CHAPTER XXXVII

Part 4 – (2 December 1983 to 23 April 1984)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

FIFTHEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

15-MONTH COMPLEX OVERHAUL & ALTERATIONS AT NORFOLK NAVY YARD VA. – SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS – LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(21 March 1983 to 31 December 1984)

Part 1 – (21 March to 27 April 1983)

Part 2 – (28 April 1983)

Part 3 – (29 April to 1 December 1983)

Part 4 – (2 December 1983 to 23 April 1984)

Part 5 – (24 April to 31 December 1984)

 

 

    “On 11 December 1983, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Charles Reynolds McGrail, Jr. , USNA '57, as Commanding Officer, ending her 31st WestPac and her 27th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Ports of calls include: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines and Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 30th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 36th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 49th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (25 October to 11 December 1983)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

 25/10/83 to 11/12/83

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

31st WestPac

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location” (Ref. 1181D).

*Ref. 1181 reported July 1982 to May 1984 consisting of 29th WestPac/ 1st NorPac, 2nd NorPac, 30th, 31st & 32nd WestPac

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 22 November to 11 December 1983, successfully completing Nuclear Technical Proficiency Inspection (NTPI) conducted by COMNUCWEPTRAGRUPAC. November 1983 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Damage Control and Repair Department and the “Flying Squad” supported the NTPI inspection. Operations Department reported that SAS Admin received an outstanding as a result of NTPI conducted by COMNAVAIRPAC. Weapons Department re-organized into an efficient productive Special Weapons Unit, capable of meeting/exceeding mission objectives. Deck Department reported that Deck Rig Team received a grade of Outstanding during NTPI Inspection (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “After Refresher Training, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) enjoyed a brief break to celebrate Thanksgiving and then departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 12 December 1983, for a At Sea/INSURV/Underway Material Inspection (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “After Refresher Training, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) enjoyed a brief break to celebrate Thanksgiving and then departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 12 December 1983, for a Material Inspection” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 14 December 1983, conducting At Sea/INSURV/Underway Administrative and Material (ADMAT) Inspection from 12 to 14 December 1983, proved to be the last significant at sea event for the ship before the New Year. Enterprise was found to be in very good condition and fit for further service. On 15 December 1983, members of a COMNAVAIRPAC Staff conducted a Command Inspection. Training Department received an overall recommended grade of good, with the Educational Services Office receiving an outstanding. Operations Department conducted INSURV in port and during a brief at sea period (12 – 13 DEC). Due to the chronic unreliability of SINS (CASREP 83060), an in-place Class “B” Overhaul of the SINS CP-642B computer was requested. Using specialized test equipment brought with them, UNIVAC specialized test equipment brought with them, UNIVAC factory representatives identified in excess of fifty marginal cards in the computer and magnetic tape unit. Weather completed ADMAT with a grade of outstanding. Photographic Division (OP) completed 2,600 photographic jobs for calendar year. CCSC installed in the SUPPLOT while remodeling and updating commences Deck Department reported that COMCARGRU THREE conducted an ADMAT Inspection and completed INSURV Inspection. Damage Control and Repair Department reported that there was one inport availability in Alameda, CA. COMCARGRU THREE Admin inspection, 3M Inspection and INSURV (UMI/Open and inspect). Engineering Department E-Division reported that they participated in INSURV. Continued work on island elevator. Engineering Department M-Division reported that #1 propeller installed during SRA was determined to be defective and was replaced by USS Hector (AR-7) ECTOR divers. #2 Main Circulating Water Pump was repaired by AAA Shipyard and returned to service. M-Division performed superbly during the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) receiving several comments for superior work practices during the open and inspection phase” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Rear Admiral Chatham. Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander T. R. Beard, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 5 (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 28 December 1983, Captain H. P. Kober, Jr, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer and Captain T. T. Hood, as Executive Officer, on her 32nd WestPac, her 20th South China Sea, on her eighth Indian Ocean deployment and her 28th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet,.on her fourth North Arabian Sea deployment; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 31st deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 37th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 50th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 1181Q, 1181R, 1181S, 1181T, 1181U, 1181V, 1181Z4, 1181Z5, 1181Z6, 1181Z7 & 1181Z8).

 

 

USS Midway (CV-41) WestPac Cruise Book 1984-85 – Ref. 1181Q

Cruise Map – Ref. 1181R

Command and Staff  – Ref. 1181S

The Cruise and Ports of Call – Ref. 1181U

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(28 December to 23 May 1984)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (4th Northern Arabian Sea) (28th Forward Deployed)

32nd WestPac

San Bernardino Straits

20th SCS

Malaca Straits

8th IO

CVW-5

NF

28 Dec 1983

23 May 1984

Western Pacific

Indian Ocean

Middle East

North Arabian Sea

50th FWFD

148-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

Midway and Battle Group ALFA conducted a joint formation with seven ships of the British Royal Navy, combining to form one of the largest international naval groups in recent history. The joint formation was indicative of the mutual trust, concern, ability and Commitment of both nations in maintaining freedom of the seas.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 115-120

RF-4B

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VA-93

Ravens -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E /

A6-E/KA-6D /

*A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2B

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system

 

    “USS Arkansas (CGN-41) joined USS Enterprise (CVN-65) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 14 to 31 December 1983 passed with USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pierside at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California” (Ref. 329B-1983 & 362D).

 

     The following sections provide 1983 Summary, December and Years End USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Department, Divisions and Air Wing History for 1983:

 

Executive Department –

 

      Enterprise manpower authorization as of 31 December 1983 and actual onboard count were as follows:

 

 

Officer

Enlisted

Allowance

168

3005

Onboard

178

2861

 

    “The Commanding Officer is Captain R. L. Leuschner, Jr. In February 1983 Captain R. J. Spane was relieved as Executive Officer by CDR J. J. Dantone. In August 1983 AOCM S. G. Youngson was relieved as Command Master Chief by AFCM M. W. Weaver. In December Lieutenant G. D. Maples was relieved by Lieutenant S. D. McNabb. Commander Carrier Group THREE, RADM Edwin R. Kohn, Jr., is embarked. Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN, Commander Robert P. Hickey, is also embarked” (Ref. 329B-1983).

 

Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) reported:

 

Major Inspections –

 

January – Mid Deployment Material Inspection GRADE: Satisfactory.

 

May – Post Deployment Material Inspection GRADE: Outstanding.

 

Production Statistics –

 

Date

Items Processed

Effectiveness Percent

RFI Percent

January

3942

91.3

73.6

February

2312

72.7

75.9

March

4802

82.4

77.7

April

4100

92.6

80.6

May

128

25.1

93.0

June

215

33.2

97.2

July

348

46.0

99.7

August

327

40.3

85.0

September

438

44.7

82.4

October

560

56.5

97.0

November

1357

77.0

62.8

 

Air Department

 

V-3 Division

 

January – 902 total crunch free aircraft moves.

February – 387 total crunch free moves.

March – 1386 total crunch free moves.

April – 774 total crunch free moves.

 

Total of crunch free moves from beginning of cruise: 7,600.

Total of hours of conflag Watch from 01 January to 28 April: 5,664.

 

July – Kool Summer Night's Concert “Cheryl Lynn and Wargt,” Hangar Bay One.

August – Kool Summer Night's Concert, "Guess Who."

October – Combined Federal Campaign Banquet, Hangar Bay One. USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) arrives Alameda, CA (Banquet), Hangar Bay One.

 

1983 total crunch free moves: 4,018.

 

V-4 Division

 

1983 total gallons JP-5 pumped: 11,250,000.

 

Medical Department –

 

The Medical Department completed a successful Antimalario Prophylaxis Program in November 1982 prior to the Mombasa, Kenya port visits. Of the total number of personnel (5,500), none experienced symptoms of malaria. Following a February 1983 20 day port sit in Subic Bay, RP 27 personnel were diagnosed with infectious hepatitis and eventually medevaced to Naval Hospital, Yokosuka, Japan and to Ad&, Alaska for further transfer to CONUS medical treatment facilities. A health record information system was developed as a means of identifying all personnel by name, rank, DOB, SSN, and work center for inclusion in the word processor. It is estimated that this data base will be completed by April 1984. It will provide information on status of immunizations, blood type, and date of last physical examination.

 

In preparation for Training Readiness Examination, Refresher Training, Command Inspection and INSURV, inventories of all storerooms, battle dressing stations, stretchers, and portable medical lockers were made. In addition over 3000 shipboard personnel were trained in self aid/buddy aid utilizing lectures, KENT TV, POD notes and hands on training.

 

Equipment Acquisitions –

 

A new double wall audio booth was received in September and installed during October. A state of the art chemistry analyzer was received in late November. An old tubular sterilizer was removed and replaced with a new medium sized sterilizer.

 

Statistical Data 1 January to 31 December 83 –

 

Laboratory test

22,173

Patient v isits

21,642

Immunizations

4,360

X-rays

4,305

EKG

413

Aud iograms

2,434

Pharmacy prescriptions

23.124

Physical examinations

1,945

 

Dental Department

 

December – COMCARGRU THREE Dental Inspection

 

 Annual Statistics –

 

 ACLS Approaches

 

Mode I A

Mode II

Mode I1I

SPN-4 1

ASR

30

2,416

519

1,623

61

 

Arrested Landings: 8,162

 

 Significant Arrested Landings:

 

200,000

7 January 1983

CDR Hickey, COM

CVW-11

F-14A

201,000

3 February 1983

LT Knight

CVW-11

A-7E

202,000

7 March 1983

LT Hirko

VA-22

A-7E

203,000

20 March 1983

LT Hashas

VS-37

S-3A

204,000

8 April 1983

LT Berg

VF-114

F-14A

205,000

7 October 1983

LT Trapnell

VAW-117

E-2C

206,000

11 October 1983

LT Shutler

VA-95

KA-6~D

207,000

7 November 1983

CDR Hightower

VA-94

A-7E

 

 AT0 Statistics:

 

Passengers: 2,753 Mail: 370,000 LBS. Cargo: 100,328 LBS.

 

Safety Department –

 

December – Major physical renovations of the ship stores, galley, and mess deck facilities were progressing toward completion in January 1984.

 

Supply Department –

 

December – Major physical renovations of the ship stores, galley, and mess deck facilities were progressing toward completion in January 1984.

 

Damage Control and Repair Department proved it self. Several minor flooding incidents occurred during SRA 83. There were no major fires during 1983.

 

Training Department –

 

During 1983, the Shipboard Indoctrination Course welcomed 799 new crewmembers aboard Enterprise. The Training Department requested and received over 2,615 quotas for Class “A” and “C” schools, Shipboard and Aircraft Firefighting, OJT, and job related training during the year. This training required the coordination of transportation, messing and berthing, and funding requirements. The Petty Officer Academy graduated 700 new third class petty officers from this course of instruction during 1983. During the year, onboard education continued to be the number one priority of the Training Department. Enterprise had 720 personnel participating in the Program for Afloat College Education (PACE). With 48 college courses to choose from, these “at sea” campus college students earned a total of 2,160 college credits during the school year. Continued utilization of the Defense Activity Non-Traditional Educational Support (DANTES) allowed the Educational Services Office to administer 600 CLEP, SAT, ACT, and GED examinations.

 

Weapons Department –

 

Fox Division –

 

October to December – Fox Division passed its TRE and REFTRA. Removal of 2 NATO Seasparrow directors, due to elevation gear box problems, and their replacement with 2 new directors” (Ref. 329B-1983).

 

 Navigation Department 1983 Travelog:

 

Date

Location

In port Days

At Sea Days

1 to 20 JAN

I.O. OPS/Enrote Perth

----

20

21 to 26 JAN

Inport  Perth

06

-----

27 JAN to 7 FEB

Enroute Subic Bay

----

12

8 to 27 FEB

Inport Subic Bay

20

----

28 FEB to 20 MAR

South China Sea, Sea of Japan

(Exercise team Spirit 83) Enroute Sasebo

----

22

21 to 25 MAR

Inport Sasebo, Japan

05

----

26 MAR to 20 APR

NORPAC/FLEETEX 83-1 Enroute Alameda

----

30

30 APR to 19 SEP

Inport Alameda SRA

143

----

20 to 25 SEP

Sea/Trials/ISE

----

06

26 SEP to 7 OCT

Inport Alameda/TRE

10

----

8 to 13 OCT

SOCAL OPAREA

----

06

14 to 30 OCT

Inport Alameda

17

----

31 OCT to 22 NOV

SOCAL OPAREA

----

23

23 NOV to 11 DEC

Inport Alameda

19

----

12 to 13 DEC

At Sea/INSURV/Underway Material Inspection)

----

02

14 to 31 DEC

Inport Alameda

18

----

TOTAL

 

288

127

 

Days in Alameda

207 / 56.8%

-----

 

Days away from Alameda

-----

158 / 43.2%

 

Inport

66%

 

 

At Sea

 

33%

Ref. 329B-1982/1983 & 362D - EQNEEDF Note: from 6 to 11 October 1983 reported for CQ’S in the Command History Report as well - Operations Department – October – CVW-11 Carrier Quals conducted from 6 to 11 October 1983 during Enterprise’s Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE).

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Second and Sixth Fleet) 1984:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69)

4th Med

CVW-7

AG

10 Oct 1984

8 May 1985

Europe

211-days

 

USS America (CV-66) – 2nd, 6th & 7th

(5th & 6th Red Sea, Gulf of Aden voyage & 3rd Arabian Sea dep.)

NorLant Voy.

11th Med

DD

5th Suez Canal

3rd Indian Ocean

6th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant Voy.

3rd SoLant

4th Caribbean

OV

CVW-1

AB

24 Apr 1984

14 Nov 1984

Europe

Indian Ocean

North Arabian Sea

205-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

*USS Independence (CV-62) – 6th & 7th (2nd Arabian Sea & 15th & 16th Red Sea & Gulf of Aden)

NorLant

19th Med      15th Suez Canal

7th IO

16th Suez Canal

Med voy.

NorLant

CVW-6

AE

18 Oct 1984

19 Feb 1985

Europe

Indian Ocean

North Arabian Sea

125-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

 

1983 Aircraft Carrier Deployments and carriers from the 6th Fleet operating with the Seventh Fleet resulted in two CV’s extending into 1984, operating under the direction of the Seventh Fleet in the western pacific or Far East:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Ranger (CV-61) - 7th

17th WestPac

4th IO

CVW-2

NE

15 Jul 1983

29 Feb 1984

Indian Ocean

230-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (4th Northern Arabian Sea) (28th Forward Deployed)

32nd WestPac

San Bernardino Straits

20th SCS

Malaca Straits

8th IO

CVW-5

NF

28 Dec 1983

23 May 1984

Europe

Indian Ocean

Middle East

North Arabian Sea

148-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

Midway and Battle Group ALFA conducted a joint formation with seven ships of the British Royal Navy, combining to form one of the largest international naval groups in recent history. The joint formation was indicative of the mutual trust, concern, ability and Commitment of both nations in maintaining freedom of the seas.

# USS Midway (CV-41) 25th deployment as a forward deployed carrier stationed at Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan)

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) – 7th

14th WestPac 11th SCS      3rd IO

CVW-2

NE

13 Jan 1984

1 Aug 1984

202-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

USS America (CV-66) – 2nd, 6th & 7th

(5th & 6th Red Sea, Gulf of Aden voyage & 3rd Arabian Sea dep.)

NorLant Voy.

11th Med

DD

5th Suez Canal

3rd Indian Ocean

6th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant Voy.

3rd SoLant

4th Caribbean

OV

CVW-1

AB

24 Apr 1984

14 Nov 1984

Europe

Indian Ocean

North Arabian Sea

205-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

USS Carl Vinson        (CVN-70) – 7th

RIMPAC ’84

CVW-15

NL

May 1984

July 1984

90-est. -days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

USS Eenterprise                    (CVN-65) – 7th

11th WestPac      8th IO

CVW-11

NK

30 May 1984

20 Dec 1984

205-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (29th Forward Deployed)

33rd WestPac

CVW-5

NF

15 Oct 1984

12 Dec 1984

Western Pacific

59-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

Operational Readiness Inspection (ORI) and participated in Fleet Ex 85.

USS Independence (CV-62) – 6th & 7th (2nd Arabian Sea & 15th & 16th Red Sea & Gulf of Aden)

NorLant

19th Med      15th Suez Canal

7th IO

16th Suez Canal

Med voy.

NorLant

CVW-6

AE

18 Oct 1984

19 Feb 1985

Europe

Red Sea

Arabian Sea

125-days

 

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

USS Carl Vinson            (CVN-70) Pacific Fleet  & 7th

1st WestPac

1st Indian Ocean

CVW-15

NL

14 Oct 1984

24 May 1985

223-days

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East

Deployed for 107 consecutive days, remained in the Indian Ocean until April of 1985, during which time, the Chief of Naval Operations named Carl Vinson in February 1985, the winner of the Admiral Flatley Memorial Award for operational readiness and aviation safety for 1984, receiving its first Meritorious Unit Commendations for operations conducted from November 1984 to May 1985, visiting Pearl Harbor, Hi.; Subic Bay, Philippines; Yokosuka, Japan; Hong Kong; Fremantle, Australia and San Diego, Calif.

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

     “From 1976 until 1984, USS Midway (CV-41) history is hallmarked by long Indian Ocean cruises and port calls to some of the most exotic Far East ports. Being constantly forward deployed keeps her on the “cutting edge” of readiness. Midway no longer undergoes overhauls; instead, her upkeep is managed through periods of Incremental Ships Restricted Availability (SRA) and or Extended Ships Restricted Availability (ESRA). These brief periods allow Midway to be serviced, but also to deploy at any time” (Ref. 1181O).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 1 January 1984, when the ship received a Readiex 84-2/COMNAVAIRPAC CATCC Assist Visit on 1 January 1984, remaining onboard until the 15th of February 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 10 January 1984, for Operations with Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CVW-11) conducting a 12 day period as part of the turnaround training cycle which included Carrier Qualifications and participation in a Readiness Exercise which included a mine warfare exercise (MINEX ALPHA) in the SOCAL OPAREA, devoting the first six days to Carrier Qualifications, receiving a Readiex 84-2/COMNAVAIRPAC CATCC Assist Visit on 1 January 1984, remaining onboard until the 15th of February 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “Burial at Sea of remains of Captain Lauren J. Smith, USN, (Ret), and Commander John Keye, USN (Ret) aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was conducted on 10 January 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “Mr. Patrick Tucker, Professional Staff Member and Senate Armed Services committee and LCDR John Huston, USN, OLA, Escort for Mr. Tucker visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 12 to 13 January 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a brief visit to Naval Air Station, North Island, California from 17 to 18 January 1984, operating in the SOCAL OPAREA from 10 to 16 January 1984. By the 16th of January 1984, Fleet Refresher airwing Carrier Qualifications was conducted with 109 of 114 CVW-11 pilots qualifying. A record of 1502 traps was recorded for six days of refresher operations; 964 day and 538 night arrested landings. Enterprise received a Readiex 84-2/COMNAVAIRPAC CATCC Assist Visit from 1 January to 15 February 1984. Operations Department Combat Directions Center personnel attended numerous team trainers (AAW, ASW) in San Diego for general training and in preparation for Readiex 84-2. With Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot, Enterprise conducted in port Linkex and Multots training in San Diego. Burial at Sea of remains of Captain Lauren J. Smith, USN, (Ret), and Commander John Keye, USN (Ret) aboard Enterprise was conducted on 10 January 1984 and Mr. Patrick Tucker, Professional Staff Member and Senate Armed Services Committee and LCDR John Huston, USN, OLA Escort for Mr. Tucker visited from 12 to 13 January 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “The Honorable Chapman B. Cox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Readiness visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 18 to 19 January 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “A group of Oakland Navy League members that included Mr. William Humble; Mr. John Giblin; Mr. Albert Haskell and Mr. Donald Clair visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 19 to 20 January 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a second visit to Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 25 January 1984, operating in the SOCAL OPAREA, providing an “open deck” for Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA)-125, VF-124, VAQ-129, VAW-110, VMPF-3, VS-41 and VRC-30 from 18 to 25 January 1984, adding an additional 559 arrested landings, 314 day and 245. The Honorable Chapman B. Cox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Readiness visited from 18 to 19 January 1984 and a group of Oakland Navy League members that included Mr. William Humble; Mr. John Giblin; Mr. Albert Haskell and Mr. Donald Clair visited from 19 to 20 January 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “Hoover High School and Junior ROTC Units visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 26 to 29 January 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “On 31 January 1984, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed San Diego and participated in Readiex 84-2 before returning to Alameda on 15 February 1984, visiting Naval Air Station, North Island, California on her second time during her cruise from 25 to 31 January 1984. January 1984 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Communications Department reported HF termination with NAVCOMMSTA Stockton. (2) Engineering Department DC/R Division continued improvements in the Maintenance Control Center concept and further strengthened the material condition of the ship. The CNO objective to accomplish more of Current Ship's Maintenance Project (CSMP) deferred work became a reality. The Maintenance Control Center began programming deferred work into the ship's trouble call system. The quality assurance program underwent a major upgrading and a clan began to bring Enterprise’s self repair capability to par with that of an IMA. The upgrade started with establishing X-ray radiography to qualify high pressure welders. The capability to weld replacement chromium molybdenum steam plant valves using the tungsten inert gas welding process was established. Implementation of the COMNAVSURFPAC Quality Assurance Manual began. New emphasis was placed on repair party and emergency party training. Acquisition of needed training publications began, as did preparation of lesson plans for each repair and unit locker, Serious INSURV deficiencies in the ship's sewage systems were corrected, and the CHT system was returned to a fully operable condition. The ship acquired and began using hydroblasting equipment. Many repairs were completed on firemain and main drain valves during both industrial and ship's force availabilities. (3) Engineering Department Electrical Division reported that the Ship's force modified #4 Ship's Service Turbine Generator to act as a coolant turbine generator for the 4A reactor coolant pumps when the 4A CTG was down for repairs. (4) Engineering Department Machinery Division reported that the Number 4 SSTG CASREPED due to failure of governor to control machine, so repairs were completed. The number 2 main engine jacking gear CASREPED, due to a failed clutch lever pin, resulting in partial engagement of jacking gear while testing main engine, so the Jacking gear motor was rewound. (5) Operations Intelligence Center served as a point of contact for FITCLANT's Soviet Navy awareness program. Over 300 Enterprise personnel attended as well as personnel from other NAS Alameda commands. (6) Weapons Department G-2 Division reported that the Pre-Mine Readiness Certification Inspection (PRE-MRCI) for overall evaluation of mine assembly, stowage, handling and transport procedures was conducted. (7) COMNAVAIRPAC conducted a Supply Management Inspection aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 31 January to 4 February 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “A group of SECNAV Guest that included Mr. Leroy Erickson; Mr. Gene Emery; Mr. Abbott Sparks, SECNAV Guest; Mr. E. E. Thayer; Mr. James Boyd and Mr. Dave Ritchie, SECNAV Guest visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 10 to 13 February 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 15 February 1984, ending her underway period for Training Operations in the southern California operating area conducted from 10 January to 15 February 1984. Enterprise received a Readiex 84-2/COMNAVAIRPAC CATCC Assist Visit in the SOCAL OPAREA from 1 January to 15 February 1984. Operations Department Combat Directions Center personnel attended numerous team trainers (AAW, ASW) in San Diego for general training and in preparation for Readiex 84-2. With Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot, Enterprise conducted in port Linkex and Multots training in San Diego. Burial at Sea of remains of Captain Lauren J. Smith, USN, (Ret), and Commander John Keye, USN (Ret) aboard Enterprise was conducted on 10 January 1984. Mr. Patrick Tucker, Professional Staff Member and Senate Armed Services Committee and LCDR John Huston, USN, OLA, Escort for Mr. Tucker visited from 12 to 13 January 1984. By the 16th of January 1984, Fleet Refresher airwing Carrier Qualifications was conducted with 109 of 114 CVW-11 pilots qualifying. A record of 1502 traps was recorded for six days of refresher operations; 964 day and 538 night arrested landings. Enterprise received a Readiex 84-2/COMNAVAIRPAC CATCC Assist Visit from 1 January to 15 February 1984. Enterprise made a brief visit to Naval Air Station, North Island, California from 17 to 18 January 1984, operating in the SOCAL OPAREA from 10 to 16 January 1984. Operations Department Combat Directions Center personnel attended numerous team trainers (AAW, ASW) in San Diego for general training and in preparation for Readiex 84-2. With Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot, Enterprise conducted in port Linkex and Multots training in San Diego. Enterprise made a second visit to Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 25 January 1984, operating in the SOCAL OPAREA, providing an “open deck” for Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA)-125, VF-124, VAQ-129, VAW-110, VMPF-3, VS-41 and VRC-30 from 18 to 25 January 1984, adding an additional 559 arrested landings, 314 day and 245. During 14 days of flight operations a total of 1102 arrested landings (784 day traps, 318 night traps) were achieved. There were 49 Case III recoveries conducted. A requested assist visit by COMNAVAIRPAC highlighted areas of potential concern and where efforts could be further directed to enhance CATCC’s operational effectiveness. The Honorable Chapman B. Cox, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Readiness visited from 18 to 19 January 1984 aand a group of Oakland Navy League members that included Mr. William Humble; Mr. John Giblin; Mr. Albert Haskell and Mr. Donald Clair visited from 19 to 20 January 1984. Enterprise departed San Diego on 31 January 1984 and participated in Readiex 84-2 before returning to Alameda on 15 February 1984, visiting Naval Air Station, North Island, California on her second time during her cruise from 25 to 31 January 1984. COMNAVAIRPAC conducted a Supply Management Inspection aboard Enterprise from 31 January to 4 February 1984. January 1984 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Communications Department reported HF termination with NAVCOMMSTA Stockton. (2) Engineering Department DC/R Division continued improvements in the Maintenance Control Center concept and further strengthened the material condition of the ship. The CNO objective to accomplish more of Current Ship's Maintenance Project (CSMP) deferred work became a reality. The Maintenance Control Center began programming deferred work into the ship's trouble call system. The quality assurance program underwent a major upgrading and a clan began to bring Enterprise’s self repair capability to par with that of an IMA. The upgrade started with establishing X-ray radiography to qualify high pressure welders. The capability to weld replacement chromium molybdenum steam plant valves using the tungsten inert gas welding process was established. Implementation of the COMNAVSURFPAC Quality Assurance Manual began. New emphasis was placed on repair party and emergency party training. Acquisition of needed training publications began, as did preparation of lesson plans for each repair and unit locker, Serious INSURV deficiencies in the ship's sewage systems were corrected, and the CHT system was returned to a fully operable condition. The ship acquired and began using hydroblasting equipment. Many repairs were completed on firemain and main drain valves during both industrial and ship's force availabilities. (3) Engineering Department Electrical Division reported that the Ship's force modified #4 Ship's Service Turbine Generator to act as a coolant turbine generator for the 4A reactor coolant pumps when the 4A CTG was down for repairs. (4) Engineering Department Machinery Division reported that the Number 4 SSTG CASREPED due to failure of governor to control machine, so repairs were completed. The number 2 main engine jacking gear CASREPED, due to a failed clutch lever pin, resulting in partial engagement of jacking gear while testing main engine, so the Jacking gear motor was rewound. (5) Engineering Department Auxiliary Division reported all work centers worked on clearing INSURV Inspection deficiencies. (6) Operations Intelligence Center serve as a point of contact for FITCLANT's Soviet Navy awareness program. Over 300 Enterprise personnel attended as well as personnel from other NAS Alameda commands. (7) Weapons Department G-2 Division reported that the Pre-Mine Readiness Certification Inspection (PRE-MRCI) for overall evaluation of mine assembly, stowage, handling and transport procedures was conducted. (8) Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CVW-11) deployed aboard Enterprise for a two week Weapons Training Exercise (WEAPTRAEX). Goals for this period were to increase landing proficiency, obtain blue water capabilities, conduct integrate Battle Group operations, demonstrate weapons loading and delivery proficiency, conduct a practice Mine Readiness Certification Inspection (MRCI) and a Electronic Warfare Technical Proficiency Inspection (EWTPI). CVW-11 conducted a 12 day period as part of the turnaround training cycle which included Carrier Qualifications and participation in a Readiness Exercise which included a mine warfare exercise (MINEX ALPHA) from 31 January to 11 February 1984. The primary mission objective was to increase mine warfare readiness for Enterprise and CVW-11. (9) Weapons Department G-1 Division passed a 3-M Inspection by COMNAVAIRPAC and a Combat Systems Readiness Test (CSRT) of equipment and systems for safety. G-1 Division conducted an underway replenishment with USS Sacramento (AOE-1), USNS Kawishiwi (AO-146), and USS Pyro (AE–24), an ammunition ship. (10) G-2 Division conducted a WEAPTRAEX. (11) Weapons Department W Division completed Special Weapons Readiness Exercise (MOREX). Also, participated in a SINKEX with the main objective to exercise air wing War-At-Sea (WAS) tactics and provide realistic training by employing a variety of floating targets. A group of SECNAV Guest that included Mr. Leroy Erickson; Mr. Gene Emery; Mr. Abbott Sparks, SECNAV Guest; Mr. E. E. Thayer; Mr. James Boyd and Mr. Dave Ritchie, SECNAV Guest visited from 10 to 13 February 1984. (12) Deck Department conducted five underway replenishments, moving 117 cargo loads, receiving 1,310,000 gallons of JP-5, and transferring a total of 121,556 gallons of DFM/JP-5 to the USS Leftwich (DD-984) and USS Waddell (DDG-24) from January to February. Total alongside time during Readiex 84-2 was 10 hours 21 minutes. During a gyro casualty while alongside the USS Sacramento (AOE-1), Enterprise safely and expeditiously conducted a four station emergency breakaway. (13) Communications Department supported the OTC for Readiex 84-2 while maintaining HF termination with NCS Stockton” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

 

Flight deck loaded with cars, returning to San Diego from a 13-month Complex Overhaul in Bremerton, Wash. 1984. Greg Brown

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026471.jpg

 

     “The Constellation (CVA-64), the 64th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 52nd, commissioning on 27 October 1961, with Captain T.J. Walker in command at New York Naval Shipyard, departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. in February 1984, upon completion of the $235 million overhaul two weeks early and under budget, something which a carrier had not accomplished since the 1940s, according to the shipyard, a 13 1/2-month Complex Overhaul (COH). In December 1982, Constellation sailed north to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash., to begin COH to allow the carrier to operate the new F/A-18AI. During the overhaul, Connie was the first carrier to receive the new aircraft. She was also fitted with the new Phalanx Close-In Weapon System radar-guided gatling-gun, ship’s Terrier missile system was replaced with NATO Sea Sparrow and modifications were made to allow the carrier to operate the new F/A-18A Hornet strike aircraft and two new flush deck catapults. Connie completed the $235 million overhaul two weeks early and under budget, something which a carrier had not accomplished since the 1940’s, according to the shipyard. Constellation set sail on her 14th deployment to the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean on 21 February 1985. This was the first operational deployment of the F/A-18 Hornet strike fighter and the LAMPS, which used the SH-60B Seahawk ASW helicopter. The Hornets replaced the A-7E Corsair IIs operated by two squadrons assigned to CVW-14, making Constellation the Navy's first carrier to have F/A18s assigned to her air wing. The SH-60B Seahawk helicopter operated as the air subsystem of the LAMPS MK III weapon system, deployed aboard the frigate USS Crommelin (FFG-37); entering the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for a Complex Overhaul in January 1983. Constellation departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash., 26 April 1976 to rejoin the Pacific Fleet at her home port of Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, completing one of the most extensive carrier overhauls ever undertaken (14 months), during an Extended Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (EDSRA) commencing in February 1975, enabling her to carry the Navy's newest air supremacy fighter, the F-14A Tomcat, and the S-3A Viking, a submarine hunter; reclassifying to CV-64 on 1 July 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises in Vietnam, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, received a Presidential Unit Citation from President Nixon in 1973 and two Vietnam Peace Keeping Cruises; completed Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) in December 1970; beginning DSRA, on her second since commissioning, shoofly after arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment on 8 May 1970 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash.; commenced workups in November 1965 for her first full-blown war cruise upon conclusion of overhaul; commencing her first DSRA upon arrival from her second WestPacdeployment, on 1 February 1965; lasting eight months from 1 February to November 1965 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash.; delivered to the Navy on 1 October 1961; launched on 8 October 1960, sponsored by Mary Herter (wife of Secretary of State Christian Herter); keel was laid down on 14 September 1957, at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York, as a Kitty Hawk-class aircraft carrier, while the contract to build her was awarded on 1 July 1956, she was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the "new constellation of stars" on the flag of the United States, which was named for one of the six frigates bought by the Continental Congress in the late 1790s. The first of those frigates made American naval history and was named for the ring of 13 stars that formed a "new Constellation" on the flag of the new United States” (Ref. 1-Constellation, 72 & 1185).

 

 

An aerial starboard bow view of the aircraft carrier USS Constellation (CV-64) underway in the Pacific Ocean, 15 February 1984. Note the F/A-18 Hornet aircraft on the bow. US Navy photo (DVIC id: DNST8507323). Defense Visual Information Center.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026434.jpg

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) suffered a fire in main engine room while under a complex overall on 17 February 1984 at the Norfolk, Va. Navy Yard” (Ref. 34).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 23 February 1984, for Independent Steaming (ISE) and Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS CQ) in the SOCAL OPAREA, inport from 15 to 23 February 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “Mr. John Watkins; Mr. Roger Gilson; Mr. Frank "Bing" Simpson; Mr. Henry Van Johns; Mr. Bill Bedford; Mr. Jeff Arnett and Mr. Harry W. Colmery, Jr. visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 25 to 26 February 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “Mr. William D. Bolton; Mr. Donald H. Scott; Dr. John G. Sundby, DDS; Mr. Edward G. Heath; Mr. Charles W. Stephens; Mr. William G. King III and Dr. James S. Bleecker visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 26 to 27 February 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “COMO Robert H. Shumaker, USN, President, NPGS and Dr. David Schrady, Provost, NPGS visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 27 to 28 February 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

     “Commander Jim Offutt, O-in-C ONR DET, Pasadena, CA.; Mr. John R. Lund; Mr. Berkely W. Johnston; Mr. Kenneth J. Campbell; Mr. Robert N. Hanson and Mr. Judd O. Roberts visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 28 to 29 February 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

     “On 29 February 1984, USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-9 embarked arrived San Francisco Bay, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain Arthur Hugh Fredrickson, as Commanding Officer, ending her 17th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet, her fourth Indian Ocean deployment, on her first North Arabian Sea deployment operating with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. Vice President George Bush and VADM Crawford Easterling visit the bridge of the aircraft carrier Ranger during a tour of the ship, May 14, 1983. On 18 July 1983, Ranger collides with USS WICHITA (AOR-1) during refueling 100 miles off San Diego, Calif. Ranger's flight deck elevator is damaged, but no injuries are reported. WICHITA damages its refueling capability. The port fueling riggins are put out of commission, including the loss of all fuel hoses. Also part of WICHITA's aft superstructure is crushed on the starboard side. While operating off Nicaragua on 18 August 1983, Ranger crewmen were blown overboard by jet exhaust. On 1 November 1983 a fire broke out in the number 2 auxiliary machinery room while the Ranger was deployed in the North Arabian Sea, east of Oman. Six crewmen were killed as a result of the fire, injuring 35 and knocked out three of the ship's four engines. The fire is in one of the four main machinery spaces and reportedly is extinguished within an hour although there is one reflash, which is extinguished. Flight operations had not yet commenced when the ship went to general quarters, so no aircraft were yet in the air. This was fortunate because the ship was then out of range of land. Some repairs were effected at sea, but by the time the ship returned to the Philippines after nearly three more months had elapsed at sea, one screw was still unavailable; reclassified to CV-61 30 June 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War, earning 13 battle stars for service in Vietnam. Her 19th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 August 1957” (15 July 1983 to 29 February 1984)” (Ref. 1-Ranger, 72, 84A, 1094A, 1095 & 1096). 

 

 15/07/83 to 29/02/84

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

Sea Service Ribbon

August 1974 thru January 1993
(11 Awards)

17Th WestPac

4th IO

Middle East

19th FWFD

230-days

Ref. 1094

 

   “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 2 March 1984, conducting Independent Steaming (ISE) and Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS CQ).from 23 February to 2 March 1984 in the southern California operating area, recording a total of 1,568 arrested landings, 1,127 day and 441 nights. In addition to CVW-11 qualifying 18 of their pilots (VS-21), deck time was provided for various West Coast air wings and squadrons, CVW-14, CVWR-30, VA-122, VFA-125, VF-124, VMA-21, VAQ-33, VAW-110, VS-41 and VRC-30 also took advantage of the Carquals. Mr. John Watkins; Mr. Roger Gilson; Mr. Frank "Bing" Simpson; Mr. Henry Van Johns; Mr. Bill Bedford; Mr. Jeff Arnett and Mr. Harry W. Colmery, Jr. visited from 25 to 26 February 1984. Mr. William D. Bolton; Mr. Donald H. Scott; Dr. John G. Sundby, DDS; Mr. Edward G. Heath; Mr. Charles W. Stephens; Mr. William G. King III and Dr. James S. Bleecker visited from 26 to 27 February 1984. COMO Robert H. Shumaker, USN, President, NPGS and Dr. David Schrady, Provost, NPGS visited from 27 to 28 February 1984. Commander Jim Offutt, O-in-C ONR DET, Pasadena, CA.; Mr. John R. Lund; Mr. Berkely W. Johnston; Mr. Kenneth J. Campbell; Mr. Robert N. Hanson and Mr. Judd O. Roberts visited from 28 to 29 February 1984. February 1984 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Engineering Department Auxiliary Division reported that the Catapult shop supported CVW-11 as CQ’s proceeded nonstop. Number 7 HPAC was overhauled by the air group. (2) Engineering Department DC/R Division successfully completed the Fire Fighting Assistance Team visit. (3) Engineering Department Electrical Division reported that they rewound and rebuilt #2 main engine jacking gear motor; upgraded the degaussing F-coil feedback circuitry enabling automatic F-coil operation; passed the Mine Warfare Readiness Inspections with no degaussing discrepancies and cut slip rings on 2B CTG helping return it to full service. (4) Operations Combat Directions Center reported that the Enterprise and Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot participated in Readiex 84-2 from 31 January to 14 February 1984. Events included an opposed sortie from San Diego, and a multithread scenario composed of long and short range AAW, ASUW, and ASW at an intense level. Training continued with Independent Steaming (ISE) and Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS CQ). (5) Supply Department reported that Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN flew 4208 hours during heavily tasking the Stock Control (S-1), Aviation Support (S-6) and Material (S-8) Division with over 6,000 demands. Despite this heavy operating mode, off-ship NMCS/PMCS averaged 59 over this period, while MC/FMC was a respectable 84%/68%. Preparations for deployment continued in all divisions, with equipment and space conditions the main concern. (6) Modernization of the ship's retail stores was completed by the Retail Sales/Service Division (S-3) with almost $100,000.00 spent on improved security, doubling display area and significantly improving the attractiveness of the spaces for the crew. (7) The Food Service Division (S-2) was busy grooming equipment for deployment, and all major equipment was inspected by contractors. In addition, a new deck was put in the aft galley and most of the mess decks were repainted. (8) The Wardroom Division (S-5) had galley and serving equipment repaired or replaced. (9) Communications Department supported COMCARGRU THREE and COMDESRON SEVEN during Readiex 84-2. (10) Weapons Department G-3 Division reported they passed the Mine Warfare Readiness Certification Inspection with a grade of “OUTSTANDING”” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 3 March 1984, with 3,900 dependents embarked for a one-day cruise aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65)” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “During exercise Team Spirit '84, on 12 March 1984, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was struck by a submerged "Victor"-class Soviet nuclear-powered attack submarine in the Sea of Japan, forcing the submarine to be towed back to her homeport. At the time of the collision, the Kitty Hawk was carrying up to several dozen nuclear weapons, and the Soviet submarine probably carried two nuclear torpedoes” (Ref. 1- Kitty Hawk & 84A).

 

    “Standing out of Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on on 14 March 1984, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) participated in ReadiEx 84-3, the final phase consisting of “an opposed, multithreat Orange Force scenario,” including a Harpoon missile exercise” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 4 to 14 March 1984 when she again departed for SOCAL to participate in Readiex 84-3. The final phase of the exercise included an opposed, multithreat, Orange Force scenario. Engineering Department Machinery Division reported that Number 3 AMCW pump CASREPED due to failed coupling. Pump was repaired by ship's force when parts were received. Contractor determined 4A MFP required shaft replacement. Number 3 main condensor air box developed a crack similar to the one in number 2 main condensor air box. COMNAVAIRPAC Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) Management Inspection (AMI) Team grades AIMD outstanding, awarding a numerical grade of 97.2 percent - the highest grade given to a Pacific Fleet carrier. Two new work centers were added to increase repair capability; namely, cable/connector repair and instrument repair” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “Standing out of Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 14 March 1984, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) will conduct Operational Readiness Examination ORE) and participate in ReadiEx 84-3, the final phase consisting of “an opposed, multithreat Orange Force scenario,” including a Harpoon missile exercise” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “Mr. Norman Newhouse; Mr. Tom Childers; Mr, George Bell, II; Mr. Harry Mercer; Mr. Don Euhus; Mr. James M. Reiter visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 16 to 17 March 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

     “Mr. Hubert Kaltenbach; Mr. Joe Kinney and Mr, Ed Fike visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 17 to 18 March 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “An A-7E of VA-93 is lost when the port catapult fails during launch off USS Midway (CV-41) in the Arabian Sea on 18 March 1984. The pilot is rescued” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “Mr. Art Neff; Mr. Robert Otis Mulvin; Mr. Roger Barkelay; Mr. Bob Rosenfeld

Mr. William Applebee; Mr. Paul Concard; Mr. Vern H. Winchell and Mr. Mike Rosenfeld visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 18 to 19 March 1983” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

     “Mr. William E, Dunkle; Mr. Richard Jensen; Mr, Robert E. Knowles; Mr. Everett C. Edwards; Mr. James Robertson; Mr, Jerome New, Jr. and RADM John Thomas (Ret) visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 19 to 20 March 1983” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

     “During the first five months of 1984, USS Midway (CV-41), as part of Battle Group ALFA, deployed to the Northern Arabian Sea. During the deployment, the war between Iran and Iraq escalated, demanding that the Battle Group remain on patrol to demonstrate the determination of the United States to keep the Strait of Hormuz safe and sea lanes open for international traffic to the oil producing states of the Middle East. Operating under threat of suicide attacks by Iranian aircraft and patrol boats, the Battle Group conducted a rigorous training schedule while maintaining constant surveillance. All areas of naval warfare were fine-tuned by units of the Battle Group in this multi-threat environment. The entire spectrum of Composite Warfare Command capabilities were exercised and evaluated on a regular basis simultaneously with real world threats in the volatile region of the Northern Arabian Sea. On the Twenty-Third of March 1984, Midway and Battle Group ALFA conducted a joint formation with seven ships of the British Royal Navy, combining to form one of the largest international naval groups in recent history. The joint formation was indicative of the mutual trust, concern, ability and Commitment of both nations in maintaining freedom of the seas” (Ref. 1081W).

 

    “Joint Task Force operating with USS Midway (CV-41), as part of Battle Group ALFA: USS Sterett (CG-31), USS O'Brien (DD-975), USS Francis Hammond (FF-1067), USS Kirk (FF-1087), USS Cochrane (DDG-21), USNS Hassayampa (T-AO-145), USNS Navasota (T-AO-106), USNS Kilauea (T-AE-26), RFA Appleleaf (A-79), HMS Glamorgan (D-19), HMS Aurora (F-10), HMS Brazen (F-91), HMS Rothesay (F-107), RFA Blue Rover (A-27) and RFA Regent (A-486)” (Ref. 1181W).

 

    “During the launch of an F-4 assigned to VF-161 the catapult on USS Midway (CV-41) flight deck breaks releasing debris into the jet's engine in the Indian Ocean on 2 April 1984. After lift-off the plane rolled to the right and the crew ejected. The RIO made it, the pilot however, ejected into the water. Both were recovered alive but the pilot died from his injuries shortly afterwards” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “After completion of Readiex 84-3, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a challenging Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) from 2 to 5 April 1984. Another multithreat scenario, it added “power projection strikes ashore.” Deck Department completed the 1984 predeployment training cycle by earning an outstanding overall grade during the ORE exercises and the senior ORE observer commented that." Enterprise had the best CV Deck Department in the Pacific Fleet." Communications Department completed ORE with a grade of satisfactory” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 6 April 1984, conducting ReadiEx 84-3 from 14 March to 5 April 1984; the final phase consisting of “an opposed, multithreat Orange Force scenario,” including a Harpoon missile exercise, on the 30th, and Operational Readiness Examination (ORE) from 2 to 5 April 1984. Deck Department conducted four underway replenishments including fuel ordnance, provisions, A/C engines and fleet freight. Received 74 lifts of general cargo, 160 lifts of live ordnance, and 2,712,981 gallons of JP-5 and delivered 890,000 gallons of fuel to the USS Sacramento (AOE-1). Deck Department completed the 1984 predeployment training cycle by earning an outstanding overall grade during the ORE exercises and the senior ORE observer commented that." Enterprise had the best CV Deck Department in the Pacific Fleet." Communications Department completed ORE with a grade of satisfactory. March 1984 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) An annual 3M inspection was conducted with an overall departmental grade of 96.2 percent. (2) Engineering Department Electrical, Auxiliary and DC/R Division successfully completed an ORE. Fully rewired and installed electrical equipment and telephone in a transmitter room to convert it for use as the ship's MARS station. During 20 days of flight operations a total of 2171 arrested landings, including 74 Case III recoveries, (1305 day traps, 866 night traps) were completed, The ORE, conducted from 1 to 5 April 1984, examined several major warfare areas with Carrier Controlled Operations being graded during a Z-32-CC exercise. (3) Enterprise CATCC received an excellent rating with an overall score of 94%. In addition, a record score of 95.1% was achieved by the Air Traffic Controllers on their written CV NATOPS examination.  (4) Operations Department Combat Directions Center reported that the ORE was conducted from 2 to 5 April 1984. It involved a multithreat scenario including power projection strikes ashore. (5) The Operations Combat Directions Center Phase I of Readiex 84-3 was spent in ASUW, AAW, EW, and ASW Team training in San Diego with other elements of Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot prior to the underway portion of the exercise. (6) Operations Intelligence Center received a grade of excellent during Readiex 84-3 and received an overall grade of excellent during ORE. MSI completed evaluation of the MIIS for COMNAVAIRPAC (EQNEEDF Note: Readiex 84-5 was reported in the Command History Report listed as an April activity but listed ORE, hence a mistake when originally typed by a Yeoman). Operations Intelligence Center commenced evaluation of SMQ-10 antenna performance in support of FIST operation. (7) Refresher Training was conducted for CVW-11 from 14 to 18 March 1984. The third phase of Readiex 84-3 consisted of Battle Group operations from 19 to 23 March 1984. The final phase of the exercise was devoted to scenario operations against Orange surface, subsurface, and air units. A Harpoonex was conducted on 30 March 1984. (8) Training Department Special Services Division was transferred to the Training Department and expanded considerably in size, budget, and crew utilization. A number of programs were initiated which provided recreational opportunities and entertainment for the crew. (9) Weapons Department G-1 Division conducted underway ammunition replenishment with USNS Kawishiwi (AO-146) and USS Haleakala (AE-25). (10) COMNAVAIRPAC Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) Management Inspection (AMID). Grade: Outstanding. Electronics Warfare Proficiency Inspection (EWTPI). Grade: outstanding. (11) Weapons Department G-3 Division conducted ordnance Readiness Inspection of bomb/mine assembly operations in which a grade of "OUTSTANDING" was received. (12) Weapons Department W Division reported that CVW-11 participated in: a scored EWTPI, a Nuclear Operational Readiness Exercise (NOREX), and an ORE (13) As cruise drew closer, the Supply Department was extremely active, ensuring last minute details were accomplished and that all divisions were prepared for an extended at sea period. The goal for Stock Control was to keep the material pipeline full at all times. To accomplish this, one top-off reorder was dropped on NSC Oakland at the end of April. The Aviation Support Division continued its efforts to expeditiously fill rotable pool deficiencies, with a goal to leave port on 30 May 1984 with 100% range and depth. Great improvements in material readiness for both pool and stock assets was evident during Readiex 84-2/ORE, which occurred from 14 March to 6 April 1984. Rotatable pool effectiveness increased to 96% while MC/FMC jumped to 87%/78%. Off-ship NMCS/PMCS during Readiex 84-2/ORE dropped to an average of 24” (Ref. ” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 19 April 1984, for Refresher Air Operations and Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) in the southern California operating area” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

                                                                                                                

    “USS Midway (CV-41) crossed the International Date Line on 19 April 1984” (Ref. 1181R).

 

    “COL Melvin Hayashi, USAF, Commandant USAF Test Pilot School, Edwards AFB, CA.; MAJ Girberto Rigobello, Brazilian AF, TPS Edward AFB; LT Robert McLean, USN, TPS Edwards AFB; Captain Doug Erlandson, Canadian AF, TPS Edwards AFB; MAJ John Barnoski, USAF, TPS Edwards AFB; Captain Kevin Burns, USAF, TPS Edwards AFB and Captain Richard Schroeder, USAF, TPS Edwards AFB visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 21 to 22 April 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

FIFTHEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

15-MONTH COMPLEX OVERHAUL & ALTERATIONS AT NORFOLK NAVY YARD VA. – SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS – LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(21 March 1983 to 31 December 1984)

Part 1 – (21 March to 27 April 1983)

Part 2 – (28 April 1983)

Part 3 – (29 April to 1 December 1983)

Part 4 – (2 December 1983 to 23 April 1984)

Part 5 – (24 April to 31 December 1984)