvers at high speed in the Mediterranean Sea, 28 July 1955. Official U.S. Navy photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo #: 80-G-K-18394). NS024314 65k. NHC. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024314.jpg

 

Iran History & Air Arm

 

    “An Air Arm in the Persian Forces was established in the mid-20s. The roots of the Iranian Air Force were created in 1924 when aircraft were used to put down enemy warlords in the south of the country. Training and equipment was acquired from Britain” (Ref. 27).

 

    “In August 1955, the Imperial Iranian Air Force (IIAF) gained independence and fell under the Ministry of War (Aviation Department)” (Ref. 16).

 

    “Operating De Havilland DH-82 Tiger Moths, Hawker Furies, Audaxs and Hinds propeller fighters on which the IIAF relied on up to 1955, the Iranian Air Force could have done little against the Soviet air forces jet fighters” (Ref. 16).

 

    “The history of the IIAF Golden Crown finds its beginning in 1955 when Gen. Mahammad Khatami, who later became the commander of the IIAF and fourteen other IIAF Pilots, attended jet pilot training at Fursten Feldbrook USAF Base in Germany. Upon completion of the training program, 10 pilots (including Gen. Khatami) returned to Iran while 5 of them (Capt.’s Nader Jahanbani, Siamak Jahanbini, and 1 st Lt.’s Iraj Mokhaberi, Amirhossain Rabii, and Abdolhossain Minousepehr) continued their training by going to jet pilot instructor course. Luckily, Fursten Feldbrook AFB was the home of the ‘Sky Blazers’ USAF Acro team at the time, and their day-to-day practices were carefully being watched by Capt. Nader Jahanbani. He wished that someday the IIAF would also have such a team of their own. This wish was the source of a close friendship between Capt. Jahanbani and the members of the ‘Sky Blazers,’ especially with team leader Maj. Smallen. This friendship enabled Capt. Nader Jahanbani to participate in some of the Sky Blazers team practices by flying in the backseat of Maj. Smallen. After completing the jet instructor pilot course and returning back to Iran, Nader Jahanbani (now Maj.) formed Iran’s first AcroJet team by practicing with Gen. Khatami (now air force commander), Capt. Jahanbini, Capt. Rabii, and 1 st Lt. Minousepehr” (Ref. 17).

 

    “On 29 September 1955, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVG-17 (tail code R) embarked arrived Naval Station, Norfolk, Va., with Captain David L. McDonald, as Commanding Officer, ending her eighth Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, with Captain McDonald, David L. as the commanding officer on 22 December 1954, participating NATO exercises, making a port call at Istanbul; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Ports of call include: Gibraltar, a British overseas territory located on the southern end of the Iberian Peninsula at the entrance of the Mediterranean; Lisbon, the capital city and largest city of Portugal and is the westernmost large city located in Europe, as well as its westernmost capital city and the only one along the Atlantic coast. It lies in the western Iberian Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and the Tagus River; Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy and Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey. Squadrons: VF-171 (*1), F2H-3P; VF-172 (*2), F2H-2; VMF-122, FJ-2; VA-175 (*3), AD-6 (A-1H); VC-8, AJ-1 (A-2A); VC-12 Det. 31 (*5), AD-5W; VC-33 Det. 31 (*6), AD-5N (A-1G) / AD-3Q; VC-62 Det. 31(*7), F2H-2P and HU-2 Det. 31, HUP-2. (*1) VF-171 disestablished on Mar. 15, 1958; (*2); (*3) VA-175 disestablished on Mar. 15, 1958; (*4) VC-8 redesignated VAH-11 on Nov. 1, 1955; (*5) VC-12 redesignated VAW-12 on Jul. 2, 1956; (*6) VC-33 redesignated VA(AW)-33 on Jul. 2, 1956 and (*7) VC-62 redesignated VFP-62 on Jul. 2, 1956. Her ninth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947 (5 March to 29 September 1955)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 34, 35, 43 & 72).

 

 05/03/55 – 29/09/55

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

 MED CRUISE

 Navy Occupation Service medal for ops in

 European waters

 21 September 1955

 8th

 Battle Efficiency Award 6th Fleet in the

 Atlantic Fleet - FY 1955

 30 September 1955

 8th

Reference 34 and 35 reflect Chat info.

 

     “Captain William Ellis Gentner, Jr. assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), on 17 October 1955, relieving Captain David L. McDonald, 10th Commanding Officer, serving from 22 December 1954 to 17 October 1955” (Ref. 35A).

 

     “Commander Robert W. Rynd, USN, assumed command as Executive Officer, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) in November 1955” (Ref. 1275J5).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) underwent short refit from September 1955 to February 1956” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) operated out of Norfolk, Va. ranging from the Va. Capes to Mayport, Florida and into Cuban waters and the West Indies” (Ref. 43).

 

     “Rear Admiral Frank T. Ward, Jr., USN, Carrier Division Two, broke his flag in USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) in February 1956” (Ref. 1275I 2).

 

     “In June 1956, Captain Richard L. Kibbe, USN, reported as Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Division Two, in USS Coral Sea (CVA-43)” (Ref. 1275I3).

 

    “Following a period of growing internal tension and foreign policy turmoil, King Hussein of Jordan dismissed British General Glubb as Commander of the Jordanian Arab Legion and formatted of a new cabinet in May 1956. In reaction to this move, two carriers (USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) and USS Randolph (CVA-15) and an amphibious force were mobilized for future deployment to the eastern Mediterranean. Jordan’s King Hussein’s new cabinet in May 1956 effectively ended this crisis but Israel, Britain, and France had serious issues that needed resolved with King Hussein and the task force remained on alert until 14 July 1956 when Randolph departed to the eastern Mediterranean, with Coral Sea scheduled to follow in August 1956” (Ref. 35).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) sailed from Norfolk, Va. on 23 July 1956 for Mayport, Florida to embark Carrier Air Group 10” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & 72).

 

USS CORAL SEA (CVA-43) with CVG-10 (P)

(23 July to August 1956)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) 2nd & 6th

WestLant

CVG-10

P

23 Jul  1956

Aug  1956

Training

Local Opearations in the Western Atlanta

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-11 (*1)

Red Rippers -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell - Banshee - Jet Attack Fighter -

All Weather

P100

F2H-4 (F-2D)

VF-103

Clubleafs -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Cougar -

Jet Fighter - Special armament or Photographic reconnaissance/Survey

P200

F9F-8B (AF-9J)

VA-106

Gladiators –

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Cougar -

Jet Fighter - Special armament or Photographic reconnaissance/Survey

P300

F9F-8B (AF-9J)

VA-104 (*2)

Hell’s Archers -

Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider -Attack

P400

AD-6 (A-1H)

VAH-11 Det. 31

Checkertails -

Heavy Attack Squadron

North American - ‘Savage’ Attack Bomber & Fighter, Recon Photo, Refuel

GN600

FJ-1

VAW-12 Det. 31

Bats - Carrier Airborne Early warning

Douglas - Skyraider

NE00

AD-5W (EA-1E)

VA(AW)-33 Det. (*3)

Knight Hawks -

All-Weather

Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider -Night fighter

SS800

AD-5N (A-1G)

*VFP-62 Det. 31

Photographic reconnaissance/Survey

McDonnell - Banshee -  Jet - Photographic Reconnaissance/Survey

PL000

F2H-2P

HU-2 Det.

Fleet Angels/Service - Helicopter Utility Squadron

Piasecki -

‘Retriever’ Chopper

HU000

HUP-2 (UH-25B)

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 and 76

 

 

NINTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENTCARRIER QUALIFICATIONSSOUTHERN ATLANTIC, SOUTHERN & WESTERN PACIFIC CRUISEAND TRANSFER TO THE WEST COAST FOR OVERALL AT PUDGETSOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON WASHINGTON

Suez Canal Crisis

(13 August 1956 to 25 February 1957)

CHAPTER XIII

 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVG-10 (tail code P), Rear Admiral Frank T. Ward, Jr., USN, Carrier Division Two, broke his flag in February 1956, Captain Richard L. Kibbe, USN, reported as Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Division Two, in Coral Sea in June 1956 embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. 13 August 1956, with Captain William Ellis Gentner, Jr., as Commanding Officer and Commander Robert W. Rynd, USN, assumed command as Executive Officer, on her ninth Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, known as Sardinia Suez crisis patrol, scheduled to participate in two NATO exercises Exercise Whipsaw - Suez Crises. Prior to her deployment sailed from Norfolk, Va., 23 July 1956 for Mayport, Florida to embark Carrier Air Group 10, operating out of Norfolk, ranging from the Virginia Capes to Mayport, Florida and into Cuban waters and the West Indies during which time Captain Gentner, William E., Jr., became the new commanding officer on 17 October 1955; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will undergo her tenth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 34, 35, 43, 72, 1275I2, 1275I3 & 1275J5).

 

Captain William E. Gentner from 10 October 1955 to 10 October 1956 - Ref. 1275I4

Mediterranean Cruise Book 1956-57 - Ref. 1275I

Carrier Air Group 10 - Ref. 1275I1

1956 Mediterranean Cruise port of call map - Ref. 1275K

1956 Mediterranean Cruise and Ports of Call - Ref. 1275L

Battle of Coral Sea - Ref. 1275L1

USS CORAL SEA History from 1947 to 1956 - Ref. 1275L2

Coral Sea CO’s from 1947 to 1956 – Ref. 1275L3

 

USS CORAL SEA (CVA-43) with CVG-10

(13 August 1956 to 11 February 1957)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) 2nd & 6th

Lant

9th Med

Lant

CVG-10

P

13 Aug 1956

11 Feb 1957

Europe

10th FWFD

183-days

Sardinia Suez crisis patrol, participating in two NATO exercises to include Exercise Whipsaw - Suez Crises

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-11 (*1)

Red Rippers -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell - Banshee - Jet Attack Fighter -

All Weather

P100

F2H-4 (F-2D)

VF-103

Clubleafs -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Cougar -

Jet Fighter - Special armament or Photographic reconnaissance/Survey

P200

F9F-8B (AF-9J)

VA-106

Gladiators –

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Cougar -

Jet Fighter - Special armament or Photographic reconnaissance/Survey

P300

F9F-8B (AF-9J)

VA-104 (*2)

Hell’s Archers -

Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider -Attack

P400

AD-6 (A-1H)

VAH-11 Det. 31

Checkertails -

Heavy Attack Squadron

North American - ‘Savage’ Attack Bomber & Fighter, Recon Photo, Refuel

GN600

FJ-1

VAW-12 Det. 31

Bats - Carrier Airborne Early warning

Douglas - Skyraider

NE00

AD-5W (EA-1E)

VA(AW)-33 Det. (*3)

Knight Hawks -

All-Weather

Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider -Night fighter

SS800

AD-5N (A-1G)

*VFP-62 Det. 31

Photographic reconnaissance/Survey

McDonnell - Banshee -  Jet - Photographic Reconnaissance/Survey

PL000

F2H-2P

HU-2 Det.

Fleet Angels/Service - Helicopter Utility Squadron

Piasecki -

‘Retriever’ Chopper

HU000

HUP-2 (UH-25B)

 (*1) Deestablished on 15 February 1959

(*2) Deestablished on 31 March 1959

(*3) Redesignated VAW-33 on 30 June 1959

*VFP or VF(P) - Light photographic reconnaissance squadron or photographic reconnaissance squadron or photographic reconnaissance squadron (light) or light photographic squadron.

*Red Rippers commissioned 1927

“The CVG-10 deployment remained a ‘jet air wing,’” (Ref. 43).

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 and 76

 

    “An AJ-1 trial crashes into nine parked planes while landing onboard USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) 8 September 1956” (Ref. 34).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVB-43) cleared Gibraltar on 21 September 1956” (Ref. 34).

 

    “The governments of Britain and France secretly began planning for an invasion of Egypt. Not to be outdone, Israel soon was doing its own invasion planning, completing its final plan on 5 October 1956” (Ref. 35).

 

     “Captain Joseph Abraham Jaap assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), on 10 October 1956, relieving Captain William Ellis Gentner, Jr., 11th Commanding Officer, serving from 17 October 1955 to 10 October 1956” (Ref. 35A).

 

    “Rear Admiral Robert B. Pirie, USN, reported as Commander Carrier Division Six, in USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) in October 1956, relieving Rear Admiral Frank T. Ward, Jr., USN, Carrier Division Two, broke his flag in Coral Sea in February 1956” (Ref. 1275I 2 & 1275J6).

 

    “Captain Joseph A. JAAP, USN assumed command in October 1956” (Ref. 1275J8).

 

    “Commander Robert W. Rynd, USN, assumed command as Executive Officer, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), relieving Commander S. B. Strong, USN, October 1956” (Ref. 1275J9).

 

    “After several inter-national mediation efforts had failed, Britain and France agreed in mid-October 1956 to undertake a joint intervention in Egypt. Aware of the upcoming Israeli plan to invade the Sinai, French officials suggested that a Franco-British force could enter Egypt ostensibly to separate the combatants, while actually seizing control of the entire Suez waterway” (Ref. 35 and 72).

 

    “Paul, King of the Hellenes and his consort, Queen Friederike Luise Thyra of Hannover Frederica visited USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) at Phaleron Bay, Greece on 20 October 1958” (Ref. 34 and 72).

 

    “On 26 October 1956, the United States learned of Israel’s military mobilization, and President Dwight Eisenhower sent the first of two personal messages to Israeli Prime Minister Ben Gurion asking that Israel do nothing to endanger the peace” (Ref. 35).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed Phaleron Bay, Greece and after operations visited Istanbul, departing on 27 October 1956” (Ref. 43).

 

    “Two days out to sea from Istanbul, still en route to Cannes, the Suez Crisis erupted and USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) was sent to assist other ships of the 6 th Fleet in evacuating and protecting Americans in the area” (Ref. 43).

 

    “In the Mediterranean on 28 October 1956, the U.S. Sixth Fleet was placed on alert and USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) and USS Randolph (CVA-15) were on station in case they were needed” (Ref. 35).

 

    “Undeterred by U.S. diplomatic maneuvering, Israeli forces began attacks in Egypt on 29 October 1956. The following day Britain and France began to make their move. The British government issued an Anglo-French ultimatum calling on the Israelis and Egyptians to withdraw their forces to a distance of 10 miles from the Suez Canal and demanding that Egypt allow British and French forces to temporarily occupy key positions guarding the canal” (Ref. 35).

 

    “While USS Antietam (CVS-36) was in Rotterdam, the Suez Crisis broke out in the eastern Mediterranean on 29 October 1956, when Israeli Brigades invaded Egypt, precipitated on July 26, 1956, when the Egyptian president, Gamal Abdel Nasser, nationalized the Suez Canal” (Ref. 400).

 

    “USS Antietam (CVS-36) cut short her visit to the Netherlands and headed for the ‘middle sea’ to bolster the 6 th Fleet during the evacuation of American citizens from Alexandria, Egypt on 30 October 1956 and upon conclusion ASW training exercises with Italian naval officers embarked before returning home” (Ref. 1-Antietam and 72).

 

    “On 30 October 1956, Admiral Walter F. Boone, U.S. Commander Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean, ordered the Sixth Fleet to assist in the evacuation of U.S. nationals from Israel and Egypt. USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) and USS Randolph (CVA-15) were directed to keep clear of British naval units operating there but after evacuating American citizens from the troubled area, stood by off Egypt. In Norfolk, Va., the Navy ordered one attack carrier, a heavy cruiser and a destroyer squadron to get ready to sail to the Mediterranean to augment the Sixth Fleet and a second CVA and a division of destroyers to be on 72-hour notice. Operating near the Suez Canal, Randolph aircraft provided air cover and surface and air reconnaissance for the evacuation of U.S. nationals from Alexandria” (Ref. 35).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) evacuates Americans from Egypt during Suez Canal Crisis 30 October 1956” (Ref. 34 and 72).

 

    “The Anglo-French attack on Egypt began at dusk on 31 October 1956 with a series of large-scale air strikes. The following day Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Admiral Arleigh Burke signaled Vice Admiral Charles R. ‘Cat’ Brown, Commander Sixth Fleet: ‘Situation tense; prepare for imminent hostilities.’ Brown signaled back: ‘Am prepared for imminent hostilities, but whose side are we on?’ In classic Burke style, the CNO’s return response was, ‘Keep clear of foreign OP areas but take no guff from anybody” (Ref. 35).

 

     “Captain Daniel F. Smith, Jr., USN, reported as Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Division Six, in USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), in October 1956” (Ref. 1275J7).

 

    “When Israel, Britain, and France invaded the United Arab Republic in October 1956, USS Randolph (CVA-15) stood ready. Operating near the Suez Canal, her aircraft provided air cover and surface and air reconnaissance for the evacuation of U.S. nationals from Alexandria” (Ref. 1-Randolph & 72).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) during the Suez Crisis, after evacuating American citizens from the troubled area, stood by off Egypt until November 1956” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea).

 

    “The Suez Crisis increased in intensity on the afternoon of 5 November when the Soviet Union sent diplomatic notes to Britain, France and Israel threatening to crush the aggressors and restore peace in the Middle East through the use of force. President Eisenhower’s reaction to these threats was that ‘if those fellows start something, we may have to hit ’em—and, if necessary, with everything in the bucket’” (Ref. 35).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) and USS Randolph (CVA-15) and their escorts shifted to an operating area southwest of Crete in order to improve their readiness posture for a general emergency” (Ref. 35).

 

    “Agreeing to a cease-fire on 6 November 1956, Britain and France ended their military operations that night at midnight. Soviet military moves continued during the next few days, however, and on the 7 th, Burke ordered attack carriers USS Forrestal (CVA-59) and USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA-42) to sail from Norfolk, Va. toward the Azores, together with a heavy cruiser and three divisions of destroyers, to act as a standby augmentation to the Sixth Fleet for possible operations in the eastern Atlantic during the Suez Crisis. U.S. Navy forces were directed to maintain readiness to execute emergency war plans” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk & 35).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) stayed off the coast of the Suez Canal for almost 30 days. From late October through 23 November 1956, she remained on station at points Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Moses off the Suez Canal” (Ref. 35).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) celebrated Christmas at Cannes, France port call on 25 December 1956” (Ref. 34).

 

    “On 11 February 1957, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVG-10 (tail code P) Rear Admiral Robert B. Pirie, USN, reported as Commander Carrier Division Six, in Coral Sea in October 1956, relieving Rear Admiral Frank T. Ward, Jr., USN, Carrier Division Two (broke his flag in Coral Sea in February 1956), Captain Richard L. Kibbe, USN, reported as Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Division Two (in Coral Sea in June 1956) embarked arrived Naval Station, Norfolk, Va., with Captain Joseph Abraham Jaap, as Commanding Officer, relieving Captain William Ellis Gentner, Jr., 11th Commanding Officer, serving from 17 October 1955 to 10 October 1956 and Commander Robert W. Rynd, USN, assumed command as Executive Officer, Coral Sea, relieving Commander S. B. Strong, USN, October 1956, ending her ninth Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, participating in two NATO exercises and was known as the Sardinia Suez crisis patrol, participating in Exercise Whipsaw - Suez Crises, operating in the Atlantic at the beginning of her deployment, an AJ-1 trial crashed into 9 parked planes while landing onboard Coral Sea on 8 September 1956, clearing Gibraltar on 21 September 1956, she conducted operations up until Captain Jaap, Jasper A. USNA relieved Captain Gentner, William E. Jr. becoming the new Commanding Officer on 10 October 1956. Paul, King of the Hellenes and his consort, Queen Friederike Luise Thyra of Hannover Frederica visited at Phaleron Bay, Greece (Athens) on 20 October 1958, departing Phaleron Bay, Greece and after operations visited Istanbul, departing on 27 October 1958 and two days out to sea from Istanbu, the Suez Crisis erupted and Coral Sea was sent to assist other ships of the 6 th Fleet in evacuating and protecting Americans in the area, while the U.S. Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean Sea on 28 October 1956 was placed on alert and Coral Sea and USS Randolph (CVA-15) were on station in case they were needed, when on 30 October 1956, Admiral Walter F. Boone, U.S. Commander Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean, ordered the Sixth Fleet to assist in the evacuation of U.S. nationals from Israel and Egypt, directing Coral Sea and Randolph to keep clear of British naval units operating there, while commencing operations to evacuate Americans from Egypt during Suez Canal Crisis on 30 October 1956, with Randolph aircraft providing air cover and surface and air reconnaissance for the evacuation of U.S. nationals from Alexandria, while after evacuating American citizens from the troubled area, Coral Sea stood by off Egypt until November 1956 at which time the Suez Crisis increased in intensity on the afternoon of 5 November when the Soviet Union sent diplomatic notes to Britain, France and Israel threatening to crush the aggressors and restore peace in the Middle East through the use of force. As a result of increased tensions Coral Sea and Randolph and their escorts shifted to an operating area southwest of Crete in order to improve their readiness posture for a general emergency, however with Britain and France agreeing to a cease-fire ending their military operations on 6 November at midnight, tensions were lowered. The soviet military moves continued during the next few days, and on the 7 th, Burke ordered attack carriers USS Forrestal (CVA-59) and USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA-42) to sail from Norfolk, Va. toward the Azores, together with a heavy cruiser and three divisions of destroyers, to act as a standby augmentation to the Sixth Fleet for possible operations in the eastern Atlantic during the Suez Crisis, maintaining readiness to execute emergency war plans, with tensions with the United Arab Republic remaining high until 15 November, when United Nations forces were brought into Egypt to provide a buffer between the Egyptians and the invasion forces. With the Soviet intervention threat gradually dissipating, Coral Sea stayed off the coast of the Suez Canal for almost 30 days (from late October through 23 November 1956, she remained on station at points Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Moses off the Suez Canal), celebrating Christmas at Cannes, France port call, 25 December 1956. Ports of call include: Gibraltar, a British overseas territory located on the southern end of the Iberian Peninsula at the entrance of the Mediterranean; Madrid (/məˈdrɪd/, Spanish: [maˈðɾið], locally: [maˈðɾiθ, -ˈðɾi]) is the capital and largest city of Spain and Port de Pollença (Catalan pronunciation: [ˈpɔrd də poˈʎɛnsə]) (Puerto Pollensa in Castilian Spanish) is a small town in northern Majorca, Spain, situated on the Bay of Pollença. It is located about 6 km east of the inland town of Pollença and two kilometres southeast of Cala Sant Vicenç. The Cap de Formentor is connected to Port de Pollença via a 13.5 km road; and Gibraltar, a British overseas territory located on the southern end of the Iberian Peninsula at the entrance of the Mediterranean; Cannes (French pronunciation: ​[kan], in Occitan Canas) is a city located on the French Riviera (It is a commune of France located in the Alpes-Maritimes department, a busy tourist destination and host of the annual Cannes Film Festival, Midem, and Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity). Saliors toured the City of Grosse near Cannes, central to France’s perfume industry). Saliors visited the The Cote d’ Azur, Monte Carlo (French pronunciation: ​[kot daˈzyʁ]; Occitan: Còsta d'Azur; literally: Azure Coast), often known in English as the French Riviera, is the Mediterranean coastline of the southeast corner of France, also including the sovereign state of Monaco. There is no official boundary, but it is usually considered to extend from the Italian border in the east to Saint-Tropez, Hyères, Toulon, or Cassis in the west, Paris and Monaco - mɒnək/, officially the Principality of Monaco (French: Principauté de Monaco (French pronunciation: ​[pʁɛ̃sipote də monako]); Monégasque: Principatu de Múnegu; Italian: Principato di Monaco; Occitan: Principat de Mónegue), is a sovereign city-state and microstate, located on the French Riviera in Western Europe. It is bordered by France on three sides; one side borders the Mediterranean Sea. Montego Bay, Jamaica, the capital of the parish of St. James and the second largest city in Jamaica by area and the fourth by population (after Kingston, Spanish Town and Portmore); Genoe or Genoa pron, the capital of Liguria and the sixth largest city in Italy; Rome (/ˈrm/, Italian: Roma [ˈroːma] (listen), Latin: Rōma) is a city and special comune (named "Roma Capitale") in Italy. Rome is the capital of Italy and region of Lazio; Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy; Taranto, a coastal city in Apulia, Southern Italy, the capital of the Province of Taranto and is an important commercial port as well as the main Italian naval base; Taranto (Italian pronunciation: [ˈtaːranto] (listen); early Italian: Tarento from Latin: Tarentum; Ancient Greek: Τάρᾱς Tarās; Modern Greek: Τάραντας Tarantas; Tarantino "Tarde") is a coastal city in Apulia, Southern Italy. It is the capital of the Province of Taranto and is an important commercial port as well as the main Italian naval base; Palermo, a city in Insular Italy, the capital of both the autonomous region of Sicily and the Province of Palermo, Italy; Augusta, Sicily, a town and comune in the province of Syracuse, located on the eastern coast of Sicily (Italy) (The city is one of the main harbours in Italy) and sailors visited Athens, the capital and largest city of Greece; Istanbul (/ˌɪstænˈbl/; Turkish: İstanbul [isˈtanbuɫ]) is the largest city in Turkey, constituting the country's economic, cultural, and historical heart. Istanbul is a transcontinental city in Eurasia, with its commercial and historical centre lying on the European side and about a third of its population living on the Asian side of Eurasia.

Note: Ports of call were collected from the 1956 to 1957 ports of call map. Note: Ports of call were collected from the 1956 to 1957 Ports of call map. Coral Sea stayed off the coast of the Suez Canal for almost 30 days (from late October through 23 November 1956, she remained on station at points Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Moses off the Suez Canal. Squadrons: VF-11 (*1), F2H-4 (F-2D); VF-103, F9F-8B (AF-9J); F9F-8B (AF-9J); VA-104 (*2), AD-6 (A-1H); VAH-11 Det. 31, AJ-1; VAW-12 Det. 31, AD-5W (EA-1E); VA(AW)-33 Det. 31 (*3), AD-5N (A-1G); VFP-62 Det. 31, F2H-2P and HU-2 Det. 31, HUP-2 (UH-25B). (*1) VF-11 disestablished on Feb. 15, 1959; (*2) VA-104 disestablished on Mar. 31, 1959 and (*3) VA(AW)-33 redesignated VAW-33 on Jun. 30, 1959; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952; her ninth Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6 th Fleet. Her tenth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947 (13 August 1956 to 11 February 1957)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 34, 35, 43, 72, 1275I 2, 1275J6 & 1275J9).

 

    “Captain Joseph A. JAAP, USN assumed command in October 1956” (Ref. 1275J8).

 

 13/08/56 - 11/02/57

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

 MED CRUISE

 None Reported

 N/A

 9th

Reference 34 and 35 reflect Chat info.

 

DEPLOYMENT HISTORY, AWARDS AND CITATIONS OPERATING with U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) (8th & 2nd) and 6th Fleet operating in the Mediterranean Sea

(19 January 1948 to 15 April 1957)

CHAPTER XIV

 

     While under direction of U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) (8 th & 2 nd) and 6th Fleet operating in the Mediterranean Sea, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made eleven deployments in foreign waters:

 

 19/01/48 – 15/04/57

   DEPLOYMENT

         DATES

 FOREIGN

 WATER

 DEPLOYMENT

       AIR

    WING

 TAIL

CODE

 ATLANTIC

 FLEET MED

 CRUISE

 19/01/48 – 05/04/48

 1st / Shakedown

 CVGB-5

     C

 Cuba & Panamá Canal

 07/06/48 – 06/0848

 2nd

 CVEG-2

      R

 1st - Med Midshipmen

 03/05/49 – 26/09/49

 3rd

 CVG-2

     M

 2nd

 09/09/50 – 01/02/51

 4th

 CVG-17

      R

 3rd  - 6/26/1950

         Korean War Started 

 20/03/51 – 06/10/51

 5th

 CVG-1

      T

 4th - Korean War Continues 

 19/04/52 – 12/10/52

 6th

 CVG-4

      F

 5th  - Korean War Continues 

 26/04/53 – 21/10/53

 7th

 CVG-8

      E

 6th - 06/27/1953

        Korean War Ended 

 07/07/54 – 20/12/54

 8th

 CVG-10

      P

 7th

 05/04/55 – 29/09/55

 9th

 CVG-17

      R

 8th

 13/08/56 - 11/02/57

 10th

 CVG-10

      P

 9th - Egyptian Suez Crisis

 26/02/57 - 15/04/57

 11th

      ?

      ?

 Southern Atlantic Southern

 & Western Pacific Cruise

http://www.usscoralsea.net/pages/aircraft.html (Ref. 34-A & 35 http://www.usscoralsea.org

Note: 07/06/48 – 06/0848:  CVG-17 embarked (tail code R) is reported as air wing by DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY — NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER (Ref. 29- Carrier deployments 1946 – 1990) & Ref. 43 reports CVEG-8, a composite of an escort carrier group and two squadrons rather then CVGB-2 and during shakedown cruise (19/01/48 – 05/04/48) its reported that CVGB-75 was the air wing rather then CVGB-5 as reported by Ref. 34 and 35).

 

     While under direction of U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) (8 th & 2 nd) and 6th Fleet operating in the Mediterranean Sea, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) was credited with the following AWARDS OR Citations:

 

 19/01/48 – 15/04/57

AWARD OR CITATION

    AIR WING

     (tail code)

 AWARD

 DATES

 ATLANTIC

 FLEET MED

 CRUISE

 Navy Occupation Service Medal for

 Operations in European waters

 

 CVG-2 - M

 CVG-1 - T

 CVG-8 - E

 CVG-10-P

 CVG-17-R

19 Sep 1949

6 April &

4 Sep 1951

14 Oct 1953

11 Dec 1954

21 Sep 1955

 2nd, 4th, 6th, 7th

 & 8th

 Battle Efficiency Award 6th Fleet in the

 Atlantic - FY 1952/54/55

 CVG-4 - F

 CVG-10-P

 CVG-17-R

30 Sep 1952

30 Sep 1954

30 Sep 1955

 5th, 7th  & 8th

http://www.usscoralsea.net/pages/aircraft.html (Ref. 34  and 35 http://www.usscoralsea.org

 

 

SOUTHERN ATLANTIC, SOUTHERN & WESTERN PACIFIC CRUISE

AND TRANSFER TO THE WEST COAST FOR OVERALL AT PUDGET

SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON, WA.

LEBANON CRISIS

Amphibious units landed 1,800 Marines on the beach near Beirut, Lebanon –

Lebanon Crisis of summer 1958 - Nationalist Chinese islands of Quemoy and

Matsu were threatened with communist invasion in August 1958 - Evacuation

of 56 U.S. citizens and three foreign nationals from Nicara, Cuba)

Iran History & Air Arm

(1 January 1957 to 10 March 1960)

CHAPTER XV

 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. 26 February 1957, with Captain Joseph Abraham Jaap, USNA, as Commanding Officer, on her first Southern Atlantic Cruise around Cape Horn, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming through the Southern and Easter Pacific to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington for her first modernization, SCB 110A conversion ordered for all three Midway-class carriers, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6 th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will undergo her 11th deployment since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 34, 35, 43 & 72).

 

USS CORAL SEA (CVA-43)

(26 February to 15 April 1957)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Pacific

SoLant

SoPac via Cape Horn Western Pacific

   ?

   ?

26 Feb 1957

15 Apr 1957

Home Port transfer to the West Coast

11th FWFD

49-days

Southern Atlantic, Southern and Western Pacific Cruise

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) visited Valparaiso, Chile; and Balboa, Canal Zone C.Z. before arriving Bremerton, Washington (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & 72).

 

    “On 15 April 1957, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) arrived Bremerton, Washington, with Captain Joseph Abraham Jaap, USNA, as Commanding Officer, ending her first Southern Atlantic, cruise around Cape Horn, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming through the Southern and Easter Pacific to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington for her first modernization, SCB 110A conversion ordered for all three Midway-class carriers, making port of calls at  Santos, Brazil; Valparaiso, Chile; and Balboa, Canal Zone, C.Z., completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6 th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Her 11th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947 (26 February to 15 April 1957)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 34 & 72).

 

 26/02/57 - 15/04/57

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

 ATLANTIC

 FLEET

 None Reported

 N/A

 SAS and WPC

Reference 34 and 35 reflect Chat info.

 

    “Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS) is comprised of property bordered on the south by Sinclair Inlet, on the west by Naval Station Bremerton, and on the north and east perimeters by the City of Bremerton. PSNS is the Pacific Northwest’s largest naval shore facility and one of Washington State’s largest industrial installations.

 

     Bremerton in western Washington is on the west side of Puget Sound. Located in Kitsap County in Washington State, the surrounding communities offer affordable, quality living in spectacular water and mountain setting. Recreational opportunities in the Pacific Northwest are many and varied, such as sailing, mountain climbing, biking, water and snow skiing, kayaking, etc (Ref. 13).

 

     Major cities within proximity to the shipyard include Seattle (one hour by ferry) and Tacoma (approximately 30 miles by road). The shipyard is also located within 50 miles of such DOD installations as the U.S. Navy’s TRIDENT Submarine Base, Bangor, Wa.; Fort Lewis Army Base, and McChord Air Force Base, both in Tacoma, Wa.

 

     Puget Sound Shipyard covers 344 acres of hard land and 338 acres of submerged land. Included in the complex are nine piers, with 12,300 lineal feet of deep water pier space, four moorings, 382 buildings and six dry docks, of which dry dock No. 6 is the largest on the West coast and is suitable for aircraft carriers. A natural harbor and temperate climate provide deep, clear water and ice-free moorage for any size of naval vessel throughout the year (Ref. 14).

 

Overhaul Photos - Ref. 1275L4

 

    “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, underwent her first modernization, SCB 110A conversion on 16 April 1957 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington. The modernization included installation of three C-11-1 steam driven catapults, which were designed to accommodate the newer and heavier jet aircraft; angled deck, enclosed hurricane bow, Mk-7-Mod 2 arresting gear identical to that installed in the Forrestal-class carriers, relocation of the elevators and three new deck-edge elevators and new weapons elevators. In addition, electronics package was installed and hull blisters widened her beam to a matronly 120 feet to accommodate the increase in her displacement. Her hull will be widened eight feet and her overall displacement increased to 63,600 tons” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 & 72).

 

     “Captain James Seton Gray, Jr. assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), on 24 April 1957, relieving Captain Joseph Abraham Jaap, 12th Commanding Officer, serving from 10 October 1956 to 24 April 1957” (Ref. 35A).

 

Iran History and Air Arm

 

     “After 72 practice sessions, in June 1958, the dream of Maj. Nader Jahanbani turned to reality and the beautiful blue Iranian sky witnessed a new flock of high-flying birds called the Imperial Iranian Air Force Golden Crown AcroJet Team (Teame Acro Jete Taje Talaee Niroueh Havaee Shahanshahi Iran). Because Maj. Nader Jahanbani was able to turn his vision and dream into reality, he became the Father of the IIAF Golden Crown” (Ref. 17).

 

     “When the coup in Iraq toppled the monarchy, the Shah pointed to the ‘dangerous’ political developments in the neighboring state, and soon after the Imperial Iranian air force acquired modern 70 F-86 swept-wing planes (sabre-jets), built under license in Canada, were handed over in 1959” (Ref. 22).

 

     “Operating F-86F Sabres, the IIAF were on there way to becoming the largest Air Force in the Middle East” (Ref. 16).

 

    “While USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) underwent her first modernization, SCB 110A conversion, during the Lebanon Crisis of summer 1958, USS Forrestal (CVA-59) was called upon to operate in the eastern Atlantic to back up naval operations in the Mediterranean when USS Princeton (CVS). Forrestal sailed from Norfolk, Va. 11 July 1958 to embark an air group at Mayport Fla. two days later, then patrolled the Atlantic until returning to Norfolk, Va. on 17 July 1958” (Ref. 1-Forrestal).

 

    “On 8 December 1958, the first firing of a Sparrow III air-to-air missile by a squadron deployed outside the U.S. was conducted by VF-64, based aboard USS Midway (CVA-41)” (Ref. 1-Midway).

 

CVA-43, former CVB-43 and CV-42 completed Major Overhaul during 1960, underwent Major Overhaul and Decommissioned during 1957, completed Major Overhaul during 1953, underwent Major Overhaul and Reclassified CVA-43 during 1952, undergoing her first overhaul since commissioning during 1951

 

SHIP

MAJOR OVERHAUL /

DECOMM

DATE

MAJOR OVERHAUL

COMPLETED / RECOMM

DATE

Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 and CV-42

Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington

16 Apr 1957

24 Apr 1957

1st modernization, SCB 110A conversion commenced 16 April 1957 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington

25 Jan 1960

“The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, as CVB-43, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, and reported to the Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Va., which was designated as her home port. The ship’s patch insignia in color, signal flag and radio call sign was issued by the U.S. Navy—BIG C, CORAL MARU, AGELESS WARRIOR—which was launched on 2 April 1946 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va.; it was sponsored and christened by Mrs. Thomas C. Kincaid, wife of RADM Thomas Kincaid, who had commanded a cruiser division under RADM Frank Jack Fletcher at Coral Sea, a Coral Sea hero.  While under construction, the unnamed (CV-42) was first named the Coral Sea, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the U.S. Navy on 10 October 1944; keel was laid down on 10 July 1944 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va.. It was originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42, then reclassified as a “Large Aircraft Carrier” (CVB-43) on 15 July 1943, while the contract to build her was awarded on 14 June 1943” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & 72).

A 45,000-ton Midway-class aircraft carrier, one of three Midway-class Large Fleet carriers built out of the six planned and was one of the last battle-class carriers under construction during World War II. While the contract to build her was awarded 14 June 1943, her keel was laid down on 10 July 1944 at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News,Va. (NN&SB Hull #440).

The contract to build Coral Sea was awarded 14 June 1943.

Originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42. Reclassified a “Large Aircraft Carrier” with hull classification symbol CVB-43 on 15 July 1943 and on 10 October 1944 renamed Coral Sea.

“While under construction, the unnamed (CV-42) was first named the Coral Sea (CVB-43), former CV-42 on 10 October 1944; keel was laid down on 10 July 1944 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va., originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42, and reclassified as a ‘Large Aircraft Carrier’ (CVB-43) on 15 July 1943, while the contract to build her was awarded on 14 June 1943” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).

Hull half-plated 18 May 1945; Hull completely Framed 14 September 1945; Hull completely plated 22 October 1945; Flight deck laid 7 March 1946; Island House erected 13 March 1946.

Sponsored and christened by Mrs. Thomas C. Kincaid, a wife of RADM Thomas Kincaid, who had commanded a cruiser division under RADM Frank Jack Fletcher at Coral Sea, a Coral Sea hero.

Dry docked 30 March 1947; Preliminary trial board 17 July 1947; Builders dock trial 6-7 August 1947; USN Trial Board 16-17 September 1947.

Ship’s patch insignia in color, signal flag and radio call sign issued by the U.S. Navy. BIG C, CORAL MARU, AGELESS WARRIOR.

Secretary of the Navy John L. Sullivan spoke at the commissioning ceremonies.

The largest warships afloat at the time, the Midway-class carriers were designed to carry an air group compliment of 133 aircraft.  CVB was a new designation for the Midway-class carrier’s, which were reclassified Large Fleet Carriers before they were commissioned.

“Following Post-Shakedown repairs and alterations in April 1948, USS Coral Sea (CVB-43) stood out of Hampton Roads on 10 May 1948 for a Naval Reserve training cruise” (Ref. 35).

Scheduled to receive 3-in./50 cal. AA battery, but they were not ready by commissioning, and she completed her first overseas deployment prior to their installation” (Ref. 35/43).

“Following voyage repairs at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, USS Coral Sea (CVB-43) conducted refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, returning to Norfolk, Va. on 21 September 1948” (Ref. 34 and 43).

Coral Sea (CVB-43) commenced a five-month scheduled period of repairs and alterations, including modernization of Coral Sea’s bridge and island in late September or early October 1948.

“A five-month scheduled period of repairs and alterations, including modernization of Coral Sea bridge and island completed, at Norfolk Naval Ship Yard, Va. on 9 February 1949; commencing in late September or early October 1948” (Ref. 34 and 43).

On 27 June 1949, USS Coral Sea (CVB-43) became the flagship of RADM William L. Rees, Jr., ComCarDiv Two and over the ensuing weeks conducted CarQuals off Atlantic City, N.J. (Ref. 34).

“Following post-deployment voyage repairs upon return from her second Mediterranean Sea deployment, Coral Sea (CVB-43) operated locally out of Norfolk and the Virginia Capes area” (Ref. 34, 43 and 72).

“Following post-deployment voyage repairs from her third Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6 th Fleet, Coral Sea (CVB-43) operated in the Virginia Capes area, qualifying CVG-1 and preparing for her fourth Mediterranean deployment” (Ref. 43 and 72).

Reclassified Hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952.

Underwent overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard, Va. from 10 October 1951 to February 1952.

Coral Sea (CVB-43) became flagship for RADM Charles R. ‘Cat’ Brown, ComCarDiv Six on 19 April 1952, to commemorate her fifth overseas deployment” (Ref. (34, 35, 43 and 72).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) conducted overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard from 12 October 1952 to in early 1953” (Ref. 34).

“Returning to Norfolk, Va., on 21 October 1953, Coral Sea (CVA-43) carried out tests for the Bureau of Aeronautics and trained members of the Naval Reserve at Mayport, Florida, and Guantanamo Bay“ (Ref. 1-Coral Sea and 72).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) underwent short refit from September 1955 to February 1956” (Ref. 43).

“In between Mediterranean cruises, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) operated out of Norfolk, ranging from the Va. Capes to Mayport, Florida and into Cuban waters and the West Indies” (Ref. 43).

“On 15 April 1957, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) arrived Bremerton, Washington, with Captain Joseph Abraham Jaap, USNA, as Commanding Officer, ending her first Southern Atlantic, cruise around Cape Horn, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming through the Southern and Easter Pacific to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington for her first modernization, SCB 110A conversion ordered for all three Midway-class carriers, making port of calls at  Santos, Brazil; Valparaiso, Chile; and Balboa, Canal Zone, C.Z., completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6 th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Her 11th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947 (26 February to 15 April 1957)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 34 & 72).

“She was assigned to the First Fleet, and had a new homeport of Alameda, California” (Ref. 1275F).

Decommissioned on 24 April 1957 for her first modernization, SCB 110A conversion commenced on 16 April 1957 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, completed her first modernization, SCB 110A on 25 January 1960. The modernization included installation of three C-11-1 steam driven catapults, which were designed to accommodate the newer and heavier jet aircraft; angled deck, enclosed hurricane bow, Mk-7-Mod 2 arresting gear identical to that installed in the Forrestal-class carriers, relocation of the elevators and three new deck-edge elevators and new weapons elevators. In addition, electronics package was installed and hull blisters widened her beam to a matronly 120 feet to accommodate the increase in her displacement.  Her hull was widened eight feet and her overall displacement increased to 63,600 tons. The SCB-110A upgrade took 33 months to complete and she was the last of all three Midway Class Carriers to complete SCB 110A.

Recommissioned on or about 25 January 1960. During the three years that followed, the carrier underwent a complete conversion. Her flight deck was lengthened to span 973 feet and the addition of an angled flight deck expanded her width to 210 feet. Most of her five-inch mounts were removed to provide room for two side elevators. Three steam catapults were added to enable jet aircraft to be launched on a “runway” less than 300 feet.

 

Recommissioning - Ref. 1275L5

 

     “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, recommissioned on 25 January 1960 after completing of SCB 110A conversion on 25 January 1960 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington. The modernization included installation of three C-11-1 steam driven catapults, which replaced her two hydraulic bow cats, designed to accommodate the newer and heavier jet aircraft. The entire port side was reconfigured with the adition of  an 11 degree angle deck including one of three new catapults, Mk-7-Mod 2 arresting gear identical to that installed in the Forrestal-class carriers. The port quarter elevator and a enclosed hurricane bow were also constructed, to include relocation of the elevators and three new deck-edge elevators and new weapons elevators. In addition, electronics package was installed and hull blisters widened her beam to a matronly 120 feet to accommodate the increase in her displacement. Her hull was widened eight feet with the addition of blisters to give increased stability and tonnage. On the flight deck another dramatic change was the conversion to a Mod 2 hydraulic arresting gear system using only four wires instead of the previous multiple wire system. Gone were the centerline elevators. Now there were three on the deck edge including one on the port quarter. She also received a new suite of weapons elevators and a multitude of habitability and other improvements became standard in future carriers. Her overall displacement increased to 63,600 tons. During the three years that followed, the carrier underwent a complete conversion. Her flight deck was lengthened to span 973 feet and the addition of an angled flight deck expanded her width to 210 feet. Most of her five-inch mounts were removed to provide room for two side elevators. Three steam catapults were added to enable jet aircraft to be launched on a “runway” less than 300 feet. The SCB-110A upgrade took 33 months to complete and she was the last of all three Midway-class Carriers to complete SCB 110A. After the SCB-110A modernization, the Coral Sea was the first aircraft carrier with a deck edge elevator on the port quarter After Coral Sea’s recommission, she became the largest ship ever commissioned on the West coast. Admiral J. S. Russell, Vice CNO and former Coral Sea CO, was the principal speaker. Captain J. S. Gray, Jr., a former XO, assumed command. Her recommissioning ceremony was most spectacular, if not unusual, with the appearance of the pipes and drums of the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada providing the music; decommissioned on 24 April 1957; commenced first modernization, SCB 110A conversion on 16 April 1957 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington; completed overhaul in early 1953 at Norfolk Navy Yard, Va.; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952, while still at sea; underwent overhaul at Norfolk Navy Ship Yard on 12 October 1952; completed overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard, Va. February 1952; entering 10 October 1951; a five-month scheduled period of repairs and alterations, including modernization of Coral Sea’s bridge and island completed, at Norfolk Naval Ship Yard, Va. on 9 February 1949; Post-Shakedown Repairs and Alterations in April 1948; reported to the Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Va., designated as her home port. Ship's patch insignia in color, signal flag and radio call sign issued by Navy. BIG C, CORAL MARU, AGELESS WARRIOR; launched on 2 April 1946 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va.; sponsored and christened by Mrs. Thomas C. Kincaid, a wife of RADM Thomas Kincaid, who had commanded a cruiser division under RADM Frank Jack Fletcher at Coral Sea, a Coral Sea hero. While under construction the unnamed (CV-42) was first named the Coral Sea, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy on 10 October 1944; keel was laid down 10 July 1944 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va., originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42, reclassified as a ‘Large Aircraft Carrier’ (CVB-43) on 15 July 1943, while the contract to build her was awarded on 14 June 1943” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72 & 1275M).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed Bremerton Washington on 1 February 1960, for Sea Trials. She returned to Bremerton for evaluation and INSERVE Inspections” (Ref. 1275N).

 

    “An open house aboard USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) was held on 15 February 1960, in appreciation for the high quality workmanship of shipyard employees. Over several thousand workers and their families attended” (Ref. 1275N).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) became a unit of Carrier Division Seven with Alameda, California as her homeport” (Ref. 1275N).

 

PUDGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON WASHINGTON

DEPLOYMENT TO ALAMEDA, CA. VIA VANCOUVER, B.C.

RECOMMISSIONED

CVAs OPERATING ON “WESTPAC”

(11 March 1960 to 18 September 1960)

(March to 1 April 1960)

CHAPTER XVI

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington 11 March 1960 and plotted a course to her new home port, Alameda, Ca. via Vancouver, B.C., in her new assignment undergoing Western Pacific and Far East deployments, with Captain James S. Gray Jr., a former XO of the ship, in command, arriving on 25 January 1960. Prior to her cruise underwent sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of first Cruise since her 1st SCB 110A on 16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960). She will undergo her first Cruise since her recommission on or about on 25 January 1960; decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 11th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).                      

 

 USS CORAL SEA (CVA-43)

(11 March to 1 April 1960)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Pacific

EastPac

   ?

   ?

11 Mar  1960

1 Apr 1960

Cruise

Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Wa. to Alameda, Ca.

via Vancouver, B.C

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

          ROLE

 AIRCRAFT DESIGN

     NICK NAME &

   PRIMARY ROLE

  TAIL

 CODE

 Modex

   AIRCRAFT   DESIGNATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) visited Vancouver, B.C. for a three day scheduled port call on 18 March 1960” (Ref. 34).

 

 

"Column Left..." The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada parade down the flight deck of the USS Coral Sea. The Highlanders, commanded by LCOL Ian Bell-Irving, were guests of Coral Sea during the ship's visit to Vancouver, British Columbia, March 1960. US Navy photo now in the Seattle Branch of the National Archives. NS024335 46k. Tracy White. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024335.jpg

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed Vancouver, B.C. on 21 March 1960, becoming the largest ship under Lion's Gate Bridge” (Ref. 34).

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Underway to Alameda, California via Canada - Ref. 1275O

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) arrival to San Francisco from Bremerton Washington - Ref. 1275O2

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Dependents Cruise - Ref. 1275O3

 

    “On 1 April 1960, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) arrived her new home port, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, ending her transit from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington via Vancouver, B.C., with Captain James S. Gray Jr., a former XO of the ship, in command, making a port visit at Vancouver, B. C. from 18 to 22 March 1960, upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of her 1st SCB 110A conversion (11 March 1960 to 1 April 1960), decommissioned 24 April 1957; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Her first Cruise since her 1st SCB 110A conversion (11 March to 1 April 1960). Her 11th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment

 since her commission 1 October 1947 (11 March to 1 April 1960)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).

 

 00/03/60- 01/04/60

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

 ATLANTIC

 FLEET

 Not Reported

 N/A

 Vancouver, B. C.

Reference 34 and 35 reflect Chat info.

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) was assigned to 7th Fleet in the Pacific (CarDiv Seven) on 1 April 1960” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) commenced underway training on 22 April 1960 out of Long Beach and San Diego; that day” (Ref. 43).

 

     “On the first day of underway training CDR P. H. Spears, the ship’s navigator, piloted the first aircraft to be launched from USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) since recommissioning. 18 days later on 9 May 1960, CDR J. Swope, Commander Air Group 15 landed an F8U-1E Crusader for Coral Sea’s first arrested landing since recommissioning” (Ref. 1275N1).

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Air Operations Photos out of Alameda, California - Ref. 1275O1

 

Shakedown Cruise Book 1960 - Ref. 1275P

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Post-Shakedown Yard Period – early July – 1960 - Ref. 1275Q

 

    “Returning to Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Wa. on 7 July 1960, the Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, commenced a scheduled six-week Post-Conversion Availability” (Ref. 43).

 

CHAPTER XI to XVI

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4