CHAPTER XXXVIII

TENTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

Exercise Dasix '85, Attain Document I, II & III in the Gulf of Sidra, Libya Air Attacks against Libya (Palestinian Liberation Front hijacked the Italian luxury liner, Achille Lauro – Bomb exploded on board a Trans World Airways flight en route to Athens from Rome, killing four American citizens) Operation Eldorado Canyon,

Final Carrier launching of a Navy fleet F-4S Phantom II

Iran History & Air Arm / Iraq and Iran War

SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS

SELECTED RESTRICTED AVAILABILITY AT NORFOLK, VA.

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia.

(1 January 1985 to 28 September 1987)

Part 1 – (1 January 1985 to 13 January 1986)

Part 2 – (14 January to 10 September 1986)

Part 3 – (11 September 1986 to 28 September 1987)

 

 

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) cleared Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, for Carquals off northern California, completing 519 traps on 13–14 September 1986. Enterprise had completed 6,854 day and 2,133 night catapult launches, together with 6,293 day and 2,702 night arrested landings, during 1986. She had also logged 1,581 day and 367 night helo launches, along with 1,511 day and 367 night helo landings. Aircraft were moved over 8,330 times in the hanger bay and 41,000 on the flight deck” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) conducted her second abnormally dangerous navigational detail of the deployment as she transited the English Channel (with its high volume of shipping) en route from Wilhelmshaven, West Germany, to Brest, France on 27 September 1986 and then headed home” (Ref. 372).

 

    “Display Determination 86 ran from 19 September to 13 October 1986, extending from the eastern Mediterranean Sea into the Aegean Sea” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Upon completion of Display Determination 86, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) exercised with USS Forrestal (CV-59) and then anchored in Haifa, Israeli on 16 October 1986” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 16 October 1986, USS Nimitz (CVN-68) with CVW-8 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia, ending her third North Atlantic deployment (4th voyage with one on a Med cruise) operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, on her 1st Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic, operating under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. Nmitz crossed the Arctic Circle at 2138, 66º33’N, 24º14’3”W” on 27 August 1986. Nimitz completed the first of two extremely demanding safety challenges for her navigational team during this deployment by sailing in the constricted waters of Vestfjord, Norway, where she conducted anti-submarine, anti-air and anti-surface operations, as well as covered several amphibious landings from 30 August to 4 September 1986. VADM Charles R. Larson relieved VADM Henry C. Mustin, Commander, Second Fleet, on board on the 2nd. Secretary of the Navy Lehman was the principal speaker. An A-7E Corsair II crashed in the Norwegian Sea attached to CVW-8 embarked aboard USS Nimitz (CVN-68). Despite an “intensive” search the crew could not recover the pilot on 4 September 1986. Nimitz conducted her second abnormally dangerous navigational detail of the deployment as she transited the English Channel (with its high volume of shipping) en route from Wilhelmshaven, West Germany, to Brest, France on 27 September 1986 and then headed home. Nimitz (CVN-68) ships in company included battleship Iowa (BB-61), amphibious command ship Mount Whitney (LCC-20), South Carolina, guided missile destroyers Kidd (DDG-993) and Richard E. Byrd (DDG-23), destroyer Thorn (DD-988), guided missile frigate Doyle (FFG-39), frigates W.S. Sims (FF-1059), Moinester (FF-1097) and Truett (FF-1095), replenishment oiler Kalamazoo (AOR-6) and ammunition ship Nitro (AE-23); ending her fifth Med cruise on her third Caribbean Sea voyage (1st on her 1st deployment); first Indian Ocean and Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, steaming through the Southern Atlantic on her way home from the Indian Ocean, operating 144 continuous days at sea during the Iran hostage crisis; ending her  second Northern Atlantic voyage on her second Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet; ending her first Caribbean Sea and Northern Atlantic deployment on her first deployment; reclassified CVN-68 30 June 1975. Her ninth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) (15 August to 16 October 1986) since she was commissioned on 3 May 1975 by President Gerald Ford” (Ref. 371 & 72).

 

    “After leaving Haifa, Israeli on 19 October 1986, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) in a “sinkex” in which her aircraft and guided missile cruiser Belknap, utilizing Harpoon, among other weapons, sank the former Italian frigate ex-Cigno” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) headed into the Adriatic Sea, an arm of the Mediterranean Sea on 20 October 1986” (Ref. 549).

 

    “During USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) Haifa-Trieste transit, CVW-3 lost an S-3 (side number 702) with its crew on 21 October 1986” (Ref. 549).

 

    “During USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) Haifa-Trieste transit, CVW-3 lost an A-6E Intruder (side number 552) (BuNo 159897) when it crashed on 24 October 1986, suffering the loss of Captains Russell Schindelheim and Timothy Morrison, USMC, of VMA(AW)-533 while searching for the lost Viking that crashed on 21 October 1986; a Honduran-flag (Marisal Lines) bulk carrier, El Sol, witnessing the mishap and assisting in salvage efforts” (Ref. 549).

 

 

The USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) was built by Northrop Grumman's Newport News sector and is pictured during its initial sea trials in 1986. The company was awarded a $558 million planning contract for the carrier's refueling and complex overhaul

http://www.nn.northropgrumman.com/images/newsphotos/news_111606C.jpg

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) made a port call at Trieste from 27 October to 3 November 1986” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) arrived back at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 20 November 1986 for an overhaul” ((Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) arrived Naples on 5 November 1986” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) completed repairs on her boiler in one of the engine rooms and a selected restricted availability at Norfolk, Va. Naval Ship Yard on 6 November 1986, commencing on 21 July 1986” (Ref. 34).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-13 was written about in a 9-page article & photo pages in the HOOK Sum 86 magazine” (Ref. 34).

 

    “USS South Carolina (CGN 37) joined USS Nimitz (CVN-68) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) arrived back at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 20 November 1986 for an overhaul” ((Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) exercised with Moroccan and USAF units in African Eagle, evolutions that tested the battle group in AAW, overland strikes, CV attack and low-level flying. Concluding African Eagle on 22 November 1986” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) reached Cannes on 22 November 1986 and celebrated Thanksgiving” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) sailed from Cannes to resume operations on 3 December 1986” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) participated in a Dasix exercise with French air forces, involving low level attacks defended by French Mirages” (Ref. 549).

 

    “The crew moved back on board USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) from 17 November to 3 December 1986” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “The crew of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) transferred General William O. Darby to USS America (CV-66) as the latter began an overhaul on 5 December 1986” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “Upon conclusion of Dasix exercise, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) began a ten-day port visit in Naples on 10 December 1986” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 14 December 1986, his eminence Corado Cardinal Ursi, the Cardinal Archbishop of Naples, visited USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and celebrated Mass and held a confirmation ceremony in the hangar bay” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) made a port call at Naples from 10 to 20 December 1986, under going the largest work package ever conducted on a forward-deployed carrier” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 20 December 1986, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) sailed for Palma (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 23 December 1986, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) pulled in for a port call at Palma” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) with CVW-8 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 30 December 1986, on her sixth Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea and home port transfer to Bremerton, Washington, crossing the Atlantic Ocean upon conclusion of her Med cruise, steaming through the Southern Atlantic, round the rough waters of Cape Horn, South America, and sail for the first time in the waters of the Pacific Ocean on her Home port transfer to the West Coast and will participate in Dual exercises National Week ‘87A with USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) in the Mediterranean Sea, and NATO exercise Dragon Hammer, which “enhanced the combat effectiveness, readiness, coordination and interoperability of allied sea, amphibious and air forces and tested their mettle against their Brazilian counterparts in TopEx 1-87, delivering over 20 “valid” attacks against a pair of Oberon-class submarines. Prior to her deployment not reported history from 17 October to 29 December 1986; made three North Atlantic deployments (four voyages with one on a Med cruise), operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the (USLANTCOM (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet; ending her fifth Med cruise on her third Caribbean Sea voyage (1st on her 1st deployment); made her first Indian Ocean and Arabian/ Persian Gulf deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, steaming through the Southern Atlantic on her way home from the Indian Ocean, operating 144 continuous days at sea during the Iran hostage crisis; ending her second Northern Atlantic voyage on her second Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet; ending her first Caribbean Sea and Northern Atlantic deployment on her first deployment; reclassified CVN-68 on 30 June 1975. She will under go her tenth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since she was commissioned on 3 May 1975 by President Gerald Ford” (Ref. 72 & 371).

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) with CVW-8 (AJ)

(30 December 1986 to 26 July 1987)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-41

Black Aces -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AJ100

F-14A

VF-84

Jolly Rogers -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AJ200

F-14A

VA-82 (*1)

Marauders -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AJ300

A-7E

VA-86 (*2)

Sidewinders -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AJ400

A-7E

VA-35

Black Panthers -                 Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -Tanker

AJ500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-124

Bear Aces -Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-138

Yellow Jackets -

Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-9

Sea Griffins -                   Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-24

Scouts - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - S-3 Viking -

Anti-Submarine

100

S-3A

VQ-2 DET.

Batmen

 

(JQ)

12, 14

EA-3B

 (*1) redesignated VFA-82 on Jul.13, 1987

(*2) redesignated VFA-86 on Jul.15, 1987

 

    “USS South Carolina (CGN-37) joined USS Nimitz (CVN-68) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

1987 EAST COAST DEPLOYMENTS - Includes Florida

Chapter XXXVIII

Appendix III

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Second and Sixth Fleet) 1986 Aircraft Carriers scheduling of deployments resulted in one CVN and CV deployments extending into 1987:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS John F. Kennedy        (CV-67)

11th Med Adriatic Sea

CVW-3

AC

18 Aug 1986

3 Mar 1987

Europe

198-days

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) – 2nd, 6th, 7th & 3rd

NorLant

7th Med

WestLant &

SoLant

1st Cape Horn SoPac

EastPac

CVW-8

AJ

30 Dec 1986

26 Jul 1987

Transfer to the West Coast

209-days

Transfer to the West Coast from Norfolk, Virginia to Bremerton, Washington, crossing the Atlantic Ocean upon conclusion of her Med cruise, steaming through the Southern Atlantic, she will round the rough waters of Cape Horn, South America, and sail for the first time in the waters of the Pacific Ocean.

 

Ports of call include: Augusta Bay and Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.

 

USS South Carolina (CGN-37) joined USS Nimitz (CVN-68) as part of her task force.

Ref. U.S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment Resources

 

The US Navy's East Coast (Second and Sixth Fleets) and West Coast Transfer to the East Cost scheduled Aircraft Carriers Deployments and Atlantic operations for 1987 are as follows:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63)

1st World Cruise        16th WestPac

5th I/O

Suez Canal

CVW-9

NG

3 Jan 1987

29 Jun 1987

Transfer to the East Coast

178-days

Departing her home port of 25 years on her first World Cruise, her fifth Indian Ocean voyage (six-month cruise) and change of home ports to Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on her first transit through the Suez Canal, via the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden and Red Sea, steaming through the Mediterranean Sea for the first time in her 25-year history operating with the 6th Fleet and the Atlantic Fleet in the North Atlantic.

USS Saratoga (CV-60)

19th Med

CVW-17

AA

5 Jun 1987

16 Nov 1987

Europe

165-days

 

CVW-11 Squadrons include: VF-191 (*1) (*2), Satan's Kittens, Fighter Squadron, Grumman, F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter; VF-194 (*3) (*4), Hellfires, Fighter Squadron, Grumman, F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter; VFA-161 (*5), Chargers, Attack Squadron, McDonnell-Douglas, FA-18A Hornet, Jet Strike Fighter; VAW-111 (*6), Grey Berets, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, Grumman - E-2C Hawkeye – Electronics; HS-16 (*7), Nighthawks, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, Sikorsky - A6-E/KA-6D, Sea King - Anti-submarine and VS-35 (*8), Boomerangs, Air Anti-Submarine, Squadron, Lockheed, S-3 Viking - Anti-Submarine. (*1) VF-191 recommissioned on Dec.4, 1986. (*2) VF-191 disestablished on Apr.30, 1988. (*3) VF-194 recommissioned on Dec.1, 1986. (*4) VF-194 disestablished on Apr.30, 1988. (*5) VFA-161 disestablished on Apr.1, 1988. (*6) VAW-111 disestablished on Apr.30, 1988. (*7) HS-16 disestablished on Jun.1, 1988. (*8) VS-35 disestablished on Jun.1, 1988.

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) 2nd

Lant

7th Carib

CVW-7

AG

21 Jun 1987

22 Jul 1987

South America Training Ops

32-days

Shakedown ’8

 

Squadrons: VF-143, Pukin' Dogs, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VF-142, Ghostriders, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VA-46, Clansmen, Attack Squadron, A7-E; VA-72, Blue Hawks, Attack Squadron, A7-E;  VA-34, Blue Blasters, Attack Squadron, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D; VAQ-132, Patriots, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; VAW-121, Bluetails, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, E-2C and VAQ-140, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; HS-5, Night Dippers, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, SH-3H and VS-31, Top Cats, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, S-3A.

USS Forrestal (CV-59) – 2nd

NorLant

CVW-6

AE

28 Aug 1987

8 Oct 1987

Atlantic

42-days

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) – 2nd & 6th

12th Med

CVW-13

AK

29 Sep 1987

28 Mar 1988

Europe

182-days

During the crossing the carrier battle group joined the 22nd Marine Amphibious Ready Group (MARG 22) to mark the first time a carrier battle group and a MARG deployed simultaneously. The two groups, fifteen ships and 13,000 men conducted training exercises on the Translant. The two groups passed Gibraltar entering the Mediterranean Sea and participated in a 3-day National Week exercises 88 with ships of the Saratoga Battlegroup, USS Iowa Surface Action Group and MARG 3-87. In all, 35 U.S ships and 25,000 sailors and Marines honed their skills.

 

3rd Mediterranean cruise since her reassignment to the 6th Fleet in the Atlantic 12 September 1983 to Present.

 

Ports of call include: Naples, Italy; Augusta, Sicily, Italy; Marseille, France; Cannes, France; Palma, in full Palma de Mallorca; Alexandria, Egypt; İzmir, Turkey; and Haifa, the largest city in northern Israel, and the third-largest city in the country.

 

Squadrons: VFA-131, F/A-18A; VFA-136, F/A-18A; VFA-137, F/A-18A; VA-55, A-6E; VA-65, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-127, E-2C; VAQ-133, EA-6B and HS-17, SH-3H.

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) participated in dual exercise National Week ‘87A withUSS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) in the Mediterranean Sea from 19 to 25 January 1987. Ranger 12, a Douglas EA-3B Skywarrior (BuNo 144850) from Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ)-2, crashed while landing on board Nimitz in the Ionian Sea, at 2328 on the 25th. The “Whale’s” front wheel caught the barricade net and the aircraft skidded across the flight deck, going over the edge and breaking apart as it struck the water. LCDR Ronald R. Callander, LT Stephen H. Batchelder, LT Alan A. Levine, LT James D. Richards and AT2 Richard A. Herzing (all VQ-2), and CTI3 Patrick R. Price and CTI3 Craig H. Rudolf (both from Naval Security Group Activity Athens, Greece) all died in the mishap” (Ref. 372A).

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

Underway at sea in 1986. Official U.S. Navy photograph by PH2 Robert Chouinard; Naval Historical Center photo #: NH 97652-KN. NS024317 176k. NHC. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024317.jpg

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) conducted training operations off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia during 1986” (Ref. 34).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) began Selected Restricted Availability (SRA), moving to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard on 1 January 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was towed (unpowered) from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard to Pier 3, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California (unpowered) on 22 January 1987 in order to complete her Selected Restricted Availability (SRA)” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) brought her visit to Palma to a close on 2 January 1987, inport from 23 December 1986 to 2 January 1987, celebrating Christmas and New Year’s Eve” (Ref. 549).

 

    “During flight operations in the central Mediterranean Sea the next day, on 3 January 1987, a VF-14 F-14A (Modex AC-106, BuNo 159431) attached to CVW-3 embarked on board USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), attempting a night landing, “bolted” and drifted right, striking an A-6 at about 1854. The collision sheared off a portion of the F-14’s right wing and severed an external fuel tank from the wing of the A-6. The crew of the F-14A ejected, and although 14 to 20-foot seas and 35-knot winds hampered the efforts, were recovered, with an HS-7 helo, Dusty Dog 610, recovering the Tomcat’s pilot and destroyer John Rodgers rescuing Lieutenant Michael J. Valen, the NFO, as well as Aviation Antisubmarine Warfare Operator 1st Class Timothy Broderick, the rescue swimmer from HS-7. John F. Kennedy’s flight deck crews extinguished the flames that issued from the Intruder’s ruptured fuel tank within minutes of the accident, preventing damage to the flight deck or surrounding planes, and the ship stood down from the fire emergency at 1926” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 6 January 1987, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) commenced her Cannes port visit” (Ref. 549).

 

    “After a pleasant ten-day visit at Cannes, arriving on 6 January 1987, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) got underway for National Week on 16 January 1987, conducted in the western Mediterranean Sea. John F. Kennedy’s battle group conducted exercises with USS Nimitz (CVN-68) in Augusta Bay” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was towed (unpowered) from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard to Pier 3, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California (unpowered) on 22 January 1987 in order to complete her Selected Restricted Availability (SRA)” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) participated in dual exercise National Week ‘87A with USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) in the Mediterranean Sea from 19 to 25 January 1987. Ranger 12, a Douglas EA-3B Skywarrior (BuNo 144850) from Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ)-2, crashed while landing on board Nimitz in the Ionian Sea, at 2328 on the 25th. The “Whale’s” front wheel caught the barricade net and the aircraft skidded across the flight deck, going over the edge and breaking apart as it struck the water. LCDR Ronald R. Callander, LT Stephen H. Batchelder, LT Alan A. Levine, LT James D. Richards and AT2 Richard A. Herzing (all VQ-2), and CTI3 Patrick R. Price and CTI3 Craig H. Rudolf (both from Naval Security Group Activity Athens, Greece) all died in the mishap” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “At the conclusion of the National Week exercise, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) anchored at Malaga on 29 January 1987 for a four-day port visit, scheduled to be her last before turnover in Rota. Growing unrest in the Middle East, shortened liberty at Malaga, as John F. Kennedy received an indefinite extension with orders to commence a high-speed transit to the eastern Mediterranean Sea where John F. Kennedy would join USS Nimitz (CVN-68) off the coast of Lebanon” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) marine security detachment reactivated on 29 January 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) arrived at her destination in the eastern Mediterranean Sea on 2 February 1987 and commenced dual carrier battle group operations with USS Nimitz (CVN-68)” (Ref. 549).

 

    “After four days of operations, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) anchored at Haifa, Israeli on 5 February 1987 for a six-day port visit. The ship’s indefinite extension, however, proved short-lived” (Ref. 549).

 

    “VADM Dunn toured USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) 19 February 1987 and announced to the crew their award of the Battle Efficiency “E” for 1985” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) returned to dual carrier battle group operations in the eastern Mediterranean Sea on 12 February 1987” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 17 February 1987, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) received orders ending her indefinite extension and dual carrier battle group operations” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On the morning of 21 February 1987, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) anchored off Rota and later that night, finished a one-day out-chop, weighed anchor and headed for Norfolk, Virginia” (Ref. 549).

 

     “Captain Bruce Barton Bremner arrived at Norfolk, Va., assuming command of USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on 23 February 1987, relieving Captain Robert Harvey Ferguson, 35th Commanding Officer, serving from 21 May 1985 to 23 February 1987” (Ref. 35A).

 

    “An A-7E (VA-82) crashed while launching aboard USS Nimitz (CVN-68), but the pilot ejected safely and the crew recovered him on 24 February 1987” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “Captain James A. (Jim) Lair, NAVCAD assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS America (CV-66) on 28 February 1987, relieving Captain Richard C. Allen, NAVCAD, 17th Commanding Officer, serving from 2 July 1985 to 28 February 1987” (Ref. 324).

 

     “Early in 1987 found USS Coral Sea (CV-43) undergoing Refresher Training and short cruises designed to prepare her for her next Mediterranean deployment” (Ref. 1275Z12 & 1275Z15).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) carried out local operations in the VaCapes and Cherry Point operating areas and visited Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1987” (Ref. 43).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a fast cruise on 27 February 1987, under going Selected Restricted Availability (SRA), conducting a fast cruise on 27 February 1987, conducting SRA from 1 January to 27 February 1987. Among the alterations performed, all CIWS mounts were replaced and bomb jettison ramps were installed. An attempt was also made to replace the slatted aircraft elevator platforms, Enterprise then being the only carrier so fitted, with solid surface platforms, but design flaws discovered in the latter caused the project to be abandoned. Strike Ops organized and supervised an efficient and cost effective cross-bay transportation system utilizing ferries, buses, and vans serving three thousand crewmembers daily. Strike Operations, as "Readiness Czar", established a turnaround training plan geared to drive the ship to M-1 status by 1 May 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

    “Captain James A. (Jim) Lair, NAVCAD assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS America (CV-66) on 28 February 1987, relieving Captain Richard C. Allen, NAVCAD, 17th Commanding Officer, serving from 2 July 1985 to 28 February 1987” (Ref. 324).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained in port Naval Air Station, Alameda, California for up keep (UPK) from 28 February to 2 March 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 embarked commenced Post-SRA Sea Trials and ACLS Certification. CVW-11 C/Q on 2 March 1987” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 3 March 1987, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) with CVW-3 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain John A. Moriarty in command, ending her 11th Mediterranean Sea deployment (12th voyage), operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea; made her Southern Atlantic voyage on her tenth Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet participating in Display Determination 86 and Exercise Dasix with French air forces being the first carrier to deploy with the Mk. 65 Quickstrike mine in her magazines; preparing for a possible emergency recall due to Hurricane Gloria stricking the eastern seaboard of the United States with high winds, thunderstorms and flooding on 18 August 1986, however the system passed swiftly, allowing John F. Kennedy to continue her deployment to the Med, arriving Rota on schedule on 28 August 1986, conducting turnover with USS America (CV-66), John F. Kennedy sailed for Benidorm, Spain, for a six-day port visit, proceeding thence for four days at sea and then anchored at Toulon, for a five-day port visit and planning meetings for Display Determination 86, a large-scale multi-national three-part exercise that included USS Forrestal (CV-59) and her battle group, and the French carrier Foch (R.99), running from 19 September to 13 October 1986, extending from the eastern Mediterranean Sea into the Aegean Sea, conducted exercises with Forrestal upon completion Display Determination 86 and then anchored in Haifa, Israeli on 16 October 1986, leaving Haifa, Israeli on 19 October 1986, John F. Kennedy engaged in a “sinkex” in which her aircraft and guided missile cruiser Belknap, utilizing Harpoon, among other weapons, sank the former Italian frigate ex-Cigno, heading into the Adriatic Sea, an arm of the Mediterranean Sea on 20 October 1986, suffering the loss of the crew of an S-3 (side number 702) with its crew when it crashed on 21 October 1986, during Haifa-Trieste transit, during which time Captains Russell Schindelheim and Timothy Morrison, USMC, of VMA(AW)-533 was lost while searching for the lost Viking that crashed; a Honduran-flag (Marisal Lines) bulk carrier, El Sol, witnessing the mishap and assisting in salvage efforts.”  (Ref. 549), making a port call at Trieste from 27 October to 3 November 1986, arriving at Naples on 5 November 1986 and upon departure steamed into the western Mediterranean Sea for a Poopdeck exercise from 11 to 12 November 1986, conducting exercises with Moroccan and USAF units in African Eagle, evolutions that tested the battle group in AAW, overland strikes, CV attack and low-level flying. Concluding African Eagle on 22 November 1986, reaching Cannes on 22 November 1986 and celebrated Thanksgiving, sailing from Cannes to resume operations on 3 December 1986, participating in a Dasix exercise with French air forces, involving low level attacks defended by French Mirages, beginning a ten-day port visit in Naples on 10 December 1986 upon conclusion of Dasix exercise, during which time his eminence Corado Cardinal Ursi, the Cardinal Archbishop of Naples, visited John F. Kennedy and celebrated Mass and held a confirmation ceremony in the hangar bay on 14 December 1986, making a port call at Naples from 10 to 20 December 1986, under going the largest work package ever conducted on a forward-deployed carrier. Sailed for Palma on 20 December 1986, John F. Kennedy sailed for Palma, arriving Palma on 23 December 1986, making a port call at Palma from 23 December 1986 to 2 January 1987, celebrating Christmas and New Year’s Eve, departing Palma on 2 January 1987, conducting flight operations in the central Mediterranean Sea the next day, 3 January 1987, a VF-14 F-14A (Modex AC-106, BuNo 159431) attached to CVW-3 embarked on board John F. Kennedy attempting a night landing, “bolted” and drifted right, striking an A-6 at about 1854, shearing off a portion of the F-14’s right wing and severed an external fuel tank from the wing of the A-6, while the crew of the F-14A ejected, and although 14 to 20-foot seas and 35-knot winds hampered the efforts, were recovered, with an HS-7 helo, Dusty Dog 610, recovering the Tomcat’s pilot and destroyer John Rodgers rescuing Lieutenant Michael J. Valen, the NFO, as well as Aviation Antisubmarine Warfare Operator 1st Class Timothy Broderick, the rescue swimmer from HS-7, during which time the flight deck crews extinguished the flames that issued from the Intruder’s ruptured fuel tank within minutes of the accident, preventing damage to the flight deck or surrounding planes, and the ship stood down from the fire emergency at 1926, commencing her Cannes port visit on 6 January 1987, got underway for National Week, conducted in the western Mediterranean Sea after a pleasant ten-day visit at Cannes, during which time John F. Kennedy’s battle group conducted exercises with Nimitz in Augusta Bay, anchoring at Malaga on 29 January 1987 for a four-day port visit, scheduled to be her last before turnover in Rota upon conclusion of the National Week exercise, while growing unrest in the Middle East, shortened liberty at Malaga, as John F. Kennedy received an indefinite extension with orders to commence a high-speed transit to the eastern Mediterranean Sea where John F. Kennedy would join Nimitz off the coast of Lebanon, arriving at her destination in the eastern Mediterranean Sea on 2 February 1987 and commenced dual carrier battle group operations with Nimitz, anchoring at Haifa, Israeli on 5 February 1987 after four days of operations for a six-day port visit, returning to dual carrier battle group operations in the eastern Mediterranean Sea on 12 February 1987, receiving orders ending her indefinite extension and dual carrier battle group operations on 17 February 1987 and on the morning of 21 February 1987, John F. Kennedy anchored off Rota and later that night, finished a one-day out-chop, weighed anchor and headed for Norfolk, Va.; made her Southern Atlantic voyage on her tenth Mediterranean Sea deployment with the 6th Fleet; ending her second North Atlantic deployment on her first Central and Eastern Atlantic Ocean deployment operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, participating in Exercise United Effort and a NATO exercise Ocean Safari; ending her ninth Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet participating in National Week XXXI and Daily Double, and stand by operations for the potential evacuation of American citizens from Beirut, in the wake of Israeli forces entering Lebanon in Operation Peace for Galilee on her first Indian Ocean and North Arabian Sea deployment with the 7th Fleet. John F. Kennedy hosted the first visit aboard a United States ship by a Somali head of state, and achieved its 150,000th arrested landing, arriving home via the Suez Canal, Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea on her second canal transit; hosting the first visit aboard a United States ship by a Somali head of state, and achieved its 150,000th arrested landing (4 January to 14 July 1982); reclassified CV-67 on 1 December 1974; ending her second Caribbean Sea deployment, on her North Atlantic voyage operating under the direction of the 2nd Fleet participating in ReadiEx 1-82 near Puerto Rico; ending her Caribbean Sea voyage to conduct her operation readiness inspection ORI operating under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, which was slated to be a two-week training cruise in the Caribbean, on her second Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet, and her North Atlantic voyage participating in NATO exercises; ending her Shakedown cruise out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in the Caribbean Sea operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. Her 15th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) (18 August 1986 to 3 March 1987) since she was commissioned 7 September 1968” (Ref. 72, 76, 380 & 549).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored in Coronado Roads, near Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 7 March 1987, while under going Post-SRA Sea Trials” (Ref. 362F).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) shifted from Coronado Roads, near Naval Air Station, North Island, California to San Francisco Bay, mooring at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 9 March 1987, conducting Post-SRA Sea Trials from 2 to 7 March 1987, anchoring in Coronado Roads on 7 March 1987, while conducting Sea Trials from 2 to 7 March 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained in port Naval Air Station, Alameda, California for up keep (UPK) from 9 to 20 March 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 20 March 1987, to conduct Independent Steaming to southern California for Carrier Qualifications with CVW-11 embarked, with objectives to test and certify new equipment and correct discrepancies discovered during initial Sea Trials, ensure ship is ready to safely conduct underway ops, prepare crew and equipment for refresher training, provide refresher CQ to aircrews, and to certify flight deck and ACLS systems” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 25 March 1987, conducting Sea Trials from 20 to 25 March 1987 and certified her ACLS and conducted Carrier Qualifications, Independent Steaming to southern California, testing and certify new equipment and correct discrepancies discovered during initial Sea Trials, ensure ship is ready to safely conduct underway ops, prepare crew and equipment for refresher training, provide refresher CQ to aircrews, and to certify flight deck and ACLS systems” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 25 March 1987, for ISE drills, exercises, Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ’s and or air refresher training off southern California with VAs-122 and 128, VFA-125, VF-124, VAQ-129, VAWs-88 and 110, VSs-21 and 35, VQ-1, VRC-30, and VX-4” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port call, mooring at Naval Air Station, North Island, California from 25 to 26 March 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) conducted dock trials, simulating at sea conditions without leaving the shipyard from 30 to 31 March 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 31 March 1987, conducting ISE drills, exercises, Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ’s and or air refresher training off southern California with VAs-122 and 128, VFA-125, VF-124, VAQ-129, VAWs-88 and 110, VSs-21 and 35, VQ-1, VRC-30, and VX-4 from 27 to 31 March 1987. Also in March, the ship test fired the first carrier-mounted Super Rapid Blooming Offboard Chaff (SRBOC), as well as holding an “Anti-Terrorist drill”” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted her Training Readiness Evaluation (TRE) from 1 to 2 April 1987 at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, during which time the San  Diego Fleet Training Group (FTG) Pacific gave an overall grade of "Excellent," with NO Restrictive / 01 Safety / 07 Major / 33 Minor discrepancies” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted her Training Readiness Evaluation (TRE) from 1 to 2 April 1987 at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, during which time the San  Diego Fleet Training Group (FTG) Pacific gave an overall grade of "Excellent," with NO Restrictive / 01 Safety / 07 Major / 33 Minor discrepancies” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 3 April 1987, to conduct a weapons exercise (WASEX) off southern California and at the San Clemente Island complex from 3 to 5 April 1987, anchoring in Coronado Roads on the 4th, before returning to NAS , Alameda, California” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored in Coronado Roads on 4 April 1987, before returning to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 embarked returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 3 April 1987, conducting a weapons exercise (WASEX) off southern California and at the San Clemente Island complex from 3 to 5 April 1987, anchoring in Coronado Roads on the 4th, before returning to NAS Alameda, California” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) moored at Naval Air Station, North Island, California from 6 to 22 April 1987 during which time Refresher Training (REFTRA) preparations were conducted pier side” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 22 April 1987, for Refresher Training (REFTRA) in the southern California operating area” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with Rear Admiral Clexton, COMCARGRU THREE (ComCarGru-3) and FTG San Diego reps. embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 23 April 1987, for a series of Training periods, drills, ending with a Training Assessment Exam and mock war scenario (Blue-Orange simulated conflict)” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) completed sea trials from 23 to 25 April 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) re-entered the fleet 26 April 1987 upon completion of sea trials from 23 to 25 April 1987, completing COH, her dock trials, simulating at sea conditions without leaving the shipyard was conducted from 30 to 31 March 1987. VADM Dunn toured Dwight D. Eisenhower 19 February 1987 and announced to the crew their award of the Battle Efficiency “E” for 1985. The marine security detachment reactivated on 29 January 1987; General William O. Darby was transferred to America as the latter began an overhaul on 5 December 1986; some 1,100 crewmembers moved back on board Dwight D. Eisenhower from the berthing vessel General William O. Darby (IX-510) in addition to 300 duty section watchstanders who lived on board each night from 17 November to 3 December 1986. General William O. Darby participated in an experiment as the first Naval vessel to have satellite television installed undocked on 12 July 1986; Newport News and Drydock flooded the drydock to a depth of 25 feet on 26 June 1986, floating Dwight D. Eisenhower four days later; commencing a 18-month Complex Overhaul (COH) 26 October 1985 at Newport News and Drydock that included the addition of the Close-in Weapons System, NATO Sea Sparrow Missile System, Navy Tactical Data System, anti-submarine warfare module, communications upgrades and rehabilitation of 1,831 berths in 25 compartments” (Ref. 44, 72, 76, 84A, 383 & 383B).

 

    “Complex Overhaul, installations: Three RIM-7M Basic Point Defense Missile System (BPDMS) NATO Sea Sparrow; three Mk 15 Mod 1 Phalanx Close-In Weapon System (CIWS). Developed in response to the ongoing threat poised by sea-skimmer and anti-ship cruise missiles, CIWS was a last-ditch “fast-reaction” defense system against those missiles, combining on a single mount fire control radars and a six barrel M61A1 Vulcan (Gatling) gun firing tungsten alloy projectiles at a rate of up to 4,500 rounds per minute; five Joint Operational Tactical Systems; two Prototype Ocean Surveillance Terminal Systems; Tactical Environmental Support System (TESS); Carrier Air Traffic Control Center Direct Altitude Identification Readout Technology System; Tactical Aircraft Mission Planning System; Integrated Carrier Antisubmarine Prediction System (ICAPS); Advanced Combat Directional System (ACDS); AN/SLQ-50 Battle Group Passive Horizon Extension System; and Mk-23 Target Acquisition System” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “During refresher training, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored in Coronado Roads on 27 April 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

    “During refresher training, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored in Coronado Roads on 29 April 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

    “Greek Chief of the Hellenic Navy General Staff VADM Leonidas Vassilikopoulos visited USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) on 30 April 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with Rear Admiral Clexton, COMCARGRU THREE (ComCarGru-3) and FTG San Diego reps. embarked, returned to Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 30 April 1987, conducting a series of Training periods, drills, exams ending with a Training Assessment Exam 29/30 April and mock war scenario (Blue-Orange simulated conflict). Enterprise anchored in Coronado Roads on the 27th and 29th, satisfactorily completed in all evaluated areas. Grades of "Outstanding" received in seven areas, a particularly noteworthy inspector comment: “Enterprise Officers, Chief Petty Officers, and Sailors are true professionals in the finest sense of the word and represent all that is great about our CV Battle Groups. Enterprise established a superb carrier Training Standard and is designated an FTG STAR Performer." Several outstanding scores received” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 1 May 1987, for live ordnance drops, SEPTAR shoots; MINEX and NOREX practiced by CVW-11 embarked” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    Following live ordnance drops, SEPTAR shoots; MINEX and NOREX practiced by CVW-11 embarked from 1 to 3 May 1987, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored in Coronado Roads on 4 May 1987, before mooring at Naval Air Station, North Island, California” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) moored at Naval Air Station, North Island, California from 4 to 6 May 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 6 May 1987, for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ’s in the southern California for VF-125, VX-4, VA-128, VA-122, VFA-125, VS-41, VAQ-1291, VAW-1101, VRC-3B” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 12 May 1987, conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ’s in the southern California for VF-125, VX-4, VA-128, VA-122, VFA-125, VS-41, VAQ-1291, VAW-1101, VRC-3B from 6 to 12 May 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “Chinese President of the National Defense University GEN Zhang Zhen toured USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) on 14 May 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) participated in NATO exercise Dragon Hammer, which “enhanced the combat effectiveness, readiness, coordination and interoperability of allied sea, amphibious and air forces” from 3 to 15 May 1987” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “The Tactical Environmental Support System (TESS), “significantly” enhancing USS Enterprise (CVN-65) capability to provide rapid responses to meteorological and oceanographic requirements, was installed from 14 to 18 May 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “Indian Chief of Naval Staff ADM Radhakrishin H. Tahiliani toured USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) 21 May 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “After another extended deployment, USS Nimitz (CVN-68) left the Mediterranean Sea on 21 May 1987, crossed the Atlantic Ocean, rounded the rough waters of Cape Horn, South America, and sailed for the first time in the waters of the Pacific Ocean en route to its new homeport, Bremerton, Washington” (Ref. 371 & 72).

 

    “Following an extended deployment, USS Nimitz (CVN-68) came about from the Mediterranean Sea from 20 to 21 May 1987. Anchoring at Augusta Bay she turned over to USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), which subsequently entered Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Penn., for a three year overhaul, replacing the latter in the Pacific Fleet. Passing westward through the Strait of Gibraltar, Nimitz sailed round Cape Horn, making her way up the Pacific coast of South America” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) crossed the equator, en route from Augusta Bay to Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, at 1109, 32º10’W on 29 May 1987” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “A civilian contractor fell 60 feet from USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) to a camel alongside. Although ship’s medical crewmembers rushed the victim to the hospital, he died two months later of his injuries on 4 June 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) BFIT 87-3 was conducted at TACTRAGRUPAC San Diego from 15 to 18 June 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “While underway off the Virginia capes, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) refueled guided missile patrol combatant (hydrofoil) Hercules (PHM-2), the first such event for both ships on 20 June 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-1 embarked departed her homeport Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia 21 June 1987, with Captain Gary Laurence Beck, as Commanding Officer, on her Shakedown ’8, and her seventh Caribbean Sea deployment, steaming South through the Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. She will under go her tenth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) her commission on 18 October 1977, Captain William E. Ramsey in command” (Ref. 44, 72, 76, 84A, 383, 383B & 1269).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 (AG)

(21 June to 22 July 1987)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-143

Pukin' Dogs -            Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

AG100

F-14A

VF-142

Ghostriders -            Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AG200

F-14A

VA-46

Clansmen -                      Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AG300

A-7E

VA-72

Blue Hawks -                      Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AG400

A-7E

VA-34

Blue Blasters -                      Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AG500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-121

Bluetails -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-140

Patriots -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-5

Night Dippers - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-31

Top Cats - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “While underway off the Virginia capes, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) refueled guided missile patrol combatant (hydrofoil) Hercules (PHM-2), the first such event for both ships on 21 June 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “Helo crews (HS-9) embarked aboard USS Nimitz (CVN-68) tested their mettle against their Brazilian counterparts in TopEx 1-87, delivering over 20 “valid” attacks against a pair of Oberon-class submarines from 11 to 15 June 1987” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) rounded the Cape of Good Horn on 18 June 1987” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “The Tactical Environmental Support System (TESS), “significantly” enhancing USS Enterprise (CVN-65) capability to provide rapid responses to meteorological and oceanographic requirements, was installed from 14 to 18 May 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

     “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) BFIT 87-3 was conducted at TACTRAGRUPAC San Diego from 15 to 18 June 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) fired her first RIM-7M Sea Sparrows. Five of the six missiles guided successfully, but the sixth suffered a fin failure and crashed into the sea. During the same exercise the ship also conducted her first Mk 15 Mod 1 Phalanx Close-In Weapon System (CIWS) firings, hitting all three towed targets on 28 June 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) arrived in Puget Sound, Wash., anchoring overnight outside of Rich Passage before mooring the next day at Pier B, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS) Bremerton to complete her home port shift from 1 to 2 July 1987” (Ref. 372A).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained in port Naval Air Station, Alameda, California for up keep (UPK) from 12 May to 6 July 1987. The Tactical Environmental Support System (TESS), “significantly” enhancing Enterprise capability to provide rapid responses to meteorological and oceanographic requirements, was installed from 14 to 18 May 1987. BFIT 87-3 conducted at TACTRAGRUPAC San Diego from 15 to 18 June 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed NAS Alameda, California 6 July 1987, to conduct Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ’s in the southern California with VAs-122 and 128, VFA-125, VF-124, VAQ-129, VAW-110, VS-41, VRC-30, and VX-4” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Ammo onload from USS Kiska from 6 to 7 July 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    On 10 July 1987, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) celebrated her 90,000th catapult launch from No. 1 catapult, and this period marked the initial use of the Joint Operational Tactical System (JOTS), providing interfacing to NTDS, embarked staffs and other ships, on board Enterprise. Also in July, the AN/SRN-25 Global Positioning System (GPS) was installed” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 13 July 1987, with VAs-122 and 128, VFA-125, VF-124, VAQ-129, VAW-110, VS-41, VRC-30, and VX-4 embarked, conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ’s in the southern California operating area from 6 to 13 July 1987, and as well Ammo onload from USS Kiska from 6 to 7 July, to embark ComCruDesGru-3, CVW-11 and ComDesRon-23 staffs and their cargo, and then conducted work at sea in the southern California operating area for additional training in mine warfare, coordinated CVBG and “scenario ops” beginning 13 July 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ’s in the southern California operating area for VAs-122 and 128, VFA-125, VF-124, VAQ-129, VAW-110, VS-41, VRC-30, and VX-4 from 14 to 15 July 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Phase I - Basic and intermediate single ship exercise, Sinkex (WASEX) vs DD hulk from 14 to 17 July 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

                                                      

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Phase II - Coordinated BG exercises and ASW Group Search from 17 to 20 July 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) operated with Japanese P-3s and destroyers Hatakaze, Hatsuyuki and Shirane on 21 July 1987” (Ref. 362F).

 

 

“Heavy seas and driving rain pound USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) and her crew during carrier qualifications for students from Training Squadrons (VTs)-4, 19, 23 and 27, flying North American (Rockwell) T-2 Buckeyes off the Florida coast” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “On 22 July 1987, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-1 embarked arrived her homeport Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain Gary Laurence Beck, as Commanding Officer, ending her Shakedown ’87, on her seventh Caribbean Sea deployment, steaming South through the Atlantic operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. While underway off the Virginia capes Dwight D. Eisenhower refueled guided missile patrol combatant (hydrofoil) Hercules (PHM-2), the first such event for both ships on 20 June 1987. Dwight D. Eisenhower fired her first RIM-7M Sea Sparrows. Five of the six missiles guided successfully, but the sixth suffered a fin failure and crashed into the sea. During the same exercise the ship also conducted her first Mk 15 Mod 1 Phalanx Close-In Weapon System (CIWS) firings, hitting all three towed targets on 28 June 1987. Heavy seas and driving rain pound Dwight D. Eisenhower and her crew during carrier qualifications for students from Training Squadrons (VTs)-4, 19, 23 and 27, flying North American (Rockwell) T-2 Buckeyes off the Florida coast. Squadrons: VF-143, Pukin' Dogs, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VF-142, Ghostriders, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VA-46, Clansmen, Attack Squadron, A7-E; VA-72, Blue Hawks, Attack Squadron, A7-E;  VA-34, Blue Blasters, Attack Squadron, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D; VAQ-132, Patriots, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; VAW-121, Bluetails, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, E-2C and VAQ-140, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; HS-5, Night Dippers, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, SH-3H and VS-31, Top Cats, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, S-3A. Her tenth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) her commission on 18 October 1977, Captain William E. Ramsey in command (21 June to 22 July 1987)” (Ref. 44, 72, 76, 84A, 383, 383B & 1269).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Phase III - Scenario exercises: Long Range ASW, Long Range ASUW. Chainsaw conducted in conjunction with ASMD exercise was highlight. Pre-NOREX and NOREX planned, briefed and conducted by ENTERPRISE/CVW, TAV MINEX from 2 to 23 July 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) moored at Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 24 July 1987, embarking CVW-11 for its only at sea period prior to being disestablished, conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ’s in the southern California operating area for VAs-122 and 128, VFA-125, VF-124, VAQ-129, VAW-110, VS-41, VRC-30, and VX-4 from 14 to 15 July 1987, as well as conduct Phase I - Basic and intermediate single ship exercise, Sinkex (WASEX) vs DD hulk from 14 to 17 July 1987, Phase II - Coordinated BG exercises and ASW Group Search from 17 to 20 July 1987, operated with Japanese P-3s and destroyers Hatakaze, Hatsuyuki and Shirane on 21 July 1987 and conducted Phase III - Scenario exercises: Long Range ASW, Long Range ASUW. Chainsaw conducted in conjunction with ASMD exercise was highlight. Pre-NOREX and NOREX planned, briefed and conducted by ENTERPRISE/CVW, TAV MINEX from 2 to 23 July 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987, 362F & 1270).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 (NH)

(24 July to 25 August 1987)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

          ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

     NICK NAME &

   PRIMARY ROLE

  TAIL

 CODE

 Modex

   AIRCRAFT   DESIGNATION

VF-191 (*1) (*2)

Satan's Kittens -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VF-194 (*3) (*4)

Hellfires -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH200

F-14A

VFA-161 (*5)

Chargers -                  Attack Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH300

FA-18A

VAW-111 (*6)

Grey Berets -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-16 (*7)

Nighthawks - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

NH500

A-6E /                     A6-E/KA-6D

VS-35 (*8)

Boomerangs - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - S-3 Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

 (*1) VF-191 recommissioned on Dec.4, 1986.

(*2) VF-191 disestablished on Apr.30, 1988.

(*3) VF-194 recommissioned on Dec.1, 1986.

(*4) VF-194 disestablished on Apr.30, 1988.

(*5) VFA-161 disestablished on Apr.1, 1988.

(*6) VAW-111 disestablished on Apr.30, 1988.

(*7) HS-16 disestablished on Jun.1, 1988.

(*8) VS-35 disestablished on Jun.1, 1988.

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “With ComCruDesGru-3, CVW-11, ComDesRon-23 staffs and their cargo with CVW-10 embarked aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) arrived Seattle, Washington on 28 July 1987, conducting work at sea Behavior Criterion 87-20 exercise in the southern California operating area for additional training in mine warfare, coordinated CVBG and “scenario ops,” and transit to Seattle from 24 to 28 July 1987, for Seattle Seafair” (Ref. 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

     “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in port at Seattle, Washington for Seattle Seafair from 28 July to 3 August 1987. Large crowds visited the ship, hosting upward of 68,000 visitors, including a VIP reception with a luncheon on board was hosted for 500 in her hangar bay” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “On 26 July 1987, USS Nimitz (CVN-68) with CVW-8 embarked arrived Bremerton, Washington, disembarking CVW-9 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif., at San Diego, Calif., ending her sixth Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), crossing the Atlantic Ocean upon departure from the Med on 21 May 1987, steamed through the Southern Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea and upon departure, and home port transfer from Norfolk, Virginia, she rounded the rough waters of Cape Horn, South America, and sailed for the first time in the waters of the Pacific Ocean operating with the Pacific Fleet. Nimitz participated in dual exercise National Week ‘87A with USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) in the Mediterranean Sea from 19 to 25 January 1987. Ranger 12, a Douglas EA-3B Skywarrior (BuNo 144850) from Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ)-2, crashed while landing on board Nimitz in the Ionian Sea, at 2328 on the 25th. The “Whale’s” front wheel caught the barricade net and the aircraft skidded across the flight deck, going over the edge and breaking apart as it struck the water. LCDR Ronald R. Callander, LT Stephen H. Batchelder, LT Alan A. Levine, LT James D. Richards and AT2 Richard A. Herzing (all VQ-2), and CTI3 Patrick R. Price and CTI3 Craig H. Rudolf (both from Naval Security Group Activity Athens, Greece) all died in the mishap. An A-7E (VA-82) crashed while launching aboard Nimitz, but the pilot ejected safely and the crew recovered him on 24 February 1987. Nimitz participated in NATO exercise Dragon Hammer, which “enhanced the combat effectiveness, readiness, coordination and interoperability of allied sea, amphibious and air forces” from 3 to 15 May 1987. After another extended deployment, Nimitz left the Mediterranean Sea on 21 May 1987, crossed the Atlantic Ocean, rounded the rough waters of Cape Horn, South America, and sailed for the first time in the waters of the Pacific Ocean en route to its new homeport, Bremerton, Washington. Following an extended deployment, Nimitz came about from the Mediterranean Sea from 20 to 21 May 1987. Anchoring at Augusta Bay she turned over to USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), which subsequently entered Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Penn., for a three year overhaul, replacing the latter in the Pacific Fleet. Passing westward through the Strait of Gibraltar, Nimitz sailed round Cape Horn, making her way up the Pacific coast of South America and crossed the equator, en route from Augusta Bay to Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, at 1109, 32º10’W on 29 May 1987. Helo crews (HS-9) embarked aboard Nimitz tested their mettle against their Brazilian counterparts in TopEx 1-87, delivering over 20 “valid” attacks against a pair of Oberon-class submarines from 11to 15 June 1987. Nimitz rounded the Cape of Good Horn on 18 June 1987, arriving in Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), Bremerton, Wash., anchoring overnight outside of Rich Passage before mooring the next day at Pier B, PSNS, Bremerton to complete her home port shift from 1 to 2 July 1987. USS South Carolina (CGN-37) joined Nimitz as part of her task force. Ports of call include: Augusta Bay and Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Nimitz made three North Atlantic deployments (four voyages with one on a Med cruise) operating with the USLANTCOM (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet; ending her fifth Med cruise on her third Caribbean Sea voyage (1st on her 1st deployment); made her first Indian Ocean and Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, steaming through the Southern Atlantic on her way home from the Indian Ocean, operating 144 continuous days at sea during the Iran hostage crisis; ending her second Northern Atlantic voyage on her second Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet; ending her first Caribbean Sea and Northern Atlantic deployment on her first deployment; reclassified CVN-68 on 30 June 1975. Her tenth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) (30 December 1986 to 26 July 1987) since she was commissioned on 3 May 1975 by President Gerald Ford” (Ref. 371 & 72).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) transited to the Elizabeth River from Norfolk Naval Shipyard for Selected Restricted Availability (SRA-86) on 21 August 1987” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “With ComCruDesGru-3, CVW-11, ComDesRon-23 staffs and their cargo with CVW-10 embarked aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) arrived Seattle, Washington on 28 July 1987, conducting work at sea Behavior Criterion 87-20 exercise in the southern California operating area for additional training in mine warfare, coordinated CVBG and “scenario ops,” and transit to Seattle from 24 to 28 July 1987, for Seattle Seafair” (Ref. 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in port at Seattle, Washington for Seattle Seafair from 28 July to 3 August 1987. Large crowds visited the ship, hosting upward of 68,000 visitors, including a VIP reception with a luncheon on board was hosted for 500 in her hangar bay” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Seattle, Washington for Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 3 August 1987, conducting Seattle Seafair from 28 July to 3 August 1987. Large crowds visited the ship, hosting upward of 68,000 visitors, including a VIP reception with a luncheon on board was hosted for 500 in her hangar bay” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 6 August 1987. Ports of call include: CVW-11 Squadrons include: VF-191 (*1) (*2), Satan's Kittens, Fighter Squadron, Grumman, F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter; VF-194 (*3) (*4), Hellfires, Fighter Squadron, Grumman, F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter; VFA-161 (*5), Chargers, Attack Squadron, McDonnell-Douglas, FA-18A Hornet, Jet Strike Fighter; VAW-111 (*6), Grey Berets, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, Grumman - E-2C Hawkeye – Electronics; HS-16 (*7), Nighthawks, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, Sikorsky - A6-E/KA-6D, Sea King - Anti-submarine and VS-35 (*8), Boomerangs, Air Anti-Submarine, Squadron, Lockheed, S-3 Viking - Anti-Submarine. (*1) VF-191 recommissioned on Dec.4, 1986. (*2) VF-191 disestablished on Apr.30, 1988. (*3) VF-194 recommissioned on Dec.1, 1986. (*4) VF-194 disestablished on Apr.30, 1988. (*5) VFA-161 disestablished on Apr.1, 1988. (*6) VAW-111 disestablished on Apr.30, 1988. (*7) HS-16 disestablished on Jun.1, 1988. (*8) VS-35 disestablished on Jun.1, 1988” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “Following a month-long leave and upkeep period, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) focused her attention on the upcoming CarQuals and a restricted availability at Norfolk Naval Shipyard that would follow on 17 August 1987; commenced restricted availability at on 1 May 1987” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 17 August 1987, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) carried out Sea Trials off the Virginia capes” (Ref. 549).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained in port Naval Air Station, Alameda, California for up keep (UPK) from 6 to 18 August 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 18 August 1987, embarking about 450 Tigers for a cruise to Naval Air Station, North Island, Alameda, California” (Ref. 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) arrived Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 18 August 1987, with about 450 Tigers embarked from Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with CVW-10 flying an air show from 18 to 19 August 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) logged her 100,000th arrested landing on 20 August 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) hosted Commander Naval Air Forces, Pacific. change of command on 21 August 1987, Vice Admiral J. H. Fetterman relieving Vice Admiral James R. Service” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) transited to the Elizabeth River from Norfolk Naval Shipyard for Selected Restricted Availability (SRA-86) on 21 August 1987” (Ref. 372A).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 22 August 1987, to conduct Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS)/Tracom CQ’s that will include TA-4s from training carrier USS Lexington (AVT-16) and “various West Coast squadrons”  in the southern California operating area, hosting Commander Naval Air Forces, Pacific. change of command on 21 August 1987, Vice Admiral J.H. Fetterman relieving Vice Admiral James R. Service” (Ref. 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

    “After catapult certification trials on 28 August, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) set course for Boston” (Ref. 549).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) accomplished 65 catapult launches and traps during a single hour on 31 August 1987” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted NATO Sea Sparrow missile shoot on 2 September 1987. NSSM shoot evaluated a kill” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 2 September 1987, conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS)/Tracom CQ’s that included TA-4s from training carrier USS Lexington (AVT-16) and “various West Coast squadrons” in the southern California operating area from 22 August to 2 September 1987, accomplishing 65 catapult launches and traps during a single hour on 31 August and conducted NATO Sea Sparrow missile shoot on 2 September 1987. NSSM shoot evaluated a kill” (Ref. 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) moored at Boston on 3 September 1987, where she hosted over 130,000 visitors in two and a half days of visiting, and Rear Admiral John R. McNamara. (ChC) Chief of Chaplains conducted a John F. Kennedy Memorial Mass.” (Ref. 549).

 

    “In 1987, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) developed the "Coral Sea configuration" in which to help streamline aircraft maintenance; two attack squadrons on board used a shared maintenance” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained in port Naval Air Station, Alameda, California for up keep (UPK) from 2 to 9 September 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) sailed from Boston on 9 September 1987 for Portland, Maine” (Ref. 549).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 9 September 1987, to conduct rigorous series of exercises that include COMPTUEX 87-4/ATA/Readiex 87-4 at-sea and or ComptuEx 87-4, Kernal Blitz, an amphibious operation near Camp Pendleton, Advanced Tactical Assessment, ReadiEx 87-4A, MRCI Inspection and 87-4/HARM/Harpoon Shoot” (Ref. 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) arrived Portland, Maine on 10 September 1987” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted MRCI Inspection on 12 September 1987” (Ref. 329B-1987).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored in Coronado Roads on 14 September 1987 during a rigorous series of exercises in the southern California operating area and off San Clemente to prepare her for deploying” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 15 September 1987, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) weighed anchor and proceeded home to Norfolk on another two-day Tiger Cruise” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Algerian Minister of Defense GEN Moustapha Cheloufi toured USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) on 22 September 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 24 September 1987, conducting rigorous series of exercises that included ComptuEx 87-4 that included ASW operations with two support submarines and bombing strikes to SOCAL targets and a successful completion of Minex B Technical Assist visit; Kernal Blitz, an amphibious operation near Camp Pendleton; Advanced Tactical Assessment that involved portions of this inspection which started in the COMPTUEX portion of the at-sea period, highlights that included successful completion of: EWTPI, ASW EXTENDEX, MRCI and NOREX evolutions; ReadiEx 87-4A that included 72 hour flight operations; 48 hour 300 NM Chainsaw operations against FEWSG raids; Harm and Harpoon shots in PMTC operation area on mobile instrumented targets; Long Range Strike (850NM) supported by organic tanking; and working interaction with USAE' AWACS aircraft; MRCI Inspection on 12 September 1987; and  87-4/HARM/Harpoon Shoot, a live Harpoon and HARM shoots, together with a long range strike up to 850 NM, “24hr AAW” and “extended ASW in the southern California operating area and off San Clemente to prepare her for deploying” (Ref. 329B-1987, 362F & 1270). 

 

 

World Cruise '83. NS024332 269k. Darrell Young (RM3), USS Coral Sea, 1983-1987

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024332.jpg

 

CHAPTER XXXVIII

TENTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

Exercise Dasix '85, Attain Document I, II & III in the Gulf of Sidra, Libya Air Attacks against Libya (Palestinian Liberation Front hijacked the Italian luxury liner, Achille Lauro – Bomb exploded on board a Trans World Airways flight en route to Athens from Rome, killing four American citizens) Operation Eldorado Canyon,

Final Carrier launching of a Navy fleet F-4S Phantom II

Iran History & Air Arm / Iraq and Iran War

SEA TRIALS AND CARQUALS

SELECTED RESTRICTED AVAILABILITY AT NORFOLK, VA.

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia.

(1 January 1985 to 28 September 1987)

Part 1 – (1 January 1985 to 13 January 1986)

Part 2 – (14 January to 10 September 1986)

Part 3 – (11 September 1986 to 28 September 1987)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXVIII

Part 3 – (11 September 1986 to 28 September 1987)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4