CHAPTER XXXIX

ELEVENTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes and Cherry Point

(October 1988 to March 1989)

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) responded during Iran 1 April incident in which USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) struck an Iranian mine in international waters - Iraq and Iran War, Cuba and Panama Canal shakedown cruise (March to May 1989) USS Coral Sea (CV-43) responded to a call for assistance from USS Iowa (BB-61) operating in the Caribbean Sea due to an explosion in the battleship's number two gun turret in which 47 crewmembers were killed 19 April 1989.

 (29 September 1987 to 31 May 1989)

Part 1 – (29 September 1987 to 16 April 1988)

Part 2 – (17 April to 31 December 1988)

Part 3 – (1 January to 31 May 1989)

 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with Captain William H. Switzer III, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 13 (CVW-13) (tail code AK), Rear Admiral John K. Ready, Commander Carrier Group Two and Captain William Story, Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Group Two embarked departed Norfolk,Virginia 29 September 1987, with Captain Captain Bruce B. Bremner, as Commanding Officer and Captain Dennis V. Mcginn, Executive Officer, on her second Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), from 12 September 1983 to Present; completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956), her 11th Mediterranean Sea deployment, on her 12th voyage in the Mediterranean Sea, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. Prior to her deployment Coral Sea developed the "Coral Sea configuration" in which to help streamline aircraft maintenance, two attack squadrons on board used a shared maintenance, carrying out local operations in the Virginia Capes and Cherry Point operating areas and visited Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1987, during which time Captain Bremner, Bruce B. arrived onboard at Norfolk, Va. 23 February 1987, becoming the new Commanding Officer, completing repairs on her boiler in one of the engine rooms and a selected restricted availability at Norfolk, Va. (21 July 1986 to 6 November 1986), proceeded by in port periods and Naval Reserve active duty training, sea trials and CarQuals off the Virginia Capes. Completing 15 “WestPac’s” while under the direction of the 7th Fleet in the Pacific (25 January 1960 to 12 September 1983); reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975; involved in two Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She will under go her 17th foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned 24 April 1957; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on October 1952. She will under go her 28th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72, 1275ZA4, 1275ZA6, 1275ZA7 & 1275ZA9-/9).

 

Mediterranean Cruise Book 1987-88 - Ref. 1275ZA

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Forty Years of Service - Ref. 1275ZA1

Command - Ref. 1275ZA2

Captain Bruce B. Bremner, CO, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) - Ref. 1275ZA3

COMCARGRU 2 Staff - Ref. 1275ZA8

 

USS CORAL SEA (CV-43) with CVW-13 (AK)

(29 September 1987 to 28 March 1988) 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) 2nd & 6th

Lant

11th Med

Lant

CVW-13

AK

29 Sep 1987

28 Mar 1988

Europe

28th FWFD

182-days

During the crossing the carrier battle group joined the 22nd Marine Amphibious Ready Group (MARG 22) to mark the first time a carrier battle group and a MARG deployed simultaneously. The two groups, fifteen ships and 13,000 men conducted training exercises on the Translant. The two groups passed Gibraltar entering the Mediterranean Sea and participated in a 3-day National Week exercises 88 with ships of the Saratoga Battlegroup, USS Iowa Surface Action Group and MARG 3-87. In all, 35 U.S ships and 25,000 sailors and Marines honed their skills.

2nd Mediterranean Cruise since her reassignment to the 6th Fleet in the Atlantic upon arrival in the 5th Fleet Area, arriving on a World Cruise via the Suez Canal and Med on 12 September 1983, her 11th Med Deployment, having completed nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956) prior to her 1st conversion (25 January 1960).

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

          ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

     NICK NAME &

   PRIMARY ROLE

  TAIL

 CODE

 Modex

   AIRCRAFT   DESIGNATION

VFA-131

Wildcats -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas -

Hornet - Jet Strike Fighter

AK1XX

FA-18A

VFA-136

Knight Hawks -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas -

Hornet - Jet Strike Fighter

AK3XX

FA-18A

VFA-137

Kestrels -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas -

Hornet - Jet Strike Fighter

AK4XX

FA-18A

VA-55

Sea Horses -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

 Jet Attack Bomber -

AK50X

A-6E

VA-65

Fighting Tigers -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -

AK51X

A-6E

VAW-127

 

Seabats - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

AK6XX

E-2C

VAQ-133

Wizards - Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron or Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -

Prowler - Jammer

Special electronic installation

AK604

A-6 - EA-6A

HS-17

Neptune's Raiders- Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

AK61X

SH-3H

 “CVW-13 CAG Capt William Switzer.”  (Ref. 34)

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 76

 

     “As USS Coral Sea (CV-43) turned 40 on 1 October 1987 she spent her birthday in the fashion for which she was built – at sea, her engines humming, her flight deck busy with the launch and recovery of aircraft as she steamed across the ocean toward the Mediterranean Sea” (Ref. 1275ZA10).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) enters the Mediterranean and begins 3-day National Week exercises in Gulf of Sidra” (Ref. 34).

    “Capt. Dayton W. Ritt became USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) second Commanding Officer on 3 October 1987” (Ref. 72 & 384).

 

    “In approx. 1987, AN Kraus, a plane captain with the E-2C squadron attached to USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71), was chalking and chaining a C-2 Cod.  He walked into the propeller and lost his head and shoulder. The crew spent the next 30 minutes cleaning up the flight deck so planes could land since the carrier was in blue water ops, as reported by Darren Sapp, Yellow Shirt aboard” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “In approx. 1987, a squadron sailor carrying a SINS cable walked behind an A-6 performing a maintenance turn and was blown off the deck of USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) in the Caribbean Sea. He was never seen again, as reported by Darren Sapp, Yellow Shirt aboard” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 embarked departed Alameda, California 25 October 1987, embarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif., with Captain Robert J. Spane as Commanding Officer, on her first Northern Pacific deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet to participate in NorPac-87, conducting Spidernet/Slyfox exercises. She will under go her 20th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on November 25, 1961” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 (NH)

(25 October to 24 November 1987)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-114

Aardvarks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NH200

F-14A

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks -                  Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NH300

A-7E

VA-94

Shrikes -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NH400

A-7E

VA-95

Green Lizards -                  Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NH500

A-6E /                     A6-E/KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers –

Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-13‚T

Black Ravens -

Tactical Electronics

Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-21

Redtails - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - S-3 Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “USS Truxtun (CGN-35) joined USS Enterprise (CVN-65) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “In the autumn of the year 1987, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) participated in NorPac-87, considered the year’s operational highlight for the ship, with “multi-faceted” evolutions being conducted in “an opposed environment under less than optimum climactic operating conditions.” NorPac-87 made severe demands on the crew, forcing them to endure “high sea states, low visibility, bitter cold weather and around-the-clock flying”” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced additional CarQuals in the waters off southern California on 25 October 1987” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) crew installed, tested and removed the AN/SLQ-50 (XN-1) battle group passive horizon extension system on board for Fleet wide evaluation in October 1987” (Ref. 383B).

 

 

Off Toulon, France, when the NBC "Today" show was onboard, November 23, 1987. NS024334 126k. Darrell Young (RM3), USS Coral Sea, 1983-1987. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024334.jpg

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) commenced an upkeep period that lasted until November 1987, during which time American Broadcasting Company (ABC) film crews came on board to film the motion picture “Supercarrier” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted additional CarQuals in the waters off southern California from 25 October to 1 November 1987, before sailing on the latter date for Alaskan waters. The following day (2 November 1987), however, she suffered the loss of Petty Officer 2nd Class Marble (Air Department) in a flight deck accident (E-2 Hawkeye propeller), as she was steaming on northerly courses in the vicinity of San Francisco, California” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Following USS Saratoga (CV-60) 8th Mediterranean Sea deployment in November 1987, Saratoga departed Mayport, Florida, and entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for overhaul at a cost of $280 million” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

    “Ultimately, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) reached the Gulf of Alaska without further incident on 7 November 1987, having conducted TARPS runs and strikes in the vicinity of the Canadian air station at Comox, British Columbia, en route, together with Dissimilar Air Combat Training (DACT) between F-14s and USAF F-15C Eagles flying out of Eielson AFB, Alaska. She combined those evolutions with bombing runs to Eileson’s “mock-up” airfield 300 NM inland and ASW to seaward with attack submarine Tunny (SSN-682)” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “After arriving in Alaskan waters, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pursued a three-phase operating schedule. In Phase I, Enterprise steamed in the Gulf of Alaska from 8 to 10 November 1987, reaching her farthest point north during NorPac-87 on the 8th, at 58ºN, 148ºW” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On the 9th and 10th of 1987, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) launched a follow-on strike against the Eielson complex, with operations including AAW versus B-52s, DACT with F-15s, and a “mini” weapon exercise with command ship Coronado (AGF-11), in which Vice Admiral Hernandez, Com3rdFlt, had broken his flag. She also carried out Spidernet/Slyfox exercises. During that time, Enterprise found time to host a visiting delegation led by Governor of Alaska Steve Cowper” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “During Phase II of a three-phase operating schedule in Alaskan waters, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted an opposed transit to Naval Station, Adak, and the Sitkin Sound Operations Area from 11 to 13 November 1987” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced Phase III, the final phase of operations in Alaskan waters, on 13 November. Sadly, during Phase III, Enterprise lost Chief Warrant Officer 4 Brashear overboard on 14 November 1987; an intensive search failed to recover him” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) departed for the Virginia capes and conducted an ISE on 16 November 1987” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Phase III, the final phase of operations in Alaskan waters, from 13 to 17 November 1987, performing haven operations in and around Sitkin Sound. The former involved a grueling 10 hours of radar navigation in restricted waters. Operations increased in tempo as the exercise progressed, Enterprise launching simulated strikes against military installations as well as performing CAP and AEW, ASW versus attack submarine Olympia (SSN-717) and mine warfare with S-3A Vikings. Sadly, during Phase III, Enterprise lost Chief Warrant Officer 4 Brashear overboard on 14 November; an intensive search failed to recover him.

 

    Operating in Sitkin Sound, a “bounded sea haven” approximately 10 by 15 NM, surrounded on three sides by mountainous terrain varying in height from 2,000–5,000 feet presented tremendous navigating and flying problems for both the ship and her embarked air wing. Accordingly, Enterprise men “developed special departure and recovery procedures designed to provide terrain clearance and easily understood procedures for all weather operations.”

 

    As could be expected, given their proximity, the Soviets monitored NorPac-87 intensively, including reconnaissance flights by Tu-95D Bears and Tu-16 Badgers on 13, 15, 16 and 17 November 1987, all intercepted by Tomcats and EA-6Bs, initially at 220 NM out from the battle group, while Balzam-class AGI SSV-080 watched the proceedings “throughout Sitkin Sound Haven ops.”  Although Enterprise accomplished a live firing of an AIM-7 Sparrow air-to-air missile, the persistent presence of SSV-080 forced the cancellation of the scheduled live Harpoon firing. Foul weather compelled cancellation of an HS-6 torpedo exercise” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) came about on 18 November 1987, returning via southeasterly courses to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California. Observers detected no Soviet aerial or surface surveillance during the return voyage, although, usually, Russian subs were known to be active in the area” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 24 November 1987, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 embarked arrived Alameda, California 25 October 1987, disembarking CVW11 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif., ending her first Northern Pacific deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet to participate in NorPac-87, conducting Spidernet/Slyfox exercises, considered the year’s operational highlight for the ship, with “multi-faceted” evolutions being conducted in “an opposed environment under less than optimum climactic operating conditions.” Her 20th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission November 25, 1961 with Captain V. P. de Poix in command (25 October 1987 to 24 November 1987)” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1987 & 362F).

 

    “On 4 December 1987, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) returned to sea for refresher training” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) returned to Norfolk on 17 December 1987, remaining there to close out 1987, concluding refresher training” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Upon conclusion of refresher training, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) underwent a technical availability” (Ref. 549).

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43), with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 13, in port, Marseille, France, December 1987. NS024383 291k. Philippe Gonzales. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024383.jpg

 

    “On 25 December 1987, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) spends Christmas at Naples, Italy during inport period” (Ref. 34).

 

     “Captain O’ Hearn reported to USS Coral Sea (CV-43) in December 1987 as Executive Officer and advanced to Captain in June 1988” (Ref. 1275ZA5).

 

1988 EAST COAST DEPLOYMENTS - Includes Florida

Chapter XXXVIII

Appendix IV

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Second and Sixth Fleet) 1987 Aircraft Carriers scheduling of deployments resulted in one CV deployments extending into 1988:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) – 2nd & 6th

12th Med

CVW-13

AK

29 Sep 1987

28 Mar 1988

Europe

182-days

During the crossing the carrier battle group joined the 22nd Marine Amphibious Ready Group (MARG 22) to mark the first time a carrier battle group and a MARG deployed simultaneously. The two groups, fifteen ships and 13,000 men conducted training exercises on the Translant. The two groups passed Gibraltar entering the Mediterranean Sea and participated in a 3-day National Week exercises 88 with ships of the Saratoga Battlegroup, USS Iowa Surface Action Group and MARG 3-87. In all, 35 U.S ships and 25,000 sailors and Marines honed their skills.

 

3rd Mediterranean cruise since her reassignment to the 6th Fleet in the Atlantic 12 September 1983 to Present.

 

Ports of call include: Naples, Italy; Augusta, Sicily, Italy; Marseille, France; Cannes, France; Palma, in full Palma de Mallorca; Alexandria, Egypt; İzmir, Turkey; and Haifa, the largest city in northern Israel, and the third-largest city in the country.

 

Squadrons: VFA-131, F/A-18A; VFA-136, F/A-18A; VFA-137, F/A-18A; VA-55, A-6E; VA-65, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-127, E-2C; VAQ-133, EA-6B and HS-17, SH-3H.

 (Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

The US Navy's East Coast (Second and Sixth Fleets) and West Coast Transfer to the East Cost scheduled Aircraft Carriers Deployments and Atlantic operations for 1988 are as follows:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS

Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) – 2nd & 6th

NorLant

5th Med

Aegean, Tyrrhenian Ionian Seas

NorLant

CVW-7

AG

29 Feb 1988

29 Aug 1988

Europe

183-days

Dragon Hammer8 1-88 Phases I–III in the Mediterranean, Aegean, Tyrrhenian and Ionian Seas involving sizeable NATO air, land and naval forces (Dragon Hammer 1-88 included scenarios to defend the Italy and Turkey from a simulated Warsaw Pact attack), reseeding a minefield just west of the Strait of Messina with eight MK-52 mines during Damsel Fair, one of the few aerial minelaying operations accomplished since the Vietnam War, Poopdeck, a multi-force exercise in the eastern Mediterranean, Phiblex ’88 the ship operated with Tunisian F-5s and ground troops in an amphibious exercise off Cap Serrat and the range at Ras Engelah, Juniper Falconry, a bilateral exercise over the desert

 

Ports of call included: Cannes, France and Palma de Mallorca.

 

Squadrons: VF-143, Pukin' Dogs, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VF-142, Ghostriders, Fighter Squadron, F-14A; VA-46, Clansmen, Attack Squadron, A7-E; VA-72, Blue Hawks, Attack Squadron, A7-E;  VA-34, Blue Blasters, Attack Squadron, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D; VAQ-132, Patriots, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; VAW-121, Bluetails, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, E-2C and VAQ-140, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, EA-6B; HS-5, Night Dippers, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, SH-3H and VS-31, Top Cats, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, S-3A.

 

USS Stump (DD-978) joined USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) as part of her task force.

USS Forrestal (CV-59) – 2nd, 6th & 7th (1st Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf)

2nd IO     Suez Canal x 2

CVW-6

AE

25 Apr 1988

7 Oct 1988

Europe

Middle East

166-days

 

USS John F. Kennedy         (CV-67) – 2nd & 6th

12th Med Tyrrhenian Sea

CVW-3

AC

2 Aug 1988

1 Feb 1989

Europe

154-days

 

USS Independence (CV-62) – 2nd, 7th & 3rd

SoLant

3rd Cape Horn

SocPac

EastPac

CVW-17

AA

15 Aug 1988

8 Oct  1988

South America

West Coast Transfer

55-days

Home Port transfer to the West Coast

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) – 2nd & 6th

1st NoLant

CVW-7

AJ

25 Aug 1988

11 Oct 1988

1st FWFD

48-days

Shakedown Cruise

Teamwork '88

 

Ports of call include: Wilhelmshaven, Germany.

 

Squadrons: VF-41 (F-14A); VF-84 (F-14A); VFA-15 (F/A-18A); VFA-87 (F/A-18A); VA-35 (A-6E); VA-36 (A-6E); VAW-124 (E-2C); VAQ-141 (EA-6B); VS-24 (S-3A) and HS-9 (SH-3H).

 

 
USS South Carolina (CGN-37) joined USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) as part of her task force. 

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) – 2nd & 6th

NoLant

DH

NW

JS

1st Med

NoLant

CVW-8

AJ

30 Dec 1988

30 Jun 1989

Europe

2nd FWFD

212-days

Dragon Hammer, National Week and Juniper Stallion

 

Ports of call include: Palma de Mallorca, Spain; Marseilles, France; Alexandria, Egypt; Antalya, Turkey; Naples, Italy; Tangiers, Morocco; Toulon, France; Monaco and Haifa, Israel.

 

Squadrons: VF-41 (F-14A); VF-84 (F-14A); VFA-15 (F/A-18C); VFA-87 (F/A-18C); VA-35 (A-6E); VA-36 (A-6E); VAW-124 (E-2C); VAQ-141 (EA-6B); VS-24 (S-3A) and HS-9 (SH-3H).

 

 

USS South Carolina (CGN-37); USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55); USS William V. Pratt (DDG-44); USS Farragut (DDG-37); USS Conyngham (DDG-17); USS Sellers (DDG-11) and USS Charles F. Adams (DDG-2) joined USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) as part of her task force.

 (Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in port from 24 November 1987 to 4 January 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11, Rear Admiral R.G. Zeller, ComCruDesGru-3 (CCDG-3) and Captain James B. Perkins, III, Commodore, ComDesRon-9 (CDS-9) embarked departed Alameda, California 5 January 1988, embarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif., with Captain Robert J. Spane as Commanding Officer, on her 12th “Westpac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Northern and Western Pacific, participating in ReadiEx 87-4B, a battle group exercise testing her ability to respond to “mines, small boats, terrorist planes” and Chinese Silkworm SSMs, while escorting/supporting convoys in a simulated Persian Gulf environment and PassEx with the Singaporean forces, on her 15th & 16th Indian Ocean voyage, on her fourth voyage in the Arabian Sea, while planes from CVW-11 flew into the Gulf of Oman, Strait of Hormuz and Persian Gulf, on her first aerial Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of Operation Earnest Will, designed to maintain freedom of navigation within the Persian Gulf, assigned to escort reflagged Kuwaiti oil tankers in the Arabian Gulf while stationed in the North Arabian Sea in April 1988 on her third North Arabian Sea deployment, following the 1 April incident in which USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) struck an Iranian mine in international waters, while the United States retaliated against Iran on 18 April 1988, positioning both surface and air units in the area, followed by participation in Operation Praying Mantis, becoming the Anti-air Warfare Commander for the “measured response” adopted by the U.S., aimed at attacking Sassan, as well as two other Iranian oil platforms, Sirri and Raksh. President Reagan and Admiral William J. Crowe, Jr., Chairman, JCS, issued rules of engagement, that allowed the Americans to defend themselves should Iranian planes or warships challenge them and will participate in INDUSA XI, a PassEx with the Indonesians consisting of low level aerial runs over Sumatra. She will under go her 21st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on November 25, 1961” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1988 & 362F).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 (NH)

(5 January to 3 July 1988)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-114

Aardvarks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NH200

F-14A

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks -                  Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NH300

A-7E

VA-94

Shrikes -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NH400

A-7E

VA-95

Green Lizards -                  Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NH500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-135

Black Ravens -

Tactical Electronics

Warfare Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

604-607

EA-6B

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

610

SH-3H

VS-21

Redtails - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - S-3 Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

VRC-40 DET.

Rawhides - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound - Transport

46, xx

C-2A

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “USS Truxtun (CGN-35) joined USS Enterprise (CVN-65) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted carrier qualifications off the southern California operating area from 5 to 6 January 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) steamed to the Hawaiian Operations Area, Kaulakahi Channel and Nihoa Island, conducting a long range strike to the Pohakuloa training area, on the 9 January 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “ADM Frank B. Kelso, II, Commander-in-Chief Atlantic Fleet, visited USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) and addressed the crew via their closed circuit television system on 19 January 1988” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) arrived north of Oahu to commence ReadiEx 87-4B on 11 January 1988, a battle group exercise testing her ability to respond to “mines, small boats, terrorist planes” and Chinese Silkworm SSMs, while escorting/supporting convoys in a simulated Persian Gulf environment. Maintaining BFD, she finished the exercise with a 42-aircraft night strike. Operations included Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACs), ASW, power projection strikes, and live firings of a Harpoon, two AIM-7 Sparrows, four Sidewinders and a Shrike. An ASW passive acoustic training system was also developed, providing realistic recognition and threat analysis of actual submarine signatures” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Upon conclusion of refresher training, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) underwent a technical availability that concluded on 11 January 1988” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Admiral Jeremiah, CinCPac, and Vice Admiral Hernandez came on board for tours and an awards ceremony, on 13 January 1988. En route to the Western Pacific, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) completed ASW and AAW operations with naval, USMC, USAF and Japanese commands. Mishaps, however, reminded all hands of the hazards inherent in carrier operations: an A-7E from VA-22 and its pilot, the plane captain, were lost when the Corsair II slid off aircraft elevator No. 2 during a respot, during the mid watch on 16 January. Three days later, the squadron lost NH 305, another Corsair II, during Dissimilar Air Combat Maneuvering (DACM), though the pilot ejected and was recovered uninjured” (Ref. 362F).

 

 

An F/A-18 Hornet of VFA-137 taxis forward through catapult steam, during flight operations on 18 January 1988. Photographed by PH2(AW) Wayne Edwards. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center (# NH 97654-KN). NS024366 63k. NHC. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024366.jpg

 

    “As she had done in the past, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) again provided humanitarian aid during that deployment. On 22 January 1988, a crewman on board the Japanese fishing vessel Yahata Maru 81, operating within range of the carrier, suffered a ruptured spleen and began going into shock, requiring immediate medical attention” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “After a brief carrier qualification period from 21 to 25 January 1988, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) held a change of command ceremony on 29 January, when Captain Hugh D. Wisely relieved Captain Moriarty” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Chopping to the 7th Fleet on 25 January 1988, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) once again found herself the object of attention by the familiar Bear Bs and Ds on the 25th and 26th, though in each instance, her Tomcats saw the Intruders off” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Vice Admiral Miller, Com7thFlt, brought Japanese Admiral Higoshiyama on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) for a tour and aerial demonstration, on 30 January 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transferred a helo to Truxtun, which brought the patient back to the carrier for surgery, which was successfully completed on 1 February 1988, when he was then transported to Subic Bay, Philippines. The severity of his injuries necessitated blood donations from 12 crewmembers” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) moored at NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 1 February 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) moored at NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines from 1 to 5 February 1988, after which time the ship stood out of Subic Bay with 17 distinguished Filipino visitors on board, including that country’s CNO, Acting Commander, Air Force, and Chief of Naval Aviation, on 6 February 1988. The ship provided an orientation and air demonstration, including firing a pair of Sidewinders at an AQM-37 target drone” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Subsequently, two days out of the Philippines, nearing the 7th of February 1988, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) embarked Tomcats intercepted Bear Ds and Fs, escorted by MiG-23 Floggers, all flying out of Cam Ranh Bay. In addition, Mayak-class AGI Aneroid followed in the carrier’s “trail”” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Rendezvousing with Singaporean forces, including patrol boats, F-5s and A-4s, on the 9 February 1988, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a PassEx with them, some air evolutions being cancelled due to foul weather” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transited the Strait of Malacca on 10 February 1988, tracking 267 shipping contacts in the crowded channel en route to the Indian Ocean” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) completed overhaul at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 11 February 1988; arriving at Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 20 November 1986 for an overhaul” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “Limited operations with the Indonesians followed, CVW-11 aircraft accomplishing low-level training over Sumatra, on 11 February 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Overnight and into the 12th of February 1988, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) completed a PassEx with Indonesian frigates north of Sumatra, activities including “tactical maneuvering” and a gun exercise off her starboard beam” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) made a port call at Izmul, Turkey on 12 February 1988” (Ref. 34).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) left the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 15 February 1988, for Sea Trials and work-ups in preparation for the next round of intensive operations” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “Rendezvousing with USS Midway (CV-41), USS Enterprise (CVN-65) then conducted a turnover, consisting of meetings and cross-deckings from 14 to 15 February 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Chopping to TF 800 on the 17 February 1988, Rear Admiral Zeller then presented to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) the Meritorious Unit Commendation for her 1986 deployment, in a ceremony on the flight deck” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “The first identified Soviet reaction to BG Foxtrot’s entry into the Indian Ocean occurred when a pair of Il-38s flying out of Aden shadowed USS Enterprise (CVN-65), being intercepted by the ship’s F-14As, on 18 February 1988. Five days later, the ship hosted a Saudi delegation led by members of the Saudi Royal Family and the U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia Hume A. Horan, an aerial demonstration being held” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “An A-7E (VA-82) crashed while launching aboard USS Nimitz (CVN-68), but the pilot ejected safely and the crew recovered him on 24 February 1987” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “The joint Franco-American exercise punctuated by USS Enterprise (CVN-65) being shadowed by Soviet Mays flying out of Aden (vectoring F-14As to intercept them on at least one occasion on the 10th), sighting a Pakistani C-130 (25 February)” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “A Helix helo launched from Udaloy class destroyer Admiral Tributs, was intercepted by the wing’s Tomcats, on 25 February 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65), meanwhile, completed her first Earnest Will mission on 25 February 1988, her embarked aircraft flying 17 F-14A escort/CAP, 12 tanker, five EA-6B and three E-2C sorties” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 29 February 1988, with Captain Gary Laurence Beck, as Commanding Officer, on her fifth Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea in support of Dragon Hammer 1-88 Phases I–III in the Mediterranean, Aegean, Tyrrhenian and Ionian Seas, involving sizeable NATO air, land and naval forces (Dragon Hammer 1-88 included scenarios to defend the Italy and Turkey from a simulated Warsaw Pact attack), reseeding a minefield just west of the Strait of Messina with eight MK-52 mines during Damsel Fair, one of the few aerial minelaying operations accomplished since the Vietnam War, Poopdeck, a multi-force exercise in the eastern Mediterranean, Phiblex ’88 the ship operated with Tunisian F-5s and ground troops in an amphibious exercise off Cap Serrat and the range at Ras Engelah, Juniper Falconry, a bilateral exercise over the desert. The ship deployed with many newly installed features and systems following her complex overhaul, in particular, the Advanced Combat Directional System (ACDS). Equipped with improved operator consoles, automated displays and computer software, ACDS enabled her Combat Information Center (CIC) team to quickly and efficiently process and analyze data. She will under go her 11th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 18 October 1977” (Ref. 44, 72, 76, 84A, 383, 383B & 1269).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 (AG)

(29 February to 29 August 1988)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-143

Pukin' Dogs -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AG100

F-14A

VF-142

Ghostriders -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AG200

F-14A

VA-46

Clansmen -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AG300

A-7E

VA-72

Blue Hawks -                      Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AG400

A-7E

VA-34

Blue Blasters -                      Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AG500

A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D

VAW-121

Bluetails –

Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-140

Patriots -

Tactical Electronics

Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-5

Night Dippers - Helicopter

Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-31

Top Cats - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “USS Stump (DD-978) joined USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A). 

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) intercepted and tracked a Russian AN-12 Cub transport on 1 and 3 March 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and Clemenceau conducted a joint Franco-American exercise on 5 March 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and Clemenceau conducted a joint Franco-American exercise from 7 to 8 March 1988, with French Admiral Deramond visiting on the latter date” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) spent February through March of 1988 preparing for the upcoming Mediterranean Sea deployment” (Ref. 549).

 

     “Rear Admiral Richard C. Macke, assumed command of Commander Carrier Group Two in March 1988” (Ref. 1275ZC10).

 

    “Inside a fortnight, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) embarked the three-man crew from an SH-2F from HSL-35 Det 7, embarked in Bagley that crashed on 5 March 1988. Though not suffering major injuries, the three men were transported to the carrier for medical evaluation, returning to their ship following the mishap investigation” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Rear Admiral Anthony A. Less, Combined Joint Task Force Middle East (CJTFME) visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 9 March 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) transited the Strait of Gibraltar and entered the Mediterranean on 12 March 1988. Due to the terrorist threat while the ship passed through the narrow chokepoint her crew manned their stations at “full bore,” with gunners standing ready at .50 cal. machine gun mounts to defend the carrier against small suicide craft. While deployed to the Med in ensuing weeks, the ship would participate in exercises with Belgian, British, Dutch, French, West German, Israeli, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Tunisian and Turkish forces. Certain allied vessels were integrated into the carrier’s battle group, including Greek destroyer Kanaris (D-212), Turkish destroyer Anittepe (D-347) and submarine Batiray (S-349). Soviet ships monitored the exercises and in some instances stood into danger by maneuvering close aboard, among them aircraft carrier Baku and guided missile destroyers Vitse Admiral Kulakov and Komsomolets Ukrainy. VS-31 Vikings tracked one Charlie II, one Echo II, two Soviet Mod Echo II, one Foxtrot and one Victor I class submarines” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “On 13 March 1988, Enterprise crossed the equator. Program for Afloat College Education (PACE) instructor Joseph Schweigenhoffer, who first “Crossed the Line” in 1936 on board battleship USS Arizona (BB-39), portrayed King Neptune” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored off Mombasa from 15 to 18 March 1988 and hosted visitors that included U.S. Ambassador to Kenya Elinor Greer Constable. Eight civilian cargo vessels/tugs contracted to ferry the liberty party ashore, however, evidenced unfamiliarity with naval equipment; one tore the aft accommodation ladder from its mountings while navigating in “offsetting currents” running as high as three–four knots. The ladder was recovered and repaired within a few hours” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) stood out of Mombasa on 18 March 1988, anchored off Mombasa from 15 to 18 March, and headed for Somalia” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) with CVW-1 embarked departed NOB, Norfolk, Virginia 21 March 1988, with Captain James A. (Jim) Lair, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her fourth Southern Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. Reclassified CV-66 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" on 30 June 1975 while at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, entering Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 27 November 1974, upon return from her North Sea deployment on 12 October 1974; making three Vietnam Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War operating with the 7th Fleet (receiving five battle stars). She will under go her 22nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 23 January 1965, with Captain Lawrence Heyworth, Jr., in command” (Ref. 1-America, 72 & 76, 324 & 824).  

 

USS America (CVA-66) with CVW-1 (AB)

(21 March to 8 May 1988)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-102

Diamondbacks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AB100

F-14A

VF-33

Starfighters -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AB200

F-14A

VFA-82

Marauders -

Strike Fighter Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AB300

FA-18C

VFA-86

Sidewinders -

Strike Fighter Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

AB400

FA-18C

VA-85

Black Falcons -                   Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AB500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-123

Screwtops - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

HS-11

Dragon Slayers -           Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-32

Maulers - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

 

 

    USS America (CV-66) task force not reported.

 

    “USS America (CV-66) again operated in the Vestfjord before making a port visit to Le Harve, France” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) aircraft flew low-level flights over Somalia from 20 to 22 March 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Lieutenant Commander Laughler, VA-22, made the USS Enterprise (CVN-65) 4,000th landing of the cruise. While steaming north northeast of Socotra on 23 March 1988, the carrier again found herself shadowed by Russian Mays out of Aden, the snoopers being intercepted by her Tomcats” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “During CarQuals off the Virginia capes on 25 March 1988, Gypsy 203, a VF-32 F-14 (BuNo 159441) crashed at 2135 after failing to gain proper airspeed off the catapult of USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67). Dusty Dog 614, flown by Lieutenant Andrew T. Macyko and Lieutenant (j.g.) Rodger T. “Rusty” Shepko, with Aviation Antisubmarine Warfare Operators 2d Class Roger Anderson as first crewman and Fred Setzer as rescue swimmer, located Lieutenant Nicholas A. Filippone, and petty officer Setzer went into the water to assist him; the HS-7 helo hoisted the NFO on board at 2154. The Sea King then illuminated Lieutenant Michael J. Nichols’s position as it headed for the ship (landing at 2156), enabling the carrier’s starboard motor whaleboat to pick up the pilot at 2158 and bring him on board at 2207. Both Nichols and Filippone received treatment for hypothermia, and were listed as “conscious, alert, and stable” by the end of the first watch” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted her second Earnest Will support mission from the Gulf of Oman, including CAP, SUCAP and ASW on 26 March 1988 and was shadowed by an Iranian P-3F” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) made a port call at Marseille, France before departing the Mediterranean” (Ref. 34).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored near al Masirah Island for a brief standdown, holding “flight deck Olympics,” including a tractor-driving contest, from the 27th to 28th March 1988. During the deployment, two destroyer tenders, USS Cape Cod (AD-43) and USS Samuel Gompers (AD-37), lay anchored nearby at various times, enabling forward support to Enterprise and her group, supplemented by COD aircraft routed through Diego Garcia and al Masirah” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 28 March 1988, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with Captain William H. Switzer III, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 13 (CVW-13) (tail code AK), Rear Admiral John K. Ready, Commander Carrier Group Two and Captain William Story, Chief of Staff, Commander Carrier Group Two embarked arrived Norfolk, Va., with Captain Bruce B. Bremner, as Commanding Officer and Captain Dennis V. Mcginn, Executive Officer, ending her second Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), from 12 September 1983 to Present; completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956), her 11th Mediterranean Sea deployment, on her 12th voyage in the Mediterranean Sea, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. During the crossing the carrier battle group joined the 22nd Marine Amphibious Ready Group (MARG 22) to mark the first time a carrier battle group and a MARG deployed simultaneously. The two groups, fifteen ships and 13,000 men conducted training exercises on the Translant. The two groups passed Gibraltar entering the Mediterranean Sea and participated in a 3-day National Week exercises 88 with ships of the Saratoga Battlegroup, USS Iowa Surface Action Group and MARG 3-87. In all, 35 U.S ships and 25,000 sailors and Marines honed their skills. Coral Sea entered the Gulf of Sidra, and visited Gaeta, Italian and on 25 December 1987, Coral Sea spent Christmas at Naples, Italy during in port period, hosting 1,700 NATO and Italian guests for a Sunset Parade in between both ports. The two days of fanfare included buffet-style feasts prepared by the ship’s galley, close-order rifle drills by the Marine detachment, weapons exhibitions by the air wing. The Sunset Parade was so popular that almost every port visited in the Mediterranean wished to receive the ship’s hospitality. Rough seas delayed liberty boats in Cannes, but the focus was on the ship, not the shore; making a port call at Marseille, France. With the French Riviera as a backdrop, NBC’s TODAY show was launched live via satellite from Coral Sea’s flight deck to take America on a stern-to-stern tour of the carrier. Virtually every department on board the ship was involved with the production. The next evening the crew jammed the hangar bay to watch singer/entertainer Wayne Newton rock the ship with classic tunes from the 60’s and 70’s. Throughout this phase of the cruise there was a decided French flavor with port visits to Marseille and Cannes. Between visits, the battle group held training exercises with the French Navy and Air Force to test the air defense structure of France’s Mediterranean coast. An arduous at-sea period, coupled with the approaching holidays made mail service a priority. Letters flooded the Sixth Fleet in response to a Dear Abby column that solicited pen pals for deployed sailors and Marines. As Coral Sea prepared to anchor in Naples for the holidays the fan mail kept flowing, as did 10,000 dozen cookies sent to the carrier’s 4,300 men by the Association of Virginia Baptist Churches. The coming of January meant more than just ringing in the New Year. It also meant they were “over the hump.” With the holidays past, the Mid-cruise Corrosion Control Audit on 18 January 1988 was a major concern. Aircrews scrubbed aircraft between flight operations, ridding them of the sea’s corrosive salt. Meanwhile in the bowels of the “Ageless Warrior,” engineers stoked the boilers to make the fresh water needed to clean the planes. The effort was a major success as the ship recorded one of the most successful audits ever aboard an aircraft carrier. Team spirit continued beyond the call of duty during a  three-day visit to Augusta Bay, Sicily, Coral Sea’s arrival during Naval Air Station Sigonella’s Orange Festival pitted her football, basketball, soccer and boxing teams against their host’. The ship’s rugby team played diplomat while scrimmaging with Sicily’s top amateur team, loosing gracefully. The ship’s ambassadorial role continued a more than 1,000 local citizens toured the ship each day. Having established herself as an ambassador of goodwill in the western and central Mediterranean Sea, Coral Sea steamed for ports in the eastern Mediterranean. A five-day anchorage at Alexandria, Egypt in early February marked the carrier’s return to the region where more than 30 years earlier it assisted in the evacuation of U. S. citizens during the Suez Crisis. She spent February visiting Alexandria and the eastern Mediterranean ports of Izmir, Turkey on 12 February 1988 and Haifa, Israel. She then steamed westward for a final port call at Benidorm, Spain. After a final exercise conducted by Commanded Task Force 60 involving dual battle group operations with USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) Battle Group, Coral Sea made a brief stop at Rota, Spain before heading home through the Atlantic. Ports of call include: Naples, the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy; Augusta, Sicily, a town and comune in the province of Syracuse, located on the eastern coast of Sicily (Italy). The city is one of the main harbours in Italy; Marseille (UK /mɑrˈs/; French: [maʁ.sɛj], locally: [mɑχˈsɛjə]; Occitan: Marselha [maʀˈsejɔ, maʀˈsijɔ]; also Marseilles in English), known in antiquity as Masalia, Massalia or Massilia (from Greek: Μασσαλία; [probably adapted from an existing language related to Ligurian) is the second largest city in France, after Paris, with a population of 850,636 (January 2011) on a land area of 241 km2 (93 sq mi); Cannes (French pronunciation: ​[kan], in Occitan Canas) is a city located on the French Riviera (It is a commune of France located in the Alpes-Maritimes department, a busy tourist destination and host of the annual Cannes Film Festival, Midem, and Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity); Palma, in full Palma de Mallorca, is the major city and port on the island of Majorca (Mallorca) and capital city of the autonomous community of the Balearic Islands in Spain; Benidorm (/ˈbɛnɪdɔrm/, Valencian: [beniˈðɔɾm], Spanish: [beniˈðor]) is a coastal town in Alicante, Spain, on the Western Mediterranean; Alexandria (/ˌælɪɡˈzændrɪə/ or /ˌælɪɡˈzɑːndrɪə/; اسكندرية, pronounced [eskendeˈrejjæ] in Egyptian Arabic) is the second largest city and the second largest metropolitan area in Egypt after Greater Cairo by size and population, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea in the north central part of the country. It is also the largest city lying directly on the Mediterranean coast; İzmir is a large metropolis in the western extremity of Anatolia and the third most populous city in Turkey, after Istanbul and Ankara. İzmir's metropolitan area extends along the outlying waters of the Gulf of İzmir and inland to the north across Gediz River's delta, to the east along an alluvial plain created by several small streams and to a slightly more rugged terrain in the south; and Haifa, the largest city in northern Israel, and the third-largest city in the country. Squadrons: VFA-131, F/A-18A; VFA-136, F/A-18A; VFA-137, F/A-18A; VA-55, A-6E; VA-65, A-6E; VAW-127, E-2C; VAQ-133, A-6 - EA-6A and HS-17, SH-3H; completing 15 “WestPac’s” while under the direction of the 7th Fleet in the Pacific (25 January 1960 to 12 September 1983); reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975; involved in two Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 28 April 1975 and during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh on 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). Her 17th foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, upon completion of Sea Trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on October 1952. Her 28th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 1 October 1947 (19 September 1987 to 28 March 1988 )” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72, 1275ZA4, 1275ZA5, 1275ZA6, 1275ZA7, 1275ZA9-/ & 1275ZA11).

 

 19/09/87 – 28/03/88

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

    “MED CRUISE”

 Not Reported

 N/A

 121h

Reference 34, 35 & 43 reflect Chat info.

 

    “On 29 March 1988, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) dispatched a “material exploitation team” to Samuel Gompers by helo to inspect a small Iranian boat. Seized in the Persian Gulf by destroyer USS John Rodgers (DD-983), the vessel was identified as that utilized by the Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps as a raider, such boats also often ending their careers as suicide craft” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) wing’s aircrews, kept busy, and on 30 March 1988 intercepted a pair of Russian aircraft en route to their delivery to the Indians, a May and a Bear F. Meanwhile, an entourage led by Ambassador Montgomery visited the ship, an aerial demonstration being performed” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) responded during Iran on 1 April 1988 incident in which USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) struck an Iranian mine in international waters.

 

    In April 1988, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was assigned to escort reflagged Kuwaiti oil tankers in the Arabian Gulf while stationed in the North Arabian Sea” (Ref. 1-Enterprise).

 

    “Commander Tad Chamberlain, CO, VA-94, made USS Enterprise (CVN-65) 265,000th arrested landing in an A-7E, on 1 April 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored off al Masirah to enable the crew to celebrate Easter on 2 April 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored off al Masirah to enable the crew to celebrate Easter from 2 to 4 April 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Soviet surveillance continued unabated, and Admiral Tribut’s Helix remained on the USS Enterprise (CVN-65) “trail” for 15 hours from 5 to 6 April 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 6 April 1988, another May out of the Gulf of Aden was also intercepted by USS Enterprise (CVN-65) wing’s aircrews” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) performed her third Earnest Will mission with multiple CAP, SUCAP and AEW sorties, on 8 April 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “CVW-7 deployed 10 aircraft (four Tomcats, two Intruders and four Corsair IIs) ashore to Hyeres, France, to fly coordinated strikes and dissimilar air combat training with 10 French Super Etendards and three Crusaders from Landivisiau beginning on 10 April 1988” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “Following a “disastrous” explosion at a Pakistani army depot in Islamabad, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) dispatched an EOD team to that city to render assistance on 10 April 1988” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 10 April 1988, U.S. Ambassador to Bahrain Sam H. Zakhem visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65)” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “A joint Franco-American exercise was held with Clemenceau, consisting of “war-at-sea strikes,” from 12 to 14 April 1988. The men of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) held an air show for their French counterparts, and hosted the Omani Assistant Chief of Air Staff. Planes from the ship intercepted another Soviet Il-38 out of Aden on the 12th” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “CVW-7 deployed 10 aircraft (four Tomcats, two Intruders and four Corsair IIs) ashore to Hyeres, France, to fly coordinated strikes and dissimilar air combat training with 10 French Super Etendards and three Crusaders from Landivisiau from 10 to 18 April 1988. The climatic culmination of the exercise pitted 20 American planes against 10 French Air Force Mirage 2000s, who defended their airfield near Dijon against a simulated strike which the Americans flew daringly through the Alps” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “On 18 April 1988, the United States retaliated against Iran following the 1 April incident in which USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) struck an Iranian mine in international waters. The retaliation involved both surface and air units. Carrier Air Wing 11 squadrons from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) were the major aviation participants. VAW-I 17s "Nighthawks" provided airborne early warning tracking and analysis of targets as as air intercept control. The initial American strikes centered around a surface group action against two Iranian oil platforms that had been identified as support bases for Iranian attacks on merchant shipping. Elements of CVW-11 provided air support for the surface groups in the form of surface combat air patrols, flying A-6E Intruders and A-7E Corsair IIs, and combat air patrols with F-14 Tomcats.

 

    The initial action began with coordinated strikes by two separate surface groups. One group, consisting of two destroyers and one amphibious ship, attacked the Sassan platform while the other group, comprising a guided missile cruiser and two frigates attacked the Sirri platform. Iranian response to the destruction of the two oil platforms involved the dispatching of numerous gunboats to prey on various targets in the Arabian Gulf. Following an attack by Iranian Boghammar speedboats on an American-flagged supply ship and a Panamanian-flagged ship, A-6Es from VA-95 were vectored in on the speedhoats by an American frigate. The aircraft dropped Rockeye cluster bombs on the speedboats, sinking one and damaging several others.

 

    Action continued to escalate. Joshan, an Iranian Combattante II Kaman-class fast attack craft, challenged USS Wainwright (CG 28) and her surface group. The American ships responded to the challenge by sinking Joshan. Fighting continued when the Iranian frigate Sahand departed Bandar Abbas and challenged elements of an American surface group. She was observed by two VA-95 A-6Es while they were flying surface combat air patrol for USS Joseph Strauss (DDG-16).

 

    Sahand launched missiles at the A-6Es, and the Intruders replied with launches of two Harpoons and four laser-guided Skipper bombs. This was followed by a Harpoon firing from Joseph Strauss. The weapons delivered against Sahand were successful. Fires blazing on her decks eventually reached her magazines resulting in the final explosions that led to her sinking. The loss of Sahand, one of Iran's most modern ships. was not enough to stop the suicidal sorties of the Iranian navy. A sister ship, Sabalan, departed her port for operations in the Gulf.

 

    She fired on several A-6Es from VA-95 with a surface-to-air missile. One of the Intruders responded with a laser-guided bomb that hit Sabalan and stopped her dead in the water. The Iranian frigate was taken in tow by an Iranian tug with the stern partially submerged. VA-95's aircraft, as ordered, did not continue the attack. This action ended the retaliatory strikes against Iran that began as a result of Iranian mining in international waters” (Ref. 1-Enterprise).

 

     “During phase training evolutions, on 24 April 1988, the submarine Bonefish, while “pursuing” USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and her battle group in exercises about 160 miles east of Cape Canaveral, Florida, suffered a major fire and a series of explosions that ripped through the boat, killing three sailors and forcing the men to abandon ship. The guided missile frigate Carr (FFG-52), sensing danger in a routine transmission from the sub, sped to the scene. John F. Kennedy learned of the catastrophe via radio when 42 nautical miles away at 1718, and immediately began assembling medical teams on the flight deck to be transported to Carr. John F. Kennedy launched the first SH-3H at 1740, two at 1744, and a fourth at 1827, and began recovering the first helicopter transporting Bonefish sailors at 1844; she launched the fifth helo ten minutes later. She continued flight operations with her helicopters into the second dog watch, and began bringing on board the first casualties at 2205” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) began heading for Mayport early in the mid watch on 25 April 1988, flying the survivors ashore to NAS Mayport by helo, retaining only Lieutenant (j.g.) William B. Swift, one of the submarine's injured officers, for further treatment” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Carr’s providential preparation for rescue work had enabled her to be ready to act as on-scene commander as soon as she arrived. Over the ensuing hours, as smoke issued from the hatches of the stricken Bonefish, Carr coordinated the work of the quintet of Sea Kings from HS-7 that “blanketed the…area all working as a cohesive team” to remove people from the burning submarine, in addition to a fixed-wing jet and her own motor whaleboat in the rescue of the 89 surviving crewmen, HS-7 helicopters employing rescue swimmers to attach rescue slings and calm anxious survivors. Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 44, Detachment 4, in Carr, utilizing their SH-60B Seahawk, evacuated ten men and pulled two from the water.

 

    John F. Kennedy assisted with the rescue and embarked many Bonefish crewmen; 23 sailors suffering from respiratory injuries received care in the ship’s inpatient ward. The carrier returned to the scene the following day to conduct further SAR operations as Bonefish was ultimately taken in tow and returned to her homeport of Charleston, South Carolina. “This complex evolution,” an HS-7 chronicler declared later, “was a textbook rescue because of the professionalism and ‘can do’ attitude exhibited by the team” of John F. Kennedy, Carr, and HS-7.

 

    Following the Bonefish incident, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) enjoyed a three-day port visit to Port Everglades, Florida” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Mines continued to be a threat in these constricted waters since the previous summer, when tanker Bridgeton struck one west of Farsi Island, on 24 July 1987, and a helo from frigate USS Jarrett (FFG-33) surprised Iran Ajr, a modified Iranian landing craft laying mines north of Bahrain, in September 1987. Disabling Iran Ajr with rockets and machine gun fire, the helo crew enabled a Sea-air-Land (SEAL) team to board, photograph and impound the minelayer, the next day” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “While steaming 55 miles northeast of Qatar on 14 April 1988, however, lookouts on board guided missile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) spotted three mines ahead. Going to general quarters, the ship soon struck a fourth mine that exploded and blew a 21-foot hole in her port side near frame 276, injuring ten sailors, and inflicting “considerable damage to the hull, deckhouse and foundation structures, essentially breaking the ship’s back.”  Herculean damage control efforts by the crew, however, saved the ship. Over the next ten days, Coalition mine countermeasures vessels located eight additional mines, examination of which left little doubt as to their Iranian origins” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Intelligence analysts assessed a photograph taken on 14 April 1988 of an Iranian dhow with a “bulbous, netted device hanging off stern plus several round objects in water astern” as a probable minelayer, indicating additional danger to the group. A special mine watch was therefore established on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65), and escorts were stationed ahead and astern of her while in formation steaming. Three SAGs were formed, the first two to assault the rigs and the third, operating off Bandar Abbas, to neutralize the Iranian fleet therein, especially Sabalan. E-2Cs from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) flew AEW tracking and analyzed targets, along with air intercept control, F-14As few CAP and A-6Es and A-7Es performed surface CAP.

 

    Carrier Air Wing 11, in coordination with Battle Group FOXTROT, conducted a major strike against Iranian naval warships and facilities in the Persian Gulf. The attacks, launched in retaliation for Iranian mining of international waters and the subsequent damage to USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58), were highly successful.

 

    VAW-I 17s "Nighthawks" provided airborne early warning tracking and analysis of targets as as air intercept control. The initial American strikes centered around a surface group action against two Iranian oil platforms that had been identified as support bases for Iranian attacks on merchant shipping. Elements of CVW-11 provided air support for the surface groups in the form of surface combat air patrols, flying A-6E Intruders and A-7E Corsair IIs, and combat air patrols with F-14 Tomcats.

 

    Air Wing ELEVEN repelled a Boghammer fast attack boat raid on the Mubarak Oil Platform, sunk the Iranian frigate Sahand and severely damaged the frigate Sabalan. Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN was subsequently awarded the Joint Meritorious Unit Award for its actions.

 

    The initial action began with coordinated strikes by two separate surface groups. One group, consisting of two destroyers and one amphibious ship, attacked the Sassan platform while the other group, comprising a guided missile cruiser and two frigates attacked the Sirri platform. Iranian response to the destruction of the two oil platforms involved the dispatching of numerous gunboats to prey on various targets in the Arabian Gulf.

 

     Following an attack by Iranian Boghammar speedboats on an American-flagged supply ship and a Panamanian-flagged ship, A-6Es from VA-95 were vectored in on the speed boats by an American frigate. The aircraft dropped Rockeye cluster bombs on the speedboats, sinking one and damaging several others.

 

    Action continued to escalate. Joshan, an Iranian Combattante II Kaman-class fast attack craft, challenged USS Wainwright (CG-28) and her surface group. The American ships responded to the challenge by sinking Joshan. Fighting continued when the Iranian frigate Sahand departed Bandar Abbas and challenged elements of an American surface group. She was observed by two VA-95 A-6Es while they were flying surface combat air patrol for USS Joseph Strauss (DDG-16).

 

    Sahand launched missiles at the A-6Es, and the Intruders replied with launches of two Harpoons and four laser-guided Skipper bombs. This was followed by a Harpoon firing from Joseph Strauss. The weapons delivered against Sahand were successful.

Fires blazing on her decks eventually reached her magazines resulting in the final explosions that led to her sinking. The loss of Sahand, one of Iran's most modern ships was not enough to stop the suicidal sorties of the Iranian navy.

 

     A sister ship, Sabalan, departed her port for operations in the Gulf. She fired on several A-6Es from VA-95 with a surface-to-air missile. One of the Intruders responded with a laser-guided bomb that hit Sabalan and stopped her dead in the water. The Iranian frigate was taken in tow by an Iranian tug with the stern partially submerged. VA-95's aircraft, as ordered, did not continue the attack. This action ended the retaliatory strikes against Iran that began as a result of Iranian mining in international waters” (Ref. 1-Enterprise).

 

    “During 15 to 16 April 1988, planning commenced for “potential retaliation” for the mining, and for an earlier incident on 5 March when Iranians on Sassan, an oil platform from which they had been attacking shipping, fired upon a pair of helos from guided missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG-56).  Multiple meetings took place with “much interaction between flag, ship and airwing.”

 

     Much of the responsibility for the operation’s planning and execution fell upon the men of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and CVW-11. On these dates she also refueled guided missile destroyers USS Lynde McCormick (DDG-8) and USS Joseph Strauss (DDG-16), and frigate USS Reasoner (FF-1063), in preparation for battle. In addition, an Iranian P-3F was intercepted patrolling over the Gulf of Oman” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 16 April 1988, BG Foxtrot ships began repositioning for potential execution of plans against the Iranians. Commodore Perkins departed USS Enterprise (CVN-65) for embarkation on board USS Lynde McCormick (DDG-8), Enterprise becoming the Anti-air Warfare Commander for Operation Praying Mantis, the “measured response” adopted by the U.S., aimed at attacking Sassan, as well as two other Iranian oil platforms, Sirri and Raksh. President Reagan and Admiral William J. Crowe, Jr., Chairman, JCS, issued rules of engagement, that allowed the Americans to defend themselves should Iranian planes or warships challenge them. Among the latter was the Saam-class frigate Sabalan, notorious for her “vicious” attacks against unarmed merchant ships in the Persian Gulf, in which she had made it a point to fire at crew’s quarters” (Ref. 362F).

 

CHAPTER XXXIX

ELEVENTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes and Cherry Point

(October 1988 to March 1989)

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) responded during Iran 1 April incident in which USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) struck an Iranian mine in international waters - Iraq and Iran War, Cuba and Panama Canal shakedown cruise (March to May 1989) USS Coral Sea (CV-43) responded to a call for assistance from USS Iowa (BB-61) operating in the Caribbean Sea due to an explosion in the battleship's number two gun turret in which 47 crewmembers were killed 19 April 1989.

 (29 September 1987 to 31 May 1989)

Part 1 – (29 September 1987 to 16 April 1988)

Part 2 – (17 April to 31 December 1988)

Part 3 – (1 January to 31 May 1989)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXIX

Part 1 – (29 September 1987 to 16 April 1988)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

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EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4