CHAPTER XXXIX

ELEVENTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes and Cherry Point

(October 1988 to March 1989)

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) responded during Iran 1 April incident in which USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) struck an Iranian mine in international waters - Iraq and Iran War, Cuba and Panama Canal shakedown cruise (March to May 1989) USS Coral Sea (CV-43) responded to a call for assistance from USS Iowa (BB-61) operating in the Caribbean Sea due to an explosion in the battleship's number two gun turret in which 47 crewmembers were killed 19 April 1989.

 (29 September 1987 to 31 May 1989)

Part 1 – (29 September 1987 to 16 April 1988)

Part 2 – (17 April to 31 December 1988)

Part 3 – (1 January to 31 May 1989)

 

 

1989 EAST COAST DEPLOYMENTS - Includes Florida

(The evacuation of the American embassy in Beirut, Lebanon)

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Second and Sixth Fleet) 1988 Aircraft Carriers scheduling of deployments resulted in one CV and one CVN deployments extending into 1989:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS John F. Kennedy        (CV-67) – 2nd & 6th

12th Med Tyrrhenian Sea

CVW-3

AC

2 Aug 1988

1 Feb 1989

Europe

154-days

 

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) – 2nd & 6th

NoLant

DH

NW

JS

1st Med

NoLant

CVW-8

AJ

30 Dec 1988

30 Jun 1989

Europe

2nd FWFD

212-days

Dragon Hammer, National Week and Juniper Stallion

 

Ports of call include: Palma de Mallorca, Spain; Marseilles, France; Alexandria, Egypt; Antalya, Turkey; Naples, Italy; Tangiers, Morocco; Toulon, France; Monaco and Haifa, Israel.

 

Squadrons: VF-41 (F-14A); VF-84 (F-14A); VFA-15 (F/A-18C); VFA-87 (F/A-18C); VA-35 (A-6E); VA-36 (A-6E); VAW-124 (E-2C); VAQ-141 (EA-6B); VS-24 (S-3A) and HS-9 (SH-3H).

 

 

USS South Carolina (CGN-37); USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55); USS William V. Pratt (DDG-44); USS Farragut (DDG-37); USS Conyngham (DDG-17); USS Sellers (DDG-11) and USS Charles F. Adams (DDG-2) joined USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) as part of her task force.

Ref. U.S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment Resources

 

The US Navy's East Coast (Second and Sixth Fleets) and West Coast Transfer to the East Cost scheduled Aircraft Carriers Deployments and Atlantic operations for 1989 are as follows:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS America (CV-66) – 2nd

4th NorLant 5th Caribbean Sea

CVW-1

AB

8 Feb 1989

3 Apr 1989

Training

South America

54-days

NATO Exercise North Star, operating in the Vestfjord

 

Ports visited not reported.

 

Squadrons: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33, F-14A; VFA-82, FA-18C; VFA-86, FA-18C; VA-85, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; VAQ-137, EA-6B; HS-11, SH-3H and VS-32, S-3A.

 

USS America (CV-66) task force not reported.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) – 2nd

Carib

CVW-13

AK

Mar 1989

May 1989

Carib

90-east

 

USS America (CV-66) 2nd, 6th & 7th

(7th & 8th Red Sea, Gulf of Aden) (2nd Arabian Sea & Persian Gulf)

NorLant

13th Med

7th Suez Canal

4th Indian Ocean

8th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-1

AB

11 May 1989

10 Nov 1989

Europe

Middle East

Indian Ocean

184-days

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) – 2nd &  6th

12th Med

CVW-13

AK

31 May 1989

30 Sep 1989

Europe

123-days

Evacuation of the American Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon

 

4th Mediterranean cruise since her reassignment to the 6th Fleet in the Atlantic upon arrival in the 6th Fleet Area, arriving on a World Cruise via the Suez Canal and Med on 12 September 1983, her 10th Med Deployment, having completed nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956) prior to her 1st conversion (25 January 1960) or 13th Med tour with either 6th or 7th Fleet.

 

Ports of call include: Palma, in full Palma de Mallorca, Spain; Marseille, France; Cannes, France; İzmir, Turkey; Alexandria, Egypt;; Haifa, the largest city in northern Israel, and the third-largest city in the country; Malaga, a city and a municipality, capital of the Province of Málaga, in the Autonomous Community of Andalusia, Spain; and Halifax (/ˈhćlɨfćks/), formally the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM), is the capital of the province of Nova Scotia, Canada.

 

Squadrons: VMFA-451, F/A-18A; VFA-132, F/A-18A; VFA-137, F/A-18A; VA-55 (*2), A-6E; VA-65, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-127 (*3), E-2C; VAQ-133, EA-6B and HS-17 (*4), SH-3H.

 

(*1) CVW-13 disestablished on Jan.1, 1991
(*2) VA-55 disestablished on Jan.1, 1991
(*3) VAW-127 disestablished on Sep.30, 1991
(*4) HS-17 disestablished on Jul.2, 1991

*USS Enterprise (CVN-65) – Pacific, 7th, 6th & 2nd

5th North Arabian

Sea dep.

14th WestPac

17th & 18th Indian Ocean Voy.

3rd Cape of Good Hope

Solant

Lant

CVW-11

NH

17 Sep 1989

16 Mar 1990

3rd World

181-Days

Home port transfer to the East Coast

Third World Cruise 89–90, her Home Port Transfer to the east coast for Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Northrop Grumman Newport News shipyard, participating in PacEx 89, a joint large-scale training evolution involving U.S., Japanese and ROK forces, Annualex 89. Two battle forces (including the carriers Enterprise and USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and the battleships USS New Jersey (BB-62) and USS Missouri (BB-63) ("Mighty Mo" or "Big Mo")) operated in conjunction with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force, Republic of Korea Navy and Air Force, U.S. Air Force and U.S. Marine Corps to provide highly successful joint training for Operation Classic Resolve, President George H.W. Bush's response to Philippine President Corazon Aquino's request for air support during the rebel coup attempt, to include open ocean AAW exercises, together with an opposed transit, ASUW and support of amphibious operations, though interrupted by “near daily” Soviet aerial reconnaissance flights to maintain the readiness of components and units of the Combined Forces Command defending the Republic of Korea. USS Alamo (LSD-33) headed to Korea to participate in the bilateral exercise Operation "Valiant Blitz 85-1" in cooperation with elements of the South Korean Navy and Marine Corps, conducted off the coast of Okinawa. Like BALIKATAN / TANGENT FLASH, VALIANT BLITZ 90, comprised of the largest assembly of U.S. naval air and sea power since World War II, was an amphibious operations training conducted off the coast of Okinawa, while coordinated operations involved a three-carrier battle group comprised of the Enterprise, USS Carl Vinson, and USS Constellation (CVN-64). USS Elliot (DD-967) provided naval gunfire support for the marine landing forces and screening actions against hostile forces opposing the transport ships. Two battle forces (including the carriers Enterprise and USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and the battleships USS New Jersey (BB-62) and USS Missouri (BB-63) ("Mighty Mo" or "Big Mo")) operated in conjunction with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force, Republic of Korea Navy and Air Force, U.S. Air Force and U.S. Marine Corps to provide highly successful joint training for Operation Classic Resolve, President George H.W. Bush's response to Philippine President Corazon Aquino's request for air support during the rebel coup attempt. Battle Week exercises and or Weapons Week, WASEX, STRIKEX, SAREX, ACM, SINKEX, BANNEREX, highlighted early-to-mid January 1990, including NSSM launch and air-to-air missile shoots (MISSELEX) in the vicinity of Diego Garcia from 4 to 8 January 1990, followed by a five event fly day on 13 February 1990, continuing crossdecking personnel and conducted WASEX against USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) and Earnest Will exercises. Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) Team will inspect the ship’s reactors. Coordinated operations involved a three-carrier battle group comprised of the Enterprise, USS Carl Vinson, and USS Constellation (CVN-64). Two battle forces (including the carriers Enterprise and USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and the battleships USS New Jersey (BB-62) and USS Missouri (BB-63) ("Mighty Mo" or "Big Mo") operated in conjunction with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force, Republic of Korea Navy and Air Force, U.S. Air Force and U.S. Marine Corps to provide highly successful joint training and Operation Classic Resolve. Battle Week exercises and or Weapons Week, WASEX, STRIKEX, SAREX, ACM, SINKEX, BANNEREX, highlighted early-to-mid January 1990, including NSSM launch and air-to-air missile shoots (MISSELEX) in the vicinity of Diego Garcia from 4 to 8 January 1990 and Earnest Will exercises.

 

Ports of call include:

 

CVW-11 Squadrons include: VF-114, Aardvarks, Fighter Squadron, Grumman, F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter; VF-213, Black Lions, Fighter Squadron, Grumman,  F-14A Tomcat, Jet Fighter: VA-22 (*1), Fighting Redcocks, Attack Squadron, Vought, A-7E, Corsair II , Jet Attack Aircraft; VA-94 (*2), Shrikes, Attack Squadron, Vought, A-7E Corsair II, Jet Attack Aircraft; VA-95, Green Lizards, Attack Squadron, Grumman, A-6E / KA-6D Intruder, Jet Attack Bomber, Tanker; VAW-117, Wallbangers, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, Grumman, E-2C Hawkeye, Electronics; VAQ-135, Black Ravens, Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron, Grumman, EA-6B Prowler, Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation; HS-6, Indians, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, Sikorsky, SH-3H Sea King - Anti-submarine and VS-21, Redtails, Air Anti-Submarine Squadron, Lockheed, S-3A Viking - Anti-Submarine. (*1) VA-22 redesignated VFA-22 on May 4, 1990 and (*2) VA-94 redesignated VFA-94 on Jun.28, 1990.

 

USS Forrestal (CV-59) – 2nd &  6th

19th Med

CVW-6

AE

6 Nov 1989

12 Apr 1990

Europe

168-days

 

*West Coast

On 19 April 1989, USS Iowa (BB-61) suffered an explosion in the battleship's number two-gun turret in which 47 crewmembers were killed. Coral Sea dispatched surgical team and medical supplies. VC-8, using SH-3G helicopters, also performed medevac and logistical support to Iowa.

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 embarked departed Alameda, California 17 September 1989, embarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif., she will under go her third World cruise, her 11th Indian Ocean voyage and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, she will under go Operation Classic Resolve, she will transit the Suez canal a second time via her fourth voyage in the Arabian Sea and second Gulf of Aden and Red Sea voyage, en route to Norfolk, Virginia via the Mediterranean Sea.

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

    “On New Year’s Day 1989, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) sailed from Cannes, bound for Haifa, Israeli” (Ref. 549).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) History from 1947 to 1989 - Ref. 1275ZC1

 

     “1989 found USS Coral Sea (CV-43) again steaming in the Virginia Capes Operating Area and points south making port calls to Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and Fort Lauderdale, Fl. in preparation for her upcoming 11th Mediterranean Sea” (Ref. 1275ZC2).

 

    “On 4 January 1989, during the second of three cycles of scheduled operations that day, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) airborne Hawkeyes and the ship’s F-14 CAP detected, at about 78 nautical miles, two Libyan MiG-23 Floggers from Al Bumbah. Other Libyan aircraft had been observed and monitored earlier, but had not behaved aggressively, inevitably returning to their base. These two MiGs continued to close at high speed, however, accelerating first from 430 to 450, and then from 450 to 500, knots. The F-14 Tomcats, from VF-32, embarked on a series of pre-planned, non-provocative maneuvers, changing course and altitude in order to establish offset. The Floggers, however, countered the F-14s’ maneuvers with their own, re-establishing “head-on forward quarter weapons release” situations. As the Libyan planes closed at high speed within range to release their own weapons, the Tomcats, one flown by Lieutenant Herman C. Cook, Jr., with Lieutenant Commander Steven P. Collins as NFO, the other by Lieutenant Commander Joseph B. Connelly and Commander Leo F. Enwright, Jr., engaged the MiGs, firing in self-defense, and splashed the two Floggers with AIM-7 and AIM-9 missiles in the central Med north of Tobruk in international waters. As a CVW-3 chronicler laconically summed it up: “USN – 2, Libya – 0” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) reached Haifa, Israeli on 6 January 1989 to what her chronicler called a “heroes welcome,” news coverage of the MiG kills having proved extremely heavy, necessitating additional 6th Fleet public affairs people to handle the sharply increased media interest” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) sailed on 9 January 1989 to conduct Exercise Juniper Hawk with Israeli forces for two days, then headed back to the central Mediterranean Sea” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted pre-flight deck certification from 9 to 12 January 1989” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) transited the Strait of Messina on 14 January 1989 to facilitate a turnover with USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-74) in the Tyrrhenian Sea, as the latter began her maiden Mediterranean Sea deployment” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Following turnover with USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-74) in the Tyrrhenian Sea, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) outchopped from the Middle Sea on 22 January 1989, and reached Norfolk on 1 February, where Secretary of the Navy William L. Ball, III, flew out to the carrier to congratulate the crew and to pass along a note of thanks for a “job well done” from the newly elected President (and former naval aviator) George H.W. Bush” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) was awarded her first CINCLANTFLT Golden Anchor Award for best retention programs in an Atlantic Fleet carrier in February 1989” (Ref. 72 & 383).

 

    “On 1 February 1989, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) with CVW-3 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain Hugh D. Wisely in command, ending her 12th Mediterranean Sea deployment (13th voyage), operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), participating in National Week ’88, Sea Wind off the coast of Alexandria, Display Determination ’88, exercises off the Tunisian coast, operating with naval and air elements of the Tunisian armed forces, a shooting match between the U.S. and Libyan aircraft developed resulting in the elimination of both of Libya's MiG-23s; African Eagle ’88, a combined USN, USAF and Moroccan exercise off the north Moroccan coast and Exercise Juniper Hawk with Israeli forces, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. John F. Kennedy recovered CVW-3 (VF-14 and VF-32, VA-75, VS-22, VMA-533, VAQ-130, VAW-126, and HS-7) between 2 and 4 August 1988, transiting the Strait of Gibraltar as she began the mid watch on 14 August 1988, relieved USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) just west of Corsica on 16 August 1988, Mediterranean-bound, John F. Kennedy part of Task Group 24.4, turns to port, preparing to launch a Grumman F-14 Tomcat from her number one catapult on 12 August 1988, participated in National Week ’88 after transiting the Strait of Messina, making a port call at Naples from 21 to 25 August 1988, where John F. Kennedy’s crewmen pooled their resources to repair a home for unwed mothers, returning to sea for four days on 25 August 1988, and then paused with a port visit to Alexandria, conducting Sea Wind off the coast of Alexandria, as efforts to further cooperation between the Egyptian and U.S. governments saw 6th Fleet elements exercising with the Egyptian Navy and Air Force from 4 to 8 September 1988, while during the evolution, both forces conducted simulated low-level strikes into Wadi Natrun, ASW training with Egyptian Romeo-class submarines, dissimilar air combat training with Egyptian F-16, Mirages, and Fishbeds, electronic warfare training with Egyptian EW/GCI sites, and cross-training Egyptian/U.S. E-2C aircrew, visiting Toulon following Sea Wind, beginning on 13 September 1988, sailing to participate in Display Determination ’88 from 22 September to 10 October 1988, maneuvers that involved war-at-sea exercises, overland low-level simulated strikes, and air-to-air engagements, visiting Antalya, Turkey from 10 to 17 October 1988 following Display Determination ’88, making a port call at Tunis, Tunisia from 21 to 24 October 1988, participating in exercises off the Tunisian coast from 24 to 26 October 1988, operating with naval and air elements of the Tunisian armed forces conducting war-at-sea strikes, simulated overland strikes at the Ras Engelah range, and defensive air combat training with Tunisian Northrop F-5’s, making a port call at Palma (28 October-4 November), re-visited Naples (14-18 November 1988), returning to a slate of active operations that included exercises, on 22 November 1988, with the French carrier Foch in a joint French and U.S. Navy exercise consisted of long-range targeting scenarios, followed by a war-at-sea strike. The two carriers’ air wings also conducted dissimilar air combat training concurrent with the war-at-sea strike, anchoring at Marseille on 23 November 1988, celebrating Thanksgiving there; families back home, meanwhile, viewed the premier of a cable video production “Young Peacekeepers,” a documentary that focused on the young men working on John F. Kennedy’s flight deck, departing Marseille on 27 November 1988 to participate in African Eagle ’88 from 1 to 10 December 1988, a combined USN, USAF and Moroccan exercise off the north Moroccan coast that featured simulated low-level strikes against several inland targets, war-at-sea strikes against Moroccan patrol boats, and dissimilar air combat training against USAF F-16 and Moroccan Mirages, anchoring at Palma on 15 December 1988, departing for Cannes on 20 December 1988, arriving Cannes on the morning of 23 December 1988, celebrating Christmas and New Year’s Eve at Cannes, sailing from Cannes, bound for Haifa, Israeli on New Year’s Day 1989, commencing her the second of three cycles of scheduled operations that day, “on 4 January 1989, during John F. Kennedy airborne Hawkeyes and the ship’s F-14 CAP detected, at about 78 nautical miles, two Libyan MiG-23 Floggers from Al Bumbah. Other Libyan aircraft had been observed and monitored earlier, but had not behaved aggressively, inevitably returning to their base. These two MiGs continued to close at high speed, however, accelerating first from 430 to 450, and then from 450 to 500, knots. The F-14 Tomcats, from VF-32, embarked on a series of pre-planned, non-provocative maneuvers, changing course and altitude in order to establish offset. The Floggers, however, countered the F-14s’ maneuvers with their own, re-establishing “head-on forward quarter weapons release” situations. As the Libyan planes closed at high speed within range to release their own weapons, the Tomcats, one flown by Lieutenant Herman C. Cook, Jr., with Lieutenant Commander Steven P. Collins as NFO, the other by Lieutenant Commander Joseph B. Connelly and Commander Leo F. Enwright, Jr., engaged the MiGs, firing in self-defense, and splashed the two Floggers with AIM-7 and AIM-9 missiles in the central Med north of Tobruk in international waters. As a CVW-3 chronicler laconically summed it up: “USN – 2, Libya – 0. John F. Kennedy reached Haifa, Israeli on 6 January 1989 to what her chronicler called a “heroes welcome,” news coverage of the MiG kills having proved extremely heavy, necessitating additional 6th Fleet public affairs people to handle the sharply increased media interest, sailing on 9 January 1989 to conduct Exercise Juniper Hawk with Israeli forces for two days, then headed back to the central Mediterranean Sea, transiting the Strait of Messina on 14 January 1989 to facilitate a turnover with USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-74) in the Tyrrhenian Sea, as the latter began her maiden Mediterranean Sea deployment, outchopped from the Middle Sea following turnover with on 22 January 1989, and reached Norfolk on 1 February, where Secretary of the Navy William L. Ball, III, flew out to the carrier to congratulate the crew and to pass along a note of thanks for a “job well done” from the newly elected President (and former naval aviator) George H.W. Bush; made her Southern Atlantic voyage on her tenth Mediterranean Sea deployment with the 6th Fleet; ending her second North Atlantic deployment on her first Central and Eastern Atlantic Ocean deployment operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet participating in Exercise United Effort and a NATO exercise Ocean Safari; ending her ninth Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet participating in National Week XXXI and Daily Double, and stand by operations for the potential evacuation of American citizens from Beirut, in the wake of Israeli forces entering Lebanon in Operation Peace for Galilee on her first Indian Ocean and North Arabian Sea deployment with the 7th Fleet, hosting the first visit aboard a United States ship by a Somali head of state, and achieved its 150,000th arrested landing, arriving home via the Suez Canal, Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea on her second canal transit; hosting the first visit aboard a United States ship by a Somali head of state, and achieved its 150,000th arrested landing (4 January to 14 July 1982); reclassified CV-67 1 December 1974; ending her second Caribbean Sea deployment, on her North Atlantic voyage operating under the direction of the 2nd Fleet participating in ReadiEx 1-82 near Puerto Rico; ending her Caribbean Sea voyage to conduct her operation readiness inspection ORI operating under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, which was slated to be a two-week training cruise in the Caribbean, on her second Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet, and her North Atlantic voyage participating in NATO exercises; ending her Shakedown cruise out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in the Caribbean Sea operating with the USLANTCOM (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. Her 16th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) (2 August 1988 to 1 February 1989) since she was commissioned 7 September 1968” (Ref. 72, 76, 380 & 540).

 

    “USS America (CV-66) with CVW-1 embarked departed NOB, Norfolk, Virginia 8 February 1989, with Captain James A. (Jim) Lair, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her fourth Northern Atlantic and fifth Caribbean Sea deployment (her first, fourth, 13th and 14th and 15th voyage were deployments, totaling 17 voyages in all), to participate in the NATO Exercise North Star, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. Reclassified CV-66 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" on 30 June 1975 while at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, entering Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 27 November 1974, upon return from her North Sea deployment on 12 October 1974; making three Vietnam Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War operating with the 7th Fleet (receiving five battle stars). She will under go her 23rd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 23 January 1965, with Captain Lawrence Heyworth, Jr., in command” (Ref. 1-America, 72 & 76, 324 & 824).  

 

USS America (CVA-66) with CVW-1 (AB) 

(8 February to 3 April 1989)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-102

Diamondbacks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AB100

F-14A

VF-33

Starfighters -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AB200

F-14A

VFA-82

Marauders -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas -

Hornet - Jet Strike Fighter

AB300

FA-18C

VFA-86

Sidewinders -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas -

Hornet - Jet Strike Fighter

AB400

FA-18C

VA-85

Black Falcons -                   Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AB500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-123

Screwtops -

Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-137

Rooks - Carrier

Tactical Electronics

Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-11

Dragon Slayers -           Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-32

Maulers - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - S-3 Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

 

 

    USS America (CV-66) task force not reported.

 

    “USS America (CV-66) again operated in the Vestfjord before making a port visit to Le Harve, France” (Ref. 1- America & 72).

 

    “USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) was awarded her first CINCLANTFLT Golden Anchor Award for best retention programs in an Atlantic Fleet carrier in February 1989” (Ref. 72 & 384).

 

    “During the month of February 1989, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) enjoyed a 30-day post-deployment stand-down period with their families” (Ref. 549).

 

 

Making over 30 knots, during a high speed run on 1 March 1989. Official U.S. Navy photograph by PH2 Michael Skeens; Naval Historical Center photo #: NH 97651-KN. NS024301 80k. NHC. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024301.jpg

 

    “The beginning of March proved similarly uneventful as harsh weather and over 20 inches of snow prevented USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) from being moved to Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a three-month industrial period” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) completed Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 3 March 1989, commencing on 3 October 1988. Repairs to the ship, especially to No. 2 aircraft elevator, resulting from the collision with Urdulitz, required considerable additional work. The ship also gained the capability to operate F/A-18 Hornets” (Ref. 76 & 383B).

 

    “Selected Restricted Availability, installations: Capability to operate and support F/A-18 Hornets; MK 36 decoy launching system; Tomahawk Missile Display System; Tomahawk Central Communication Network and Advanced Combat Direction System; replacement: message processing and distribution system with NavMacs V5 processing/distribution system” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “On 11 March 1989, the weather finally broke and USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) transited to the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in balmy, spring-like conditions” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) returned to Norfolk Naval Station upon completion of a three-month industrial period on 14 June 1989; transiting to Norfolk Naval Shipyard in balmy, spring-like conditions for a three-month industrial period on 11 March 1989” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) conducted Sea Trials from 9 to 13 March 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “In March 1989, the nonskid for the entire hanger deck aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was replaced” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Danish Crown Prince Frederick [Frederik A.H. Christian] toured USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) on 16 March 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

     USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Selective Restricted Availability (SRA) moored at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 1 October 1988 to 31 March 1989, “early work” beginning on 16 September. Among the services completed was overhaul of all four catapults and modifications to the RIM-7M missile system. Throughout her SRA, Enterprise lay moored at Alameda. The Fleet Training Group inspected her the next day. Additional training and inspections while in port followed. The pre-flight deck certification was conducted from 9 to 12 January 1989. Forty flight deck sailors serving aboard Enterprise cross-decked to USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) for refresher training, 25 January to 2 February 1989. In March 1989, the nonskid for the entire hanger deck aboard Enterprise was replaced” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 3 April 1989, USS America (CV-66) with CVW-1 embarked arrived NOB, Norfolk, Virginia 8 February 1989, with Captain James A. (Jim) Lair, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her fourth Northern Atlantic and fifth Caribbean Sea deployment (her first, fourth, 13th and 14th and 15th voyage were deployments, totaling 17 voyages in all), participating in NATO Exercise North Star, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, participating in the, operating in the Vestfjord before making a port visit to Le Harve, France. Squadrons: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33, F-14A; VFA-82, FA-18C; VFA-86, FA-18C; VA-85, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; VAQ-137, EA-6B; HS-11, SH-3H and VS-32, S-3A. Reclassified CV-66 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" on 30 June 1975 while at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, entering Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 27 November 1974, upon return from her North Sea deployment on 12 October 1974; making three Vietnam Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War operating with the 7th Fleet (receiving five battle stars). Her 23rd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 23 January 1965, with Captain Lawrence Heyworth, Jr., in command (8 February 1989 to 3 April 1989)” (Ref. 1-America, 72 & 76, 324 & 824).  

 

    “In April 1989, after completing a shakedown cruise, USS America (CV-66) participated in "Fleet Week '88." Sailors and ships were sent to New York City to demonstrate the Navy to the citizens in preparation for the USS Iowa (BB 61) battle group's move to Staten Island in 1989” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-13 (tail code AK) embarked departed Norfolk, Va. in April 1989, with Captain Lloyd

Edward Allen, Jr., as Commanding Officer and Captain Michael S. O’ Hearn, as Executive Officer, on her fourth Caribbean Sea

cruise, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet; completing

her first Cuba and Panama Canal Shakedown Cruise (19 January 5 to April 1948), her first midshipman cruise to the

Mediterranean Sea and Caribbean Sea (7 June to 6 August 1948) (first two under the direction of the 6th Fleet) and fifteenth

“WestPac” or World Cruise which ended after a Caribbean Sea cruise from 23 March  to 12 September 1983 fourth Caribbean

Sea cruise (March to May 1989), operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of

the 2nd Fleet. Coral Sea responded to a call for assistance from USS Iowa (BB-61) due to an explosion in the battleship's number two

gun turret in which 47 crew members were killed. The explosive ordnance disposal from Coral Sea removed volatile powder charges

from the ship's 16-inch guns and flooded powder magazines. Coral Sea also dispatched a surgical team and medical supplies. VC-8,

using SH-3G helicopters, also performed medevac and logistical support to Iowa; completing her first Cuba and Panama Canal

shakedown cruise (19 January 5 to April 1948), her first midshipman cruise to the Mediterranean Sea and Caribbean Sea (7 June

to 6 August 1948) (first two under the direction of the 6th Fleet) and fifteenth “WestPac” or World Cruise which ended after a

Caribbean Sea cruise from 23 March 1983 to 12 September 1983” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard”

brochure, 34, 35, 72 & 1275ZC8).

 

USS CORAL SEA (CV-43) with CVW-13 (AK)

(April 1989) 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) 2nd

Carib

 

CVW-13

AK

19 Apr 1989

 

South America

Dispatched surgical team and medical supplies. VC-8, using SH-3G helicopters, also performed medevac and Logistical Support to Iowa. USS Iowa (BB-61) suffered an explosion in the battleship's number two-gun turret in which 47 crewmembers were killed.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

          ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

     NICK NAME &

   PRIMARY ROLE

  TAIL

 CODE

 Modex

   AIRCRAFT   DESIGNATION

VMFA-451

Marines - Warlords -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet - Jet Strike Fighter

   AK100

FA-18A

VFA-132

Privateers -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet - Jet Strike Fighter

   AK300

FA-18A

VFA-137

Kestrels -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet - Jet Strike Fighter

   AK400

FA-18A

VA-55 (*1)

Sea Horses -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -

   AK500

A-6E

VA-65

Fighting Tigers -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -

   AK510

A-6E

VAW-127 (*2)

Seabats - Carrier

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

     AK

  600-603

E-2C

VAQ-133

Wizards - Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron or Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -

Prowler - Jammer

Special electronic installation

      AK

  604-607

A-6 - EA-6A

HS-17(*4)

Neptune's Raiders- Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

  AK610

SH-3H

(*1) CVW-13 disestablished on Jan.1, 1991

(*2) disestablished on Jan.1, 1991

(*3) disestablished on Sep.30, 1991

(*4) disestablished on Jul.2, 1991

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 76

 

    “The Navy installed automated teller machines on board, eliminating time consuming pay lines for the crew of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) in April 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “British Commander United Kingdom Army LGEN Sir David Ramsbotham visited USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) on 10 April 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) stood out of Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 13 April 1989, for Post-SRA Sea Trials and carrier qualifications in the southern California operating area” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    “On 16 April 1989, the VS-30 "Diamondcutters," embarked in USS America (CV-66), became the first fleet S-3 squadron to fire a Harpoon anti-ship missile. The launch resulted in a direct hit on the target by a detachment assigned to VS-30 as it participated in Exercise North Star '89” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “On two separate underway replenishments with ammunition ship Pyro (AE-24), USS Enterprise (CVN-65) onloaded 805 and 148 pallets of ammunition, respectively, on 19 and 20 April 1989.  She repeated the procedure on 5 June, loading 142 more pallets from USS Mount Hood (AE-29)” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 19 April 1989, while operating in the Caribbean Sea, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) responded to a call for assistance from USS Iowa (BB-61) due to an explosion in the battleship's number two gun turret in which 47 crew members were killed. The explosive ordnance disposal from Coral Sea removed volatile powder charges from the ship's 16-inch guns and flooded powder magazines. Coral Sea also dispatched a surgical team and medical supplies. VC-8, using SH-3G helicopters, also performed medevac and logistical support to Iowa” (Ref. 1 Coral Sea & 72).

 

    “In late April 1989, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-13 (tail code AK) embarked arrived Norfolk, Va., with Captain Lloyd Edward Allen, Jr., as Commanding Officer and Captain Michael S. O’ Hearn, as Executive Officer, her fourth Caribbean Sea cruise, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. Coral Sea responded to a call for assistance from USS Iowa (BB-61) due to an explosion in the battleship's number two gun turret in which 47 crew members were killed. The explosive ordnance disposal from Coral Sea removed volatile powder charges from the ship's 16-inch guns and flooded powder magazines. Coral Sea also dispatched a surgical team and medical supplies. VC-8, using SH-3G helicopters, also performed medevac and logistical support to Iowa; completing her first Cuba and Panama Canal shakedown cruise (19 January 5 to April 1948), her first midshipman cruise to the Mediterranean Sea and Caribbean Sea (7 June to 6 August 1948) (first two under the direction of the 6th Fleet) and fifteenth “WestPac” or World Cruise which ended after a Caribbean Sea cruise from 23 March 1983 to 12 September 1983 (April 1989)” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72 & 1275ZC8).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) received the Battle “E” from Vice Admiral Fetterman on 27 April 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 28 April 1989, conducting Post-SRA Sea Trials and carrier qualifications in the southern California operating area from 13 to 28 April 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    “The Navy evaluated F-14A-plus Tomcats with VF-142 and VF-143 while the ship steamed off the Virginia capes. USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) became the first ship to provide air traffic control services to the improved Tomcats from 17 to 28 April 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) moored at Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 28 April 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) moored at Naval Air Station, North Island, California from 28 April to 1 May 1989, anchoring at Coronado Roads on the 2nd” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    “The crew of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) hosted a reunion by more than 500 members of the Defenders of Bataan and Corrigedor on 3 May 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored at Coronado Roads 9 May 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    “USS America (CV-66) with CVW-1 embarked departed NOB, Norfolk, Virginia 11 May 1989, with Captain James A. (Jim) Lair, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 13th Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, on her fourth Indian Ocean deployment operating with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. Departing early from separate port visits America and USS Coral Sea (CV-43) were diverted to the eastern Mediterranean Sea as a show of force in the wake of the suspected hanging of Marine Corps Lt. Col. William R. Higgins by Middle East terrorists, and threats to other hostages (Lt. Col. Higgins had been kidnapped in February 1988 while a member of the United Nations peacekeeping forces in Lebanon), with America only two days out, a fire in the pump room killed two sailors and caused minor damage while the ship was in the Atlantic en route to the Mediterranean Sea for her six-month deployment, that found America evacuating the American Embassy in Lebanon in 1989, a country in Western Asia, on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea. It is bordered by Syria to the north and east and Israel to the south. Upon conclusion of operations, America made her way to the Indian Ocean, steaming to the Suez Canal, making her seventh transit, steaming through the Red Sea, Bab el Mandeb Strait, Gulf of Aden, on her fourth Indian Ocean deployment operating with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. Upon conclusion of operations, she will steam back to the Gulf of Aden, Bab el Mandeb Strait, and headed to the Red Sea, transiting the Suez Canal, on her eighth transit, steaming through North Atlantic on her way home. Reclassified CV-66 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" on 30 June 1975 while at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, entering Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 27 November 1974, upon return from her North Sea deployment on 12 October 1974; making three Vietnam Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War operating with the 7th Fleet (receiving five battle stars). She will under go her 24th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 23 January 1965, with Captain Lawrence Heyworth, Jr., in command (11 May 1989 to 10 November 1989)” (Ref. 1-America, 72, 76, 324 & 824).  

 

USS America (CVA-66) with CVW-1 (AB) 

 (11 May 1989 to 10 November 1989)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-102

Diamondbacks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AB100

F-14A

VF-33

Starfighters -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AB200

F-14A

VFA-82

Marauders -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas -

Hornet - Jet Strike Fighter

AB300

FA-18C

VFA-86

Sidewinders -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas -

Hornet - Jet Strike Fighter

AB400

FA-18C

VA-85

Black Falcons -                   Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -Tanker

AB500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-123

Screwtops -

Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-137

Rooks - Carrier

Tactical Electronics

Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-11

Dragon Slayers -           Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-32

Maulers - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - S-3 Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

 

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 13 May 1989, conducting refresher training in the southern California operating area from 1 to 13 May 1989, including air defense against naval aircraft, B-52s and North America B-1A Lancers, and tactical maneuvering with battleship USS Missouri (BB-63)” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 13 May 1989, a fire in the pump room of USS America (CV-66) kills two sailors and causes minor damage while the ship is in the Atlantic en route to the Mediterranean for a six-month deployment” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) participated in joint exercise Solid Shield 89 off the South Carolina coast from 4 to 19 May 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “On 27 May 1989, Captain Herbert A. Browne, Jr. relieved Captain Wisely as commanding officer of the USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) in a ceremony held in Trophy Park, on the grounds of the shipyard, guest access being severely restricted due to the security regulations in the industrial area” (Ref. 549).     

 

 

USS Independence (CV-62) underway, 1988-1989 (note F/A-18 Hornet on port catapult and corresponding bridle catcher still in place). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center. (# NH 97715). (Thanks to William F. Baca, who helped date this photo). NS026221 115k. NHC. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026221.jpg

 

CHAPTER XXXIX

ELEVENTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS off the Virginia Capes and Cherry Point

(October 1988 to March 1989)

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) responded during Iran 1 April incident in which USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) struck an Iranian mine in international waters - Iraq and Iran War, Cuba and Panama Canal shakedown cruise (March to May 1989) USS Coral Sea (CV-43) responded to a call for assistance from USS Iowa (BB-61) operating in the Caribbean Sea due to an explosion in the battleship's number two gun turret in which 47 crewmembers were killed 19 April 1989.

 (29 September 1987 to 31 May 1989)

Part 1 – (29 September 1987 to 16 April 1988)

Part 2 – (17 April to 31 December 1988)

Part 3 – (1 January to 31 May 1989)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXIX

Part 3 – (1 January to 30 May 1989)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4