CHAPTER XXXVIII

Part 1 – (1 January 1985 to 13 January 1986)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXVIII

TENTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

Exercise Dasix '85, Attain Document I, II & III in the Gulf of Sidra, Libya Air Attacks against Libya (Palestinian Liberation Front hijacked the Italian luxury liner, Achille Lauro – Bomb exploded on board a Trans World Airways flight en route to Athens from Rome, killing four American citizens) Operation Eldorado Canyon,

Final Carrier launching of a Navy fleet F-4S Phantom II

Iran History & Air Arm / Iraq and Iran War

SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS

SELECTED RESTRICTED AVAILABILITY AT NORFOLK, VA.

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia.

(1 January 1985 to 28 September 1987)

Part 1 – (1 January 1985 to 13 January 1986)

Part 2 – (14 January to 10 September 1986)

Part 3 – (11 September 1986 to 28 September 1987)

 

 

US Atlantic Fleet

 

    “The Atlantic Fleet of the United States Navy is the part of the Navy responsible for operations in around the Atlantic Ocean.

 

    As of 1985, the HQ of the Atlantic Fleet remains the former naval hospital at Norfolk, Virginia. The fleet command was no longer mixed in with the United States Atlantic Command commencing in 1985 (1947 to 1985). The HQ of the Atlantic Fleet remained onboard a rather odd assortment of ships; the Augusta (CA-31), the old wooden ship Constellation, Vixen (PG-35), and Pocono (AGC-16) from 1941 to 1948. The Atlantic Fleet reappeared 1 February 1941 along with the Pacific Fleet and the new Asiatic Fleet. This time each fleet was to be under the command of a full Admiral, which jumped the fleet's commander Ernest J. King from a two-star to a four-star flag flying over his flagship Texas (BB-35).  The Atlantic Fleet was reorganized into the Scouting Force in 1923 until 1941.  The Atlantic Fleet originally came into existence in 1906 (along with the Pacific Fleet), established by President Theodore Roosevelt as protection for new bases in the Caribbean acquired as a result of the Spanish-American War.  In 1907, the first commander of the Atlantic Fleet was Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans, who hoisted his flag in the battleship Maine (BB-10) on 1 January 1906, took his 16 battleships, now dubbed the Great White Fleet, on a round-the-world goodwill cruise that served the purpose of advertising the USA's naval strength and reach to all other nations of the globe from 1907 to 1909”  (Ref. 313B).

 

US Second Fleet

 

    “The US Second Fleet is a part of US Atlantic Command. Based in Norfolk, Virginia, and is responsible in peacetime for training the Atlantic battle fleet in war-fighting skills, developing and evaluating new naval tactics and maintaining theater battle group readiness. In February 1950, the command was redesignated to its current title, US Second Fleet.  The force consists of a balanced mix of capabilities including aircraft carriers, surface combatants, submarines, surveillance assets, amphibious forces, marine landing and mobile logistic units.  Second Fleet operates primarily in the Atlantic Ocean from the North Pole to the South Pole and from the shores of the United States to the west coast of Europe. It also operates along both coasts of South America and part of the west coast of Central America. In all, it covers more than 38 million square miles (98 million km˛). 

 

    The US Second Fleet traces its origin to the reorganization of the Navy after World War II in December 1945 when the formation of the US Eighth Fleet was activated as it was recognized that a numbered fleet was needed for the Atlantic” (Ref. 313C).

 

US Sixth Fleet

 

    “The Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean is the major operational component of Naval Forces Europe.  Sixth Fleet is headquartered on a command ship forward deployed to Gaeta, Italy and operating in the Mediterranean Sea. The U.S. Sixth Task Fleet was established in 1949, the same year the North Atlantic Treaty Organization was formed, in the early days of the Cold War.  In 1946, President Truman dispatched battleship Missouri to the Eastern Mediterranean to counter Soviet threats to Turkey and Iran. The U.S.  The United States has maintained a naval presence in the Mediterranean Sea since the early 19th century, when U.S. Naval forces first engaged the Barbary Pirates to prevent them from interfering with commercial shipping. "Millions for defense, but not a penny for tribute!” (Ref. 313E).

 

1984 EAST COAST DEPLOYMENTS - Includes Florida

Chapter XXXVIII

Appendix I

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Second and Sixth Fleet) 1983 Aircraft Carriers scheduling of deployments, resulted in one CV and CVN deployments extending into 1984:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS John F. Kennedy          (CV-67)

SoLant              10th Med

CVW-3

AC

27 Sep 1983

2 May 1984

Europe

219-days

 

USS Independence (CV-62) – 2nd & 6th

Solant     Guantanamo (Gitmo) Bay, Cuba

3rd Carib

17th Med

5th NorLant

Norwegian Sea

CVW-6

AE

18 Oct 1983

11 Apr 1984

South America

Europe

177-days

 Air wing CVW-6 flew missions in support of Operation Urgent Fury, the action to liberate the Caribbean nation of Grenada and served as a NATO Peace Keeper returning to waters off Lebanon, conducting air strikes against Syrian positions and ”Teamwork 84.”

Grenada “Operation Urgent Fury” Indy Cruise Map

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv62-84/108.htm

 

Ports of call included Naples the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy from 6 to 13 January 1984; Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey; Haifa, the largest city in northern Israel, and the third-largest city in the country; Rome, a city and special comune ("Roma Capitale") in Italy; Beirot, the capital and largest city of Lebanon; Portsmouth, the second largest city in the ceremonial county of Hampshire on the south coast of England.

 

Squadrons: VF-14, F-14A; VF-33, F-14A; VA-15, A-7E; VA-87, A-7E; VA-176, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-124, E-2C; VAQ-131, EA-6B; HS-15, SH-3H and VS-28, S-3A.

 

USS Independence (CV-62) Task Group: USS Richmond K. Turner (CG-20), USS Coontz (DDG-40), USS Caron (DD-970), USS Moosbrugger (DD-980), USS Clifton Sprague (FFG-16), USS Suribachi (AE-21) with the Invasion Tactical Planning and Hands On Operational Control conducted by the Air Staff of the Independence.

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Second and Sixth Fleet) scheduled Aircraft Carriers Deployments for 1984 are as follows:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS America (CV-66) – 2nd

12th Caribbean Sea Voy.

CVW-1

AB

25 Mar 1984

mid Apr 1984

Voyage

22 est. days

 Type Training and Exercises

 

Visited St. Thomas, in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

 

Squadrons: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33, F-14A; VA-46, A-7E; VA-72, A-7E; VA-34, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; VAQ-136 (*1), EA-6B; HS-11, SH-3H and VS-32, S-3A.

 

USS America (CV-66) task force not reported.

USS America (CV-66) – 2nd, 6th & 7th

(5th & 6th Red Sea, Gulf of Aden voyage & 3rd Arabian Sea dep.)

NorLant

11th Med

DD

5th Suez Canal

3rd Indian Ocean

6th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

3rd SoLant

4th Caribbean

OV

CVW-1

AB

24 Apr 1984

14 Nov 1984

Europe

Middle East

Indian Ocean

South America

205-days

 Exercise "Ocean VentureNATO and Exercise "Display Determination."

 

Visited Caracas, Venezuela; Malaga, Spain; Port Said, Egypt; Naples Italy; Catania, Italy and Augusta Bay.

 

Squadrons: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33, F-14A; VA-46, A-7E; VA-72, A-7E; VA-34, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; VAQ-135, EA-6B; HS-11, SH-3H; VS-32, S-3A; VQ-2 Det. A, EA-3B and VRC-50 Det., C-2.

 

USS America (CV-66) task force not reported.

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) 2nd

2nd NorLant

5th Caribbean

CVW-7

AG

8 May 1984

20 Jun 1984

South America Training Ops

44-days

 40th Anniversary Commemoration of the D-Day landings of World War II

 

Ports of call included: Lisbon, Portugal; Portsmouth, UK; Brest, France and St. Thomas, Virgin Islands.

 

Squadrons: VF-143, Pukin' Dogs, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VF-14, Ghostriders, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VA-66, Waldos, Attack Squadron, A7-E; VA-12, Flying Ubangis, Attack Squadron, A7-E;  VA-65, Tigers, Attack Squadron, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D; VAQ-132          , Waldos, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; VAW-121, Bluetails, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, E-2C; VS-31, Top Cats, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, S-3A; HS-5, Night Dippers, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, SH-3D; VS-31, Top Cats, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, S-3A; HM-12 Det., Sea Dragons, Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron, CH-53A; VRC-40 Det., Rawhides, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron, C-1.

 

USS Arthur W. Radford (DD-968) and USS Virginia (CGN-38) joined USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) as part of her task force.

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) 2nd

WestLant

 

CVWR-20

AF

Jun 1984

Jul 1984

Training

Squadrons: VF-201, F-4S; VF-202, F-4S; VA-203, A-7E; VA-204, A-7B; VA-205, A-7B/E; VFP-206, RF-8G; HS-75, SH-3D; VAQ-209, EA-6A and VAW-78, E-2C.

 (Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

1985 EAST COAST DEPLOYMENTS - Includes Florida

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Second and Sixth Fleet) 1984 Aircraft Carriers scheduling of deployments, resulted in one CV and CVN deployments extending into 1985:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS

Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) – 2nd & 6th

Lant

4th Med

Lant

CVW-7

AG

10 Oct 1984

8 May 1985

Europe

211-days

Med-1-85, Natio/onal Week XXXIII, Dasix, multi-national exercises that “spanned the entire Mediterranean and all warfare areas” operating with large numbers of NATO ship and aircraft, including USS Independence (CV-62) and Sea Wind, a joint air defense exercise with Egyptian forces

 

Ports of call included: Toulon, France; Athens, Greece; Haifa, Israel; Naples, Italy; Toulon, France and Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

 

Squadrons: VF-143, Pukin' Dogs, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VF-14, Ghostriders, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VA-66, Waldos, Attack Squadron, A7-E; VA-12, Flying Ubangis, Attack Squadron, A7-E;  VA-65, Tigers, Attack Squadron, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D; VAQ-132, Waldos, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; VAW-121, Bluetails, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, E-2C; HS-5, Night Dippers, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, SH-3H and VS-31, Top Cats, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, S-3A.

 

USS Spruance (DD-963); USS Sampson (DDG-10) and USS Coontz (DDG- 40) joined USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) as part of her task force.

USS Independence (CV-62) – 2nd, 6th & 7th

(4th & 5th Red Sea & Gulf of Aden)

Lant

18th Med

4th Suez Canal

3rd IO

5th Suez Canal

Med

Lant

CVW-6

AE

18 Oct 1984

19 Feb 1985

Europe

Indian Ocean

Middle East

125-days

Troubled area of the Middle East ensuring oil tankers were not hassled.

 

Ports of call included Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, known as Las Palmas, the co-capital (jointly with Santa Cruz) and the most populous city in the Autonomous Community of the Canary Islands, and the ninth largest city in Spain.

 

Squadrons: VF-14, F-14A; VF-32, F-14A; VA-15 (*1), A-7E; VA-87 (*2), A-7E; VA-176, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-124, E-2C; VAQ-131, EA-6B; HS-15, SH-3H and VS-28, S-3A.

 

(*1) VA-15 redesignated VFA-15 on Oct.1, 1986 and (*2) VA-87 redesignated VFA-87 on May 1, 1986.

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Second and Sixth Fleet) scheduled Aircraft Carriers Deployments for 1985 are as follows:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS Nimitz (CVN-68)

NorLant

6th Med

NorLant &

WestLant

4th Carib

WestLant

CVW-8

AJ

8 Mar 1985

4 Oct 1985

South America

Europe

211-days

Readiness Exercise 1-85 followed by an operational readiness evaluation, in the Caribbean Sea. Due to heightened tensions resulting from fighting against Marxist rebels in Central America, Nimitz began steaming off the eastern coast of that isthmus for .S. Naval Presence Operations, on her sixth Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet, participating in Operation Distant Hammer, a multi-national exercise with USAF, French, Italian and Turkish forces, extending operations into the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, when ordered to steam at flank speed to off the coast of Lebanon in response too two Lebanese Shiite Muslim gunmen hijacked TWA Flight 847, carrying 153 passengers and crew, including many Americans on 14 June 1985. Operation Bright Star 85, a huge exercise with USAF, Army, Marine, Egyptian, Jordanian, Omani and Somali forces followed before turning over to USS Saratoga (CV-60) at Augusta Bay preparatory to returning home but the ongoing crisis in the Middle East in the wake of terrorists kidnapping several Americans in Beirut, forced her to divert and race to “Beno Station,” as her crew humorously dubbed the ship’s operating area in the eastern Mediterranean, for contingency operations.

 

Ports of call included: Anchoring in Augusta Bay, Sicily.

 

CVW-8 Squadrons: VF-41, F-14A; VF-84, F-14A; VA-82, A-7E; VA-86, A-7E; VA-35, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-124, E-2C; VAQ-138, EA-6B; HS-9, SH-3H and VS-24, S-3A.

USS

Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) – 2nd

Lant

6th Caribbean

CVW-7

AG

8 Jul  1985

22 Aug 1985

South America Training Ops

Europe

46-days

ReadiEx 2-85, a war at sea, long range strike and antisubmarine exercise with USS Saratoga (CV-60) and off the eastern coast of Guatemala and Honduras for “U.S. Naval Presence Operations.

 

Squadrons: VF-143, Pukin' Dogs, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VF-14, Ghostriders, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VA-66 (*1), Waldos, Attack Squadron, A7-E; VA-12 (*2), Flying Ubangis, Attack Squadron, A7-E;  VA-65, Tigers, Attack Squadron, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D; VAQ-132, Waldos, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; VAW-121, Bluetails, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, E-2C; HS-5, Night Dippers, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, SH-3H and VS-31, Top Cats, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, S-3A.

 

(*1) disestablished on Oct.1, 1986 and (*2) disestablished on Oct.1, 1986.

USS America (CVA-66) -

2nd

3rd NorLant

CVW-1

AB

24 Aug 1985

9 Oct 1985

Training

47-days

""Ocean Safari," a six-week NATO Exercise

 

Visited Portsmouth, England.

 

CVW-1 Squadrons: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33, F-14A; VA-46, A-7E; VA-72, A-7E; VA-34, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; VAQ-135, EA-6B; HS-11, SH-3H and VS-32, S-3A.

 

USS America (CV-66) task force not reported.

USS Saratoga (CV-60)

18th Med

Gulf of Sidra - Surt (Sirte)

CVW-17

AA

26 Aug 1985

16 Apr 1986

Europe

234-days

Arab terrorists had found and struck an Italian luxury liner, Achille Lauro, resulting in the death of an American tourist, prompting President Ronald Reagan to order seven F-14 Tomcats from the VF-74 "Bedevilers" and VF-103 "Sluggers" launched from USS Saratoga (CV-60) off the coast of Crete, while the Tomcats continuously supported by VA-85 KA-6D air tankers and VAW-125 E-2C Hawkeye aircraft. Exercise "Display Determination II and III and USS Coral Sea (CV-43) participated in amphibious exercises from 21 to 24 February 1986 off the coast of Tunisia with Saratoga.

 

VF-74, F-14A; VF-103, F-14A; VA-83, A-7E; VA-81, A-7E; VA-85, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-125, E-2C; VAQ-137, EA-6B; HS-3, SH-3H; VS-30, S-3A and VQ-2 DET., EA-3B.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

10th Med

Gulf of Sidra - Surt (Sirte)

CVW-13

AK

1 Oct 1985

19 May 1986

Europe

97-days

Exercise Dasix '85 (8-9 January 1986), evolutions designed to test the effectiveness of the French Air Force and French air defense command/control structure. Following the terrorist attacks on 27 December 1985 in the Rome and Vienna airports, a series of Freedom of Navigation operations in the Gulf of Sidra (Operations in the Vicinity of Libya, OVL) were approved. Code-named “Operation Attain Document,” the first from 26 to 30 January 1986 occurred without incident. Coral Sea and USS Saratoga (CV-60) participated in operations, which were collectively named “Attain Document II” in the Gulf of Sidra, Libya 10 to 15 February 1986. Coral Sea participated in amphibious exercises 15 to 22 March 1986 off the island of Sardinia. On 23 March 1986, while operating off coast of Libya, aircraft from Saratoga, Coral Sea and USS America (CV-66) crossed what Libyan strongman Mohammar Khadafi had called the "Line of Death. On 24 March 1986, USS Ticonderoga (CG-47) accompanied by two destroyers, Scott (DDG-995) and Caron (DD-970), moved south of the "Line," covered by fighter aircraft, at 0600, commencing “Attain Document III. Libyan armed forces fired missiles at U.S. naval forces operating in the Gulf of Sidra after declaring international waters as their own. U.S. retaliation was swift and deadly, when SA-2s and 5s fired on the Americans during the mid watch on 24 March 1986, who responded with Operation Prairie Fire, sinking Waheed with two Harpoons and MK 20 Rockeye cluster bombs from A-6E Intruders of VAs-34 and 85, the first operational use of the missile in combat Operation `Attain Document III was conducted from 24 to 29 March 1986. Operation Eldorado Canyon. Operation Eldorado Canyon commenced early on the afternoon of 14 April 1986, as tanker aircraft took off from bases in England to support the Air Force North American F-111F and EF-111 planes that soon followed them into the air and began the 3,000 mile (5,000 km) trip to the target. During April 1986, aircraft from USS Coral Sea (CV-43) and America pounded Libyan targets. On 28 April 1986, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) became the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier to transit the Suez Canal, en route from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea to relieve USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on station with America off the coast of Libya. The transit began at 0300 and lasted 12 hours. It was the first time in over 22 years that Enterprise was in the Mediterranean Sea.

 

Ports of calls include: Naples, Italy twice; Toulon; Istanbul; Catania; Palermo and Trieste.

 

CVW-13 Squadrons: VFA-131, FA-18A; VFA-132, FA-18A VMFA-314, FA-18A VMFA-323, FA-18A VA-55, A-6E/KA-6D VAW-127, E-2C HS-17, SH-3H VAQ-135 (*1), EA-6B and VQ-2 DET., EA-3B. (*1) VAQ-135 deployed aboard the Coral Sea from Jan. 1, 1986 to May 19, 1986.

 (Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

 

A similar, but later (1985+), view: SPS-30 height-finding radar replaced by a 3D SPS-48, SPS-43A long-range air-search radar substituted by SPS-49. USS Coral Sea (CV-43) had the Fleet's last operational SPS-30 radar. NS024306 72k. USN.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024306.jpg

 

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), left, and USS Constellation (CV-64). NAS North Island, San Diego, Calif., circa 1984. NS026483a 317k. NS026483a 317k. Richard Miller BMCS USNR Ret.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026483a.jpg

 

    “Rear Admiral Chatham assumed command as Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77) and Carrier Group Five on 26 January 1985” (Ref. 1081Z4).

 

    “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, conducted a 15-month complex overhaul involving repairs and alterations to the ship at Norfolk, Va. Navy Yard from 17 October 1983 to 18 January 1985. Included in the package were all of the equipment required to operate F/A-18s -two large Mk 7 jet blast deflectors, flush deck nose gear launch, catapult mods, rotary launch valves and avionics support equipment. The latest electronics SPS-48 and SPS-49, air search radars were also fitted to enable her to operate to the end of the decade ($186 mil). ” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 43, 35 and 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 12 December 1984 to 1 February 1985” (Ref. 72).

 

 

At 1948 Thursday, April 11, 1985 USS Coral Sea (CV-43) collided with the Ecuadorean tanker Napo about 45 miles southeast of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The carrier had been in the area since April 3 on refresher training and was conducting flight operations when the collision occurred. Eleven aircraft airborne at the time of the accident were diverted to the Naval Air Station at Guantanamo Bay. There was a Soviet intelligence gathering ship shadowing Coral Sea, since her embarked Carrier Air Wing 13 (CVW-13) was equipped with the then new F/A-18A Hornet aircraft. There were no injuries to crew members of either ship, but the carrier's bow had a 30-foot hole punched in and some radar and communications equipment damaged, and had to return to Norfolk. The Napo was holed above the waterline and spilled 7,600 barrels of oil before reaching Guantanamo for repairs. This series of three photos was taken by Bill Fessenden from the bridge wing of USS Charleston (LKA-113). At the time LKA-113 was moored to the South Wall of US Naval Station Norfolk's Destroyer and Submarine (D&S) piers. Bill was using a 35-mm camera equipped with a 200-mm telephoto lens and Kodak 400 speed color film. Coral Sea is seen traveling south bound in Hampton Roads, heading towards the Elizabeth River, and eventually, to Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, VA. Damage to the ship's bow area, as the result of the recent collision with Napo, is clearly visible. In the first photo, Coral Sea can be seen passing by two unidentified Sturgeon-class submarines, as well as the after area of USS Glover (FF-1098). In the second photo, the ship at the extreme right is USS Milwaukee (AOR-2), while the object on the left of third photo, is the forward "H" frame of Charleston. NS024347 182k. Bill Fessenden. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024347.jpg

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

NS024347a 150k http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024347a.jpg

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

NS024347b 163k http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024347b.jpg

 

    “The Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, conducted a drydocking for hull repairs commencing upon return to Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Va. on 12 April 1985 ($11 million collision), concluding a training voyage in the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba AOR, pulling for repairs at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba after colliding with the Ecuadorean tanker NAPO during air operations 45 miles southeast of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba on 12 April 1985. A 30-foot hole in the carrier's bow is punched in and some radar and communications equipment is damaged. The NAPO is holed above the waterline and spills 7,600 barrels of oil before reaching Guantanamo for repairs. Eleven aircraft airborne at the time of the accident are diverted to Guantanamo Bay” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 43, 72 & 85A).

 

    “A formal investigation later blames the Commanding Officer of the Coral Sea for the incident, saying he "used poor judgment in electing to be absent from the bridge during the entire launch and recovery cycle...with a Soviet vessel within 1,500 yards and with other vessels well within" the closest point of approach limits the captain had established” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “Captain Robert Harvey Ferguson assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on 21 May 1985, relieving Captain Robert Eugene ("Gene") Tucker, 34th Commanding Officer, serving from 31 August 1984 to 21 May 1985” (Ref. 35A).

 

    “On 14 June 1985, two Lebanese Shiite Muslim gunmen hijacked TWA Flight 847, carrying 153 passengers and crew, including many Americans. In response, USS Nimitz (CVN-68) was ordered to steam at flank speed to the Eastern Mediterranean, off the coast of Lebanon” (Ref. 371 & 72).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) conducted COMPTUEX 3-85 from 6 to 20 June 1985. Training operations off NC & VA coasts followed” (Ref. 34).

 

    “Captain Walter Jackson Davis, Jr., NROTC 1959 assumed command of USS Ranger (CVA-61) on 3 July 1985, relieving Captain Arthur Hugh Fredrickson, 24th Commanding Officer, serving from 8 July 1983 to 3 July 1985” (Ref. 1095 & 1096).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) remained in the Eastern Mediterranean, off the coast of Lebanon until August 1985” (Ref. 371 & 72).

 

    “USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked 17th Mediterranean Sea deployment was anything but ordinary. After departing Mayport in August 1985, Saratoga steamed toward the Mediterranean for what was scheduled to be a routine deployment” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

    “Resuming normal operations in the summer of 1985, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) embarked NATC's carrier suitability branch with F/A-18A, A-6E, A-7E, F-14A and T-2Cs to complete shipboard testing of the ship's catapults, arresting gear and automatic carrier landing system” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) conducted ReadEx 3-85, NATO operations in Eastern Atlantic with UK and NL 13 August to 7 September 1985” (Ref. 34).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with stood Hurricane Gloria while berthed at Norfolk, Va. from 26 to 27 September 1985” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with Captain John P. Gay, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 13 (CVW-13) (tail code AK), Rear Admiral J. C. Breast, Commander Carrier Group Two and Captain G. F. Streeter, Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Group Two embarked departed Norfolk,Virginia 1 October 1985, with Captain Robert Harvey Ferguson, as Commanding Officer and Captain John A. Lockard, as Executive Officer, on her 1st Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, operating with the Sixth Fleet since reassignment to the 6th Fleet from 12 September 1983 to Present, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956). Coral Sea scheduled to conduct Exercise Dasix '85 (8-9 January 1986), evolutions designed to test the effectiveness of the French Air Force and French air defense command/control structure. Coral Sea will join Saratoga to participate in operations, which were collectively named “Attain Document” in the Gulf of Sidra, Libya from 24 to 31 January 1986 and from 10 to 15 February 1986. Coral Sea scheduled to participate in amphibious exercises from 21-24 February 1986 off the coast of Tunisia with Saratoga and from 15 to 22 March 1986 off the island of Sardinia. On 23 March 1986, while operating off coast of Libya, aircraft from Saratoga, Coral Sea and America crossed what Libyan strongman Mohammar Khadafi had called the "Line of Death. Attain Document II and III and Operation Eldorado Canyon followed. She will under go her tenth Mediterranean Sea deployment, on her 11th voyage in the Mediterranean Sea. Prior to her deployment when a few days earlier Coral Sea with stood Hurricane Gloria while berthed at Norfolk 26-27 September 1985, arriving in port upon conclusion of ReadEx 3-85, NATO operations in Eastern Atlantic with UK and NL 13 August to 7 September 1985, conducting normal operations in the summer of 1985, Coral Sea embarked NATC's carrier suitability branch with F/A-18A, A-6E, A-7E, F-14A and T-2Cs to complete shipboard testing of the ship's catapults, arresting gear and automatic carrier landing system, completing COMPTUEX 3-85 from 6 to 20 June 1985, preceded by training operations off NC & VA, welcoming Captain Ferguson, Robert H. as the new Commanding Officer, relieving Captain Tucker, Robert E. Jr., Naval Postgraduate School ' 65 Bio CV-34 on 31 August 1984, reporting onboard on 21 May 1985, completing repairs 3 June 1985 ($11 million collision) at Norfolk, Va. Ship Yard from her collision with the civilian tanker Ecuadorean NAPO during air operations 45 miles southeast of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba 12 April 1985, while a formal investigation later blames the Commanding Officer of the Coral Sea for the incident, saying he "used poor judgment in electing to be absent from the bridge during the entire launch and recovery cycle...with a Soviet vessel within 1,500 yards and with other vessels well within" the closest point of approach limits the captain had established. Completing post-overhaul sea trials and RefTra from 19 November l984 to 11 April 1985 upon completion of a 15-month complex overhaul at Norfolk, Va. Navy Yard (17 October 1983 to 18 January 1985) ($186 mil), during which time Coral Sea suffers a minor engine room fire during overhaul at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard 17 December 1984, while the fire was extinguished in an hour with three crewmen injured and $6,000 damage to the vessel, with Captain Tucker, Robert E. reporting onboard 31 August 1984. Completing 15 “WestPac’s” while under the direction of the 7th Fleet in the Pacific (25 January 1960 to 12 September 1983); reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975; involved in two Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruises was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She will under go her 16th foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wa.; upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned 24 April 1957; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 27th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947 since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72, 1275Z4, 1275Z5 & 1275Z7).

 

Mediterranean Cruise Book 1985-86 - Ref. 1275Z

The Cruise and Ports of Call - Ref. 1275Z2

Cruise Map - Ref. 1275Z2A

Command and Staff - Ref. 1275Z3

Captain Robert H.  Ferguson, CO – Ref. 1275Z6

 

    “Commanded by Capt. Robert H. Ferguson, with CVW-13 embarked, it was the first deployment of the new F/A-18 Hornet to the Mediterranean. The Hornets were assigned to VFA-131 and VFA-132 on board Coral Sea” (Ref. 1 Coral Sea) flown by Marine Squadrons VMFA-314, VMFA 323, VFA-131 and VFA-132 to the Mediterranean. CVW-13 CAG was Capt John P. Gay 2 October 1985 and 29 November 1985 Commander Byron L. Duff became CAG of CVW-13 (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 34, 35 & 72).

 

USS CORAL SEA (CV-43) with CVW-13 (NK)

(1 October 1985 to 19 May 1986) 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) 2nd & 6th

Lant

10th Med

Lant

CVW-13

AK

1 Oct 1985

19 May 1986

Europe

27th FWFD

231-days

Exercise Dasix ’85, Attain Document I, II & III in the Gulf of Sidra, Libya - Operation Eldorado Canyon.

Final Carrier launching of a Navy fleet F-4S Phantom II.

1st Mediterranean Cruise since her reassignment to the 6th Fleet in the Atlantic upon arrival in the 5th Fleet Area, arriving on a World Cruise via the Suez Canal and Med on 12 September 1983, her 10th Med Deployment, having completed nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956) prior to her 1st conversion (25 January 1960).

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

          ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

     NICK NAME &

   PRIMARY ROLE

  TAIL

 CODE

 Modex

   AIRCRAFT   DESIGNATION

VFA-131

Wildcats -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

  AK100

FA-18A

VFA-132

Privateers -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

  AK200

FA-18A

VMFA-314

Marines -

Black Knights

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

  AK300

FA-18A

VMFA-323

Marines -

Death Rattlers

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet Jet

Strike Fighter

  AK400

FA-18A

VA-55

Warhorses -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

 Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

  AK500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-127

Seabats - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye -Electronics

    AK

 600-603

E-2C

HS-17

Neptune's Raiders - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

  AK610

SH-3H

VAQ-135

Black Ravens - Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron or Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

    AK

 604-607

A-6 - EA-6A

VQ-2 Det.

Batmen - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -

Jet Attack Fighter -

YA3D-2P - Photographic reconnaissance/Survey

  JQ17

A3D / A3D-2P (RA-3B)

Final Carrier launching of a Navy fleet F-4S Phantom II.

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 76

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port call, moored at North Island for a four-day visit from 27 September to 1 October 1985” (Ref. 362E).

 

    “To avoid Hurricane Gloria, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) transited “deadstick” over to the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, due to the latter’s more sheltered berths from 27 September to 1 October 1985” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California, for ComptuEx 86-1 on 1 October 1985, a multi-threat scenario utilizing the BFD, and including separate CIWS and NATO Sea Sparrow shoots” (Ref. 362E).

 

    “On 3 October 1985, boiler problems developed while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was in the Atlantic on her eleventh Mediterranean cruise” (Ref. 34).

 

    “On 8 October 1985, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) began carquals off the Virginia capes to begin trials of her newly installed or overhauled systems” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 10 October 1985, conducting ComptuEx 86-1 from 1 to 10 October 1985, a multi-threat scenario utilizing the BFD, and including separate CIWS and NATO Sea Sparrow shoots. During this work-up period Enterprise operated with BG Foxtrot, consisting of cruisers Truxtun and Arkansas, destroyers David R. Ray (DD-971) and O’Brien (DD-975), frigates Lewis B. Puller (FFG-23), McClusky (FFG-41), Bagley (FF-1069) and Reasoner (FF-1063), and old logistics consort Sacramento, after which time Enterprise became the lead ship of the parade of 14 ships passing beneath the Golden Gate to enter San Francisco Bay for the culmination of Fleet Week, 12 October 1985. On hand to greet her were Admiral James A. Lyons, CinCPac, and Mayor Diane Feinstein, all being treated to an air show by the Naval Flight Demonstration Squadron Blue Angels, before she moored at Alameda” (Ref. 362E).

 

    “USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked was called into action on 10 October 1985” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72)

 

    “Arab terrorists had found and struck an Italian luxury liner, Achille Lauro. The ship had just departed Alexandria, Egypt, on a pleasure cruise of the Mediterranean. A few hours later, terrorists from the Palestinian Liberation Front hijacked the ship. After tense negotiations and the killing of an American tourist, the hijackers traveled in a battered tugboat to the city of Port Said, Egypt, after Achille Lauro anchored just off the coast. Egyptian authorities made hasty arrangements for the terrorists to depart the country. They boarded an Egypt Air 737 jumbo jet at the Al Maza Air Base, northeast of Cairo.

 

    On orders from President Ronald Reagan, seven F-14 Tomcats from the VF-74 "Bedevilers" and VF-103 "Sluggers" were launched from USS Saratoga (CV-60). Supporting the Tomcats continuously were VA-85 KA-6D air tankers and VAW-125 E-2C Hawkeye aircraft. Off the coast of Crete, the F-14s, without the use of running lights, eased up beside and behind the airliner. On command, the Tomcats turned on their lights and dipped their wings — an international signal for a forced landing. The E-2C Hawkeye radioed the airliner to follow the F-14s. Realizing they were in a "no-win" situation, the hijackers allowed the pilot to follow the Tomcats to Naval Air Station, Sigonella, Italy.

 

     One hour and 15 minutes later, the jumbo jet landed and the hijackers were taken into custody. Seven hours after the fighter jets were scrambled, all USS Saratoga (CV-60) aircraft returned to the carrier without a shot fired” (Ref. 1-Saratoga).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) made a port call at Port Lauderdale, Florida from 11 to 15 October 1985, during which she hosted some 25,000 visitors” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 28 October, for her last at-sea period of the year, operating in the southern California operating area in an Operational Readiness Exam (ORE) and ReadiEx 86-1, that also involved threats by terrorist aircraft, and her Battle Group evaluation” (Ref. 362E).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) conducted target of opportunity exercises with the attack submarine Boston (SSN-703) on 15 October 1985. During those evolutions, the carrier controlled the guided missile destroyer Richard E. Byrd (DDG-23) and VS-24 planes as they tracked Boston for four hours and “attacked” her twice” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 18 October 1986, Captain Gary L. Beck relieved Captain Richard C. Macke as commanding officer of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69)” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) returned to Norfolk, Virginia on 18 October 1985” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 26 October 1985, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) underwent a 18-month Complex Overhaul (COH) at Newport News and Drydock that included the addition of the Close-in Weapons System, NATO Sea Sparrow Missile System, Navy Tactical Data System, anti-submarine warfare module, communications upgrades and rehabilitation of 1,831 berths in 25 compartments” (Ref. 44, 72, 76, 84A, 383 & 383B).

 

    “On 29 October 1985, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) got underway for shakedown training, testing her newly installed CIWS 20mm Phalanx MK 15, while continuing tests of NATO MK 29 Sea Sparrow weapons, elevators and the surface ship torpedo system” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) conducted target of opportunity exercises with Minneapolis-St.Paul (SSN-708) from 29 to 31 October 1985, John F. Kennedy aircraft maintaining contact on their adversary for 16 hours and simulating 14 attacks” (Ref. 549).

 

    “As the month of November 1985 began, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) assisted five people on board a fishing vessel in distress on 1 November” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) transited to the Elizabeth River from Norfolk Naval Shipyard for Selected Restricted Availability (SRA-86) on 1 November 1985” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “While steaming south-southwest of San Diego, Ca. on 2 November 1985, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) struck a portion of Bishop Rock, about 100 miles west of San Diego, Calif. The crew counter-flooded the void and controlled flooding, but in addition to damage to the hull, the No. 1 screw received damage. The grounding also resulted in the temporary loss of the use of 24 JP-5 fuel storage tanks. Reports say the Enterprise sustains a 60-foot gash in the outer hull and damages one propeller. The damage required repairs that could only be completed in drydock. After having a one-day standdown to assess the damage, Enterprise continued her scheduled training taking part in ReadiEx 86-1 exercise before going into drydock scheduled for 27 November 1985” (Ref. 362E).

 

    “Vice Admiral Moranville, Com3rdFlt visited on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) from 5 to 7 November 1985” (Ref. 84A & 362E).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) made a port call at Nassau from 9 to 13 November 1985” (Ref. 549).

 

     “Captain John P. Gay, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 13 from April 1963 to November 1985” (Ref. 1275Z8-/8).

 

     “Commander Bryon L. Duff, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 13 from November 1985 to Present” (Ref. 1275Z9-/9).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) conducted an ASW evolution from 17 to 20 November 1985, with Bonefish (SSN-582), during which her aircraft assisted destroyers John Rodgers (DD-983) and O’Bannon (DD-987) and frigate William S. Sims (FF-1059) in generating 51 hours of “contact time” and making 57 “attacks,” and a target of opportunity evolution with Honolulu (SSN-718) that saw aircraft from the carrier maintaining contact for 21 hours and simulating 14 attacks” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 23 November 1985, conducting her last at-sea period of the year, operating in the southern California operating area in an Operational Readiness Exam (ORE) and ReadiEx 86-1 that also involved threats by terrorist aircraft, and her Battle Group evaluation from 28 October to 23 November 1985. While steaming south-southwest of San Diego, Ca. on 2 November 1985, Enterprise struck a portion of Bishop Rock, about 100 miles west of San Diego, Calif. The crew counter-flooded the void and controlled flooding, but in addition to damage to the hull, the No. 1 screw received damage. The grounding also resulted in the temporary loss of the use of 24 JP-5 fuel storage tanks. Reports say the Enterprise sustains a 60-foot gash in the outer hull and damages one propeller. The damage required repairs that could only be completed in drydock. After having a one-day standdown to assess the damage, Enterprise continued her scheduled training taking part in ReadiEx 86-1 exercise before going into drydock scheduled for 27 November 1985. Vice Admiral Moranville, Com3rdFlt visited on board Enterprise from 5 to 7 November 1985” (Ref. 362E).

 

    “On 25 November 1985, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) returned to Norfolk, Virginia, a John F. Kennedy Hawkeye detected a surprise raid by Marine All Weather Attack Squadron (VMA(AW)) 533, which deck-launched interceptors from the ship handled” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored in San Francisco Bay from 27 to 28 November 1985, before shifting to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard for an emergency Drydock Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) on the 28th” (Ref. 362E).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) made a port call at Haifa, Israel on 29 November 1985 at which time Cdr Byron L. Duff became CAG of CVW-13, reliving Capt John P. Gay”  (Ref. 34).

 

    “In December, an EOD detachment was established on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) to inspect the damage of the hull and propeller Enterprise damaged when she struck a portion of Bishop Rock. Twenty-five dives, encompassing 400 man-hours, were required to evaluate the damage, the diver also investigating underwater damage to Lewis B. Puller” (Ref. 362E).

 

    “On 9 December 1985, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) completed fleet Carquals and tracking exercises for her CIWS 20mm Phalanx MK 15 systems and NATO MK 29 Sea Sparrow weapons, cross-decked people from Patrol Squadron (VP) 8, VP-24, and VP-26, and qualified pilots from VA-42 and VA-174, VMA(AW)-533, and CVW-3.

 

    “On 11 December 1985, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) conducted ASW exercises with L. Mendel Rivers (SSN-686) and Archerfish (SSN-678) from 11 to 12 December 1985, P-3 Orions from VP-5, VP-24, and VP-56, assisted by the frigate Bowen (FF-1079) generated 51 hours of contact and 30 simulated attacks. John F. Kennedy made a port call at Mayport on 13 December 1985, completing the surface ship torpedo defense system on 16 December before returning to Norfolk, Virginia on 19 December 1985” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) made a port call at Naples, Italy on 25 December 1985 for Christmas & New Years” (Ref. 34).

 

    “With mid-air refuelings, the jet returned to the ship safely after the six-hour mission, demonstrating the long-range capabilities of USS Coral Sea (CV43)/Air Wing 13 team. The quiet, uneventful cruise was altered on 27 December 1985” (Ref. 1275Z12).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) spent from 9 October through 31 December 1985 alternating periods of upkeep at NOB, Norfolk, Virginia, with local operations in the Virginia capes operating area” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

                                  

1986 EAST COAST DEPLOYMENTS - Includes Florida

Chapter XXXVIII

Appendix II

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Second and Sixth Fleet) 1985 Aircraft Carriers scheduling of deployments resulted in two CV deployments extending into 1986:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS Saratoga (CV-60)

18th Med

Gulf of Sidra - Surt (Sirte)

CVW-17

AA

26 Aug 1985

16 Apr 1986

Europe

234-days

Arab terrorists had found and struck an Italian luxury liner, Achille Lauro, resulting in the death of an American tourist, prompting President Ronald Reagan to order seven F-14 Tomcats from the VF-74 "Bedevilers" and VF-103 "Sluggers" launched from USS Saratoga (CV-60) off the coast of Crete, while the Tomcats continuously supported by VA-85 KA-6D air tankers and VAW-125 E-2C Hawkeye aircraft. Exercise "Display Determination II and III and USS Coral Sea (CV-43) participated in amphibious exercises from 21 to 24 February 1986 off the coast of Tunisia with Saratoga.

 

VF-74, F-14A; VF-103, F-14A; VA-83, A-7E; VA-81, A-7E; VA-85, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-125, E-2C; VAQ-137, EA-6B; HS-3, SH-3H; VS-30, S-3A and VQ-2 DET., EA-3B.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

10th Med

Gulf of Sidra - Surt (Sirte)

CVW-13

AK

1 Oct 1985

19 May 1986

Europe

97-days

Exercise Dasix '85 (8-9 January 1986), evolutions designed to test the effectiveness of the French Air Force and French air defense command/control structure. Following the terrorist attacks on 27 December 1985 in the Rome and Vienna airports, a series of Freedom of Navigation operations in the Gulf of Sidra (Operations in the Vicinity of Libya, OVL) were approved. Code-named “Operation Attain Document,” the first from 26 to 30 January 1986 occurred without incident. Coral Sea and USS Saratoga (CV-60) participated in operations, which were collectively named “Attain Document II” in the Gulf of Sidra, Libya 10 to 15 February 1986. Coral Sea participated in amphibious exercises 15 to 22 March 1986 off the island of Sardinia. On 23 March 1986, while operating off coast of Libya, aircraft from Saratoga, Coral Sea and USS America (CV-66) crossed what Libyan strongman Mohammar Khadafi had called the "Line of Death. On 24 March 1986, USS Ticonderoga (CG-47) accompanied by two destroyers, Scott (DDG-995) and Caron (DD-970), moved south of the "Line," covered by fighter aircraft, at 0600, commencing “Attain Document III. Libyan armed forces fired missiles at U.S. naval forces operating in the Gulf of Sidra after declaring international waters as their own. U.S. retaliation was swift and deadly, when SA-2s and 5s fired on the Americans during the mid watch on 24 March 1986, who responded with Operation Prairie Fire, sinking Waheed with two Harpoons and MK 20 Rockeye cluster bombs from A-6E Intruders of VAs-34 and 85, the first operational use of the missile in combat Operation `Attain Document III was conducted from 24 to 29 March 1986. Operation Eldorado Canyon. Operation Eldorado Canyon commenced early on the afternoon of 14 April 1986, as tanker aircraft took off from bases in England to support the Air Force North American F-111F and EF-111 planes that soon followed them into the air and began the 3,000 mile (5,000 km) trip to the target. During April 1986, aircraft from USS Coral Sea (CV-43) and America pounded Libyan targets. On 28 April 1986, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) became the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier to transit the Suez Canal, en route from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea to relieve USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on station with America off the coast of Libya. The transit began at 0300 and lasted 12 hours. It was the first time in over 22 years that Enterprise was in the Mediterranean Sea.

 

Ports of calls include: Naples, Italy twice; Toulon; Istanbul; Catania; Palermo and Trieste.

 

Exercise Dasix ’85, Attain Document I, II & III in the Gulf of Sidra, Libya - Operation Eldorado Canyon.

 

Final Carrier launching of a Navy fleet F-4S Phantom II.

 

2nd Mediterranean Cruise since her reassignment to the 6th Fleet in the Atlantic upon arrival in the 5th Fleet Area, arriving on a World Cruise via the Suez Canal and Med on 12 September 1983, her 10th Med Deployment, having completed nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956) prior to her 1st conversion (25 January 1960) and now her 11th Med tour with either 6th or 7th Fleet (Attain Document I-III), while during her 10th Med Deployment she visited three ports in the 6th Fleet Area.

 

Ports of call include: Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy; Trieste, a city and seaport in northeastern Italy and situated towards the end of a narrow strip of land lying between the Adriatic Sea and Italy's border with Slovenia, which lies almost immediately south and east of the city; Catania, an Italian city on the east coast of Sicily facing the Ionian Sea, between Messina and Syracuse and the capital of the homonymous province, and is the second-largest city in Sicily and the tenth in Italy; Palermo, a city in Insular Italy, the capital of both the autonomous region of Sicily and the Province of Palermo; Toulon, a city in southern France and a large military harbor on the Mediterranean coast, with a major French naval base, located in the Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur region, Toulon is the capital of the Var department in the former province of Provence and Malaga, a city and a municipality, capital of the Province of Málaga, in the Autonomous Community of Andalusia, Spain; Haifa, the largest city in northern Israel, and the third-largest city in the country; Istanbul (/ˌɪstćnˈbl/; Turkish: İstanbul [isˈtanbuɫ]) is the largest city in Turkey, constituting the country's economic, cultural, and historical heart. Istanbul is a transcontinental city in Eurasia, with its commercial and historical centre lying on the European side and about a third of its population living on the Asian side of Eurasia; and Malaga, a city and a municipality, capital of the Province of Málaga, in the Autonomous Community of Andalusia, Spain.

 

Squadrons: VFA-131, F/A-18A; VFA-132, F/A-18A; VMFA-314, F/A-18A; VMFA-323, F/A-18A; VA-55, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-127, E-2C; HS-17, SH-3H; VAQ-135 (*1), EA-6B and VQ-2 Det., EA-3B.

 

(*1) VAQ-135 deployed aboard the Coral Sea
(*1) from Jan. 1, 1986 to May 19, 1986

 (Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

The US Navy's West Coast Aircraft Carriers participating in 6th Fleet operations scheduled Aircraft Carriers Deployments for 1986 are as follows:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Pacific, 3rd, 7th, 6th & 2nd (1st Red Sea, Gulf of Aden & 3rd North Arabian

Sea dep.)

12th WestPac

13th & 14th Indian Ocean

1st Suez Canal

3rd Med

off the coast of Libya in the Gulf of Sidra

Lant

SoLant

4th Cape Horn

SoPac

EastPac

CVW-11

NH

13 Jan 1986

13 Aug 1986

2nd World Cruise

Middle East

Coast of Libya

213-Days

BgaRem-86, a major fleet exercise involving surface, subsurface and air action culminating in an amphibious operation on Maui, Exercise Lightning Flash, PassEx 86-1M, a series of Freedom of Navigation operations in the Gulf of Sidra conducting “daily sorties” and monitoring maritime traffic in the strategically vital Bab-al-Mandeb (Following the terrorist attacks on 27 December 1985 in the Rome and Vienna airports) and Operations in the Vicinity of Libya, OVL, conducting “spinner ops”–attempts to provoke Libyan responses were approved, resulting from Operation Attain Document III, Operation Prairie Fire and Operation El Dorado Canyon, a joint operation, the Air Force flew 18 F-111F Aardvarks of the 48th Tactical Fighter Wing, and four EF-111A Ravens from the 20th Tactical Fighter Wing, together with 29 tankers, all flying from England, a round trip of nearly 6,000 miles, as a result of the terrorist attacks on 27 December 1985 in the Rome and Vienna airports.

 

Ports of call include:

 

CVW-11 Squadrons include: VF-114, Aardvarks, Fighter Squadron, Grumman, F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter; VF-213, Black Lions, Fighter Squadron, Grumman,  F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter: VA-22, Fighting Redcocks, Attack Squadron, Vought - A-7E, Corsair II , Jet Attack Aircraft; VA-94, Shrikes, Attack Squadron, Vought, A-7E Corsair II, Jet Attack Aircraft; VA-95, Green Lizards, Attack Squadron, Grumman, A-6E / KA-6D Intruder, Jet Attack Bomber, Tanker; VAW-117, Wallbangers, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, Grumman, E-2C Hawkeye, Electronics; VAQ-133, Wizards, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, Grumman, EA-6B Prowler, Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation; HS-6, Indians, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, Sikorsky, SH-3H Sea King - Anti-submarine; VS-21, Redtails, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, Lockheed, S-3A Viking - Anti-Submarine and VQ-1 Det., World Watchers, Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron, Grumman - EA-3B Hawkeye -Special electronic installation.

 

USS Truxtun (CGN-35) and USS Arkansas (CGN-41) joined Enterprise as part of her task force.

 

The US Navy's East Coast Aircraft Carriers participating in the Atlantic and 3rd Fleet operations scheduled Aircraft Carriers Deployments for 1986 are as follows:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) 2nd

5th NorLant

CVW-8

AJ

15 Aug 1986

16 Oct 1986

North Atlantic

63-days

NATO exercises Northern Engagement 86 and Northern Wedding 86 in the North Atlantic, both designed to test NATO’s ability and resolve to defend northern Europe against an East Bloc attack.

 

Ports of call included: Wilhelmshaven, West Germany, to Brest, France.

 

Nimitz ships in company included battleship Iowa (BB-61), amphibious command ship Mount Whitney (LCC-20), South Carolina, guided missile destroyers Kidd (DDG-993) and Richard E. Byrd (DDG-23), destroyer Thorn (DD-988), guided missile frigate Doyle (FFG-39), frigates W.S. Sims (FF-1059), Moinester (FF-1097) and Truett (FF-1095), replenishment oiler Kalamazoo (AOR-6) and ammunition ship Nitro (AE-23).

USS John F. Kennedy        (CV-67)

11th Med Adriatic Sea

CVW-3

AC

18 Aug 1986

3 Mar 1987

Europe

198-days

Transfer to the East Coast

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) – 2nd, 6th, 7th & 3rd

NorLant

7th Med

WestLant &

SoLant

1st Cape Horn SoPac

EastPac

CVW-8

AJ

30 Dec 1986

26 Jul 1987

Home port transfer to the West Coast

209-days

Transfer to the West Coast from Norfolk, Virginia to Bremerton, Washington, crossing the Atlantic Ocean upon conclusion of her Med cruise, steaming through the Southern Atlantic, she will round the rough waters of Cape Horn, South America, and sail for the first time in the waters of the Pacific Ocean.

 

Ports of call include: Augusta Bay and Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.

 

USS South Carolina (CGN-37) joined USS Nimitz (CVN-68) as part of her task force.

Ref. U.S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment Resources

 

Crisis in Libya

 

    “As the new year, 1986, began, tensions in the Mediterranean basin would result in USS America (CV-66) sailing to deploy with the 6th Fleet one month earlier than planned” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “On 7 January 1986, President Ronald Reagan ordered all American citizens out of Libya, and broke off all remaining ties between the two nations. At the same time, the President directed the dispatch of a second carrier battle group to the Mediterranean Sea, and directed the Joint Chiefs of Staff to look into military operations against Libya, whose leader, Moammar Gadhafi, was strongly suspected of fomenting terrorist activity” (Ref. 1-America, 43 & 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) floated free from drydock at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard upon completion of an emergency Drydock Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) conducted from 6 to 7 January 1986, under going repairs since 28 November 1985” (Ref. 362F).

 

     “In Memory - “Major John N. Summerlin, VMFA 314 was lost on 8 January 1986” (Ref. 1275Z1).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) had begun the year at Naples before carrying out Exercise Dasix '85 (8-9 January 1986), evolutions designed to test the effectiveness of the French Air Force and French air defense command/control structure” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) floated free from drydock at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard upon completion of an emergency Drydock Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) conducted from 6 to 7 January 1986, under going repairs from 28 November 1985 to 12 January 1986, Enterprise moved to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California the same day” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “CVW-11 Fly took place on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on the 12th and the day of departure for the Mediterranean Sea on 13 January 1986. VF-213 fatality with F-14 air crew ejection on deck” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 and Rear Admiral Jonathan T. Howe, ComCruDesGru-3 embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 13 January 1986, embarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif. Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain Robert L. Leuschner, Jr. as the Commanding Officer, on her second World Cruise, her 12th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet on her 13th and 14th Indian Ocean voyage, on her third Arabian Sea deployment in support of BgaRem-86, a major fleet exercise involving surface, subsurface and air action culminating in an amphibious operation on Maui, Exercise Lightning Flash, PassEx 86-1M, operating with the 7th Fleet, in what would turn out to be her third Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming through the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden on her 1st Suez Canal, en route from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea, becoming the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier to transit the Suez Canal where she will relieve USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on station with USS America (CV-66) off the coast of Libya (first time in over 22 years that Enterprise was in the Mediterranean Sea) in support of a series of Freedom of Navigation operations in the Gulf of Sidra conducting “daily sorties” and monitoring maritime traffic in the strategically vital Bab-al-Mandeb (Following the terrorist attacks on 27 December 1985 in the Rome and Vienna airports) and Operations in the Vicinity of Libya, OVL, conducting “spinner ops”–attempts to provoke Libyan responses were approved, resulting from Operation Attain Document III, Operation Prairie Fire and Operation El Dorado Canyon, a joint operation, the Air Force flew 18 F-111F Aardvarks of the 48th Tactical Fighter Wing, and four EF-111A Ravens from the 20th Tactical Fighter Wing, together with 29 tankers, all flying from England, a round trip of nearly 6,000 miles, as a result of the terrorist attacks on 27 December 1985 in the Rome and Vienna airports. Upon conclusion of operations in the Mediterranean Sea, Enterprise will steam to her home port through the North & South Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, making her 4th Cape of Good Hope transit to the Indian Ocean, Western and Eastern Pacific, en route to her home port. The wing consisted of VFs-114 and 213 (F-14As), VAs-22 and 94 (A-7Es) and 95 (A-6Es and KA-6Ds), VAQ-135 (EA-6Bs), VAW-117 (E-2Cs), VS-21 (S-3As), VRC-50 Det (C-2As), a single EA-3B from VQ-1 Det B, and HS-6 (SH-3Hs). She will under go her 19th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on November 25, 1961” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 362F & 1270). 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 (NH)

(13 January to 13 August 1986)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-114

Aardvarks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH200

F-14A

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks -                  Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NH300

A-7E

VA-94

Shrikes -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NH400

A-7E

VA-95

Green Lizards -                  Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NH500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-133

Wizards -                Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -  Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-21

Redtails - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

VQ-1 Det.

World Watchers -

Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Special electronic installation

002

EA-3B

The wing consisted of VFs-114 and 213 (F-14As), VAs-22 and 94 (A-7Es) and 95 (A-6Es and KA-6Ds), VAQ-135 (EA-6Bs), VAW-117 (E-2Cs), VS-21 (S-3As), VRC-50 Det (C-2As), a single EA-3B from VQ-1 Det B, and HS-6 (SH-3Hs).

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “USS Truxtun (CGN-35) and USS Arkansas (CGN-41) joined USS Enterprise (CVN-65) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “The wing consisted of VFs-114 and 213 (F-14As), VAs-22 and 94 (A-7Es) and 95 (A-6Es and KA-6Ds), VAQ-135 (EA-6Bs), VAW-117 (E-2Cs), VS-21 (S-3As), VRC-50 Det (C-2As), a single EA-3B from VQ-1 Det B, and HS-6 (SH-3Hs)” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “An accident claimed two lives, when, on 13 January 1986, the day the USS Enterprise (CVN-65)  deployed from Alameda for Pearl, Lieutenant Joseph Durmon, pilot, and Lieutenant (jg) Steven Engeman, RIO, VF-213, were both killed when their ejection seats were fired from NH 203, their F-14A, on the flight deck” (Ref. 362F).

 

CHAPTER XXXVIII

TENTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

Exercise Dasix '85, Attain Document I, II & III in the Gulf of Sidra, Libya Air Attacks against Libya (Palestinian Liberation Front hijacked the Italian luxury liner, Achille Lauro – Bomb exploded on board a Trans World Airways flight en route to Athens from Rome, killing four American citizens) Operation Eldorado Canyon,

Final Carrier launching of a Navy fleet F-4S Phantom II

Iran History & Air Arm / Iraq and Iran War

SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS

SELECTED RESTRICTED AVAILABILITY AT NORFOLK, VA.

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia.

(1 January 1985 to 28 September 1987)

Part 1 – (1 January 1985 to 13 January 1986)

Part 2 – (14 January to 10 September 1986)

Part 3 – (11 September 1986 to 28 September 1987)