CHAPTER XXXVII

Part 3 – (29 April to 1 December 1983)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

FIFTHEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

15-MONTH COMPLEX OVERHAUL & ALTERATIONS AT NORFOLK NAVY YARD VA. – SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS – LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(21 March 1983 to 31 December 1984)

Part 1 – (21 March to 27 April 1983)

Part 2 – (28 April 1983)

Part 3 – (29 April to 1 December 1983)

Part 4 – (2 December 1983 to 23 April 1984)

Part 5 – (24 April to 31 December 1984)

 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Pusan, the largest port city in South Korea and is located on the southeastern-most tip of the Korean peninsula from 25 to 29 April 1983” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “After steaming through the Gulf of Aden and Bab el Mandeb Strait, USS America (CV-66) reached the Red Sea, transiting the Suez Canal, the fourth time since her commission USS America (CV-66) headed for Souda Bay on 4 May 1983” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) reached an anchorage at Souda Bay on 7 May 1983” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “On 9 May 1983, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Charles Reynolds McGrail, Jr. , USNA '57, as Commanding Officer, ending second North Pacific and her 25th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. An F-4S assigned to VF-161 strikes the ramp on approach, setting the flight deck of Midway on fire before going over the side in the western Pacific on 4 June 1983. The RIO ejects safely while the pilot could not the recovered. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 28th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 34th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 47th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (2 June to 8 August 1983)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 84A).   

 

 25/02/83 to 09/05/83

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Battle Efficiency Award (Navy "E" Ribbon), marking her as the outstanding carrier in the Pacific Fleet

Jan 1982 to Jun 1983

2nd NorPac

Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation

Western Pacific, NorPac and Indian Ocean

*28 Dec 1983 to 1 May 1984*

same

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

same

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces. The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location” (Ref. 1181D).

*Ref. - 1081 reported July 1982 to May 1984 consisting of 29th WestPac/ 1st NorPac, 2nd NorPac, 30th, 31st & 32nd WestPac

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

 “After five days at anchorage in Souda Bay, USS America (CV-66) got underway for Malaga, Spain on 11 May 1983” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) reached Malaga, Spain on 14 May 1983 for a nine-day port visit” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “Back home there were special discounts on ball games, concerts, Great America, and Marine World Africa USA. Following her post-deployment standdown, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) then underwent an “extensive” Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 15 May 1983. Engineering Department M-Division reported that excessive low vacuum on #1 Main Condenser was occurred. As a result, #1 Main Engine was placed in emergency use only status. Subsequent inspection by shipyard upon return to Alameda revealed an eroded hole concealed by a structural beam in the air box. The hole was patched by Mare Island Naval Shipyard personnel. Upon return from deployment and the beginning of the SRA, the Supply Department began aggressively improving its spaces and facilities and undertaking new programs to prepare for the next cycle of predeployment exercises” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) conducted power projection training over Korea and Okinawa and supported landing exercises in the Philippines while operating in the Philippine Sea during her first World Tour and fifteenth “WestPac” in the Aleutians, refereeing to the Shumagin islands, Aleutian chain, Alaska of Islands, which extend westward from the Alaskan mainland for 1,100 miles, and the Bering Sea islands, including the Pribilofs, St. Matthew, Hall, St. Lawrence, and Little Diomede. The Aleutian chain is volcanic in origin, with a maritime climate in which wind is ever present. Vegetation at higher elevations consists of dwarf shrub communities, mainly willowand crowberry. Meadows and marshes of herbs, sedges, and grasses are plentiful, and some islands have ericaceous bogs. Sea ice does not extend to the Aleutians and permafrost is generally absent; however, sea ice is an important feature of the Bering Sea. Bird Conservation Regions - BCR Map (Ref. 45 & 72).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines from 15 to 19 May 1983” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) departed Malaga on 23 May 1983 after a nine-day port visit, arriving on the 14th and headed for her home port” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) crossed the Equator on 24 May 1983” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Singapore, officially the Republic of Singapore, is a Southeast Asian island city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometers (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south) from 26 to 31 May 1983” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “By the end of May 1983, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in the midst of an “extensive” Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California commencing on 15 May 1983; arriving from her tenth “WestPac” deployment on 28 April 1983. May 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) commenced rework/verification of 75 major test installations and 400 pieces of ground support equipment in support of the Ship's Selected Repair Availability (SRA). (2) AIMD Major Inspection reported that Post Deployment Material Inspection GRADE was Outstanding. (3) Air Department V-1 Division commenced ship's force rehabilitation of 150 spaces. (4) Damage Control and Repair Department reports: Reactor Resin Discharge, Major AFFF Conversion and repairs. Over 135 firemain and main drainage valves were replaced by ship's force and contractors. COMNAVAIRPAC Readiness and Training Representative positively endorsed the Damage Control and Repair Department Organization to the Commanding Officer” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 11 December 1982 to 2 June 1983” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 2 June 1983, with Captain Charles Reynolds McGrail, Jr. , USNA '57, as Commanding Officer, on her 30th WestPac and her 26th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 29th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 35th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 48th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(2 June to 14 August 1983)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (26th Forward Deployed)

30th WestPac

CVW-5

NF

2 Jun 1983

14 Aug 1983

Western Pacific

48th FWFD

74-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF)  115-120

RF-4B

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VA-93

Ravens -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E /                     A6-E/KA-6D /

*A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2B

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -        Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system

 

    “USS New Jersey (BB-62); USS Morton (DD-948); USS Meyerkord (FF-1058); USS Francis Hammond (FF-1067); USS John A. Moore (FFG-19) and USNS Mispillion (T-AO-105) joined up with USS Midway (CV-41) as part of her task force” (Reef. 84A).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) met USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) on 9 June 1983” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “After steaming through the Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea, East China Sea, Yellow Sea, Sea of Japan, Gulf of Thailand, Java Sea, South China Sea, Straits of Malacca, a narrow sea, where she conducted air defense exercises over Singapore, Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean, Gulf of Aden, Bab-el-Mandeb, Red Sea, Gulf of Suez Canal, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) transited the Suez Canal North, the first time on 15 June 1983 and then entered the Mediterranean Sea” (Ref. 1275Y1 & 1275Y9).

 

    “Captain Robert L. Leuschner, Jr. assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 17 June 1983, relieving Captain Robert J. Kelly, ninth Commanding Officer, serving from 23 February 1980. VADM Robert F. Shultz, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Air Warfare) was the guest speaker” (Ref. 329A-11th reported & 329B-1982 & 1270). 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Augusta Bay, Sicily, a town and comune in the province of Syracuse, located on the eastern coast of Sicily (Italy) on 18 June 1983. The city faces the Ionian Sea. The city is one of the main harbors in Italy” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in the midst of an “extensive” Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California commencing on 15 May 1983; arriving from her tenth “WestPac” deployment on 28 April 1983. June 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Engineering Department E-Division reported that the Flight deck runway center line lights and red-and-white spot lights were refurbished. Cleaned and inspected all major ship's service buses and propulsion plant load centers. E-Division assumed responsibility for electrical support of habitability from DC department. June 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (2) Air Department V-1 Division completed flight deck re-nonskid and conducted training for next at-sea period, including fire fighting and ALRE Training. (3) Communications Department reported that a CMS training visit was held onboard in preparation for the CMS Inspection. Work was begun on the renovation of the message center and the NAVMACS V-2 System was removed making it necessary to transfer the communications guard t o NTCC Alameda. (4) Damage Control and Repair Department was awarded the Habitability “H” and runner up for DC Excellence award by COMNAVAIRPAC. (5) Supply Department reported that Commander D. A. Tarantino, SC, USN, relieved Commander E. Auerbach, SC, USN, as Supply Officer, on 17 June 1983. The S-2 and S-5 Divisions hosted the reception for the Enterprise Change of Command Reception” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy from 24 to 25 June 1983” (Ref. 1275Y1)” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Cannes (French pronunciation: ​[kan], in Occitan Canas) is a city located on the French Riviera (It is a commune of France located in the Alpes-Maritimes department, a busy tourist destination and host of the annual Cannes Film Festival, Midem, and Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity) from 27 June to 5 July 1983” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 8 July 1983” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “In July 1983, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) C-1A Greyhound was transferred to VRC-30, which was to provide future COD support” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Ranger (CV-61) departed Alameda, California 15 July 1983, embarking CVW-9 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif. She will under go her 17th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet, her fourth Indian Ocean deployment on her first North Arabian Sea and Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment operating with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. Prior to her deployment conducted west coast operations on 17 October 1982 to 14 July 1983, entering the history books on 21 March 1983 when an all-woman flight crew flying a C-1A Trader from VRC-40 "Truckin' Traders" landed aboard the carrier, commanded by Lt. Elizabeth M. Toedt and the crew included Lt.(j.g.) Cheryl A. Martin, Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Gina Greterman and Aviation Machinist's Mate Airman Robin Banks. Reclassified to CV-61 on 30 June 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War, earning 13 battle stars for service in Vietnam. She will under go her 19th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 10 August 1957” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-9 (NG)

(15 July 1983 to 29 February 1984)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-211

Checkmates -            Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NG100

F-14A

VF-24

Fighting Renegades -            Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NG200

F-14A

VA-192

Golden Dragons -             Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NG300

A-7E

VA-195

Dambusters -             Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NG400

A-7E

VA-165

Boomers -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NG500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-112

Golden Hawks - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-138

Yellow Jackets  -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -    Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-8

Eightballers - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -  Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-33

Screwbirds - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

 

 

    “On 18 July 1983, USS Ranger (CVA-61) collides with USS WICHITA (AOR-1) during refueling 100 miles off San Diego, Calif.  Ranger's flight deck elevator is damaged, but no injuries are reported. USS WICHITA damages its refueling capability. The port fueling riggins are put out of commission, including the loss of all fuel hoses. Also part of WICHITA's aft superstructure is crushed on the starboard side” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy on 20 July 1983” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “By the end of July 1983, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in the midst of an “extensive” Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California commencing on 15 May 1983; arriving from her tenth “WestPac” deployment on 28 April 1983. July 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) reported that the ship’s C-1 Aircraft was transferred permanently to VRC-30. Carrier on board delivery support will in the future be provided by VRC-30. Participated in the Aviation Consolidated Allowance Listing (AVCAL) review at AS0 Philadelphia and provided component repair history information, technical expertise and data processing support in preparation for review of more than 1500 AVCAL items. (2) Air Department V-1 Division won Air Department Softball Tournament. Air Department selected as runner-up for Battle “E.” (3) Air Department V-3 Division reported that the Kool Summer Night's Concert “Cheryl Lynn and Wargt,” was held in Hangar Bay One. (4) Communications Department reported that the CMS Inspection was completed by COMNAVAIRPAC and the NAVMACS V3 installation on was commenced along with installation of the GR-23 VHF Communications System. (5) Engineering Department E-Division reported that they refurbished ship's degaussing controllers; reorganized the division such that Electrical, Safety and Supply work centers were separate shops.; rewound various motors in support of the SRA and installed additional flight deck spot lights on the island’s camera booth and masthead lights. (6) Weapons Department reported that they found the Marine Detachment leaving the ship again. This time the whole detachment went to Twenty-Nine Palms, California for 20 days; spending the whole time in the desert, training for our role as marines. (7) Operations Department reported that AC1 Edward E. HEHIR, was selected as CINCPACFLT Carrier Air Traffic Controller of the Year after having previously been selected as COMNAVAIRPAC Air Traffic Controller of the Year. Enterprise CATCC personnel attend team training at NATTC, NAS, Memphis, Tennessee. Fleet Imagery Support Terminal (FIST) removed to USS Ranger (CV-61). (8) Supply Department reported that the combined efforts of S-1, S-6, S-7 Divisions, and AIMD provided a highly successful re-AVCAL conference at the Aviation Supply Office in Philadelphia, PA., utilizing computerized records for aviation repair parts and consumables demanded during the deployment. A total value of over $47 million in new material was added to the AVCAL. In S-7 Division an improved Shipboard Non-tactical Computer (SNAPI) was installed with the conversion from the AN/UYK-5(V) to the AN/UYK-65 Computer System. SNAP will improve support for shipboard and intermediate level maintenance, supply, financial, and administrative functions and will lead to extended use of work center data entry devices. With the assistance of Fleet Aviation Logistics Support Center (FALSC) personnel intensive rewarehousing of storeroom material produced highly accurate inventory and location records. Quality assurance audits of all 77 supply storerooms provided increased material issue effectiveness and improved control over classified material, flight clothing, rotatable pool, and nuclear propulsion material” (Ref. 329B-1982 & 362D).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy from 20 July to 1 August 1983” (Ref. 1275Y1).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Rota, Spain, a Spanish municipality located in Cadiz Province, Andalusia; the second largest city in the ceremonial county of Hampshire on the south coast of England on 6 August 1983. Coral Sea traveled through Straits of Bonifacio, between Corsica and Sardinia, named after the Corsican town Bonifacio, Adriatic Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea, Straits of Messina and Ionian Sea during her visits to Augusta Bay, Sicily, Naples, Canes France and a second Naples visit. Cora Sea departed Rota, Spain and then the Mediterranean Seas, Ligurian Sea, Balearic Sea, Alboran Sea and then the Strait of Gibraltar to the Atlantic Ocean, plotting a new course to the Caribbean Sea, arriving in waters off Nicaragua to counter Soviet arm shipments 9 August 1983 and ended the momentous journey showing "presence" off the coasts of South and Central America near Nicaragua, and upon conclusion of operations steamed through the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Straits of Florida before entering Norfolk, Va. via” (Ref. 34 & 43, 45, 72, 1275Y1 & 1275Y9).

 

    “On 14 August 1983, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Charles Reynolds McGrail, Jr. , USNA '57, as Commanding Officer, ending her 30th WestPac and her 26th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system. USS New Jersey (BB-62); USS Morton (DD-948); USS Meyerkord (FF-1058); USS Francis Hammond (FF-1067); USS John A. Moore (FFG-19) and USNS Mispillion (T-AO-105) joined up with Midway as part of her task force; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 29th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 35th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 48th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (2 June to 14 August 1983)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

 02/06/83 to 14/08/83

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation

Western Pacific, NorPac and Indian Ocean

*28 Dec 1983 to 1 May 1984

30th WestPac

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

same

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

 

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

*Ref. - 1181 reported July 1982 to May 1984 consisting of 29th WestPac/ 1st NorPac, 2nd NorPac, 30th, 31st & 32nd WestPac

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “While operating off Nicaragua on 18 August 1983, USS Ranger (CV-61) crewmen were blown overboard by jet exhaust” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “By the end of August 1983, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in the midst of an “extensive” Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California commencing on 15 May 1983; arriving from her tenth “WestPac” deployment on 28 April 1983.August 1983 accomplishments reported by departments/divisions/Air Wing: (1) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) reported that the SHIPALT 5320K, E-2C Advanced Radar System Test Set installed in Avionics Shop No. 2B. SHIPALT X6124K, RADCOM Test Set (AN/USM-467), installed in 1-22-2-4. This bench supports the APS-125 airborne system of the E-2C. (2) Air Department V-3 Division reported that Kool Summer Night's Concert, "Guess Who" was held aboard. (3) Communications Department reported that the Xerox 7000 duplicating machines were removed and replaced by two modern Xerox 9400 high capacity copiers. The NAVMACS V3 System installation was accepted and a “Smart” Team was onboard for 3 weeks to conduct operator training. During August Communications completed 98 percent of its ships force work package. (4) Deck Department reported that the entire department participated in three days of underway replenishment training at Stream School, NSC Oakland, CA. (5) Engineering Department A-Division reported that during the period from May to August, A-Division completed major installation of 2 new winches, installation of aircraft elevator cellulube vent system, overhaul of 3 fire pumps, 4 air conditioning units #4 high pressure air compressor and both Elliott low pressure air compressors. (6) Engineering Department E-Division reported that the F coil deguassing failed to operate in automatic mode. Ship's Force cut slip rings for #2 and #4 special frequency turbine generator. Refurbished flight deck 400 cycle Aircraft Starting Stations. (7) Engineering Department M-Division reported that excessive blade damage required replacement of dl1 propeller. Ship's force coordinated diver efforts to remove the propeller from the shaft and Inspection of the auxiliary oiler revealed excessive pitting of tubes requiring complete retubing; discovering failed cap screws on virtually all lifting beams on the main feed pump throttle valves. (8) Weapons Department Marine Detachment reported that they spent their time getting ready to go to sea again and two weeks at the rifle range. All the marines qualified with both rifle and pistol. (9) Operations Department reported that the ASW Module develops and presents to various local units Module Antisubmarine Training (MAST) Scenario to reduce earning curve of an ASW Module, resulting from extended yard periods or periods of inactivity. The MAST scenario has received CNAP and CNAL attention. Class “C” Overhaul of communications systems was also completed. (10) Supply Department S-2 Division began a massive program to install while in all the messing areas after removing the existing PRC composition flooring, and installed four 60 gallon steam jacket kettles in the aft galley to provide a better atmosphere and improved service capabilities. (11) In S-3 Division the ships laundry received a complete Class B Overhaul and the frequency of laundry services was increased. The ships barber shops were remodeled and a $98,000.00 contract was awarded to remodel all stores, including the enlargement of the main store, establishment of a uniform store, building a new fountain, and installing a complete security system. The REAVCAL effort continued as S-1, S-6, S-7 Divisions, and FALSC personnel joined S-8 Division in there AVCAL wall-to-wall inventory of over 60,000 line items. The effort was a success, and achieved a 98.2% inventory accuracy rate” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “On 31 August 1983, Master Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Stephen Youngson was relieved as USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Command Master Chief by Master Chief Aircraft Maintenance Technician Marvin Weaver” (Ref. 329B-1983).

 

    “On 12 September 1983, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with Captain Roy Cash, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 14 (CVW-14) (tail code NK), Rear Admiral Paul F. McCarthy, Jr., Commander Carrier Group One and Rear Admiral K. E. Moranville, Commander Carrier Group Four (onboard together or relieved by COMCARGRU FOUR) embarked arrived her new homeport transfer to Naval Operating Base Norfolk, Va. with Captain Jerome Lamarr ("Jerry") Johnson, as Commanding Officer and Captain L. H. Price, Executive Officer. on her 15th “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, ending her third Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment, her first World Tour, her first Gulf of Aden, Red Sea and Suez Canal transit on her tenth voyage in the Mediterranean Sea, and Global Plate Change on her third cruise to the Caribbean Sea (first two under the direction of the 6th Fleet), with Captain Johnson, Jerome L. in command. Coral Sea participated in battle group operation exercises near USSR with USS Midway (CV-41) and USS Enterprise (CVN-65) upon departure from Alameda, Ca. Coral Sea pulled in for a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hi. on 1 April 1983. Cora Sea joined up with Enterprise and Midway on 10 April 1983, participating in FleetEx 83-1. All three carriers then completed a “counterclockwise sweep” of the northwestern Pacific. A “rare opportunity” was provided for both naval and Air Force crews via aerial refueling with the latter’s KC-10 tankers, which refueled KA-6s, in turn refueling naval aircraft. The large Extender fuel loads “provided tactical flexibility” and thus permitted naval air intercepts “at realistic speeds and extended cycle times.” Soviet aerial reconnaissance was “heavy,” but unusually, Russian surface surveillance was “nearly non-existent. Coral Sea pulled in for a port of call at Pusan, the largest port city in South Korea and is located on the southeastern-most tip of the Korean peninsula on 25 April 1983. Coral Sea made a port of call at Pusan, the largest port city in South Korea and is located on the southeastern-most tip of the Korean peninsula from 25 to 29 April 1983. Coral Sea conducted power projection training over Korea and Okinawa and supported landing exercises in the Philippines while operating in the Philippine Sea during her first World Tour and fifteenth “WestPac” in the Aleutians, refereeing to the Shumagin islands, Aleutian chain, Alaska of Islands, which extend westward from the Alaskan mainland for 1,100 miles, and the Bering Sea islands, including the Pribilofs, St. Matthew, Hall, St. Lawrence, and Little Diomede. The Aleutian chain is volcanic in origin, with a maritime climate in which wind is ever present. Vegetation at higher elevations consists of dwarf shrub communities, mainly willowand crowberry. Meadows and marshes of herbs, sedges, and grasses are plentiful, and some islands have ericaceous bogs. Sea ice does not extend to the Aleutians and permafrost is generally absent; however, sea ice is an important feature of the Bering Sea. Bird Conservation Regions - BCR Map. Coral Sea made a port of call at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines from 15 to 19 May 1983. Coral Sea crossed the Equator on 24 May 1983. Coral Sea made a port of call at Singapore, officially the Republic of Singapore, is a Southeast Asian island city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometers (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south) from 26 to 31 May 1983. Coral Sea met USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) on 9 June 1983. Coral Sea After steaming through the Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea, East China Sea, Yellow Sea, Sea of Japan, Gulf of Thailand, Java Sea, South China Sea, Straits of Malacca, a narrow sea, where she conducted air defense exercises over Singapore, Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean, Gulf of Aden, Bab-el-Mandeb, Red Sea, Gulf of Suez Canal, Coral Sea transited the Suez Canal North, the first time on 15 June 1983 and then entered the Mediterranean Sea. Coral Sea pulled in for a ports of call at Augusta Bay, Sicily, a town and comune in the province of Syracuse, located on the eastern coast of Sicily (Italy) on 18 June 1983. The city faces the Ionian Sea. The city is one of the main harbors in Italy. Coral Sea made a port of call at Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy from 24 to 25 June 1983; Cannes (French pronunciation: ​[kan], in Occitan Canas) is a city located on the French Riviera (It is a commune of France located in the Alpes-Maritimes department, a busy tourist destination and host of the annual Cannes Film Festival, Midem, and Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity) from 27 June to 5 July 1983; Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy from 20 July to 1 August 1983 and pulled in for a port of call at Rota, Spain, a Spanish municipality located in Cadiz Province, Andalusia; the second largest city in the ceremonial county of Hampshire on the south coast of England on 6 August 1983. Coral Sea traveled through Straits of Bonifacio, between Corsica and Sardinia, named after the Corsican town Bonifacio, Adriatic Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea, Straits of Messina and Ionian Sea during her visits to Augusta Bay, Sicily, Naples, Canes France and a second Naples visit. Cora Sea departed Rota, Spain and then the Mediterranean Seas, Ligurian Sea, Balearic Sea, Alboran Sea and then the Strait of Gibraltar to the Atlantic Ocean, plotting a new course to the Caribbean Sea, arriving in waters off Nicaragua to counter Soviet arm shipments 9 August 1983 and ended the momentous journey showing "presence" off the coasts of South and Central America near Nicaragua, and upon conclusion of operations steamed through the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, entering the Straits of Flordia and headed home. Coral Sea’s deployment Statists: Fast-acting Flying Squad reacted to 29 fires, 14 floods, 28 personnel causalities and 8 smoke situations. During the cruise, Coral Sea traveled 50,000 miles. The crew ate 231,000 hamburgers, 179,000 hot dogs, 351,000 loaves of bread and 54,506 dozen eggs. Coral Sea burned 20 million gallons of DFM and 10 million gallons of JP-5. The SPS-10 antenna rotated 3,564,000 times and transmitted 8,268,480,000 miles. SPS-31 radar transmitted 720,000,000 times. Communications processed over 155,000 messages and 688 commercial telegrams. Dental filed over 6,000 teeth and pulled over 1,600. Capt Commette extracted the 5,000th wisdom tooth of his tour onboard Coral Sea. Catapult #1 launched 2,154 aircraft; Catapult #2 launched 2,795 aircraft; Catapult #3 launched 1,753 aircraft and the Arresting Gear rapped 6,347 aircraft. 7,000 aircraft launches and recoveries, passed through 28 bodies of water, crossed the Equator twice, transited the Suez Canal, visited six foreign countries and made her triumphant return to the Hampton Roads area after an absence of more than 26 years. The following Oceans and Seas are presented in a logical interpretation of references 1275Y1 and 1275Y9 in regards to the where the carrier traveled while deployed: Pacific Ocean, Philippine Sea, East China Sea, Yellow Sea, Sea of Japan, Gulf of Thailand, Java Sea, South China Sea, Straits of Malacca, a narrow sea, where she conducted air defense exercises over Singapore, Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean,  Gulf of Aden, Bab-el-Mandeb, Red Sea, Gulf of Suez Canal, North (14 June 1983), Mediterranean Seas, Straits of Bonifacio, between Corsica and Sardinia, named after the Corsican town Bonifacio, Adriatic Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea, Straits of Messina, Augusta Bay, Ionian Sea, Mediterranean Seas, Ligurian Sea, Balearic Sea, Alboran Sea, Strait of Gibraltar,  Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, Straits of Florida. Reference 1275Y9 also list Straits of Malacca twice and while the Java Sea in Indonesia and Gulf of Thailand areas of operation are listed, no port of calls are listed at any Indonesian or Thailand port, showing the flag" between Israel, Lebanon and Libya as suggested in reference. 34 & 43. Departing the Mediterranean Sea, plotting a new course to the Caribbean Sea, arriving in waters off Nicaragua to counter Soviet arm shipments 9 August 1983 and ended the momentous journey showing "presence" off the coasts of South and Central America near Nicaragua, before entering Norfolk, Va. on 12 September 1983. Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hi.; Pusan, the largest port city in South Korea and is located on the southeastern-most tip of the Korean peninsula; Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines; Singaporee, officially the Republic of Singapore, is a Southeast Asian island city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometres (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south); Augusta, Sicily, a town and comune in the province of Syracuse, located on the eastern coast of Sicily (Italy). The city is one of the main harbours in Italy; Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy; Cannes (French pronunciation: ​[kan], in Occitan Canas) is a city located on the French Riviera (It is a commune of France located in the Alpes-Maritimes department, a busy tourist destination and host of the annual Cannes Film Festival, Midem, and Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity); and Rota, Spain, a Spanish municipality located in Cadiz Province, Andalusia; the second largest city in the ceremonial county of Hampshire on the south coast of England. Squadrons: VF-154, F-4N; VF-21, F-4N; VA-97, A-7E; VA-27, A-7E; VA-196, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-113, E-2B and HS-12, SH-3G. (Reference 1275Y9 also list Straits of Malacca twice and while the Java Sea in Indonesia and Gulf of Thailand areas of operation are listed, no port of calls are listed at any Indonesian or Thiland port, showing the flag" between Israel, Lebanon and Libya as suggested in reference. 34 & 43). Reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975; involved in two Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh on 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam peace Coast Patrol Cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 973), following six Vietnam War Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). Her 15th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of Sea Trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Her 26th deployment since her commission 1 October 1947 (21 March 1983 to 12 September 1983)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 43, 45, 72, 329B-1983, 362D, 1275Y1, 1275Y5, 1275Y6, 1275Y8-/8, 1275Y9 & 1275Z10).

 

 21/03/83 - 12/09/83

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  “WESTPAC”

 None reported

 N/A

 15th

Reference 34, 35 & 43 reflect Chat info.

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43 became part of the Atlantic Fleet Command and operated under the direction of the 6th Fleet in the

Mediterranean Sea, reuniting with Norfolk, Va. after 26 years of service with the Pacific Command and the 7th Fleet, serving with

the Atlantic Fleet Command operating under the direction of the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean Sea (19 January 1948 to 31 March

1960), as an operational carrier, she will now once again take her direction from the 6th Fleet. While home ported at Norfolk,

Va. in the Atlantic, Coral Sea will make deployments with the Sixth Fleet in European waters” (Ref. 34).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted an “extensive” Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 15 May to 20 September 1983. In addition to work done by some 400 civilian contractors, Enterprise ship's force completed 3534 key jobs. Mare Island resin discharge work and SSSF pre-SRA-83 work dominated. The department was responsible for creating and maintaining information flow between all off ship repair activities (including SUPSHIP San Francisco and Mare Island Naval Shipyard) and all of the departments onboard. To this end weekly meetings were held with all repair organizations to identify and correct any problems and to discuss new work. SRA and September 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) The Damage Control and Repair Department (Habitability Division) carried out the objectives of the NAVSEA Habitability Self Help Program in which shipwide berthing and head improvement programs were put into effect. These programs replaced ten percent of the existing racks onboard with "tall man” berths and extensively upgraded the habitability of crew head and berthing spaces. Another part of the departmental involvement was the completion of more than five hundred ship's force work items, including approximately thirty eight nuclear welding repairs. In addition, the Damage Control and Repair Department supplied training to more than 100 fire watch personnel assigned to the SFOMS Department and to multiple duty section inport fire party members. Extensive Hull Maintenance Technician schooling for nuclear welding (NEC 4956) was used to improve the Industrial Repair capability to support propulsion plant repairs. Fire fighting and Damage Control schools at Treasure Island were extensively used to ready the Enterprise repair parties for Refresher Training 1983. (2) Deck Department completed a comprehensive Selected Repair Availability (SRA) in which 26,000 man hours were used to complete 100 Deck Department Ship's Force Projects, completed Refresher Training, NTPI, Command Inspection, and INSURV Inspection. During this period Deck Department conducted 12 underway replenishments transferring over 600 lifts of ordnance and cargo. (3) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) reported that the GSE beach detachment rework effort was completed. Total cost was $218K and included commercial rework of all Weapons Handling Equipment and selected aircraft Ground Support Equipment such as NQA, spotting dollies, and MMGIA. (4) Air Department V-1 Division reported that Flight deck markings were recertified. Counter Measure Washdown System certified. Aircraft Handling Team re-certified by COMNAVAIRPAC. (5) Air Department V-2 Division accomplished 225 jobs which included 613 key operations. All equipment is in a ready status for launch and recovery operations. Installation of the LSO Heads-up Display System completed and the ACLS certification with 100 percent availability of cat/gear and plat/lens equipment completed. (6) Air Department V-4 Division SRA work completed: 1) Thirty-five JP-5 tanks cleaned/repaired; 2) Four each JP-5 purifiers converted to direct drive and 3) No. 3 pump room bilge repaired. (7) Carrier Air Wing Eleven deployed to NAS Fallon for ten days of intensive weapons work. Conducted numerous major long range coordinated strikes. (8) Damage Control and Repair Department successfully completed SRA-83 on time. (9) Dental Department hosted meeting of "Bay Area Armed Force Dental Study Club.” (10) Engineering Department E-Division reported that in preparation for Sea Trials, replaced #/1, #4 and #8 Ship's Service Turbine Generator circulating water pump bearings and #3 distilate brine pump bearings. (11) Weapons Department Marine Detachment reported that a video movie was produced to educate the ship's crew to our mission, and has proven very successful. (12) Operations Department awarded Battle "E". SRA terminates. Major certification of Category I Diagnostic Tests from 8 to 14 September 1983 and Category II A Helicopter Pierside Test on 16 September 1983. (13) Safety Department reported that prior planning and training helped the ship's crew transit from a carrier flying aircraft at sea to an industrial shipyard environment. During this four month SRA-83, Safety Department conducted over 400 inspections of contractor and sips force personnel, and as a result, there were no major in industrial accidents or injuries. Upon completion of SRA, the Safety Department once again helped with the transition back to a sea going environment. (14)  The Training Department coordinated and monitored the training of 58 officers and enlisted personnel from Naval Reserve Unit (CVN-65) Det 0181, Columbus, Ohio and Det. 0287 from Alameda, CA, during their two weeks Active Duty for Training (ACDUTRA) onboard Enterprise. While onboard, these naval reservists became qualified in 3-M Maintenance and Damage Control. They also received valuable on-the-job training and refinement of in-rate skills and knowledge. (15) Weapons Department G-2 Division reported that during this four month SRA-83, major alteration to all Weapon Elevator Operator Control Stations was accomplished and incorporation of Emergency Stop Switches from 14 to 30 October 83. G-2 Division onload, handled 729 pallets of ordnance in one night” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 20 September 1983, for Sea Trials and Independent Steaming Exercise (ISE). The Communications Department reported that preparations for getting underway dominated early September and Dock and Sea Trials were conducted. The Communications Department conducted a THIRD Fleet Contingency Exercise as the ship got underway” (Ref. 329B-1983).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) flight deck was recertified on 21 September 1983, as was the Automatic Carrier Landing System (ACLS)” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “From 22 to 24 September 1983, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) evaluated for CNO the catapult launch of F-14s towing gunnery banners, and carried out full rudder tests with a maximum heel at 30 knots/30º rudder of 12” (Ref. 329B-1983).

 

    “In September 1983, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) air operations and medical departments received Battle Efficiency “Es” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 26 September 1983, conducting Sea Trials and Independent Steaming Exercise (ISE) from 20 to 26 September 1983. The Communications Department reported that preparations for getting underway dominated early September and Dock and Sea Trials were conducted. The Communications Department conducted a THIRD Fleet Contingency Exercise as the ship got underway. Enterprise evaluated for CNO the catapult launch of F-14s towing gunnery banners, and carried out full rudder tests with a maximum heel at 30 knots/30º rudder of 12 from 22 to 24 September 1983. During this period the flight deck was recertified (21 September 1983), as was the Automatic Carrier Landing System. Underwent an “extensive.” Air Department V-1 Division reported that Flight deck markings were recertified. Counter Measure Washdown System certified. Aircraft Handling Team re-certified by COMNAVAIRPAC. Engineering Department A-Division completed Sea Trials successfully and completed re-certification of catapults and supervisory control circuit. All personnel completed requalification on all underway watch stations. Started work up for REFTRA with increased emphasis on DC training. Engineering Department M-Division successfully completed Sea Trials. #11 Turbine Driven Fire Pump CASREP because a journal bearing seized. Operations Department reported that Carrier ASW Module software program, 4.0.1D upgrade was delivered. Sea Trials completed without incident. Automatic Carrier Landing System (ACLS) certified. A chronological list of the major certification events follows:

 

Category I Diagnostic Tests 8-14 SEP

Category II A Helicopter Pierside Test 16 SEP

Category II B Data Link Flight Test 20-21 SEP

Category III Underway Mode I Flight Tests 21-25 SEP

 

     After conducting 428 automatic carrier landings, the following ACLS AN/SPN42A certifications were issued:

 

     A-7E cleared for interim Mode I operations to weather minimums of 200/1/2 WOD 22-28 kts 345-3550 relative; A-6E/F-4S Aircraft cleared for Mode IA operations and AN/SPN-41 cleared as Mode I monitor and independent ICLS using glidepath setting of 3-25 degrees.

 

      Upon completion of SRA-83 the department began to develop work packages for the upcoming availabilities that were scheduled during the remainder of the inport periods prior to the next deployment. To become more responsive to the needs of the ship, the Damage Control and Repair Department created the Maintenance Control Center. Patterned after a concept based on Air Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) organization and procedures the Maintenance Control Center (MCC) provided close monitoring of the ship's many repair-oriented divisions1 job scheduling and utilization of manpower. During the first month of operation of the MCC the response time on maintenance requests was reduced by half when compared to the previous month. A twenty-five percent increase in job completions was also realized. Another reason that departmental productivity increased was the acquisition of two IBM personal Computers. One of the computers is located in the MCC to assist in tracking of jobs. The other is primarily to be used by the DCA to track DCPO training and maintain inventory on all damage control gear aboard” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “On 28 September 1983, a Fleet Training Group's Training and Readiness Evaluation (TRE) found USS Enterprise (CVN-65) "ready for scheduled training leading to combat operations qualifications per type/class on all areas except for Damage Control." (The Damage Control area was rectified sufficiently to commence Refresher Training). In September Battle Efficiency “E’s” were awarded by COMNAVAIRPAC to Enterprise for Operations and Medical Departments. Air Department was selected as a runner-up. Damage Control Department was awarded the Habitability "H" and was a runner-up for the DC Excellence Award. September 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Air Department V-2 Division completed TRE with an “Outstanding,” no discrepancies (2) Carrier Air Wing Eleven deployed to NAS Fallon for ten days of intensive weapons work. Conducted numerous major long range coordinated strikes. Damage Control and Repair Department successfully completed TRE, Fire Fighting Assist Team visit, Counter Measure Water Washdown System test, creation of Maintenance Control Center” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

     “Captain Jeremy Dolph ("Bear") Taylor, Naval Postgraduate School ' 65 Bio assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on 1 October 1983, relieving Captain “Captain Jerome Lamarr ("Jerry") Johnson, 32nd Commanding Officer, serving from 2 July 1981 to 1 October 1983” (Ref. 34 & 35A).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Training Department initiated an NJROTC Indoctrination Program and “welcomed aboard” 21 NJROTC Cadets from the Naval Junior ROTC Unit, Sanger High School, Sanger, California. These high school students, between the ages of 14 to 18 years, along with two adult escorts arrived onboard Enterprise for an at-sea orientation cruise which began on 6 October 1983 for the Cadets and based on different dates reporting the sea period, possibly arrived two days before Enterprise departed” (Ref. 329B-1983).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 26 September to 7 October 1983 and went to sea on 7 October 1983 for the return and Carrier Qualifications (CQ) of her airwing, CVW-11, composed of VF-114, VF-213, VA-22, VA-94, VA-95, VS-21, VAQ-133, VAW-117, and HS-6, with VS-21 replacing VS-37” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 8 October 1983, for CVW-11’s Carrier Qualifications, with VS-21 replacing VS-37” (Ref. 362D).  

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 13 October 1983, conducting Carrier Qualifications for CVW-11, with VS-21 replacing VS-37 from 8 to 13 October 1983, logging 1,429 arrested landings, 863 day/566 nights, qualifying 113 day/113 night pilots and 605 Case II approaches. Engineering Department A-Division began work ups for REFTRA with increased emphasis on DC training. She returned to San Francisco in time to participate in Fleet Week, joining the procession of ships beneath the Golden Gate Bridge and into the bay, including USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), USS Merrill (DD-976), USS Chandler (DDG-996), USS O’Brien (DD-975), USS Mars (AFS-1), USS Wabash (AOR-5), USS Mauna Kea (AE-22), USS Berkeley (DDG-15), USS Duncan (FFG-10) and USS Lewis B. Puller (FFG-23). Training Department initiated an NJROTC Indoctrination Program and “welcomed aboard” 21 NJROTC Cadets from the Naval Junior ROTC Unit, Sanger High School, Sanger, California. These high school students, between the ages of 14 to 18 years, along with two adult escorts arrived onboard Enterprise for an at-sea orientation cruise which began on 6 October 1983. During this week long cruise, the Cadets received orientation and indoctrination from various departments onboard. Using a designated "running mate" from each department for the cadets, these young men received valuable training in areas such as navigation, damage control, and deck seamanship” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D - EQNEEDF Note: from 6 to 11 October 1983 reported for CQ’S in the Command History Report as well - Operations Department – October – CVW-11 Carrier Quals conducted from 6 to 11 October 1983 during Enterprise’s Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE)).

 

     USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 31 October 1983, for Rrefresher Training in the southern California operating area, in port from 14 to 30 October 1983. Air Department V-2 Division reported that in a six-day period, CVW-11 aircraft completed a total of 1429 arrested landings to qualify every pilot in the wing. Enterprise conducted Independent Steaming Exercises, including repeated General Quarters and first aid training, in preparation for the upcoming REFTRA. Enterprise returned to San Francisco Bay in time to join the Fleet Week procession of 11 ships through the golden Gate and into the bay. Included in the festivities were USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) (COMCRUDESGRU THREE - RADM Baldwin embarked), USS Merrill (DD-976), USS Chandler (DDG-996), USS O'Brien (DD-725), USS Mars (AFS-1), USS Wabash (AOR-5), USS Mauna Kea (AE-22), USS Berkeley (DDG-15), USS Duncan (DD-485)‎, and USS Lewis B. Puller (FFG-23) (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, commenced a 15-month complex overhaul involving repairs and alterations to the ship at Norfolk, Va. Navy Yard 17 October 1983. Included in the package were all of the equipment required to operate F/A-18s -two large Mk 7 jet blast deflectors, flush deck nose gear launch, catapult mods, rotary launch valves and avionics support equipment. The latest electronics SPS-48 and SPS-49, air search radars were also fitted to enable her to operate to the end of the decade ($186 mil)” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).

 

 

An aerial port bow view of USS Kitty Hawk underway in the Pacific Ocean, October 1983. Photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class C. Yebba (DN-SC-85-06884). NS026333 94k. USN. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026333.jpg

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 14 August to 25 October 1983” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 25 October 1983, with Captain Charles Reynolds McGrail, Jr., USNA '57, as Commanding Officer, on her 31st WestPac and her 27th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 30th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 36th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 49th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(25 October to 11 December 1983)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (27th Forward Deployed)

31st WestPac

CVW-5

NF

25 Oct 1983

11 Dec 1983

Western Pacific

49th FWFD

68-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF)  115-120

RF-4B

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VA-93

Ravens -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E /

A6-E/KA-6D /

*A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2B

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system

 

    “On 25 October 1983, aircraft from USS Independence (CV-62) embarked air wing flew missions in support of Operation Urgent Fury, the action to liberate the Caribbean nation of Grenada. Returning to Lebanon that same year, the ship's air wing conducted air strikes against Syrian positions” (Ref. 1-Independence).

 

   “For four months, USS America (CV-66) underwent a period of repairs and alterations, emerging from the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 28 October 1983, commencing on 8 July 1983” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “Departing Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 28 October 1983, USS America (CV-66) commenced operations locally off the Virginia capes with CVW-1 embarked” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “On 29 October 1983, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) with CVW-15 embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alemeda, California, with a crew of nearly 6,000 Sailors, sailing under the Golden Gate Bridge for the first time as it entered San Francisco Bay, ending her eight-month around the world deployment, steaming from Norfolk, Virginia operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, she traveled through the waters of the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, South Atlantic, Indian Ocean, Philippine Sea, South China Sea, East Sea/Sea of Japan and the Western Pacific Ocean en route to her new homeport via Pearl Harbor Hi. operating with the Pacific Fleet, visiting foreign ports of St. Thomas, US Virgin Island; Monaco; Morocco; Abidijan, Cote D'Ivoire; Perth, Australia; Subic Bay, Philippines; Hong Kong; Sasebo, Japan and Pusan, South Korea; her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on  13 March 1982 (1 March to 29 October 1983)” (Ref. 72 & 375).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 31 October 1983, for refresher training in the southern California operating area” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “On 1 November 1983 a fire broke out in the number 2 auxiliary machinery room while the USS Ranger (CV-61) was deployed in the North Arabian Sea, east of Oman. Six crewmen were killed as a result of the fire, injuring 35 and knocked out three of the ship's four engines. The fire is in one of the four main machinery spaces and reportedly is extinguished within an hour although there is one reflash, which is extinguished. Flight operations had not yet commenced when the ship went to general quarters, so no aircraft were yet in the air. This was fortunate because the ship was then out of range of land. Some repairs were effected at sea, but by the time the ship returned to the Philippines after nearly three more months had elapsed at sea, one screw was still unavailable” (Ref. 1-Ranger, 72 & 84A).

 

 

On November 1, 1983, a major fuel and oil fire broke out in an engine room while the ship operated in the North Arabian Sea. Six crewmembers were killed and 35 injured. The fire was reportedly extinguished within an hour and the ship continued operations.

Carlos C. Castellanos. NS026113 74k. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026113.jpg

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced Training Assessment which included successful completion of: En route training/transit, open ocean navigation, oparea forecasting/BG tactical environmental effects summary, AGI surveillance / harassment / INCSEA training, flex deck operations, mining exercise (MINEX), war-at-sea exercise (WASEX), grid operations, formation steaming, replenishment-at-sea ( connected replenishment), submarine vulnerability periods/ASW freeplay, helo/crash/flight deck fire, rigging for barricade operations, major conflaguration (first carrier to ever pass this evolution), mass casualty drill, live anti-carrier simulated strike and chemical, biological, radiological (CBR) hit recovery on 15 November 1983. Enterprise was found "ready to commence advanced level training in all evaluated areas including ASW leading to battle group operations COMFLETRAGRU” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

     “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Training Assessment which included successful completion of: En route training/transit, open ocean navigation, oparea forecasting/BG tactical environmental effects summary, AGI surveillance / harassment / INCSEA training, flex deck operations, mining exercise (MINEX), war-at-sea exercise (WASEX), grid operations, formation steaming, replenishment-at-sea ( connected replenishment), submarine vulnerability periods/ASW freeplay, helo/crash/flight deck fire, rigging for barricade operations, major conflaguration (first carrier to ever pass this evolution), mass casualty drill, live anti-carrier simulated strike and chemical, biological, radiological (CBR) hit recovery from 15 to 18 November 1983. Enterprise was found "ready to commence advanced level training in all evaluated areas including ASW leading to battle group operations COMFLETRAGRU” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “On 22 November 1983, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and the USS WABASH (AOR-5) have a minor collision during refueling in Oakland, Calif. Oakland, Calif.” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 22 November 1983, conducting Refresher Training (REFTRA) in the southern California operating area; underway from 31 October to 22 November 1983. Training Assessment included successful completion of: En route training/transit, open ocean navigation, oparea forecasting/BG tactical environmental effects summary, AGI surveillance / harassment / INCSEA training, flex deck operations, mining exercise (MINEX), war-at-sea exercise (WASEX), grid operations, formation steaming, replenishment-at-sea ( connected replenishment), submarine vulnerability periods/ASW freeplay, helo/crash/flight deck fire, rigging for barricade operations, major conflaguration (first carrier to ever pass this evolution), mass casualty drill, live anti-carrier simulated strike and chemical / biological / radiological (CBR) hit recovery from 15 to 18 November 1983. Enterprise was found "ready to commence advanced level training in all evaluated areas including ASW leading to battle group operations COMFLETRAGRU. During a “dark night,” the ship received a distress call, around 2300. Alert 30, the HS-6 helo on plane guard, was aloft and racing to the scene in barely 15 minutes, followed closely by a second and then a third, all three staying airborne until the SAR was called off. Air Department V-2 Division finished REFTRA with 895 catapult launches and 847 arrested landings. Completed 9,440 catapult shots and 8,162 arrested landings in 1983. Enjoyed a 100 percent availability rate for catapult/arresting gear and plat/lens equipment. Carrier Air Wing Eleven conducted REFTRA and first cyclic operations since last deployment. Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) completed successful refresher training period supporting the embarked air wing to 87 percent mission capable rate and 3000 flight hours in a 21 day period. Achieved a 62 percent ready-forissuerate on 1500 components inducted. Operations Department reported that the Combat Direction Center received an overall grade of 80%. CATCC received a COMNAVAIRPAC assist visit during REFTRA. This visit provided COMNAVAIRPAC its first opportunity to closely observe CATCC operations in over 15 months. A CATCC ADMAT was simultaneously conducted and a grade of outstanding was received. SESS equipment groomed by NAVSECGRUACT Skaggs Island personnel. Damage Control (DC) and Repair Department (RD) completed Fleet REFTRA, continued Captain's Cup Competition, sent one HTC to Ultrasonic Test School. Another HTC is scheduled for this school in January. This education will add an Ultrasonic Testing capability to the Enterprise QA/NDT support posture. Deck Department conducted twenty seamanship evolutions during REFTRA receiving an overall grade of 90. Second ever towing (by Pacific Titan) of Enterprise completed safely and efficiently with a score of 100 awarded by ORE Observers. During shipboard REFTRA the DC and RD demonstrated its visibility. Fleet Training Group (FTG) observers that were grading the damage control portions of REFTRA stated that no other carrier had done so well in as many areas as Enterprise. Specific positive comments were directed at the superb level of training of the ‘Flying Squadt,” the DC Training Team and the steady improvement of the performance of the repair locker personnel. Enterprise was the first carrier to receive a grade of satisfactory during the CV Major Conflageration Drill. The DC Training Team (DCTT) was recommended for advanced training. By demonstrating that the level of shipboard damage control training and material condition is maintained at a high level the concept of a separate DC and RD proved it self. Several minor flooding incidents occurred during SRA 83. Engineering Department A-Division reported that catapults and Hydraulics shops operating with no major problems after SRA Ship's Force Operational Maintenance System (SFOMS) availability. Major failures to #5 air conditioning unit, #6 air conditioning chilled water pump and #3 air conditioning speedy increaser. Major failures to #2 and #4 high pressure air compressor and #5 Elliot LPAC. All items repaired by SUPSHIPS SF contractors prior to INSURV. 02N2 plant personnel commenced taking aviators oxygen samples after completion of the aviators breathing oxygen analyst course completion. Engineering Department E-Division troubleshot and repaired hanger bay division and deckedge doors. Engineering Department M-Division reported that #2 Main Circulating Water Pump CASREP because the reduction gears failed resulting in #2 Main Engine out of commission for most of REFTRA. Supply Department reported that predeployment exercises commenced with Carrier Qualification of the airwing in September and REFTRA in November. The REAVCAL process continued with S-1 Division ordering 21,778 line items valued at $40 million for stock and generating a computerized offload of over 30,000 excess items valued at $22.5 million which S-8 Division physically removed and offloaded. During REFTRA 83, the Sales Division grossed $213,000.00 from its ship stores, soda, and video operation. Weapons Department G-4 Division trained in elevator operation, electric reachfork & diesel forklifts from October to November 1983” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

 

USNS Navasota (T-AO-106) underway during a Replenishment at Sea of USS Midway (CV-41) and USS England (CG-22) in the Pacific, late 1983. US Navy photo. NS091910608 70k. James Furst Jr. IC2 USN.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/19/091910608.jpg

 

    “On 1 December 1983, as part of the President's “Partnership in Education” program, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) adopted Millbrae, California's Mills High School to offer the school career educational training and counseling assistance, as well as tutorial services and Navy orientation tours” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

FIFTHEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

15-MONTH COMPLEX OVERHAUL & ALTERATIONS AT NORFOLK NAVY YARD VA. – SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS – LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(21 March 1983 to 31 December 1984)

Part 1 – (21 March to 27 April 1983)

Part 2 – (28 April 1983)

Part 3 – (29 April to 1 December 1983)

Part 4 – (2 December 1983 to 23 April 1984)

Part 5 – (24 April to 31 December 1984)