CHAPTER XXXVII

Part 5 – (24 April to 31 December 1984)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

FIFTHEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

15-MONTH COMPLEX OVERHAUL & ALTERATIONS AT NORFOLK NAVY YARD VA. – SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS – LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(21 March 1983 to 31 December 1984)

Part 1 – (21 March to 27 April 1983)

Part 2 – (28 April 1983)

Part 3 – (29 April to 1 December 1983)

Part 4 – (2 December 1983 to 23 April 1984)

Part 5 – (24 April to 31 December 1984)

 

 

    “USS America (CV-66) with CVW-1 embarked departed NOB, Norfolk, Virginia 24 April 1984, with Captain Leighton Warren (Snuffy) Smith, Jr., USNA, as Commanding Officer, on her Caribbean/10/Atlantic, on her fourth Caribbean Sea deployment (her first, fourth and 13th and 14th voyage were deployments, totaling 16 voyages in all) to participate in Exercise "Ocean Venture,” operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, on her 11th Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea in support of NATO Exercise, "Display Determination," on her third Indian Ocean deployment, operating with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. America will make her fifth Suez Canal transit, Red Sea, Bab el Mandeb Strait and Gulf of Aden voyage and upon return from the Indian Ocean, will enter the Gulf of Aden, Bab el Mandeb Strait Red Sea to the Suez Canal, her sixth transit on her return transit to the Mediterranean Sea, the Atlantic and home. Reclassified CV-66 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" on 30 June 1975 while at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, entering Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 27 November 1974, upon return from her North Sea deployment on 12 October 1974; making three Vietnam Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War operating with the 7th Fleet (receiving five battle stars). She will under go her 19th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 23 January 1965, with Captain Lawrence Heyworth, Jr., in command” (Ref. 1-America, 72 & 76, 324 & 824).  

 

USS America (CVA-66) with CVW-1 (AB)

(24 April to 14 November 1984)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-102

Diamondbacks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AB100

F-14A

VF-33

Starfighters -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AB200

F-14A

VA-46

Clansmen -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AB300

A-7E

VA-72

Blue Hawks -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AB400

A-7E

VA-34

Blue Blasters -                   Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AB500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-123

Screwtops -

Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-135

Black Ravens -

Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-11

Dragon Slayers -           Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-32

Maulers - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

VQ-2 Det. A

Batmen - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Special electronic installation

(JQ)

xx

EA-3B

VRC-50 Det.

Foo Dogs - (COD) aircraft of high-priority equipment and personnel.

Grumman - C-2A -Greyhound

(RG) 424

C-2

 

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 30 April 1984, conducting Refresher Air Operations and a successful Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) in the southern California operating area from 19 to 30 April 1984 and then began a month long period of preparations for overseas movement (POM). During the ORSE, prior to deployment, 10 days of FLEXDECK flight operations were also conducted. A total of 1408 arrested landings (953 day traps, 455 night traps) were completed, with a total of 43 Case III recoveries. Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) received the S-3 Supply/AIMD support award from Lockheed Aircraft Company. Established phased maintenance kits for support equipment to reduce AWP down time. Installed human factors engineered microminiature repair work stations. Engineering Department Auxiliary Division reported that ORSE was completed with the catapult and diesel shops receiving only a very few minor discrepancies. Auxiliary Division continued to support Carrier Qualifications during at sea period. Engineering Department Electrical Division achieved an above average grade on the ORSE. SSSF continued work to replace 4A MFP turbine rotor bearings, and nozzle plate. During hot testing of 4A MFP the turbine end H. P. sleeve bearing was wiped. Engineering Department Machinery Division achieved an above average grade on the ORSE. SSSF continued work to replace 4A MFP turbine rotor bearings, and nozzle plate. During hot testing of 4A MFP the turbine end H. P. sleeve bearing was wiped. As cruise drew closer, the Supply Department was extremely active, ensuring last minute details were accomplished and that all divisions were prepared for an extended at sea period. The goal for Stock Control was to keep the material pipeline full at all times. To accomplish this, one top-off reorder was dropped on NSC Oakland at the end of April. The Aviation Support Division continued its efforts to expeditiously fill rotable pool deficiencies, with a goal to leave port on 30 May 1984 with 100% range and depth. Great improvements in material readiness for both pool and stock assets was evident during Readiex 84-2/ORE, which occurred from 14 March to 6 April 1984. Rotatable pool effectiveness increased to 96% while MC/FMC jumped to 87%/78%. Off-ship NMCS/PMCS during Readiex 84-2/ORE dropped to an average of 24. Supply Department reported that during April, Enterprise was announced as the winner of the 1984 Captain Maury A. Notch Laundry/Dry Cleaning Excellence Award. VADM Easterling, COMNAVAIRPAC, presented this award and the S-3 Aviation Supply Excellence Award for 1983 in a ceremony on board in May. Determined to ensure the exemplary laundry service provided to the crew continued a mini-overhaul of all laundry and dry cleaning equipment was accomplished in May. S-5 accomplished numerous habitability upgrades during this period, the most significant of which was the removal of 50 two-man berths and installation of 50 three-man berths, increasing the Wardroom berthing to 515 racks. Additional projects included procuring new chairs for Wardroom II and installing new carpet in the Wardroom Lounge. Finally, the Material Division significantly upgraded its paces by adding MSP cabinets and overhead storage bins to many storerooms. The Training Department coordinated and monitored the training of 44 officers and enlisted personnel from Naval Reserve Unit (CVN-65) Det. 0181, Columbus, Ohio and Det. 0287 from Alameda, California. During their two week Active Duty for Training (ACDUTRA) period, these reservists received training in Damage Control, 3-M, and in-rate skills” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “Upon conclusion of of Exercise "Ocean Venture," USS America (CV-66) visited Caracas, Venezuela” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) departed on 9 May 1984 for the Mediterranean Sea” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “On 18 May 1984, Captain R. P. Hickey was relieved as CAG by Commander D. L. Carroll. CVW-11 deployed on board Enterprise for an extended seven month deployment” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “The seventh Ranger (CVA-61), former CVA-61, the 61st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 49th, commissioning at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 10 August 1957, Captain Charles T. Booth II in command departed Alameda, California in May 1984 for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. for overhaul” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) reached Malaga, Spain, on 21 May 1984” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “On 23 May 1984, USS Midway (CV-41) with Rear Admiral Chatham. Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander T. R. Beard, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 5 (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), Captain H. P. Kober, Jr, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer and Captain T. T. Hood, as Executive Officer, ending her 32nd WestPac, her 20th South China Sea, on her eighth Indian Ocean deployment and her 28th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her fourth North Arabian Sea deployment. An A-7E of VA-93 is lost when the port catapult fails during launch off Midway in the Arabian Sea on 18 March 1984. The pilot is rescued. During the launch of an F-4 assigned to VF-161 the catapult on Midway flight deck breaks releasing debris into the jet's engine in the Indian Ocean on 2 April 1984. After lift-off the plane rolled to the right and the crew ejected. The RIO made it, the pilot however, ejected into the water. Both were recovered alive but the pilot died from his injuries shortly afterwards. Midway crossed the International Date Line on 19 April 1984. During the first five months of 1984, Midway, as part of Battle Group ALFA deployed to the Northern Arabian Sea. During the deployment, the war between Iran and Iraq escalated, demanding that the Battle Group remain on patrol to demonstrate the determination of the United States to keep the Strait of Hormuz safe and sea lanes open for international traffic to the oil producing states of the Middle East. Operating under threat of suicide attacks by Iranian aircraft and patrol boats, the Battle Group conducted a rigorous training schedule while maintaining constant surveillance. All areas of naval warfare were fine-tuned by units of the Battle Group in this multi-threat environment. The entire spectrum of Composite Warfare Command capabilities were exercised and evaluated on a regular basis simultaneously with real world threats in the volatile region of the Northern Arabian Sea. On the Twenty-Third of March 1984, Midway and Battle Group ALFA conducted a joint formation with seven ships of the British Royal Navy, combining to form one of the largest international naval groups in recent history. The joint formation was indicative of the mutual trust, concern, ability and Commitment of both nations in maintaining freedom of the seas. Joint Task Force operating with Midway, as part of Battle Group ALFA: USS Sterett (CG-31), USS O'Brien (DD-975), USS Francis Hammond (FF-1067), USS Kirk (FF-1087), USS Cochrane (DDG-21), USNS Hassayampa (T-AO-145), USNS Navasota (T-AO-106), USNS Kilauea (T-AE-26), RFA Appleleaf (A-79), HMS Glamorgan (D-19), HMS Aurora (F-10), HMS Brazen (F-91), HMS Rothesay (F-107), RFA Blue Rover (A-27) and RFA Regent (A-486). Midway spent 111 continuous days at sea and steamed over 63,000 miles or 1 ½ times the circumference of the earth. Her previous record of 91 continuous days on station was shattered. Conducting almost 9,800 hours of flight operations, she launched and recovered over 5,300 aircraft, breaking the all time record for the first quarter in any year of her history. The post office processed over 441,189 pounds of mail, the laundry cleaned and washed over a million pounds of clothes, the air transportation office moved 1.79,063 pounds of cargo and 1,562 passengers, Midways “Grapes” pumped almost 10 million gallons of JP-5 during over 8,000 aircraft refueling, Food Service provided 1,176,000 meals including 41,078 steaks, 3,655 lobsters…. 59,579 pounds of chicken and 20,288 pounds of frankfurters, one hundred and three sailors re-enlisted, KWAY radio broadcast over 3,715 hours of radio entertainment and KMID-TV, 4,010 hours of television programming, the ship’s print shop completed 4,946,325 impressions, and Midway processed over 2,500 slimy pollywogs to Honorable Shellbacks. And, there were 37 documented and duly recorded “GREEN FLASHES” (Change of Command – Ref. 1081T). Ports of calls include: Sassebo, Japan; Pusan, Korea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippnes;  Manila, Republic of Philippines; Honkong, B. C. C., Pattaya Beach, Thailand and Singapore. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 31st deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 37th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 50th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (28 December to 23 May 1984)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 84A, 1181Q, 1181R, 1181S, 1181T, 1181U, 1181V, 1181Z4, 1181Z5, 1181Z6, 1181Z7 & 1181Z8).

 

 28/12/83 to 23/05/84

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation

Western Pacific, NorPac and Indian Ocean

*28 Dec 1983 to 1 May 1984*

32nd WestPac

San Bernardino Straits

20th SCS

Malaca Straits

8th IO

Middle East

4th Northern Arabian Sea

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

same

 

*Ref. - 1081 reported July 1982 to May 1984 consisting of 29th WestPac/ 1st NorPac, 2nd NorPac, 30th, 31st & 32nd WestPac

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The SSDR is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “USS America (CV-66) commenced her transit of the Mediterranean Sea on 29 May 1984” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 30 April to 30 May 1984 conducting Pre-Overseas Movements (POM). One month POW accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Communications Department completed all antenna maintenance in preparation for deployment. (2) Deck Department conducted Boat Coxswain training. (3) Engineering Department Auxiliary Division reported that Number 1, 3, and A/C units overhauled by SUPSHIP SF contractor personnel with ship's force assistance on parts and labor. Number 4 Elliott was overhauled by the air group and desiccant was changed in the forward and aft 02N2 plants. Machine shop supported underway preparations by performing many minor repairs to Engineering Department's components and specifically to 84 propulsion plant's main feed pumps. Hydraulics shop personnel supervised the overhaul of aircraft elevator stanchions by SUPSHIP SF contractor personnel. (4) Engineering Department DC/R Division successfully completed POM. As a result of Marine Detachment fire which resulted from improper control of hot work on 31 May 84 much tighter controls were subsequently implemented for hot work safety. In the area of fire prevention, several new ideas from fire awareness seminars were implemented like stenciling bulkheads adjacent to spaces with combustibles. (5) Engineering Department Electrical Division reported that SSSF completed repairs of 4A MFP. Contractors performed repairs on all main condenser air boxes by welding in new segments of the air box to cover the air box weak areas. M Division performed shutdown maintenance in preparation for deployment. (6) Engineering Department Machinery Division reported that SSSF completed repairs of 4A MFP. Contractors performed repairs on all main condenser air boxes by welding in new segments of the air box to cover the air box weak areas. M Division performed shutdown maintenance in preparation for deployment. (7) Operations Combat Directions Center reported that Enterprise conducted upkeep during the month of May until getting underway for deployment on 30 May 1984. (8) Operations Intelligence Center installed Basic Elint Tracker (BELT) for evaluation during deployment, CCG-3/CVIC tasked national sensors for intelligence collection during RIMPAC. Fleet Intelligence Support Terminal (FIST) installed during Pearl Harbor in port period, FICPAC Fleet SAO package brought aboard. (9) Supply Department Disbursing (S-4) received over $10,000,000.00 in currency from the Federal Reserve Bank in San Francisco. S-2 was busy loading large quantities of provisions, and left for deployment "stocked to the overhead." Additionally, an under utilized forward vegetable preparation room was converted into a Bake Shop during May, ensuring an ample supply of baked goods. (10) Training Department trported that May saw the beginning of the Midshipmen Summer Training Program. Lasting until September, the Training Department coordinated the indoctrination and training of over 70 first and third class midshipmen. During this period, the midshipmen were integrated into the ship's company and exposed to all facets of life at sea including watch standing and day-to-day departmental routine. (11) Weapons Department G-3 Division weight tested weapons handling equipment. On 18 May 1984, Captain R. P. Hickey was relieved as CAG by Commander D. L. Carrol” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11, Commander D. L. Carrol as CAG embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 30 May 1984, embarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif., with Captain Robert L. Leuschner, Jr. as the Commanding Officer, on her 11th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Western and second Northern Pacific, on her 11th & 12th Indian Ocean voyage and second North Arabian Sea deployment, on her 3rd Arabian Sea voyage participating in RimPac 84, was a “multinational, two carrier, extended exercise,” involving U.S. and Japanese P-3s, USAF B-52s, and about 90 American and Australian ships and two Carrier Battle Groups which provided multiple scenarios and exercised all warfare areas throughout the 23 day transit from CONUS to the Hawaiian OPAREA (Highlights included: war at-sea and power projection strikes, extensive ASW training, and close air support missions in an amphibious operating area); BgaRem 84-4, an ASW exercise northwest of Kauai “appended” to RimPac 84, and Communications Department reported “Went into a Smallpipe condition during Bgarem.” Bell Volcano 84-1, an amphibious and power projection exercise required the ship to provide CAP and CAS, both exercises in the Hawaiian Operations Area; TransitEx ASW evolution with attack submarine Drum (SSN-677) was comprised of ASW training provided by the Battle Group's SSN (DS) and other intra-Battle Group exercises, a PassExes was conducted with JMSDF surface units in the vicinity of Guam, with Japanese ships in the vicinity of Guam, and an InChopEx to SEVENTHFLT with USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) providing Orange air services and aircraft as opposing forces, on the way. Four Soviet Sibir class AGEs and a Primorye class AGI monitored the transit with more than passing interest; MissilEx 84-5, consisting of a RIM-7H NATO Sea Sparrow fired at a QM-74C drone target; Inchopex with USS America (CV-66) in the North Arabian Sea in the course of an on station turnover, beginning a three month North Arabian Sea patrol period; Passing Exercise refereed to as PassExes with British, French and German forces, comprising air defense, maneuvering, communications and data link exercises; Beacon Flash 84-7 provided four days of intensive utilization of low level navigation and SAREX training for CVW-11. Dissimilar Air Combat Training (DACT) highlighted this exercise. Participated in ASWEX 84-9U which provided four days of realistic Indian Ocean ASW training. Next, a two day exercise, MULTIPLEX 84-6, was designed to provide training for the Warfare Commanders (AW, AS, AX) and integrate Battle Group assets into the composite warfare structure. Air wing assets were launched out of alert status as required by each warfare commander to counter AAW threats (GRID), ASUW threats (WASEX), and ASW threats. Beacon Flash Exercise involving MK82 bombs and LUU-2B/B para flares; Passing exercise known as and 85-1U from 13 to 15 October 1984, considered especially noteworthy due to “intensive and successful ASW prosecution efforts” evaluating ASW operations in the Indian Ocean environment; Fleetex 85-1, a major fleet exercise that integrated three CV Battle Groups (joining forces with USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and USS Midway (CV-41) and their Battle Groups), which evaluated all primary mission areas of CV operations: coordinated strikes utilizing Air Force KC135/E-3A assets, major grid exercises, long range WASEX's, and ASW missions. Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) reported the ship deployed with all test benches 100 percent operational and 98 percent support equipment (yellow gear) availability. She will under go her 18th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on November 25, 1961” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72. 76, 329B-1984, 362D & 1270). 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 (NH)

(30 May to 20 December 1984)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-114

Aardvarks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH200

F-14A

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks -                  Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NH300

A-7E

VA-94

Shrikes -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NH400

A-7E

VA-95

Green Lizards -                  Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NH500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-133

Wizards -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -  Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-21

Redtails - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

VQ-1 Det.

World Watchers -

Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye -Special electronic installation

002

EA-3B

VRC-50 Det.

Foo Dogs - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound

(RG) 42x/71x

C-2A/US-3A

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

     “USS Arkansas (CGN-41) joined USS Enterprise (CVN-65) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “Accompanying USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot, comprising guided missile cruisers USS Arkansas (CGN-41) and USS Jouett (CG-29), destroyers USS Kinkaid (DD-965) and USS Leftwich (DD-984), frigates USS Mahlon S. Tisdale (FFG-27), USS Brewton (FF-1086) and USS Robert E. Peary (FF-1073), USS Sacramento (AOE-1) and ammunition ship USS Flint (AE-32)” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “En route to Hawaii from 30 May 1984, Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot participated in RimPac 84 through USS Enterprise (CVN-65) arrival at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 15 June 1984. Communications Department reported “Went into a Smallpipe condition during Bgarem.” Communications Department assumed communications guard for COMCARGRU THREE, COMDESRON SEVEN, COMCARAIRWING ELEVEN and all squadrons participated in RimPac 84 with COMSUBGRU THREE embarked. Operations Department Combat Directions Center reported that RimPac 84, was a “multinational, two carrier, extended exercise,” involving U.S. and Japanese P-3s, USAF B-52s, and about 90 American and Australian ships and submarines, the latter numbering both diesel and nuclear-powered boats. The initial rendezvous of seven individual surface groups, integrating 50 ships into a single formation, set the tone for the complex exercise. Enterprise avoided Orange submarines detecting and localizing her by “high-speed” restrictive emissions control (EmCon) and “zig-zag.” RimPac 84 began with an opposed transit from the SOCAL operating area to Hawaii was conducted during the month of June. Opposition was composed of US and JMSDF P3's, Air Force B-52's, US and Australian Surface Units, and US and allied submarines, both nuclear and diesel. The exercise culminated in the Hawaiian area with an amphibious operation in the vicinity of Maui. During June, primarily in RimPac 84, CVW-11 flew 80–110 sorties per day for 4,762 flight hours. Enterprise’s participation was rated as highly effective in both exercises. During RimPac 84, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) provided exceptional support to the embarked air wing, averaging 87 percent mission capable, 82 percent full mission capable, and 85 percent ASW readiness rates. This was significant considering that the air wing flew 80-110 sorties per day for 4,762 flight hours during the month of June 1984. Initial “WestPac” Deploment/Rimpac-84 Air wing Refresher Operations within the SOCAL OPAREA were scheduled and coordinated by Air Operations from May to June 1984. RimPac 84 involved over 90 ships and two Carrier Battle Groups which provided multiple scenarios and exercised all warfare areas throughout the 23 day transit from CONUS to the Hawaiian OPAREA. Highlights included: war at-sea and power projection strikes, extensive ASW training, and close air support missions in an amphibious operating area. During this in port period, post-exercise debriefs and Indian Ocean and Western Pacific deployment briefings were conducted. During Rimpac-84, Supply Department tested the aviation support capability with over 4700 hours flown in June. Although July and August were somewhat slower months in terms of flight hours, heavy rains caused demands to remain high and the NMCS/PMCS counts to rise. For the period; however, Enterprise exceeded all COMNAVAIRPAC standards, providing excellent support to both AIMD and Air Wing ELEVEN. Off-ship NMCS/PMCS averaged 55 for this period while the on ship NMCS/PMCS count was 27. A low average of 229 AWP components was maintained, while Rotatable Pool achieved an issue effectiveness rate of 97%. In early June, S-8 started a major rewarehousing effort for A-Complex, a group of seven aviation storerooms; and Main II complex, which consists of four HM&E COSAL material storerooms. AIMD received a message of recognition from Commander THIRD Fleet commending Enterprise’s Supply/AIMD/CAG team for a "superb level of material readiness" from work-ups through RimPac 84. Completed incorporation of the Seawater Activated Release System (SEAWARS) in 15 parachutes, making CVW-11 the first air wing to deploy with SEAWARS” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “Clearing Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 19 June 1984, after visiting since the 15th, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) took part in BgaRem 84-4, an ASW exercise northwest of Kauai “appended” to RimPac 84, involving both nuclear and diesel submarines as threats. It began with a successful opposed sortie of Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot from Pearl Harbor, and continued on the PMRF range at Barking Sands off the island of Kauai. The exercise included a large amount of data collection for analysis by COMTHIRDFLT. Enterprise was never successfully targeted by Orange submarines during the scenario. The exercise scenario also included Orange air and surface threats. COMTHIRDFLT described the exercise as "the best Bgarem to date." Communications Department reported “Went into a Smallpipe condition during Bgarem.” During this in port period, post-exercise debriefs and Indian Ocean and Western Pacific deployment briefings were conducted” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “One day into her deployment, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was visited by VADM Crawford A. Easterling, COMNAVAIRPAC visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 1 June 1984 and immediately began participation in exercise RimPac 84. Participation in RimPac continued until arrival in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) reached Port Said, Egypt on 3 June 1984” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “Captain John F. Calhoun, USN assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Constellation (CV-64), relieving Captain Lyle F. Bull, USN, 18th Commanding Officer, serving from September 1982 to June 1984” (Ref. 406A).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) transited the Suez Canal, her fifth transit on 4 June 1984” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) passed through the Red Sea, Bab el Mandeb Strait, Gulf of Aden through the Arabian Sea and joined the 7th Fleet in the Indian Ocean on 8 June 1984, relieving USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63)” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “On 15 June 1984, while operating in the Indian Ocean, an F-14 aircraft from VF-33 crashes on the flight deck of USS America (CV-66) in a Class Alpha accident causing more than $500,000.00 in damage but no injuries” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “En route to Hawaii, the group participated in RimPac 84, through USS Enterprise (CVN-65) arrival at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 15 June 1984. A “multinational, two carrier, extended exercise,” RimPac 84 involved U.S. and Japanese P-3s, USAF B-52s, and about 90 American and Australian ships and submarines, the latter numbering both diesel and nuclear-powered boats.

 

     The initial rendezvous of seven individual surface groups, integrating 50 ships into a single formation, set the tone for the complex exercise. Enterprise avoided Orange submarines detecting and localizing her by “high-speed” restrictive emissions control (EmCon) and “zig-zag.” The exercise culminated in an amphibious operation off Maui” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Clearing Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 19 June 1984, after visiting since the 15th, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) took part in BgaRem 84-4, an ASW exercise northwest of Kauai “appended” to RimPac 84, and Bell Volcano 84-1, an amphibious and power projection exercise requiring the ship to provide CAP and CAS, both exercises in the Hawaiian Operations Area” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Media representatives from participating RimPac 84 nations visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 23 June 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “Commander, Carrier Group THREE, RADM Edwin D. Kohn, Jr., U. S. Navy, embarked USS Enterprise (CVN-65) until relieved on 26 June 1984 by RADM John R. Batzler, U. S. Navy” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “During June, primarily in RimPac 84, CVW-11 flew 80–110 sorties per day for 4,762 flight hours” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned for a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii for a second visit on 29 June 1984, operating in the Hawaii OPAREA from 19 to 29 June 1984, clearing Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 19 June 1984, after visiting since the 15th, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) took part in BgaRem 84-4, an ASW exercise northwest of Kauai “appended” to RimPac 84, involving both nuclear and diesel submarines as threats. It began with a successful opposed sortie of Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot from Pearl Harbor, and continued on the PMRF range at Barking Sands off the island of Kauai. The exercise included a large amount of data collection for analysis by COMTHIRDFLT. Enterprise was never successfully targeted by Orange submarines during the scenario. The exercise scenario also included Orange air and surface threats. COMTHIRDFLT described the exercise as "the best Bgarem to date." Communications Department reported “Went into a Smallpipe condition during Bgarem.” Bell Volcano 84-1, an amphibious and power projection exercise required the ship to provide CAP and CAS, both exercises in the Hawaiian Operations Area. During this in port period, post-exercise debriefs and Indian Ocean and Western Pacific deployment briefings were conducted. Rear Admiral Kohn was relieved as ComCarGru-3 by Rear Admiral John R. Batzler, on 26 June 1984. June 1984 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Engineering Department DC/R Division disestablished the Damage Control Department and placed the damage control organization back under the Chief Engineer with a nuclear trained Damage Control Assistant” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

 

A barricade restrains an F-14A Tomcat (BuNo 161296, modex NE107) from VF-1 "Wolfpack" during an emergency landing aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), 30 June 1984. The Tomcat had to make a barricade arrestment due to a sheared starboard strut. The recovery was successful; no injuries were sustained. U.S. Navy photo by PH3 Hall, available from DefenseImagery.mil (# DN-ST-87-11416). NS0263bo 153k. Robert Hurst. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/0263bo.jpg

 

 

Crew members use an NP-50 crane to remove a damaged F-14A Tomcat from the flight deck after an emergency barricade landing aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), 30 June 1984. (See above.). U.S. Navy photo by PH3 Hall, available from DefenseImagery.mil (# DN-ST-87-11420). NS0263boa 213k. Robert Hurst. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/0263boa.jpg

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port call Pearl Harbor, Hawaii for a second visit from 29 June to 2 July 1984, then continuing on her westerly course into “WestPac” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

     “Burial at sea of remains of Captain Russell Fletcher, USNR (Ret), and Commander John Otto Buerger, USN (Ret) aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was conducted on 4 July 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “En route on her westerly course into the Western Pacific, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was shadowed by Soviet Bears on 7 July 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “En route on her westerly course into the Western Pacific, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was shadowed by Soviet Bears on 16 July 1984. At one point, an F-14 was diverted to Wake Island, maintained in a caretaker status for just such emergencies and for “island resupply.” Operations Combat Directions Center reported that Enterprise conducted a TransitEx ASW evolution with attack submarine Drum (SSN-677), comprised of ASW training provided by the Battle Group's SSN (DS) and other intra-Battle Group exercises, a PassEx was conducted with JMSDF surface units in the vicinity of Guam, with Japanese ships in the vicinity of Guam, and an InChopEx to SEVENTHFLT with USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) providing Orange air services and aircraft as opposing forces, on the way. Four Soviet Sibir class AGEs and a Primorye class AGI monitored the transit with more than passing interest” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “In July 1984, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) completed incorporation of the Seawater Activated Release System (SeaWars), something that promised to facilitate rescues of downed aircrew, in 15 parachutes” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “VADM J. R. Hogg, COMSEVENTHFLT visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 23 to 24 July 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port call, mooring at NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 24 July 1984, en route from Hawaii since the 2nd disembarking VADM J. R. Hogg, COMSEVENTHFLT visiting from 23 to 24 July 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “Media team Staff Tokyo Co,, LTD; Masani Tazuka, Director; Masahuru Furuya, Cameraman; Masahiro Tanaka, Cameraman and Yoshitomo Aoki, Advisor from visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 1 August 1984 for a four day visit” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port of call, moored at NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines from 24 July to 2 August 1984. Communications Department received Communications Assistant Team visit from NAVCAMS “WestPac” Guam. While in port Subic Bay, received a pre-Indian Ocean assist from the CAT team at Subic. July 1984 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Engineering Department DC/R Division completed very successful availability at SRF Subic Bay, completing over 100 jobs were completed in 10 days. Completed sewage CHT system preoverhaul test and inspection. (2) Operations Combat Directions Center reported en route activity involved Transitex was comprised of ASW training provided by the Battle Group's SSN (DS) and other intra-Battle Group exercises. A Passex was conducted with JMSDF surface units in the vicinity of Guam, followed by an Inchopex to SEVENTHFLT with USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) providing Orange air services. A two and one-half week upkeep period followed in Subic Bay. (3) Operations Intelligence Center received Fleet Intelligence graphic tasking. Completed Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot Intelligence and Language Specialty Survey (over 300 personnel with special qualifications identified). Operations Intelligence Center attended special briefings at FISC WPAC, Cubi Point, R. P. and conducted liaison with FISC personnel. Received special information and material for “WestPac” and IO deployment. FISC WPAC SAO package brought aboard (4) A port visit to Subic Bay from 20 July to 1 August 1984 gave every Supply Department Division a chance to top off and be ready for the upcoming Indian Ocean period. In addition, plans were made by the service divisions to ensure crew morale was kept high during the extended period at sea. Steel Beach picnics, Beer Day, foreign merchandise sales and special meal events were all planned to ensure later success. A special eight day payday was held by S-4 on 8 August 1984, providing the crew with spending money while in port Hong Kong. Late in August, Control Division split into two divisions, Stock Control (S-1) and Surface Support (S-9). S-9 took over the customer services part of Control Division handling technical support, CASREP/hot list expediting, Never Out management, RPPO training, and typewriter repair. Stock Control maintained responsibilities for financial management, inventory management and Q COSAL” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted MissilEx 84-5, consisting of a RIM-7H NATO Sea Sparrow fired at a QM-74C drone target and conducted a brief South China Sea transit to Hong Kong from on 2 August 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Media team Staff Tokyo Co., LTD; Masani Tazuka, Director; Masahuru Furuya, Cameraman; Masahiro Tanaka, Cameraman and Yoshitomo Aoki, Advisor from visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 1 to 4 August 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port call British Crown Colony, Hong Kong on 6 August 1984, requalifying 114 pilots from CVW-11 during two days of Carrier Qualifications en route from Subic Bay since the 2nd in the South China Sea. A total of 375 arrested landings (270 day traps, 105 night traps) were completed, with eight Case III recoveries” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

   “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port of call British Crown Colony, Hong Kong from 6 to 11 August 1984 and then made a transit to station in the North Arabian Sea” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “Following her visit to the British Crown Colony, Hong Kong, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) crossed the South China Sea headed for the Indian Ocean via the Strait of Malacca on what would be her tenth voyage since her commission on 11 August 1984. Three Badgers, however, backed up by a Bear, operating out of American-built facilities at Cam Ranh Bay, reconnoitered her on 13 August 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

   “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) visitors during 12 August 1984 included Captain Joseph A. Dressler, USN, Defense/Naval Liaison Officer, Hong Kong; Captain Chuck E. Dolejs, USMC, Assistant Liaison Officer; Mr. Richard L. Williams, Acting Consul General, Hong Kong; BGEN A. B. Crowfoot, Deputy Commander British Forces/Chief of Staff, Hong Kong; Ms. Barbara Scharge, Chief, Political Section, U. S. Consulate, Hong Kong; Mr. Paul Mooney, Newsweek International, Editorial Assistant; LTCOL Alastair Kennedy, M. B. E., Head, Joint Service Intelligence Staff, CBF, Hong Kong; MAJ The Honorable Jeremy F. A. Grey, Deputy Head Joint Service Intelligence Staff, CBF, Hong Kong; MAJ Richard Balkwell, Staff Officers JSIS; SQD LDR Gordan Spencer, RAF, Staff, JSIS; LCDR Warwich Ackland, RN, Staff Officer Navy, JSIS; FLT LT Peter Thomas, RAF, Pilot 28th Squadron, SEK Hong Kong, Hong Kong; Mr. Bruce Tully, Regional Security Officer, U. S. Consulate, Hong Kong; Mr. Pat Pritchard, Refugee Ship Unit, Marine Officer, Marine Dept., Hong Kong; Mr. Cliff Thew, General Manager, Chung Wah Ship Building Hong Kong Superintendent Spencer Fu, Senior Staff Officer Operations, Royal Hong Kong Marine Police; Mr. Jerry Penwarden, General Traffic Manager, Cathay Pacific; Mr. William C. Hutchings, Deputy Airport Manager, Kai Tak Airport, Hong Kong; Mr. Samuel Chain, Air Traffic Control Officer, Kai Tak Airport, Hong Kong; Mrs. Rayne Collins, President, Royal Navy Wives Association; FLT LT W. C. Harris (CERI), Pilot, Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Air Force and Mr. Marc Williams, student” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “Following her visit to the British Crown Colony, Hong Kong, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) crossed the South China Sea headed for the Indian Ocean via the Strait of Malacca on what would be her tenth voyage since her commission. Three Badgers, however, backed up by a Bear, operating out of American-built facilities at Cam Ranh Bay, reconnoitered her on 13 August 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

USS Constellation (CV-64)

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

Meritorious Unit Commendation (MU)

meritorious Unit Commendation

(6 Awards) with 1 Silver Star (No Medal for this Award)

01/01/84 to 24/08/84 -       4th Award

Stateside Training

Ref. - 406A

 

    “Transiting the Strait of Malacca westbound, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) executed an InChopEx with USS America (CV-66), whose crew and aircraft provided “realistic scenarios for the north Arabian Sea environment,” relieving the latter on 24 August 1984. While there, Enterprise proved a “stabilizing force” and evidenced a “show of [U.S.] resolve to countries in the region,” ongoing destabilization resulting from the Iranian-Iraqi War embroiling the region” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Soviet Il-38s and AN-12 Cubs, and Iranian P-3Fs and C-130s operating in the battle group area of interest were intercepted and escorted. Shipping was carefully monitored, merchant shipping being of “particular interest” due to the resurgence of Iranian and Iraqi attacks on maritime traffic in the Northern Arabian Gulf. For the first two weeks in the Indian Ocean, “an active flight deck” aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was maintained in the mornings hopefully preventing seasonal heavy dew and reducing hazards, as well as Iranian P-3 patrols, whose flights often coincided with early mornings. The weather continued to be a problem, however, as blowing dust in the air was very prevalent, “creating low level haze and occasionally reducing flight visibility,” the mixture of settling dust and a wet flight deck also creating slippery, hazardous conditions” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Communications Department reported that during Indian Ocean steaming, traffic totals were 10,196 messages sent and 37,956 received for the month. USS Enterprise (CVN-65) executed an InChopEx with USS America (CV-66), whose crew and aircraft provided “realistic scenarios for the North Arabian Sea environment,” relieving the latter on 24 August 1984 in the North Arabian Sea in the course of an on station turnover, beginning a three month North Arabian Sea patrol period, traveling since the 11th. Enterprise transited the Strait of Malacca westbound on 11 August 1984 and into the Indian Ocean. Communications Department established HF termination with NAVCOMMSTA Harold E. Holt, Australia, underway for the Indian Ocean. Received a turnover with the USS America (CV-66) and established termination with NAVCOMMSTA Diego Garcia. Operations Intelligence Center that FIST equipment malfunctions, received FIST from America, Parts from America FIST were interchanged with Enterprise’s FIST and system resumed operations. As part of the Indian Ocean turnover America provided realistic scenarios for the North Arabian Sea environment. Aircraft simulating surveillance flights (MAY, P-3) and small tactical raids (section F-4 tactics) exposed the CVW-11 to the type of threats prevalent in the NAS. During transit of the South China Sea, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was subject to aerial reconnaissance by Il-38s and AN-12 Cubs, and Iranian P-3Fs and C-130s operating out of Cam Rahn Bay, SRV, operating in the battle group area of interest were intercepted and escorted. Shipping was carefully monitored, merchant shipping being of “particular interest” due to the resurgence of Iranian and Iraqi attacks on maritime traffic in the Northern Arabian Gulf. For the first two weeks in the Indian Ocean, “an active flight deck” aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was maintained in the mornings hopefully preventing seasonal heavy dew and reducing hazards, as well as Iranian P-3 patrols, whose flights often coincided with early mornings. The weather continued to be a problem, however, as blowing dust in the air was very prevalent, “creating low level haze and occasionally reducing flight visibility,” the mixture of settling dust and a wet flight deck also creating slippery, hazardous conditions” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) departed the Indian Ocean on 29 August 1984 and steamed to the 6th Fleet through the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, Bab el Mandeb Strait, to the Red Sea Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

     “Captain Robert Eugene ("Gene") Tucker assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on 31 August 1984, relieving Captain Jeremy Dolph ("Bear") Taylor, 33rd Commanding Officer, serving from 1 October 1983 to 31 August 1984” (Ref. 34 & 35A).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) August 1984 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) continued to maintain the rotable pool effectiveness rate of 97 percent. Completed the operational evaluation on the AN/SRC-47 Flight Deck Communications System (FDCS) PRC-114 multichannel radios for COMNAVELEXSYSCOM. (2) Air Department reported that during a three day period, CVW-11 pilots received 374 day and 152 night arrested landings. There were 18 stationary altitude reservations requested from Oakland and Honolulu ARTCC's for air wing utilization. To preclude airspace conflicts and transition problems, military liaison representatives from both Oakland and Honolulu ARTCC's were embarked in Alameda and remained on board until completion of RIMPAC Phase II. Following two weeks of night flight operations, a day/partial night Battle Flex-Deck scenario was implemented. S-3A aircraft were also launched "light," and scheduled to join on K-A6 tankers for the last Case III recovery to take excess fuel remaining overhead (up to their maximum trap weight), and proved to be successful on numerous occasions. Maximum utilization of touch and go landings followed by DELTA switches for the E-2C and S-3A eased the night currency problems generally encountered by these multipiloted aircraft. (3) Engineering Department DC/R Division completed the Work Definition Conference for SRA 85. (4) Engineering Department Electrical Division reported that the Ship's force completed numerous pump overhauls while underway. Changed out the resin in all four reserve feed demineralizers. Faced eight inch and 10 inch flanges on two SSTG’s and a main engine guard valve respectively to repair steam leaks. (5) Engineering Department Machinery Division reported that the Ship's force completed numerous pump overhauls while underway. Changed out the resin in all four reserve feed demineralizers. Faced eight inch and 10 inch flanges on two SSTG’s and a main engine guard valve respectively to repair steam leaks. (6) The Command Career Counselor's Office was absorbed into the Training Department and a number of new retention programs were initiated. These programs included a Career Counselor's TV program, suggestion boxes, retention interview sheets, and retention training classes for officers, chiefs and leading petty officers” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) transited the Suez Canal, her sixth transit on 2 September 1984 bound for Naples (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “COL Dewey, USAF, USDAO MUSCAT DATT/AIRA and MAJ Leaon, USMC, USDAO MUSCAT ALUSNA; DOD/USO Show "Good Company;" Gary W. Toyn, Manager, Vocalist and Dancer Kevin L. Cunningham, Lead Guitarist; Wendy R. Johnson, Vocalist/Dancer Karen A. Oldroyd, Dancer; Alan K. Palmer, Vocalist and Dancer; Terry L. Vernieum, Drummer/Vocalist; Sherry D. Wood, Keyboards/Vocalist and Blair E. Sutherland, Bass Guitarist visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 4 September 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “RADM Hogg, RN, Flag Officer Flotilla ONE CTG 321.1 visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 5 September 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “DOD/USO Show "Good Company;" Gary W. Toyn, Manager/Vocalist/Dancer Kevin L. Cunningham, Lead Guitarist; Wendy R. Johnson, Vocalist/Dancer Karen A. Oldroyd, Dancer; Alan K. Palmer, Vocalist/Dancer; Terry L. Vernieum, Drummer/Vocalist; Sherry D. Wood, Keyboards/Vocalist and Blair E. Sutherland, Bass Guitarist visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 4 to 8 September 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

     “USS America (CV-66) pulled in for a port call at Monaco on 13 September 1984” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    During September 1984, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) accomplished passing exercise refereed to as PassExes with British, French and German forces, comprising air defense, maneuvering, communications and data link exercises Operations Combat Directions Center reported North Arabian Sea air threat during the period was composed of Soviet and Iranian long range aircraft” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced ASWEx’s 84-9U on 21 September 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) visited Monaco from 13 to 22 September 1984 before she participated in one phase NATO Exercise, "Display Determination." After stopping briefly to Naples, America returned to sea soon thereafter, and took part in the second phase of "Display Determination" before visiting Catania (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted ASWEx’s 84-9U from 21 to 24 September 1984, considered especially noteworthy due to “intensive and successful ASW prosecution efforts” by Battle Group (BG) Foxtrot assets, especially ASW aircraft, evaluating ASW operations in the Indian Ocean environment. Intense ASWEX 84-9U was conducted from 21 to 24 September 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

    “Captain A. R. Maness, USN, CTF 72 visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 24 to 25 September 1984” (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Supply Department held a cook out/beer day on 27 September 1984, heavily tasking S-2, S-2M and S-5 (Ref. 329B-1984).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) September 1984 accomplishments reported by Departments, Divisions and Air Wing: (1) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) manufactured helicopter machine gun mounts for HS-6 and repaired an F-14 canopy which was determined to be depot repair. (2) COMFAIRWESTPAC Mid-Deployment Material Inspection Grade: satisfactory. (3) Engineering Department Electrical Division utilized anchorage time to perform steam out repairs. Ruptured tube in number 7 SSTG was plugged. 3A MFP CASREP due to a stuck throttle and ship's force commenced repairs. (4) Engineering Department Machinery Division utilized anchorage time to perform steam out repairs. Ruptured tube in number 7 SSTG was plugged. 3A MFP CASREP due to a stuck throttle and ship's force commenced repairs. (5) Operations Department Operations Intelligence Center reported that FITRON 213 and CVIC establish new record time for hot print processing of TARPS imagery, of two min and 52 seconds. Intelligence Center personnel were sent TAD to augment USS Arkansas (CGN-41), a Virginia-class nuclear-propelled guided-missile cruiser surveillance operation of the USS Leningrad’s (CHG-103) mine countermeasure operations in the Red Sea/Gulf of Aden. (6) Weapons Department G-3 Division reported that Beacon Flash 84-7 provided four days of intensive utilization of low level navigation and SAREX training for CVW-11. Dissimilar Air Combat Training (DACT) highlighted this exercise. Participated in ASWEX 84-9U which provided four days of realistic Indian Ocean ASW training. Next, a two day exercise, MULTIPLEX 84-6, was designed to provide training for the Warfare Commanders (AW, AS, AX) and integrate Battle Group assets into the composite warfare structure. Air wing assets were launched out of alert status as required by each warfare commander to counter AAW threats (GRID), ASUW threats (WASEX), and ASW threats. Beacon Flash Exercise involving MK82 bombs and LUU-2B/B para flares conducted (Mention of Indian Oceanoperations suggests the ship or its planes operated in the IO and North Arabian Sea” (Ref. 329B-1984 & 362D).

 

Iran History

 

    “Hojatolislam Sayyed Ali Khamenei was elected to succeed Ayatollah Khomeini in October 1984. The early years of the revolutionary government were marked by the virtual elimination of political opposition and the consolidation and regularization of revolutionary organizations. Unrelenting executions on sometimes trivial allegations, rumors of torture, persecution of Baha'is, arbitrary arrests, bad prison conditions, and the denial of basic rights tarnished the reputation of the republic's leaders” (Ref. 22).

 

    “A Soviet Type II nuclear powered submarine was localized and tracked for 41 hours on 5 October 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Rear Admiral J.F. Adams, Commander, Middle East Force, and members of his staff, were on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on the 6 October 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced passing exercise known as and 85-1U on 13 October 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted passing exercise known as and 85-1U from 13 to 15 October 1984, considered especially noteworthy due to “intensive and successful ASW prosecution efforts” evaluating ASW operations in the Indian Ocean environment” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, commenced a 16-month overhaul at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Va., involving repairs and alterations to the ship at Norfolk, Va. Navy Yard 17 October 1983. Included in the package were all of the equipment required to operate F/A-18s -two large Mk 7 jet blast deflectors, flush deck nose gear launch, catapult mods, rotary launch valves and avionics support equipment. The latest electronics SPS-48 and SPS-49, air search radars were also fitted to enable her to operate to the end of the decade. She was outfitted with an entirely new radar suite, major rework of the ship’s propulsion plant and blast plate state-of-the-art hardware on the flight deck. This $210 million complex overhaul would prepare Coral Sea for a new role in the Atlantic Fleet, with a new air wing, and a new fighter/attack jet. The Navy’s newest fighter/attack jet, the F/A-18 Hornet strike-fighter, with its dual attack and fighter capabilities, seemed an appropriate partner for Coral Sea” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72 & 1275Z10).

 

    “While in the North Arabian Sea, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) had her hands full with Russian surface ships as well, including minesweeper Natya, submarine tender Ugra, AGI Alpinist and Mertkr Nahodka, as well as “numerous Soviet arms carriers” heading for Iraq and other Arab client states. Attempting to enhance relations with their allies in the region the Russians dispatched a mine countermeasures force, including the helicopter cruiser Leningrad, to the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. Given that her capabilities were of considerable interest, Enterprise sent some intelligence people to Arkansas for “special operations,” enabling the U.S. cruiser to monitor Soviet progress in September 1984. With USS Arkansas (CGN-41) detached, Enterprise became Anti-Air Warfare Commander (AAWC), from 15 to 20 October 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) with CVW-15 (NL)

(13 October 1984 to 24 May 1985)

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East

Deployed for 107 consecutive days, remaining in the Indian Ocean until April of 1985, during which time, the Chief of Naval Operations named Carl Vinson in February 1985, the winner of the Admiral Flatley Memorial Award for operational readiness and aviation safety for 1984, receiving its first Meritorious Unit Commendations for operations conducted from Nov.1984 to May 1985.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-51

Screaming Eagles -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NL100

F-14A

VF-111

Sundowners -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NL200

F-14A

VA-97

Warhawks -                        Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NL300

A-7E

VA-27

Royal Maces -                        Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NL400

A-7E

VA-52

Knightriders -                        Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NL500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-114

Hormel Hogs - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-134

Garudas - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-4

Black Knights - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-29

Dragonflies - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

VQ-1 Det.

World Watchers - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Special electronic installation

005

EA-3B

VRC-50 Det.

Foo Dogs

Grumman - Greyhound -  Lockheed - Viking - Utility

(RG)

42x
(RG)

71x

C-2A
US-3A

F-14 Tomcat, A-7E, EA-6B Prowler and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “A Soviet Type II nuclear powered submarine was localized and tracked for 14 hours on 20 October 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Robert E. Peary (FF-1073) regained contact of the second Soviet Type II nuclear powered submarine that was localized and tracked for 14 hours on 20 October 1984, three days later (23 October), during which time an SH-2 gaining sonobuoy contact and vectoring in other aircraft to the hunt” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Rear Admiral McCarthy, Commander, TF 70, arrived USS Enterprise (CVN-65) for a visit for several days on 26 October 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) reached Augusta Bay on 27 October 1984, and was relieved by USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) on that date, sailing soon thereafter for the United States” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “Rear Admiral McCarthy, Commander, TF 70, visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 26 to 29 October 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

Iran History

      “Hojatolislam Sayyed Ali Khamenei was elected to succeed Ayatollah Khomeini in October 1984. The early years of the revolutionary government were marked by the virtual elimination of political opposition and the consolidation and regularization of revolutionary organizations. Unrelenting executions on sometimes trivial allegations, rumors of torture, persecution of Baha'is, arbitrary arrests, bad prison conditions, and the denial of basic rights tarnished the reputation of the republic's leaders” (Ref. 22).

 

 

An F-14A Tomcat aircraft takes off from the aircraft carrier USS Constellation (CV-64) during Fleet Exercise 85, Pacific Ocean, 29 October 1984. An F/A-18A Hornet is on a catapult in front of a Mark-7 jet blast deflector. Behind the deflector is an S-3A Viking aircraft with wings folded. Among the aircraft parked on the flight deck are S-3A's, F/A-18A Hornets and A-6E Intruders. US Navy photo by JO2 Millie Tamberg (DVIC id: DNSN8602055). Defense Visual Information Center.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026435.jpg

 

 

An elevated port bow view of the aircraft carrier USS Constellation (CV-64) underway in the Pacific Ocean, 29 October 1984, during Fleet Exercise 85. Various aircraft of Carrier Air Wing 14 are parked on the flight deck. US Navy photo by JO2 Millie Tamberg (DVIC id: DNST8602018). Defense Visual Information Center.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026436.jpg

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was discharged of her North Arabian Sea responsibilities prior to actually being relieved by USS Independence (CV-62), but following the hijacking of a Saudi airliner en route to Iran on 5 November 1984, Enterprise received orders to take station in the northern Arabian Sea for possible emergency response. Speedy resolution of the crisis, however, resulted in a cancellation of the order the next day, while she was steaming toward the area, and Enterprise turned eastward on 5 November. Just west of Eight Degree Channel the ship was shadowed by an Indian Il-38 May, and again by Russian bombers out of Cam Rahn Bay while crossing the South China Sea” (Ref. 362D).

 

 

USS Independence (CV-62) in the Suez Canal. Photo believed to have been taken on 8 November 1984. NS026212 282k. Mark Sprenkle. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026212.jpg

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) putt into NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 12 November 1984, after 93 days at sea” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “On 14 November 1984, USS America (CV-66) with CVW-1 embarked arrived at NOB, Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain Leighton Warren (Snuffy) Smith, Jr., USNA, as Commanding Officer, ending her Caribbean/10/Atlantic, on her fourth Caribbean Sea deployment (her first, fourth, 13th and 14th voyage were deployments, totaling 16 voyages in all), to participate in Exercise "Ocean Venture,” operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, on her 11th Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea in support of NATO Exercise, "Display Determination," on her third Indian Ocean deployment, operating with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. Upon conclusion of of Exercise "Ocean Venture," America visited Caracas, Venezuela and  on 9 May 1984 headed for the Mediterranean Sea, reaching Malaga, Spain, on 21 May 1984, commencing her transit of the Mediterranean Sea on 29 May 1984, America reached Port Said, Egypt on 3 June 1984, transiting the Suez Canal, her fifth transit on 4 June 1984. America passed through the Red Sea, Bab el Mandeb Strait, Gulf of Aden through the Arabian Sea and joined the 7th Fleet in the Indian Ocean on 8 June 1984, relieving USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). On 15 June 1984, while operating in the Indian Ocean, an F-14 aircraft from VF-33 crashes on the flight deck of America in a Class Alpha accident causing more than $500,000.00 in damage but no injuries.  America departed the Indian Ocean on 29 August 1984 and steamed to the 6th Fleet through the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, Bab el Mandeb Strait, to the Red Sea,  transiting the Suez Canal, her sixth transit on 2 September 1984 bound for Naples Italy, and after a port visit steamed to for a port call at Monaco on 13 September 1984, visiting Monaco from 13 to 22 September 1984, before she participated in one phase NATO Exercise, "Display Determination." After stopping briefly to Naples Italy, America returned to sea soon thereafter, and took part in the second phase of "Display Determination" before visiting Catania and then steamed to Augusta Bay on 27 October 1984, and was relieved by USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) on that date, sailing soon thereafter for the United States. Squadrons: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33, F-14A; VA-46, A-7E; VA-72, A-7E; VA-34, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; VAQ-135, EA-6B; HS-11, SH-3H; VS-32, S-3A; VQ-2 Det. A, EA-3B and VRC-50 Det., C-2. Visited Caracas, Venezuela; Malaga, Spain; Port Said, Egypt; Naples Italy; Catania, Italy and Augusta Bay. Reclassified CV-66 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" on 30 June 1975 while at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, entering Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 27 November 1974, upon return from her North Sea deployment on 12 October 1974; making three Vietnam Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War operating with the 7th Fleet (receiving five battle stars). Her 19th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 23 January 1965, with Captain Lawrence Heyworth, Jr., in command (24 April 1984 to 14 November 1984)” (Ref. 1-America, 72 & 76, 324 & 824).  

 

    “Standing out of NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 19 November 1984, arriving on th 12th, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced FleetEx 85, joining forces with USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and USS Midway (CV-41)” (Ref. 362D).

 

     “Numerous” Russian reconnaissance flights dogged USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and her consorts while participating in the exercise, drawing “extensive Soviet air surveillance.” Orange opposition comprised naval, USMC and USAF commands, including KC-135s and E-3As, and seven Japanese and U.S. submarines, both diesel and nuclear powered types. A Soviet aerial “multiwave regimental size raid” was also simulated. Post exercise analysis confirmed that Enterprise “contributed to over 27 hours of contact time and 46 constructive attacks by VS and HS assets.” During FleetEx 85, CVW-11 flew over 800 sorties and 2,200 flight hours in a 12-day period, the BFD concept providing “the means to quickly set and maintain the grid and to quickly respond to all contingencies arising during grid operations”” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Rear Admiral McCarthy was on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 25 November 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Vice Admiral Hogg was on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 26 November 1984” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Japanese Rear Admiral Oyama arrived on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 26 November 1984 for a visit for several days” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) departed Norfolk, Virginia on 29 November 1984, for Carrier Qualifications in the Virginia capes operating areas from 29 November to 17 December 1984” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “Japanese Rear Admiral Oyama visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 26 to 30 November ” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “After completing the FleetEx 85, commencing on 19 November 1984, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) sailed for home, by which point she had controlled over 2,700 aerial intercepts during this deployment. Among the latter were 61 non-U.S. surveillance aircraft, the last of which were Bears on 2 and 3 December 1984. In every such instance during the cruise, fighters from Enterprise intercepted these aircraft and escorted them out of threat range” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 10 December 1984, embarking 900 male Tiger Cruise guests” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) commenced on 12 December 1984” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) sailed three days later with 900 male guests for a Tiger Cruise, returning to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, embarking 900 male Tiger Cruise guests” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “On 17 December 1984, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) suffers a minor engine room fire during overhaul at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. The fire is extinguished in an hour with three crewmen injured and $6,000 damage to the vessel” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) returned to NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 18 December 1984, conducting Carrier Qualifications in the Virginia capes operating area from 29 November to 17 December 1984” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “On 20 December 1984, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, disembarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif. , with Captain Robert L. Leuschner, Jr. as the Commanding Officer, ending her 11th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Western and Northern Pacific, on her 11th & 12th Indian Ocean voyage and second North Arabian Sea deployment, participating in RimPac 84, a “multinational, two carrier, extended exercise,” RimPac 84 involved U.S. and Japanese P-3s, USAF B-52s, and about 90 American and Australian ships and submarines, the latter numbering both diesel and nuclear-powered boats, BgaRem 84-4, an ASW exercise northwest of Kauai “appended” to RimPac 84, and Bell Volcano 84-1, an amphibious and power projection exercise requiring the ship to provide CAP and CAS, both exercises in the Hawaiian Operations Area,  TransitEx ASW evolution with attack submarine Drum (SSN-677), a PassEx with Japanese ships in the vicinity of Guam, and an InChopEx with USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) aircraft as opposing forces, MissilEx 84-5, consisting of a RIM-7H NATO Sea Sparrow fired at a QM-74C drone target, InChopEx with USS America (CV-66), passing exercises known as PassExes with British, French and German forces, comprising air defense, maneuvering, communications and data link exercises, ASWEx’s 84-9U and 85-1U, due to “intensive and successful ASW prosecution efforts” evaluating ASW operations in the Indian Ocean environment and FleetEx 85, joining forces with USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and USS Midway (CV-41). One day into her deployment, Enterprise was visited by Vice Admiral Crawford A. Easterling, AirPac. USS Arkansas (CGN-41) joined Enterprise as part of her task force. Accompanying her was BG Foxtrot, comprising guided missile cruisers USS Arkansas (CGN-41) and USS Jouett (CG-29), destroyers USS Kinkaid (DD-965) and USS Leftwich (DD-984), frigates USS Mahlon S. Tisdale (FFG-27), USS Brewton (FF-1086) and USS Robert E. Peary (FF-1073), USS Sacramento (AOE-1) and ammunition ship USS Flint (AE-32). One day into her deployment, Enterprise was visited by Vice Admiral Crawford A. Easterling, AirPac. En route to Hawaii, the group participated in RimPac 84, through USS Enterprise arrival at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 15 June 1984. A “multinational, two carrier, extended exercise,” RimPac 84 involved U.S. and Japanese P-3s, USAF B-52s, and about 90 American and Australian ships and submarines, the latter numbering both diesel and nuclear-powered boats. The initial rendezvous of seven individual surface groups, integrating 50 ships into a single formation, set the tone for the complex exercise. Enterprise avoided Orange submarines detecting and localizing her by “high-speed” restrictive emissions control (EmCon) and “zig-zag.” The exercise culminated in an amphibious operation off Maui. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 19 June 1984, after visiting since the 15th, Enterprise took part in BgaRem 84-4, an ASW exercise northwest of Kauai “appended” to RimPac 84, and Bell Volcano 84-1, an amphibious and power projection exercise requiring the ship to provide CAP and CAS, both exercises in the Hawaiian Operations Area. Rear Admiral Kohn was relieved as ComCarGru-3 by Rear Admiral John R. Batzler, on 26 June 1984. During June, primarily in RimPac 84, CVW-11 flew 80–110 sorties per day for 4,762 flight hours. Enterprise made a port call Pearl Harbor, Hawaii for a second visit from 29 June to 2 July 1984, then continuing on her westerly course into WestPac. En route on her westerly course into the Western Pacific, Enterprise was shadowed by Soviet Bears on 7 July 1984. En route on her westerly course into Western Pacific, Enterprise was shadowed by Soviet Bears on 16 July 1984. At one point, an F-14 was diverted to Wake Island, maintained in a caretaker status for just such emergencies and for “island resupply.” In addition Enterprise conducted a TransitEx ASW evolution with attack submarine Drum (SSN-677), a PassEx with Japanese ships in the vicinity of Guam, and an InChopEx with USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) aircraft as opposing forces, on the way. Four Soviet Sibir class AGEs and a Primorye class AGI monitored the transit with more than passing interest. In July 1984, Enterprise completed incorporation of the Seawater Activated Release System (SeaWars), something that promised to facilitate rescues of downed aircrew, in 15 parachutes. Vice Admiral J.R. Hogg, Com7thFlt, stayed on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 23 to 24 July 1984. made a port call, moored at NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines from 24 July to 2 August 1984. Enterprise conducted MissilEx 84-5, consisting of a RIM-7H NATO Sea Sparrow fired at a QM-74C drone target on 2 August 1984. Enterprise visited Hong Kong on 6 August 1984, requalifying 114 pilots from CVW-11 during two days of carquals en route. Enterprise visited British Crown Colony, Hong Kong from 6 to 11 August 1984. Following her visit to the British Crown Colony, Hong Kong, Enterprise crossed the South China Sea headed for the Indian Ocean via the Strait of Malacca on what would be her tenth voyage since her commission. Three Badgers, however, backed up by a Bear, operating out of American-built facilities at Cam Ranh Bay, reconnoitered her on 13 August 1984. Transiting the Strait of Malacca westbound, Enterprise executed an InChopEx with USS America (CV-66), whose crew and aircraft provided “realistic scenarios for the north Arabian Sea environment,” relieving the latter on 24 August 1984. While there, Enterprise proved a “stabilizing force” and evidenced a “show of [U.S.] resolve to countries in the region,” ongoing destabilization resulting from the Iranian-Iraqi War embroiling the region. Soviet Il-38s and AN-12 Cubs, and Iranian P-3Fs and C-130s operating in the battle group area of interest were intercepted and escorted. Shipping was carefully monitored, merchant shipping being of “particular interest” due to the resurgence of Iranian and Iraqi attacks on maritime traffic in the Northern Arabian Gulf. For the first two weeks in the Indian Ocean, “an active flight deck” aboard Enterprise was maintained in the mornings hopefully preventing seasonal heavy dew and reducing hazards, as well as Iranian P-3 patrols, whose flights often coincided with early mornings. The weather continued to be a problem, however, as blowing dust in the air was very prevalent, “creating low level haze and occasionally reducing flight visibility,” the mixture of settling dust and a wet flight deck also creating slippery, hazardous conditions. September 1984, Enterprise accomplished passing exercise known as PassExes with British, French and German forces, comprising air defense, maneuvering, communications and data link exercises. Enterprise commenced ASWEx’s 84-9U on 21 September 1984. Enterprise conducted ASWEx’s 84-9U from 21 to 24 September 1984, considered especially noteworthy due to “intensive and successful ASW prosecution efforts” evaluating ASW operations in the Indian Ocean environment. A Soviet Type II nuclear powered submarine was localized and tracked for 41 hours on 5 October 1984. Rear Admiral J.F. Adams, Commander, Middle East Force, and members of his staff, were on board Enterprise conducted passing exercise known as and 85-1U from 13 to 15 October 1984, considered especially noteworthy due to “intensive and successful ASW prosecution efforts” evaluating ASW operations in the Indian Ocean environment. While in the North Arabian Sea, Enterprise had her hands full with Russian surface ships as well, including minesweeper Natya, submarine tender Ugra, AGI Alpinist and Mertkr Nahodka, as well as “numerous Soviet arms carriers” heading for Iraq and other Arab client states. Attempting to enhance relations with their allies in the region the Russians dispatched a mine countermeasures force, including the helicopter cruiser Leningrad, to the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. Given that her capabilities were of considerable interest, Enterprise sent some intelligence people to Arkansas for “special operations,” enabling the U.S. cruiser to monitor Soviet progress in September 1984. With USS Arkansas (CGN-41) detached, Enterprise became Anti-Air Warfare Commander (AAWC), from 15 to 20 October 1984. A Soviet Type II nuclear powered submarine was localized and tracked for for 14 hours on 20 October 1984. USS Robert E. Peary (FF-1073) regained contact of the second Soviet Type II nuclear powered submarine that was localized and tracked for 14 hours on 20 October 1984, three days later (23 October), during which time an SH-2 gaining sonobuoy contact and vectoring in other aircraft to the hunt. Rear Admiral McCarthy, Commander, TF 70, arrived Enterprise for a visit for several days on 26 October 1984. Rear Admiral McCarthy, Commander, TF 70, visited Enterprise from 26 to 29 October 1984. Enterprise was discharged of her North Arabian Sea responsibilities prior to actually being relieved by USS Independence (CV-62), but following the hijacking of a Saudi airliner en route to Iran on 5 November 1984, Enterprise received orders to take station in the northern Arabian Sea for possible emergency response. Speedy resolution of the crisis, however, resulted in a cancellation of the order the next day, while she was steaming toward the area, and Enterprise turned eastward on 5 November. Just west of Eight Degree Channel the ship was shadowed by an Indian Il-38 May, and again by Russian bombers out of Cam Rahn Bay while crossing the South China Sea. Enterprise put into NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 12 November 1984, after 93 days at sea. Standing out of NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 19 November 1984, arriving on th 12th, Enterprise commenced FleetEx 85, joining forces with USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and USS Midway (CV-41). Numerous” Russian reconnaissance flights dogged Enterprise and her consorts while participating in the exercise, drawing “extensive Soviet air surveillance.” Orange opposition comprised naval, USMC and USAF commands, including KC-135s and E-3As, and seven Japanese and U.S. submarines, both diesel and nuclear powered types. A Soviet aerial “multiwave regimental size raid” was also simulated. Post exercise analysis confirmed that Enterprise “contributed to over 27 hours of contact time and 46 constructive attacks by VS and HS assets.” During FleetEx 85, CVW-11 flew over 800 sorties and 2,200 flight hours in a 12-day period, the BFD concept providing “the means to quickly set and maintain the grid and to quickly respond to all contingencies arising during grid operations.” Rear Admiral McCarthy was on board Enterprise on 25 November 1984 and Japanese Rear Admiral Oyama visited Enterprise from 26 to 30 November 1984. After completing the FleetEx 85, commencing on 19 November 1984, Enterprise sailed for home, by which point she had controlled over 2,700 aerial intercepts during this deployment. Among the latter were 61 non-U.S. surveillance aircraft, the last of which were Bears on 2 and 3 December 1984. In every such instance during the cruise, fighters from Enterprise intercepted these aircraft and escorted them out of threat range. Enterprise pulled in for a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 10 December 1984, embarking 900 male Tiger Cruise guests. Enterprise sailed three days later with 900 male guests for a Tiger Cruise, returning to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, embarking 900 male Tiger Cruise guests. Ports of call: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii twice; NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines twice and British Crown Colony, Hong Kong. Her 18th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 25 November 1961 with Captain V. P. de Poix in command (30 May to 20 December 1984)” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72. 76 & 362D).   

 

CHAPTER XXXVII

FIFTHEENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

15-MONTH COMPLEX OVERHAUL & ALTERATIONS AT NORFOLK NAVY YARD VA. – SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS – LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia

Iran History & Air Arm - Iraq and Iran War

(21 March 1983 to 31 December 1984)

Part 1 – (21 March to 27 April 1983)

Part 2 – (28 April 1983)

Part 3 – (29 April to 1 December 1983)

Part 4 – (2 December 1983 to 23 April 1984)

Part 5 – (24 April to 31 December 1984)