CHAPTER XXXVII

FIFTHEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

15-MONTH COMPLEX OVERHAUL & ALTERATIONS AT NORFOLK NAVY YARD VA. – SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS – LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(21 March 1983 to 31 December 1984)

Part 1 – (21 March to 27 April 1983)

Part 2 – (28 April 1983)

Part 3 – (29 April to 1 December 1983)

Part 4 – (2 December 1983 to 23 April 1984)

Part 5 – (24 April to 31 December 1984)

 

 

    “On 28 April 1983, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) runs aground within sight of the port of San Francisco after eight months at sea. It is stranded for five hours until the tide and tugs pull it free” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “During the final leg of the inbound channel to San Francisco, Ca. on 28 April 1983, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 embarked, runs aground within sight of the port of San Francisco after eight months at sea. It is stranded for five hours until the tide and tugs pull it free. Allowing her to moor at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, disembarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif. and COMCARGRU THREE, RADM Edwin R. Kohn, Jr., relieving RADM Joseph J. Barth, Jr. on 30 October 1982), with Captain Robert J. Kelly as the Commanding Officer, ending her tenth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Western and first Northern Pacific, on her ninth and tenth Indian Ocean voyage and first North Arabian Sea deployment, participating in a joint Ship ASW Readiness Evaluation Measuring (SHAREM) and Air Readiness Evaluation Measuring (AIREM) exercise, an Air Readiness Evaluation Measuring exercise en route to Hawaiian waters; TRANSITEX - eight days of operations in the Hawaiian OPAREA including a major ASW Exercise (BGAREM), HARPOONEX, MISSILEX and live and inert ordnance delivery; CRAE 83-1, a four cycle dual CV ordnance exercise with USS Midway (CV-41). All sorties were conducted a s Mini ALFA Strikes; while in Philippine waters, she conducted MissilEx 83-2, providing CVW-14 “valuable air to air weapons work,” off Poro Point; Weapons Department reported that NORPAC 82 exercise was completed along with dual battle group operations; Carrier Readiness Ammunition Exercise was completed. GMMC Randall and FTG2 Smith of FOX division were designated Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialists and awarded ESWS insignia; Enterprise Communications Department participated in Small Pipe 1-83 while operating in the Indian Ocean. This exercise tested Enterprise’s HF Communications capability. As in previous Small Pipe exercises, the evolution was excellent training for circuit operators. Newly arrived junior personnel derived benefit from the HF operations. Southbound en route Diego Garcia for participation in Weapons Week 83 While with BG Foxtrot, Enterprise participated in exercises Jade Tiger 82 while operating in the North Arabian Sea from 2 to 8 December 1982 and Beacon Flash, a two-day event, the former involving CAS, CAP surface surveillance, anti-boat patrol and ASW missions flown in support of amphibious landings, and the latter allowing “aircrews to hone their low level and navigations skills;” Carrier Battle Group (CVBG), Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot conducted Weapons Week 83; CVW-11 embarked aboard Enterprise with training in air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons delivery and Rainbow Reef (a convoy transitex with merchant ships from the Rapid Deployment Force Detachment (RDJTF Det.) (at Diego Garcia)) in the vicinity of Diego Garcia; Beacon South, a joint exercise with the Australians provided Enterprise aircrews with low level and weapons delivery training. Units of the BG Foxtrot, Enterprise battle group, departed their respective ports and reformed on 26 January 1983 for a transit north through the Sunda Strait, encountering some difficulty regarding Indonesian intransigence to allow the ships through, pressing “right of free passage,” transiting northbound on 1 February 1983, en route to Subic Bay via the Java Sea, and into the South China Sea. Enterprise and her BG Foxtrot consorts steamed north through the Tsushima Strait and into the Sea of Japan for Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83, a 16 day joint amphibious exercise with ROK forces, in the Sea of Japan with USS Midway (CV-41) and connecting seas, supporting the landings and provided interdiction support en route Sasebo, Japan (Carrier Air Wing Eleven wing provided support to amphibious task force during simulated assault. Interdiction support also provided Operations Department reported that Enterprise provided support for Amphibious Operations in the Okinawa and Japan OPAREA’s and operating independently before rendezvousing with Midway on 30 March 1983 for the transit north through the Sea of Japan and out the Tsugaru Strait en route Fleextex 83-1 in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Enterprise BG Foxtrot and Midway Battle Group participated in FleetEx 83-1 (rendezvousing with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 9 April 1983). All three carriers then completed a “counterclockwise sweep” of the northwestern Pacific. Engineering and Reactor Departments annual Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE). Enterprise commenced a joint Ship ASW Readiness Evaluation Measuring (SHAREM) and Air Readiness Evaluation Measuring (AIREM) exercise, an Air Readiness Evaluation Measuring exercise en route to Hawaiian waters from 7 to 12 September 1982. ADM S. R. Foley, CINCPACFLT visited Enterprise from 8 to 9 September 1982. Enterprise pulled in for a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 13 September 1982. Enterprise transited from Alameda to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 1 to 12 September 1982. September-October 1982- CVW-11 deploys aboard Enterprise for an extended eight month cruise. TRANSITEX - eight days of operations in the Hawaiian OPAREA including a major ASW Exercise (BGAREM), HARPOONEX, MISSILEX and live and inert ordnance delivery. Following a visit to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 13 to 16 September 1982, Enterprise stood out on the morning of the 17th for “several days of flight operations.” In Hawaii, the free bus shuttle service between the base and Waikiki was provided by Special Services at a cost of $5,000, and according to the bus company's records Enterprise personnel took approximately 10,500 rides on the bus. Airops/Quals reported no fires; Pearl Harbor upkeep availability. Enterprise reopened its Brig on 14 September 1982. While still in the vicinity of Hawaii, Enterprise CVW-11 aircraft utilized the opportunity to deliver a wide variety of ordnance, both live and inert, including AGM-84A Harpoons during which time aircrews sighted a sail boat in distress and coordinated a successful rescue effort aircrews sighted a sailboat in distress and coordinated and successful SAR rescue on 19 September 1982. Transiting to the North Pacific (NorPac), Enterprise conducted “freedom of the seas” operations with the USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG). The two groups steamed in an area roughly centered upon. MODLOC position was 51N/171E, approximately 300 miles southeast of the extensive Russian facilities at Petropavlosk, the Soviet Banner Pacific Fleet’s major submarine base. From the time she neared her NorPac operations area on 23 September 1982, until she departed the Sea of Japan, Enterprise proved “the subject of extensive Soviet air, surface, and subsurface surveillance.” During Cyclic Operations on 23 September 1982, Sideflare 74, a CH-46 from HC-11’s USS Sacramento (AOE-1) Det. ditched at sea due to fuel starvation, Enterprise assuming on scene SAR command. Enterprise assumed SAR on scene command. Prompt action by the Air Traffic Control Center aboard Enterprise to vector indigenous SH-3 assets from HS-6 to the scene of action resulted in the recovery of all personnel from frigid northern Pacific waters with no casualties. Additionally, a pair of Tomcats from VF-213 were diverted to Adak, Alaska, due to reduced ceiling visibility in the carrier operating area. The F-14s returned to Enterprise the following day, believed to be the first time that F-14s landed or took off from Adak. On 30 September 1982, the Enterprise CVBG inchopped to the 7th Fleet, proceeding with the USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG) southward, to the east of the Kuril Islands. September 1982 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Supply Department reported that Enterprise operated in the Northern Pacific and utilized for the first time a previously untested logistic channel. Materials were moved from Travis AFB, to McCord AFB and ultimately to Naval Station Adak. From this point material was moved to the Enterprise via US-3A. The airhead at Adak proved successful and demonstrated that this facility could be expanded to support the requirements of a CV Battle Group. (2) Training Department, for the first time in over three years, maintained Temporary Additional Duty Outside U.S. (TEMADD OUTUS) Funds for Emergency Leave. Training Department started utilizing the Defense Activity for Nontraditional Educational Support (DANTES) Examinations and has administered over two hundred exams in CLEP, SAT, ACT, and GED. (3) Airops/Quals reported no fires; Pearl Harbor upkeep availability; extended deployment commences. (4) Deck Department rigged four stations for the first time, used fueling-at-sea station nine for the first time and conducted seven UNREPS. (5) Engineering Department E Division reported that after extensive troubleshooting of the bridge microphone station, a failed relay in the 1 MC circuitry was discovered and replaced. (6) Engineering Department M-Division reported they experienced a major casualty to number 4 main Engine reduction gears during the transit from Pearl Harbor to Subic Bay. A wiped bearing and sheared bearing cap stud were found inside the reduction gear casing. The shaft was uncoupled at sea by Machinery Division personnel in less than four hours. Puget Sound Naval Shipyard dispatched a Tiger Team to meet the ship in Subic Bay and repairs were completed in the five day in port period. Recovery of the main engine including recoupling of the shaft, an operational check, vibrational analysis and final reduction gear inspection was successfully completed during the six day transit to Singapore. (7) Weapons Department conducted HARPOON exercise, with air wing aircraft, expending one AIM84A HARPOON. This is the first HARPOON expended by CVN-65 and CVW-11. Weapons Department reported that numerous ordalts were installed in the Close-In Weapon System by a team from general dynamics. MT.23 became qualified after successfully engaging a towed target in Hawaii Pacific Missile Range. Since leaving CONUS on 1 SEP 82, Marine Detachment provided honor guards, color guards and rifle details on eight separate occasions adding the “professional touch” to change of command and other ceremonies/ services  or both the ship and embarked air wing and also the accompanying ships of the Battle Group FOXTROT. Marine detachment implemented and managed the ship's visit or control and physical security bill while in foreign ports. Marine detachment also added a Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) training syllabus; a well rounded, all encompassing training program to prepare Marines for later assignment to the Fleet Marine Force (FMF). (8) Operations Department reported the installation of the closed-loop, chilled water cooling system for the AN/SLQ-17(V)2 system significantly improved system reliability. The Carrier Intelligence Center (CVIC) Fleet Imagery Support Terminal (FIST) system was installed with EDP technicians designated for partial maintenance. This equipment has proved to be 100% reliable with no failure. A representative from Naval Broadcast Service Detachment San Diego conducted extensive system training for OE-04 Division technicians. Sony DXC1800H color cameras were installed in KENT-TV and CVIC, significantly improving camera, and system reliability to the benefit of both embarked squadrons and ship's entertainment. Naval Sea Support Center Pacific provided Refresher Training on dehydrator maintenance for the MM1’s attached to OE-04 Division during the ship's visit to Pearl Harbor. Environmental support for all Battle Group Foxtrot units was commenced in association with the “WestPsac” deployment. Acquisition of facsimile charts via satellite as part of a COMTHIRDFLT/NAVCAMS EASTPAC feasibility test was conducted. Of particular note was the “unprecedented” use of Backfire bombers, on 30 September and 2 October 1982, to “reconnoiter” both USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG). The tension between the two superpowers provided both with opportunities to test the other’s resolve and naval competency, and planes from both carriers conducted simulated dual wing coordinated strikes that were frighteningly real in the circumstances. The USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Battle Group joined the SEVENTH Fleet on 30 September and proceeded with the USS Midway (CV-41) Battle Group south, to the east of the Kuril Islands and entered the Sea of Japan via the Tsugaru Straits on 3 October 1982. Enterprise CVBG inchopped to the 7th Fleet, proceeding with the USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG) entered the Sea of Japan via the Tsugaru Strait, between Hokkaid, and Honshū, Japan, on 3 October 1982. VADM M.S. Holcomb, Com7thFlet visited Enterprise on 5 October 1982. VADM M. S. Holcomb, COMSEVENTHFLT visited Enterprise on 5 October 1982. RADM R. F. Brown, 111, COMCARGRU FIVE visited Enterprise on 9 October 1982. CRAE 83-1 was a four cycle dual carrier exercise between Enterprise and USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG), with all sorties practiced by their aircraft being conducted as Mini Alpha strikes. Four days later the “Big E” departed the Southern Sea of Japan via the Tsushima Straits on 9 October 1982. An international group of consul generals, led by British General Sir John Archer, Commander in Chief, U.K. Land Forces, visited the ship on 12 October 1982. “Northern Pacific and Sea of Japan provided CVW-11 with excellent opportunities to train against Soviet surveillance aircraft, submarines, and surface combatants, conducted dual CV operations including dual airwing coordinated strikes. CRAE 83-1, a four cycle dual CV ordnance exercise with USS Midway (CV-41). All sorties were conducted as Mini ALFA Strikes. Missilex 83-2- conducted off Poro PT RP, this successful exercise provided the airwing valuable air to air weapons work. Honorable Sir Denys Robeccton KBE, Chief Justice, Hong Kong; Mr. Alfred Preissil, Consul General of Austria; Dr. Hans Dietrich, Consul General of the Federal Republic of Germany; Dr. Pedro M. R. A. Catarino, Consul General of Portugal; Lord Kadoorie, CBE, JP, China Light and Power Company; General Sir John Archer, KCB, OBE, Former Commander and British Forces (HK); Commander-in-Chief, UK Land Forces and Mr. Clemencio F. Montesa, Consul General of the Philippines visited Enterprise on 12 October 1982. Enterprise was underway in the Northern Pacific conducting operations en route Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 17 September to 13 October 1982. Enterprise moored at NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines from 14 to 18 October 1982.  Ultimately standing out for the South China Sea en route to Singapore, she encountered and rescued a boatload of six Vietnamese refugees, later disembarking them in Singapore. Airops/Quals reported no fires; Ship's Repair Facility (SRF) Subic Bay upkeep availability. During the 19 to 24 October 1982 transit of the South China Sea, Enterprise embarked six Vietnamese refugees, or “boat people.” Upon arrival at Singapore on 25 October 1982, a party led by Harold E.T. Thanyer, U.S. Ambassador, Singapore, Yeap A.B.C. Rose, Deputy High Commissioner, Malaysia, the Filipino Ambassador Privado G. Jimenez, Republic of the Philippines;  and Ambassador Sudjatmiko, Indonesia to Singapore and Mr. Morton S. Smith, Deputy Chief of Mission, American Embassy visited Enterprise. Operations Department reported that COMNAVAIRPAC conducted their annual 3M inspection during 18 to 25 October 1982, awarding the Operations Department an overall grade of 92.6%. The installation of the SSQ-80 HF/VHF/UHF radar receiver was affected by FES Subic, to enhance Indian Ocean operations. Enterprise pulled in for a port of call at Singapore on 25 October 1982, en route Singapore from 19 to 24 October 1982. The six Vietnamese refugees, or “boat people” rescued at sea were disembarked in Singapore. Enterprise made a port of call at Singapore from 25 to 29 October 1982. Singapore upkeep availability conducted. Successful 3-M Inspection conducted. Damage Control Department scores were the highest for the ship. The six Vietnamese refugees, or “boat people” rescued at sea were disembarked in Singapore. Following her visit to Singapore, from 25 to 29 October 1982, Enterprise transited north through the Straits of Malacca and entered the Indian Ocean on 30 October 1982. Commander Carrier Group THREE, RADM J. J. Barth, embarked on board Enterprise on 12 March 1982. He was relieved on 30 October 1982 by RADM E. R. Kohn. Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN embarked on board Enterprise beginning in January, Commander F. L. Tillotson commanding. October 1982 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Deck Department conducted six UNREPS. (2) V-4 Division completed 4519 crunchless moves (1000 mishap free moves since overhaul). (3) Weapons Department reported that NORPAC 82 exercise was completed along with dual battle group operations. A Carrier Readiness Ammunition Exercise was completed. GMMC Randall and FTG2 Smith of FOX division were designated Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialists and awarded ESWS insignia. Department successfully passed the annual 3-M Inspection that was conducted by COMNAVAIRPAC San Diego, CA. Weapons Department expended ORE package MK82 bombs 487 each, MK84 bombs 4 each, MK45 Para Flare 16 each, conducted missile firing exercise, expended one AIM9G and SIDEWINDER, four AIM9H SIDEWINDER three AIM9L SIDEWINDER. While in the Indian Ocean the first Navy Alcohol Safety Action Program/Navy Drug Safety Action Program Classes were conducted aboard Enterprise, utilizing on board assets, graduated 29 and 23 personnel, respectively. Enterprise Communications Department participated in Small Pipe 1-83 while operating in the Indian Ocean. This exercise tested Enterprise’s HF Communications capability. As in previous Small Pipe exercises, the evolution was excellent training for circuit operators. Newly arrived junior personnel derived benefit from the HF operations. Enterprise proceeded to the North Arabian Sea on 30 October 1982. On 6 November 1982, Commander F. L. Tillotson was relieved as CVW-11 CAG by Commander R. P. Hickey. RADM C. E. Gurney, III, COMIDEASTFOR visited Enterprise on 9 November 1982. Enterprise operated in the North Arabian Sea from October 30 to 19 November 1982. This was especially important owing to the recent outbreak of war between Iraq and Iran. Following the radical Islamic revolution in Iran in 1979, Saddam Hussein took advantage of the ensuing chaos and ordered the Iraqi Army to invade Khuzestan province in southwestern Iran on 22 September 1980. The invasion was both an attempt to inspire a populist revolt against the fundamentalist Shia regime in Teheran and to gain control of the vast petroleum reserves of the region. Although Hussein anticipated a quick victory that would allow him to install a friendly government in Tehran, the invasion provoked a determined, nationalist resistance by the Iranians that stopped the Iraqi offensive dead in its tracks. Despite enjoying a significant military advantage -- the Iraqi Army was well supplied with Warsaw Pact tanks, artillery and other weapons -- the campaign bogged down into a stalemate, with both sides suffering heavy losses in a war of attrition among the fortifications and trenches along the border. Both sides soon escalated the conflict through air, artillery and missile strikes against enemy cities, later extending these attacks against oil tankers and other ships carrying enemy commodities in the Northern Arabian Gulf. By the early 1980s, neutral ships in the region could anticipate missile or gunboat attacks from either side, and Enterprise was needed to monitor activity, and to respond to ships damaged or in peril from attack. On 20 November 1982, Enterprise came about for a visit to Mombasa, initiating 3,994 pollywogs by entering Realm of Neptunus Rex and crossed the equator at 044º33’E, on 20 November. Also in Mombasa was USS Samuel Gompers (AD-37), enabling some upkeep to be completed on board the carrier. Enterprise was underway in the North Arabian Sea conducting operations from 30 October to 21 November 1982. Mombasa, Kenya Provincial Commissioner; Mayor of Mombasa; Commander, Kenya Navy and Provincial Police Officer visited Enterprise on 23 November 1982, anchoring at Mombasa on 24 November 1982  (Ref. 329B-1982-Command History Report has conflicting dates as 22 to 27). Enterprise made a port call at Mombasa from 24 to 28 November 1982 and headed for the Indian Ocean. September to November 1982 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Western Pacific deployment resulted in increased use of boat and aircraft crane and anchor windlass equipment. Machine shop instrumental in virtually all facets of ship operation, manufacturing parts for radar units, F-14, A-6, A-7 aircraft, steam generators and various pumps and motors. Captain’s elevator began to show effects of extended use, requiring new motor bearings and renewal of winch shaft oil rings. First use of utility boats for liberty craft. Boat Engineer qualification program completed. Utility boat III ran aground in Mombasa requiring major rudder, screw and strut repairs by ship’s force. Successfully completed COMNAVAIRPAC 3-M inspection with a grade of excellent for the 02N2 plants. October to November 1982 accomplishments reported by departments/divisions/Air Wing: (1) Engineering Department E Division reported that the rewind shop provided extensive support to battle group units. Extensive support was provided. November 1982 accomplishments reported by departments/divisions/Air Wing: (1) Deck Department conducted eight UNREPS. Rigged five stations for the first time. Transferred over 400 lifts by CONREP. Refueled three escorts one after the other. Took a double ROBB at number nine station for the first time and conducted twelve UNREPS. (2) Engineering Department A-Division (3) Engineering Department E Division reported that the rewind shop provided extensive support to battle group units. Extensive support was provided to USS Omaha (SSN-692) during the Singapore visit. (4) Airops/Quals reported no fires; upkeep in Mombasa, Kenya with USS Samuel Gompers (AD-37). (5) Supply Department was selected as runner up in the annual COMNAVAIRPAC Food Service Excellence Award and advanced into the second round of the NEY Food Service Award competition. After clearing Mombasa, Enterprise operated for the remainder of the year in the North Arabian Sea with Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot, also comprising  USS Bainbridge (CGN-25); USS Ocallahan (FF-1051); USS Hepburn (FF-1055); USS Hull (DD-945); USS Waddell (DDG-24); USS Shasta (AE-33); USS Sacramento (AOE-1); USS White Plains (AFS-4); USNS Ponchatula (TAO-148); USS Harry W. Hill (DD-986) (Detached to shadow Soviet carrier Minsk, which was transiting the Indian Ocean for her first deployment to the Far East, a matter of considerable interest to U.S. planners – rejoined 19/20 January 1983); USS Reasoner (FF-1063) (Detached on ASW duty – rejoined 10 January 1983) and FNS Kersaint (D-622) (Operating with BG until 10 January 1983). Enterprise was underway in the Indian Ocean on 28 November 1982, returning north to operate for the remainder of 1982 in the North Arabian Sea, taking part in exercises Jade Tiger 82 and Beacon Flash. On New Years Eve Enterprise was southbound en route Diego Garcia for participation in Weapons Week 83 and was highlighted by the arrival of the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders for a much-awaited performance onboard. While with BG Foxtrot, Enterprise participated in exercises Jade Tiger 82 commencing on 2 December 1982 and Beacon Flash, a two-day event, the former involving CAS, CAP surface surveillance, anti-boat patrol and ASW missions flown in support of amphibious landings, and the latter allowing “aircrews to hone their low level and navigations skills” while operating in the North Arabian Sea. During exercises Jade Tiger 82 while operating in the North Arabian Sea from 2 to 8 December 1982 and Beacon Flash, a two-day event, the former involving CAS, CAP surface surveillance, anti-boat patrol and ASW missions flown in support of amphibious landings, and the latter allowing “aircrews to hone their low level and navigations skills,” Lieutenant General Robert Kingston, U.S.A., Commander, Rapid Deployment Joint Task Forced (RDJTF), Rear Admiral Stanley Arthur, Commander, RD Naval Force and Arthur Lowrie, RDJTF Political Advisor, consulted with officers on Enterprise from 2 to 3 December 1982. Ambassador Peter A. Southland, U. S. Ambassador to Bahrain and Colonel Sam Hall, USAF, Defense Attaché, Oman visited Enterprise on 19 December 1982. RADM Stevenson, Deputy Chief of Chaplains visited Enterprise on 21 December 1982. Enterprise was underway in the North Arabian Sea from 28 November to 31 December 1982. November to December 1982 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Exercise Jade Tiger, six day exercise provided the airwing the opportunity to participate in a joint forces exercise from November to December 1982. Close air support, combat air patrol surface surveillance, anti-patrol boat, and anti-submarine missions were flown in the amphibious operations area in support of an amphibious assault. Beacon Flash, a two day exercise allowing aircrews to hone their low level and navigations skills and conducted real world surveillance of the Soviet Naval units operating in the Indian Ocean. December 1982 accomplishments reported by departments/divisions/Air Wing: (1) Airops/Quals reported no fires, construction of a stage assembly for Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders visit and DC competitive exercises conducted that included Z-52-D and Z-32-D. During 1982, Airops/Quals reported the ship completed 11,372 arrested landings and made 33 UnReps. (2) Quality Assurance (QA) Division capabilities continue to expand to magnaflux testing. (3) Engineering Department E Division Electrical Division overhauled #2 Special Frequency Turbine Generator slip rings and again refurbished the  slip rings on 114 Special Turbine Generator. The stabilizer gyro on the forward Mark 19 Gyrocompass failed and was replaced. Additionally, the standby power supply for the forward gyro was overhauled. (4) Deck Department received over 600 lifts by CONREP in December 1982. (5) Operations Department reported that two Enterprise personnel from the carrier’s Intelligence Division augmented USS Harry W. Hill (DD-986) to assist in reporting information regarding the Soviet carrier MINSK. (6) Engineering Department M-Division 4-A main feed pump experienced a catastrophic failure of its turbine journal bearing that required replacement of the turbine rotor at sea. These repairs were accomplished rapidly by ship’s force with no outsider assistance. Virtually all steam-out repairs have been completed at sea. Equipment reliability has remained extremely high during first half of the “WestPac” deployment. During 1982, M-Division transferred over one million gallons of Distillate Fuel Marine (DFM) and distilled over 36 million gallons of water. (7) Training Department – During 1982 the Shipboard Indoctrination Course welcomed on board 1140 new Enterprise crewmembers. The Training Department requested and administered over 2409 quotas for Class II “A” and Class “C” School, Shipboard and Aircraft Fire fighting and OJT or job related training during 1982. The Petty Officer Academy was started in December and graduated 776 new Third Class Petty Officers during 1982. (8) Safety Department – The beginning of 1982 signaled the end of a long overhaul period at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. The Enterprise Safety Department had to adjust rapidly from an industrial shipyard environment to that of a carrier flying aircraft at sea. The safety awareness of the crew has played a major role in the prevention of accidents and materials related damage during 1982. From the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard to becoming the mainstay of Battle Group Foxtrot, the end of 1982 found Enterprise safely completing operations under the most trying weather conditions of the Northern Pacific and extended blue water operations in the Indian Ocean. During this period Enterprise flew in excess of 18,600 flight hours. Enterprise carefully and methodically developed and implemented a safety oriented work plan designed to ensure full combat readiness with an embarked air wing within seven months. As a result, no flight related mishaps in which the ship was considered a contributing factor were encountered in 1982. Reportable ground mishaps and aircraft crunches were also nil. Several inputs, and contributions were submitted and received for ongoing safety programs. All Command Inspections, ORE, INSURV, 3-M, etc., received grade’s ranging from excellent to outstanding. No deaths were recorded due to automobile or motorcycle accidents. There were no major injuries which resulted in partial disability to the victims, although some minor injuries occurred as a result of motor vehicle accidents, recreational related mishaps and liberty incidents. Two ship’s company deaths were recorded during 1982. One death resulted from a man overboard on 7 November, and the second death was due to an accidental fall on 20 November 1982. Three air wing deaths occurred in 1982. A flight deck maintenance accident resulted in the death of a man from VS-37 on 5 November. Two A-7 incidents each resulted in the death of the pilots; one from VA-94 on 14 June and the other from VA-22 on 15 July.

 

(9) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) –

 

Production Statistics –

 

Date

Item Processed

 

Effectiveness Percent

Processed RFI Percent

JAN

282

49.9

88.5

FEB

294

48.8

95.2

MAR

248

29.9

68.2

APR

1230

66.2

80.8

MAY

2214

74.6

48.0

JUN

61

18.6

69.1

JUL

3971

80.6

73.2

AUG

1188

14.0

21.3

SEP

4052

76.0

81.1

OCT

3721

79.1

72.8

NOV

4146

81.6

68.9

DEC

4884

79.4

73.8

 

(10) Air Department – During 1982 Air Department completed 11,372 arrested landings without accident. All catapults and arresting gear have been available 100% of the time. Since the beginning of the cruise 10,298,420 gallons of JP-5 have been expended.

 

The following statistics from 1982 are recorded:

 

 NCLS Approaches:

 

Mode I A

Mode II

Mode III

SPN-4 1

ASR

89

2390

717

1780

181

 

(b) Arrested Landings: 11,372

 

(c) Significant Arrested Landings:

 

189,000

20 March

LCDR Gorrell

VAW-117

E-2C

190,000

28 April

LT Nutter

VA-22

A-7E

191,000

10 May

LCDR Herrel

VAW-117 i

in an E-2C

192,000

7 July

CDR Wolter

VA-95

A-6E

193,000

21 July

LT Gray

VA-22

A-7E

194,000

3 September

CDR Wolter

VA-95

A-6E

195,000

26 September

LT Semcken

VF-213

F-14A

196,000

19 October

CDR Hezlep

VA-22

A-7E

197,000

12 November

LCDR Greene

VA-95

A-6E

198,000

4 December

LT Dillard

VA-94

A-7E

199,000

19 December

CDR Hickey

CVW-11 CAG

A-6E

 

d. CATCC Qualifications: After three years of air traffic inactivity the following CATCC PQS watchstation qualifications have been attained in 1982:

 

Case I – 27 watchstation qualifications

Case I1 – 24 watchstation qualifications

Case I11 – 32 watchstation qualifications

 

e. Air Transfer Office Statistics:

 

Passengers: 2,488

Mail: 334,910 lbs

Cargo: 127,870 lbs

 

(11) Dental Department in 1982 became fully operational following the extended overhaul period. All phases of dentistry to ship’s company and embarked airwing and staff personnel, as well as emergency care to our battlegroup were provided. Subsequent to the expected increases in clinical demand during deployment, schedules developed were opened to maximize clinic utilization including extended evening sick call and oral prophylaxis availabilities. The prosthetic lab became fully operational and provided excellent support. Noteworthy contributions were made by all dental personnel in general quarter’s battle dressing station assignments and mass casualty drill. Accomplishments: 1) All dental records converted to terminal digit. Dental PMS program restructured resulting in greater efficiency and compliance by ship’s personnel; 2) Planning for Central Oral Evacuation System installation completed and included in 1983 SRA period and continued material and equipment upgrades made to clinical and administrative spaces (i.e LIFEPAC 5 Portable Cardiac Monitor and Defibrillator Unit, etc.). (12) Medical Department – During 1982 the Enterprise Medical Department transitioned to providing a road range of operational medical support following three years of limited services in overhaul. Mass casualty training evolutions and a complete update of ship’s stretchers, first aid boxes and battle dressing stations during Refresher Training and the Operational Readiness Exam highlighted the preparations for a Western Pacific deployment. A major medical supply onload in August 1982 resulted in authorized medical allowances plus six months supply in all major categories of consumables. Major events and developments: Pilot Test Module Laboratory (MODULAB) installed in the Medical Department to evaluate availability of advanced shipboard laboratory facilities. Cognizant agency-Naval Ocean Systems Center, San Diego, Biomedical engineering Branch. The Medical Department was certified by Commander Naval Air Force Pacific Force Medical Officer. For the first time a permanently assigned ship’s company general surgeon and nurse anesthetist reported on board for duty, and a state of the art Ohio Modulus Anesthesia Unit was installed.

 

Statistical Data:

 

Laboratory procedures

22,040

Patient Visits

21,301

Immunizations

15,730

X-Ray procedures

4,490

Electrocardiograms

329

Audiograms

1,844

Pharmacy units

25,706

Physicals

1,535

 

     For Enterprise 1983 began on a positive note, as “Big E” and her battle group began a transit out of the Arabian Sea toward a port visit in Australia on 1 January 1983 Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) V-2 Division reported they completed a 53 day Indian Ocean line period, yet reports have the “Big E” in the North Arabian Sea from 28 November 1982 to 1 January 1983. Enterprise with COMCARGRU THREE, (being relieved RADM Edwin R. Kohn, Jr., on 30 October 1982) and CVW-11 embarked operated for the remainder of the year in the North Arabian Sea with Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot, also comprising USS Bainbridge (CGN-25); USS Ocallahan (FF-1051); USS Hepburn (FF-1055); USS Hull (DD-945); USS Waddell (DDG-24); USS Shasta (AE-33); USS Sacramento (AOE-1); USS White Plains (AFS-4); USNS Ponchatula (TAO-148); USS Harry W. Hill (DD-986) (Detached to shadow Soviet carrier Minsk, which was transiting the Indian Ocean for her first deployment to the Far East, a matter of considerable interest to U.S. planners - rejoined 19/20 January 1983); USS Reasoner (FF-1063) (Detached on ASW duty - rejoined 10 January 1983) and FNS Kersaint (D-622) (Operating with BG until 10 January 1983). Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot conducted Weapons Week 83 from 3 to 9 January 1983, providing CVW-11 embarked aboard Enterprise with training in air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons delivery and Rainbow Reef (a convoy Transitex with merchant ships from the Rapid Deployment Force Detachment (RDJTF Det.) (at Diego Garcia)) in the vicinity of Diego Garcia, and on 11 January 1983. Accomplishments: (1) (2) Carrier Air Wing Eleven provided air wing training in air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons delivery. (3) The Operations Department participated in a major Battle Group Chaffex while en route to Western Australia during Weapons Week. The exercise included all surface capable units and A-7's with ALE-41 PODS. Enterprise intelligence personnel TAD to USS Harry W. Hill (DD-986) participated in intelligence gathering mission against Soviet Aviation Cruiser MINSK. U. S. Forces press right of free passage through Sunda Straits, successfully and uneventfully transiting. Weapons Department Fox Division reported that two NATO Seasparrow Missile Firings. Frigate USS Reasoner (FF-1063), similarly detached for ASW duty, rejoined Enterprise on 10 January. French destroyer Kersaint (D-622) also operated with the group until 10 January 1983. Beacon South, a joint exercise with the Australians from 18 to 19 January 1983 provided Enterprise aircrews with low level and weapons delivery training. On 18 and 19 January 1983, the “Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot conducted Exercise Beacon South with Australian units, and on 21 January 1983, Enterprise, USS Sacramento (AOE-1) and Harry W. Hill (DD-986) (Detached to shadow Soviet carrier Minsk, which was transiting the Indian Ocean for her first deployment to the Far East, a matter of considerable interest to U.S. planners - rejoined 19/20 January 1983); arrived in (Perth) Fremantle, Austrilla for a brief visit. Other units called at Geraldton and Bunbury. Among the distinguished visitors to Enterprise from Western Australia were Premier Ray O’Connor, Mr. Sinclair, Minister of Defense, Air Chief Marshall McNamara, Chief of Defense Force Staff, and Vice Admiral Leach, Chief of Naval Staff. Carrier Air Wing Eleven provided air wing with low level and weapons delivery training. The Marine Detachment –During the transit from Australia to the Philippines in February the detachment's initial assignment was to prepare and institute a plan of action to repel ‘Pirates” which had been operating in the area. The plan was designed to protect the Enterprise as well as the remaining battle group. Upon our safe arrival in Subic Bay the detachment went to the field. Of the twenty-four days spent at Subic Bay the Marine Detachment spent twelve days in the jungle. A ten day live – fire tactical field exercise was completed in the Zambales Training area. This was followed by a two day course on jungle environmental training. This training was topped off by a special Marine Detachment Mess Night. Operations Department conducted Mobile Sea Range Operations near Diego Garcia. Standing out from (Perth) Fremantle, Austrilla and their respective ports Enterprise reformed with the ships of Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot, also comprising USS Bainbridge (CGN-25), USS Waddell (DDG-24), USS Hull (DD-945), USS O’Callahan (FF-1051), USS Hepburn (FF-1055), USS Shasta (AE-33), USS Sacramento (AOE-1), USS White Plains (AFS-4) and USS Ponchatula (T-AO-148) on 26 January 1983. In addition, destroyer USS Harry W. Hill (DD-986) steamed northerly courses toward Indonesian waters. Units of the Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot, Enterprise battle group, departed their respective ports and reformed on 26 January 1983 for a transit north through the Sunda Strait, encountering some difficulty regarding Indonesian intransigence to allow the ships through, pressing “right of free passage,” transiting northbound on 1 February 1983, en route to Subic Bay via the Java Sea, and into the South China Sea. January 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) completed COMFARIWESTPAC Mid-deployment Material Inspection with a grade of satisfactory. Facilities relocated as a result of inspectors recommendations include: Aviators Breathing Oxygen Test Stand relocated from 1-171-3-A to 1-57-4-E and operation taken over by the Engineering Department. APS116 Freon Fill unit moved from 1-171-3A to 1-22-0-L to prevent aviator equipment contamination by freon. (2) Air Departments V-3 Division completed a total crunch free aircraft moves. (3) The Enterprise Communications Department conducted Smallpipe HF Contingency Exercises with NAVCOMMSTA Diego Garcia. (4) Engineering Department A-Division Machine Shop manufactured a total of 24 aircraft repair parts and repaired 4A main feed rotor assembly. 02N2 generating plants ability to produce nuclear propulsion plant grade nitrogen was in question. NAVSSES determined the 02N2 plant max purity is 99% instead of 99.5% (nuclear grade) and that the 02N2 plant were not installed to meet system demands at the 99.5% purity requirement. Diesel work center continued to support liberty boat operation while in Australia. Engineering Department E-Division reported that the Ships force repaired #4 Ship's Service Turbine Generator amplydine following discovery of shorted brushes. (5) Engineering Department M-Division  - January – #8 SSTG circulating water pump motor bearing failed and was overhauled by ship's force. #4A Main Feed Pump failed and the rotor assembly was replaced at sea by ship's force. (6) The Supply Department reported that throughout the second half of the deployment, a high level of April material support and personal services was provided to the ship and Air Wing (CVW-11) Team. Control Division (S-1) maintained a continuous flow of critical parts throughout the deployment, and utilized an untested logistic pipeline required for support of North Pacific Operations. Two reorders totaling 4094 line items at NSD Subic Bay were routed through Atsugi, Japan and Adak, Alaska. The quality assurance team rescreens of not in stock and not carried material produced an average issue of 40 NMCS/PMCS and 28 awaiting parts requisitions per month. The Aviation Support Division (S-6) exceeded all COMNAVAIRPAC standards in providing support for the embarked airwing and AIMD. In spite of the long NORPAC logistics pipeline, 5-6 maintained a low average of 119 off ship NMCS/PMCS requisitions, 360 awaiting parts components and achieved a 95.1% rotatable pool effectiveness rate for all aircraft. The Material Division (S-8) continued their fine operational support by coordinating and moving massive quantities of material. In the Indian Ocean, more than 17 tons of cargo were carrier onboard delivered (COD) onto the ship from Diego Garcia and Masirah, and 215 tons were received via MLSF ship, and almost 40 tons of retrograde material shipped. The heavy flow continued in February with an extended inport period in Subic Bay, and did not let up the remainder of the deployment. The Data Processing Division (S-7) processed over 500,000 records ranging from financial to 3M Maintenance Data. The Food Service Division (S-2) received more than 1,000 tons (worth $1.5 million) in food stores to feed the crew almost a half million rations. The Sales Division (S-3) provided foreign merchandise and tons of canned soda to boost monthly s les over $300 thousand. Additionally, they averaged 3,600 haircuts, 4,000 pieces of dry cleaning and 55 tons of laundry per month. Disbursing Division (S-4) provided services for 6,000 ship's company and embarked airwing personnel during the deployment. They paid out average monthly disbursements of $3.7 million, including an average payroll of $2.6 million; monthly deposits averaged $2,642,500.00; average daily cash outflow was $50,900.00 during this period. Over 23,657 OCR documents were transmitted for adjusting pay records. The Wardroom Division (S-5) served more than $100,000.00 in meals and maintained daily service for over 500 occupants of the Enterprise Hilton” (Ref. 329B-1983).

 

Distinguished visitors to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) for January 1983 – Ref. 329B-1983

 

Honorable Ray 0' Connor

Premier W. Australia

CAPT Underhill

Seventh Fleet Liaison

Mr. Sinclair

Minister of Defense for W. Australia

Air Chief Marshall McNamara

Chief of Defense Force Stafffor W. Australia

Vice Admiral Leach

Chief of Naval Staff for W. Australia

Major Walk Kowalewski

Defense Attache for W. Australia

CDR Peter McCloskey

Staff Officer for W. Australia

David Parker

W. Australian Leader of Opposition Party

Kim Beazley

Federal Parlimentarian, Member for SWAN, Australian Labor Party (ALP)

Tom Butler

State President, ALP

Michael Beahan

State Secretary, ALP

David Fisher

State Manager for R & I Banks

Arthur Povah

Acting State Manager, ABC

Simon Had field

Editor, Western Mall

Dan 0. Sullivan

Editor-in-Chief, W. Australia

Keith Smart

President, Australian American Association

Graham Keep

Manager for Reserve Bank

Stephen Ecton

United States Consul

Ross Ptorey, Paul Langoulant

Channel 9 TV, Australia

Robert Brown, Peter Makowski

Channel 7 TV, Australia

John Mort, Don Smith, Eddi Mills

A.B.C. TV, Australian

Dick Siudak

Australian Flying Magazine

Lester Glenister

Sunday Times Newspaper

Jim Downes, Chris Doing,

Sunday Times Newspaper

Scott Harford-Davis

Four Corners (ABC TV Sydney)

Nigel Wilson

Melborne Newspaper

Nick Ellis

Western Mail Newspaper

John Altham

Daily News Newspaper

Andrew May, Bill Plowman

West Australian Newspaper

Alan Hale

Weekend News Newspaper

 

     Crossing the Java Sea Enterprise entered the South China Sea, and headed to the Philippines Sea, pulling in for a port call, mooring at NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 8 February 1983. February 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) The Marine Detachment aboard Enterprise en route to the Philippines, prepared and instituted a plan to repel pirates known to be operating in the area. Enterprise conducted Cope Thunder, a Joint air wing/Air Force exercise providing training in joint strike tactics during February. (2) Engineering Department A-Division reported all systems operated well during the cold weather operations in the Northern Pacific with all winches and capstans having virtually no problems. Enterprise sailed from NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 27 February 1983, arriving on the 8th, to rendezvous with other “elements” of the Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot. February 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Air Department V-1 Division reported that the Flight deck landing area was re-nonskidded during SRA at Subic Bay, R.P. (2) V-2 Division reports completion of SRA. (3) Communications Department reported that the majority of February was spent inport Subic Bay, R. P. During this period several departmental personnel attended Military Customs Inspector, 3M Surface, Antenna Maintenance and Command Training Team classes. Also, during this period extensive antenna maintenance was performed. Enterprise Communications personnel visited several ships and NAVCOMMSTA San Migue. (4) Damage Control and Repair Department reported “WestPac” upkeep in Subic Bay, R.P., with SRF and shipboard personnel completing 370 job actions by SRF and shipboard personnel. (5) Deck Department conducted extensive maintenance/preservation on the ship's sides. (6) Engineering Department A-Division reported that the Hydraulics shop received major assistance during availability at SRF Subic Bay for the island elevator, #2 ACEL door winch cable and steering gear relief valves. The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration shop maintained the ship in a comfortable environment with three units overhauled by SRF Subic. (7) Engineering Department E-Division reported that in preparation for Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE), #5 and /I6 switchgear, #2 and #3 switchgear, and #1, #2, #I3 and #4 diesel switch gear rooms were rehabilitated. (8) Engineering Department M-Division reported that #8 SSTG trip throttle valve was refaced by SRF Subic Bay, eliminating recurrent steam leaks. (9) Operations Department reported that AN/SMQ-6 System completely overhauled during Subic in port period (by NAVOCEANCOMFAL). A damaged reflector on the AN/SPN-43A antenna was replaced. (10) Engineering Department A-Division reported that Catapult shop completed ORSE Inspection with an excellent on material condition and evolutions. Soviet surveillance continued as Enterprise and her Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot consorts steamed north through the Tsushima Strait and into the Sea of Japan (is the eastern channel of the Korea Strait, which lies between Korea and Japan, connecting the Sea of Japan and the East China Sea) to participate in Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83, a 16 day joint amphibious exercise with ROK forces, supporting the landings and provided interdiction support en route Sasebo, Japan commencing on 28 February 1983. February 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Air Department V-2 Division reported that one three hour CQ period completed 163 traps. (2) Air Department V-3 Division reported that there were 387 total crunch free moves. (3) Carrier Air Wing Eleven made a final preparation for Sea of Japan and Northern Pacific operations. (4) Air Department V-3 Division reported that there were 387 total crunch free moves in February. (5) Communications Department reported that the majority of February was spent inport Subic Bay, R. P. During this period several departmental personnel attended Military Customs Inspector, 3M Surface, Antenna Maintenance and Command Training Team classes. Also, during this period extensive antenna maintenance was performed. Enterprise Communications personnel visited several ships and NAVCOMMSTA San Miguel. (6) Weapons Department reported that due to the political and environmental issues surrounding "Nuclear Power,” Marine Detachment was tasked with providing an overall security plan to protect the ship en route to Sasebo, Japan. This plan covered all contingencies including air, surface and subsurface attacks. The port visit was uneventful. (7) Operations Department reported that preparations for Team Spirit 83 operations commence in the Philippines Operating Area and Refresher of CV pilots was conducted and provided Carrier CQ’s services to VRC-50 and VQ-1.

 

Distinguished visitors to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) for February 1983 – Ref. 329B-1983

 

Mrs. Francesca, Mrs. Isobel Pioornell

Readers Digest, Far East Edition Pioornell

Philippine Guests

U. S. Guests

BGEN Baladad

COL Paiso

COL 0' Campo

CAPT Fisher

COL Capa

COL Strigling

CDR Regula

MAJ Abraham

CDR Buaquen

LT Honda

COL Subala

COL Gugen

COL Jarque

MAJ Henneman

COL Sapelo

Ambassador H. Monroe Brown, U. S. Ambassador to New Zealand

COL Amano

Ambassador & Mrs. Richard L. Walker, U. S. Ambassador to South Korea

COL Francisco

CAPT Shapiro with 25 guests (Filipino families) COMUSNAVPHIL Chief of Staff

CAPT Matic

Mrs. Gordon with 25-30 guests, Olongapo Mayor's wife

MAJ Gill

Philippine Guest Titles

COL Abadia

 

COL & Mrs. Virgilio David,

AFP, Deputy Narcotics Command/Executive Officer, Narcotics Command

LTCOL Ferdinand Lagman

PC, Commander, Metropolitan District Command

LCDR Edgardo Isreal, PN

Assistant Chief of Staff, Intelligence, SUBCOM

CAPT & Mrs. Augusto Angcanan

PC, Commanding Officer, 164 PC Company, Metropolitan District Command

CAPT & Mrs. Nester Sanarers

PC, Intelligence Officer, Metropolitan District Command

 

U. S. Guests

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Reilly

Regional Director for Operations, U. S. Naval Investigative Service Regional Office, Philippines

Mr. & Mrs. Carl Merritt

Special Agent in Charge, U. S. Naval, Investigative Service Resident Agent, Subic Bay

Mr. Lance Arnold

Investigative Service Resident Agenvy, Cubi Pt., Special Agent, U. S. Naval Investigative Service

M r & Mrs. Daniel Fernandez

Investigative Service Resident Agency, Cubi Pt., Special Agent, U. S. Naval Investigative Service Agency, Subic Bay

Mr. Ebata and Mr. Todaka

Media representative from Pacific Sea Power

Review (Japanese Publication)

 

     Coming from a port visit in Hong Kong, Soviet reaction to the presence of Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot had already commenced upon departure from Subic Bay, and on 2 March 1983, two TU-95/BEAR D reconnaissance aircraft reconnoitered Enterprise as the ship operated 30NM off Subic Bay. This reaction continued at a high level as the battle group steam north through the Tsushima Strait and into the Sea of Japan as a participant in Exercise Team Spirit 83 en route Sasebo, Japan. Enterprise and her Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot consorts participated in Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83, a 16 day joint amphibious exercise with ROK forces, in the Sea of Japan with USS Midway (CV-41) and connecting seas (Korea Strait (is a sea passage between Japan and South Korea, connecting the East China Sea and the Sea of Japan in the northwest Pacific Ocean. The East China Sea is bounded on the east by Kyūshū and the Ryukyu Islands of Japan, on the south by the South China Sea, and on the west by the Asian continent. It connects with the Sea of Japan through the Korea Strait; it opens in the north to the Yellow Sea), supporting the landings and provided interdiction support en route Sasebo, Japan from 28 February to 20 March 1983. Numerous” civil aircraft penetrated her carrier control zone during the evolution, seven unauthorized flights being so dangerous as to be reported to Commander, Naval Force Japan. Carrier Air Wing Eleven wing provided support to amphibious task force during simulated assault. Interdiction support also provided Operations Department reported that Enterprise provided support for Amphibious Operations. Stand off reconnaissance activity by Soviet aircraft begins. Because of the stringent EMCON requirements of Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83, ten Case III departure/recovery evolutions were conducted without benefit of Enterprise SPN-43 CATCC radar and TACAN. Throughout Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83operations in the Okinawa and Japan OPAREA’s Enterprise’s Carrier Control Zone was penetrated by numerous civil fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft. Seven reports of unauthorized flights through the Carrier Control Zone was addressed to Commander, Naval Force Japan. Personnel from NOCD Misawa augmented Meteorology Division to provide tailored ASW support to Battle Group during upcoming FleetEx 83-1 (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D-EQNEEDF Note-Command History Report mentions the South China Sea). Upon completing Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83, Enterprise pulled in for a port call at Sasebo, Japan on 21 March 1983, to conduct the first visit to that port by a nuclear-powered ship since we last called there in 1968. Enterprise made a port call at Sasebo, Japan from 21 to 25 March 1983 (Underway the morning of the 26th), but unlike her first visit (1968), no major incidents occurred other than “a few” peaceful demonstrations by Japanese opposed to her brief stay. The previous visit had caused widespread riots, but this time Enterprise crewmembers found the Japanese people very friendly, with only a few large but peaceful demonstrations. In fact, in true Enterprise tradition no major incidents occurred, and our very successful visit helped clear the way for future nuclear-powered ship visits to Japan. Damage Control and Repair Department reported that Enterprise is the first nuclear surface combatant visiting a Japanese port in 15 years. After standing out of Sasebo on 26 March 1983, Enterprise operated independently before rendezvousing with Midway on 30 March 1983 for the transit north through the Sea of Japan and out the Tsugaru Strait en route  FleetEx 83-1 in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. March 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Air Department V-3 Division reported that there were 1,386 total crunch free moves. (2) Damage Control and Repair Department reported that Enterprise is the first nuclear surface combatant visiting a Japanese port in 15 years. (3) Weapons Department Marine Detachment held an award ceremony which included the presentation of 3 Navy Achievement Medals.

 

Distinguished visitors to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) for March 1983 – Ref. 329B-1983

 

The Honorable Young Sun Kim

Chairman, Defense Sub Committe, Republic of Korea (ROK)

GEN Sonh Tae Kim

Korea (ROK)

GEN Joon Yul So

Chief of Staff, ROK Air Force

The Honorable Suk Min Yoon

Commanding General, ROK Army

The Honorable Myung Soo Hwang

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Young Soc Kim

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Jin Kil Chung

Member Defense Sub Committee ( ROK)

The Honorable Kun Hwan Ryu

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Kan Dong Lee

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Jung Yeon Cho

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Duk Kyu Kim

Member Defense Sub Committee (ROK)

The Honorable Noh Sik Kim

DCINC UNC

LTGEN Winfield W. Scott, Jr.

ROK Army

LTG Hong Han Kim

DIR Joint Staff, JCS, ROK

LTG Sang Hoon Lee

1st Vice CNO, ROK Navy

VADM Tae Yong Kim

Assistant Chief of Staff

MAJGEN James V. Cox

Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, Pacific Command

RADM James G. Stroms, III

Commander, Naval Forces Korea

RADM Hogg

Commander, Task Force 75

BGEN Pointer

U. S. Army

H i s Excellency Song Hyup Kim

Prime Minister, ROK

The Honorable Sung Min Yoon

Minister of Defense, ROK

The Honorable John Chan Lee

Member Defense Sub Committee, ROK

GEN Yoon Ho Kim

Chairman, JCS, ROK

GEN Robert W. Sennewald

CINC UNC CFC

GEN Hwang Yung Si

Chief of Staff, ROK Army

ADM Ch, Kyung Whan

CNO ROKN

GEN Noh Yong Park

DCINC CFC

The Honorable Kap Jong Ji

Member, Defense Sub Committee, ROK

RADM ( Ret) Yong Kil Cho

SECGEN to Prime Minister, ROK

LTGEN In Ki Kim

Vice Chief of Staff, ROK Air Force

LTGEN June Byung Park

CDR, Def Sec Committee, ROK

LTGEN Jae Yoon Kim

CDR, CAC

LTGEN Hee Jae Park

Second Vice CNO, ROK Navy

VADM Song Hwa Choe

Commander ROK Fleet

MAJGEN Chul Ho An

DCOFS CFC

Mr. Paul M. Cleveland

MIN COUN/DCM U. S. Embassy

VADM Holcomb

Commander, SEVENTH Fleet

MGEN Haebel

Commander, TF 79

RADM Brown

Commander, TF 70

Mr. H. Kimura

Former Secretary of Lower House Member, Japan

Mr. I. Masuoka

Former Secretary of Lower House Member, Japan

Mr. H. Funada

Diet Member, Japan

Mr. K. Yosano

Diet Member, Japan

Mr. K. Obuchi

Diet Member, Japan

Mr. N. Shirahama

Diet Member, Japan

Miss P. Clapp

U. S. Embassy

Mr. M. Nakayama

Diet Member, Former LDP Foreign Ploicy Chairman

Mr. Terazono

Chairman MBC, Former Governor Kogoshima

Mr. J. Kishi

MBC

CAPT E. E. Lindsey

Commander, Fleet Activity, Sasebo, Japan

Mr. M. Ysuji

President, Tsuji Industries

Mr. Y. Tsuji

President, Nishi-Kyushu Warehouse Co.

Dr. T. Nanakuma

President, Nishu-Nippon Food Service Center

VADM Esterling

Commander, Naval Air Force, Pacific

C. J. Corica

Mayor of Alameda

Ann Diament

Mayor-Elect of Alameda

George Tekai

Mr. Sulu (Starship Enterprise)

 

     Enterprise and USS Midway (CV-41) Carrier Battle Group (CVBG), Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot participated in FleetEx 83-1, rendezvousing with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 9 April 1983. All three carriers then completed a “counterclockwise sweep” of the northwestern Pacific. At midday on 18 April 1983, Enterprise detached for home. Admiral Foley noted that FleetEx 83-1 “…fully integrated three carrier battle force operations; theater wide operations in support of the battle force; integration of the full range of air force maritime capabilities into battle force and theater naval operations, and incorporation of both Canadian and Coast Guard units into the battle force.” On board for Enterprise’s return to Alameda was actor George Takei, who had portrayed Lieutenant Commander Sulu, the “helmsman” of the “starship Enterprise” in the television and film series Star Trek. Enterprise and Midway Carrier Battle Group (CVBG), Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot participated in FleetEx 83-1 (rendezvousing with Coral Sea on 9 April 1983) from 26 March to 20 April 1983. All three carriers then completed a “counterclockwise sweep” of the northwestern Pacific. March 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Air Department V-1 Division supported 24 hour flight ops in Northern Pacific. (2) Air Department V-2 Division conducted Fleetex 83-1 in the Northern Pacific with 100 percent availability of catapult/arresting gear and plat/lens equipment. (3) Carrier Air Wing Eleven provided excellent training in anti-air and anti-submarine warfare. (4) Operations Department reported that Soviet air reconnaissance is heavy while surface surveillance in nearly non-existent. USAF KC-10 tankers provide a rare opportunity to derive extremely beneficial training for Navy Aircrews. FleetEx 83-1 operations used KA-6 aircraft to refuel from KC-10, and then redistributed fuel to CVBF aircraft during composite CVBF/USAF strike training exercises. KC-10's provided tactical flexibility by maintaining large volumes of airborne fuel. This flexibility permitted the conduct of intercepts at realistic speeds and extended cycle times. (50 Safety Department applied lessons learned from a previous excursion to the North Pacific, Safety personnel were involved in all phases of the ship's operation, while encountering adverse weather, and pitching decks from January to April. A “rare opportunity” was provided for both naval and Air Force crews via aerial refueling with the latter’s KC-10 tankers, which refueled KA-6s, in turn refueling naval aircraft. The large Extender fuel loads “provided tactical flexibility” and thus permitted naval air intercepts “at realistic speeds and extended cycle times.” Soviet aerial reconnaissance was “heavy,” but unusually, Russian surface surveillance was “nearly non-existent. En route to Alameda, Enterprise Engineering and Reactor Departments commenced their annual Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) on 17 April 1983 ORSE. En route to Alameda, Enterprise Engineering and Reactor Departments successfully completed their annual ORSE on 23 April 1983. With LCDR Sulu (George Takei), helmsman of starship Enterprise, on hand, Enterprise arrived in San Francisco Bay on 28 April 1983. April 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Engineering Department E-Division reported that the ship successfully passed ORSE. Ship's force recut slip rings for #3, #4, and #7 Ship's Service Turbine Generators. (2) Engineering Department M-Division experienced excessively low vacuum on #1 Main Condenser. As a result, #1 Main Engine was placed in emergency use only status. Subsequent inspection by shipyard upon return to Alameda revealed an eroded hole concealed by a structural beam in the air box. The hole was patched by Mare Island Naval Shipyard personnel. Engineering M-Division participated in, and successfully passed the 17 to 23 April 1983 ORSE. Coming from a port visit in Hong Kong, Soviet reaction to the presence of Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot had already commenced upon departure from Subic Bay, and on 2 March 1983, two TU-95/BEAR D reconnaissance aircraft reconnoitered Enterprise as the ship operated 30NM off Subic Bay. This reaction continued at a high level as the battle group steam north through the Tsushima Strait and into the Sea of Japan as a participant in Exercise Team Spirit 83 en route Sasebo, Japan. Enterprise and her Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot consorts participated in Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83, a 16 day joint amphibious exercise with ROK forces, in the Sea of Japan with Midway and connecting seas (Korea Strait (is a sea passage between Japan and South Korea, connecting the East China Sea and the Sea of Japan in the northwest Pacific Ocean. The East China Sea is bounded on the east by Kyūshū and the Ryukyu Islands of Japan, on the south by the South China Sea, and on the west by the Asian continent. It connects with the Sea of Japan through the Korea Strait; it opens in the north to the Yellow Sea), supporting the landings and provided interdiction support en route Sasebo, Japan from 28 February to 20 March 1983 (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D - EQNEEDF Note-Command History Report mentions the South China Sea). Carrier Air Wing Eleven wing provided support to amphibious task force during simulated assault. Interdiction support also provided Operations Department reported that Enterprise provided support for Amphibious Operations. Stand off reconnaissance activity by Soviet aircraft begins. Because of the stringent EMCON requirements of Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83, ten Case III departure/recovery evolutions were conducted without benefit of Enterprise SPN-43 CATCC radar and TACAN. Throughout Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83operations in the Okinawa and Japan OPAREA’s Enterprise’s Carrier Control Zone was penetrated by numerous civil fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft. Seven reports of unauthorized flights through the Carrier Control Zone was addressed to Commander, Naval Force Japan. Personnel from NOCD Misawa augmented Meteorology Division to provide tailored ASW support to Battle Group during upcoming FleetEx 83-1. Upon completing Valiant Flex/Team Spirit 83, Enterprise pulled in for a port call at Sasebo, Japan on 21 March 1983, to conduct the first visit to that port by a nuclear-powered ship since we last called there in 1968. Enterprise made a port call at Sasebo, Japan from 21 to 25 March 1983 (Underway the morning of the 26th), but unlike her first visit (1968), no major incidents occurred other than “a few” peaceful demonstrations by Japanese opposed to her brief stay. The previous visit had caused widespread riots, but this time Enterprise crewmembers found the Japanese people very friendly, with only a few large but peaceful demonstrations. In fact, in true Enterprise tradition no major incidents occurred, and our very successful visit helped clear the way for future nuclear-powered ship visits to Japan. Damage Control and Repair Department reported that Enterprise is the first nuclear surface combatant visiting a Japanese port in 15 years. After standing out of Sasebo on 26 March 1983, Enterprise operated independently before rendezvousing with Midway on 30 March 1983 for the transit north through the Sea of Japan and out the Tsugaru Strait en route FleetEx 83-1 in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. March 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Air Department V-3 Division reported that there were 1,386 total crunch free moves. (2) Damage Control and Repair Department reported that Enterprise is the first nuclear surface combatant visiting a Japanese port in 15 years. (3) Weapons Department Marine Detachment held an award ceremony which included the presentation of 3 Navy Achievement Medals. Deployment end and April 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Air Department V-2 Division ended the 82-83 deployment which included operations in the Indian Ocean, Western Pacific and Northern Pacific. A total of 10,734 cats/traps were accomplished since the start of the cruise. (2) Air Department V-3 Division reported 774 total crunch free moves. Total of crunch free moves from beginning of cruise: 7,600. Total of hours of conflag Watch from 1 January to 28 April: 5,664. (3) Communications Department sent 57,000 messages and received over 243,000. Additionally, in excess of 6 million Xerox copies were run off and distributed. (4) Engineering Departmnt A-Division reported that the catapult fill and blowdown system continued to work well although frequent component adjustments were required from February to April. (5) The Medical Department completed a successful Antimalario Prophylaxis Program in November 1982 prior to the Mombasa, Kenya port visits. Of the total number of personnel (5,500), none experienced symptoms of malaria. Following a February 1983 20 day port sit in Subic Bay, RP 27 personnel were diagnosed with infectious hepatitis and eventually medevaced to Naval Hospital, Yokosuka, Japan and to Adak, Alaska for further transfer to CONUS medical treatment facilities. A health record information system was developed as a means of identifying all personnel by name, rank, DOB, SSN, and work center for inclusion in the word processor. It is estimated that this data base will be completed by April 1984. It will provide information on status of immunizations, blood type, and date of last physical examination. (6) The Dental Department provided all phases of dental treatment to ship's company and embarked airwing and staff personnel, as well as emergency care to the remainder of “Battle Group Foxtrot” during the closing months of the 1982-83 STPAC deployment. Dental Department personnel also played key roles in organization and management of Battle Dressing Stations and support in Mass Casualty Drills. (7) During the deployment to “WestPac” and the Indian Ocean, the Damage Control and Repair Department continued to utilize the “WestPac” Work Package procedures to prepare for the availabilities that were scheduled during the remainder of the cruise. Several automated procedures were developed for use on the ship that allowed accurate inputs from all departments to be added to the “WestPac” Work Package (WWP) and forwarded on to various repair activities which utilized this information to plan and estimate jobs to be done for the ship. The Damage Control and Repair Department worked closely with PERA (CV) representatives to create a WWP that would allow the current WWP data base to be transmitted to CONUS activities to allow for early planning of additional work for SRA-83 and follow on activities. Major rework of 100 plus watertight and ballistic doors; overhauls of 50 joiner doors and the entire drinking fountain system were carried out. Through the efforts of the Repair, Damage Control and Habitability Divisions the internal work request system reduced the out of commission lists throughout the ship. During the deployment to the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean, the availability of ship's High Capacity Fog/Foam (HCFF) and Aqueous Fog Forming Foam Twin Agent Unit (AFFF/TAU) to the flight deck, hangar bays and propulsion systems was uninterrupted and outstanding PMS Required Action Rate (RAR) statistics were routinely achieved. No major fires occurred in 1982. (8) Safety Departmnt returned to NAS, Alameda with no flight related mishaps in which the ship was considered a contributing factor. Reportable ground mishaps and aircraft crunches were also NIL (9) The Training Department assisted U. S. Customs officials in officially clearing the Enterprise through U. S. Customs upon her return from deployment. This involved a pre-arrival military customs inspections, and the collection and processing of customs forms from 5,120 ship's company and airwing personnel assigned to Enterprise. (10) Weapons Department G-2 Division conducted a Ammunition offload. (11) G-4 Division reported a safe, expeditious Ammunition offload. (12) During the second half of the Western Pacific/Indian Ocean deployment, Deck Department conducted 25 UNREPS receiving over nine million gallons of JP-5, transferring 2,741 lifts and 25 aircraft engines by CONREP. Over 200,000 gallons of DFM were received with 308,000 gallons DFM delivered. Enterprise spent 77.5 hours alongside during the period January to April 1983. (13) The Marine Detachment held an award ceremony which included the presentation of 3 Navy Achievement Medals. Her aircraft utilized the opportunity to deliver a wide variety of ordnance, both live and inert, including AGM-84A Harpoons. (14) During the present deployment, the Deck Department has conducted 33 UNREPS, receiving over 10 million gallons of JP-5, and has transferred 1725 lifts and 22 engines by CONREP. Over 428,000 gallons of Distillate Fuel Marine (DFM) were received with 373,000 gallons DFM delivered. All total, Enterprise has spent 75.5 hours alongside. Tours in Singapore and Mombasa were subsidized to the tune of $36,000.00 by Special Services. Annually Special Services disburses about $500,000.00 towards the crews recreation for tours, such as those already mentioned, discounts for on base activities, such as the numerous free recreational services paid for by the fund in Subic Bay. Special Services had a busy year providing recreation events on board and tours/transportation in liberty ports. Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hi., Subic Bay, Philippines, Perth, Australia, Singapore, Mombasa, Kenya and Sasebo, Japan. During the cruise CVW-11 had flown approximately 29,000 hours and recorded over 11,000 traps. CVW-11 Squadrons include: VF-114, Aardvarks, Fighter Squadron, Grumman, F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter; VF-213, Black Lions, Fighter Squadron, Grumman,  F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter: VA-22, Fighting Redcocks, Attack Squadron, Vought, A-7E Corsair II, Jet Attack Aircraft; VA-94, Shrikes, Attack Squadron, Vought, A-7E Corsair II, Jet Attack Aircraft; VA-95, Green Lizards, Attack Squadron, Grumman, A-6E / KA-6D Intruder, Jet Attack Bomber, Tanker; VAW-117, Wallbangers, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, Grumman, E-2C Hawkeye, Electronics; VAQ-133, Wizards, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, Grumman, EA-6B Prowler, Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation; HS-6, Indians, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, Sikorsky, SH-3H Sea King - Anti-submarine; VS-37, Sawbucks, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, Lockheed, S-3A Viking - Anti-Submarine. USS Bainbridge (CGN-25) and USS George Philip (FFG-12) joined Enterprise as part of her task force. Her 17th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 25 November 1961 with Captain V. P. de Poix in command (1 September 1982 to 28 April 1983)” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 84A, 329B-1982/1983 & 362D).

 

 01/09/82 to 28/04/82

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

humanitarian service ribbon

Humanitarin Service Medal (HS)

(first star)

23 October 1982

 

 

 

10th WestPac

Middle East

17th FWFD

Ref. 329B-1972/1973, 1271 & 1271A

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

FIFTHEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

15-MONTH COMPLEX OVERHAUL & ALTERATIONS AT NORFOLK NAVY YARD VA. – SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS – LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(21 March 1983 to 31 December 1984)

Part 1 – (21 March to 27 April 1983)

Part 2 – (28 April 1983)

Part 3 – (29 April to 1 December 1983)

Part 4 – (2 December 1983 to 23 April 1984)

Part 5 – (24 April to 31 December 1984)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

Part 2 – (28 April 1983)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4