CHAPTER XL

Part 1 – (31 May to 31 December 1989)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XL

TWELFTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

The evacuation of the American embassy in Beirut, Lebanon

(1 June 1989 to 26 April 1990)

Part 1 – (31 May to 31 December 1989)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 January 1990)

Part 3 – (1 February to 26 April 1990)

 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with Captain Warren B. Christie, Jr., Commander, Carrier Air Wing 13 (CVW-13) (tail code AK) Rear Admiral Richard C. Macke, assumed command of Commander Carrier Group Two in March 1988 embarked departed Norfolk, Va. 31 May 1989, with Captain Lloyd Edward Allen, Jr., as Commanding Officer and Captain Michael S. O’ Hearn, as Executive Officer, on her third Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), from 12 September 1983 to Present; completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956), her 12th Mediterranean Sea deployment, and her 13th voyage in the Mediterranean Sea, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. Prior to her deployment under went her fourth Caribbean Sea Cruise (March to May 1989), on her 29th deployment and on 19 April 1989 Coral Sea responded to a call for assistance from USS Iowa (BB-61) due to an explosion in the battleship's number two gun turret in which 47 crew members were Killed (the explosive ordnance disposal from Coral Sea removed volatile powder charges from the ship's 16-inch guns and flooded powder magazines) while Coral Sea dispatched a surgical team and medical supplies. VC-8, using SH-3G helicopters, also performed medevac and logistical support to Iowa, while prior to her 30th deployment been cited for dumping medical wastes off North Carolina coast in July 1988, while prior to the incident welcomed Captain Allen, Lloyd Edward as the new Commanding Officer, arriving on board 22 June 1988 and would be the last Commanding Officer, proceed by local operations in the VaCapes and Cherry Point operating areas and visited Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1988. Completing 15 “WestPac’s” while under the direction of the 7th Fleet in the Pacific (25 January 1960 to 12 September 1983); reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975; involved in two Vietnam peace coast patrol cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March (1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She will under go her 18th foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will go her 29th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 1 October 1947” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 & 72, 1275ZC8, 1275ZC10 & 1275ZC11-/11)

 

Mediterranean Cruise Book 1989 - Ref. 1275ZC

The Cruise and Ports of Call - Ref. 1275ZC3

Cruise Port dates - Ref. 1275ZC4

Decommissioning - Ref. 1275ZC5

Command and Staff - Ref. 1275ZC6

Captain L. E. “Ed” Allen, CO of USS Coral Sea (CV-43) - Ref. 1275ZC7

 

USS CORAL SEA (CV-43) with CVW-13 (AK)

(31 May to 30 September 1989) 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) 2nd & 6th

Lant

12th Med

Lant

CVW-13

(*1)

AK

31 May 1989

30 Sep 1989

Europe

29th FWFD

123-days

Evacuation of the American Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon

3rd Mediterranean Cruise since her reassignment to the 6th Fleet in the Atlantic upon arrival in the 5th Fleet Area, arriving on a World Cruise via the Suez Canal and Med on 12 September 1983, her 11th Med Deployment, having completed nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956) prior to her 1st conversion (25 January 1960).

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

          ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

     NICK NAME &

   PRIMARY ROLE

  TAIL

 CODE

 Modex

   AIRCRAFT   DESIGNATION

VMFA-451

Marines - Warlords -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

   AK100

FA-18A

VFA-132

Privateers -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

   AK300

FA-18A

VFA-137

Kestrels -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

   AK400

FA-18A

VA-55 (*2)

Sea Horses -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -

   AK500

A-6E

VA-65

Fighting Tigers -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber

   AK510

A-6E

VAW-127 (*3)

Seabats - Carrier

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

     AK

  600-603

E-2C

VAQ-133

Wizards - Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron or Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -

Prowler - Jammer

Special electronic installation

      AK

  604-607

A-6 - EA-6A

HS-17 (*4)

Neptune's Raiders - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

  AK610

SH-3H

(*1) CVW-13 disestablished on Jan.1, 1991

(*2) disestablished on Jan.1, 1991

(*3) disestablished on Sep.30, 1991

(*4) disestablished on Jul.2, 1991

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 76

 

Iran History

 

     “Upon the approval by the Majles of all of his ministerial nominations (representing a healthy balance of the factions), Rafsanjani began the process of rebuilding the war-torn economy. Considered a "pragmatist," or "moderate," Rafsanjani favored a policy of economic liberalization, privatization of industry, and a rapprochement with the West that would encourage much-needed foreign investment. A move toward the latter was facilitated with the resumption of diplomatic ties between Iran and the United Kingdom on September 27, 1990, despite the fatwa (religious edict) issued by Khomeini 18 months earlier calling for the death of the British author Salman Rushdie, whose novel The Satanic Verses (1988) was considered blasphemous to Islam” (Ref. 22).

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) silhouetted against a low sun, as she arrives at Palma, Spain, during her final Mediterranean deployment, June 1989. Photographed by PH2 Michael Skeens. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center (# NH 97653-KN). NS024356 68k. NHC. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024356.jpg

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) relieved USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) in June 1989” (Ref. 34).

 

     “Captain Michael S. O’ Hearn was relieved as XO of USS Coral Sea (CV-43) by Commander Ralph K. Zia in June 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC8 & 1275ZC9).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 5 June 1989, for ReadiEx 02-89, carquals, tactical exercises and cyclic flight operations with BG Foxtrot and Japanese units in the southern California operating area” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) onloaded 142 pallets of ammunition from USS Mount Hood (AE-29) on 5 June 1989” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “The crew of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) enjoyed the opportunity of participating in the creation of the motion picture “The Hunt for Red October,” when Paramount Studios filmed scenes on board from 8 to 9 June 1989” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) hosted a reunion of 75 former crewmen of USS Hornet (CV-8) on 10 June 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced participation in ComptuEx 89-4, including mock raids from “multiple aircraft in a hostile electromagnetic operating environment,” and from the Japanese on 19 June 1989” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) pulled in for a port of call at Palma, in full Palma de Mallorca, Spain on 20 June 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) participated in ComptuEx 89-4, operations that included mock raids from “multiple aircraft in a hostile electromagnetic operating environment,” and from the Japanese from 19 to 26 June 1989” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) made a port of call at Palma, in full Palma de Mallorca, is the major city and port on the island of Majorca (Mallorca) and capital city of the autonomous community of the Balearic Islands in Spain - Benidorm (/ˈbɛnɪdɔrm/, Valencian: [beniˈðɔɾm], Spanish: [beniˈðor]) is a coastal town in Alicante, Spain, on the Western Mediterranean from 20 to 27 June 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Advanced Training Assessment (ATA) operations that included CIWS and missile firings from 27 to 29 June 1989” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) pulled in for a port of call at Marseille (UK /mɑrˈs/; French: [maʁ.sɛj], locally: [mɑχˈsɛjə]; Occitan: Marselha [maʀˈsejɔ, maʀˈsijɔ]; also Marseilles in English), known in antiquity as Masalia, Massalia or Massilia (from Greek: Μασσαλία; [probably adapted from an existing language related to Ligurian) is the second largest city in France, after Paris, with a population of 850,636 (January 2011) on a land area of 241 km2 (93 sq mi) on 30 June 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “Workers at Norfolk Naval Shipyard and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., assisted the crew of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) in lifting Nos 1 and 2 Main Engine high pressure turbine casings. The massive project began during Solid Shield 89 when the crew noted small casing steam leaks, as neither engine’s casing had been lifted since her initial construction in June 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

     “On 30 June 1989, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) with CVW-8 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia, with Capt. Dayton W. Ritt in command, ending her first Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming through the Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Med in support of Dragon Hammer, National Week and Juniper Stallion. Theodore Roosevelt was awarded her first CINCLANTFLT Golden Anchor Award for best retention programs in an Atlantic Fleet carrier in February 1989. Ports of call include: Palma de Mallorca, Spain; Marseilles, France; Alexandria, Egypt; Antalya, Turkey; Naples, Italy; Tangiers, Morocco; Toulon, France; Monaco and Haifa, Israel. Squadrons: VF-41 (F-14A); VF-84 (F-14A); VFA-15 (F/A-18C); VFA-87 (F/A-18C); VA-35 (A-6E); VA-36 (A-6E); VAW-124 (E-2C); VAQ-141 (EA-6B); VS-24 (S-3A) and HS-9 (SH-3H). USS South Carolina (CGN-37); USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55); USS William V. Pratt (DDG-44); USS Farragut (DDG-37); USS Conyngham (DDG-17); USS Sellers (DDG-11) and USS Charles F. Adams (DDG-2) joined USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) as part of her task force. Her second Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 25 October 1986, with Capt. Paul W. Parcells named as the Prospective Commanding Officer, and christened by Mrs. Barbara Lehman, wife of Secretary Lehman (20 December 1988 to 30 June 1989)” (Ref. 72, 84A & 384).

 

    “From 1986 to 1989, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) had a helicopter crash on deck and in the water and the crew had to catch an S-3 in the barricade, as reported by Darren Sapp, Yellow Shirt aboard” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 30 June 1989, conducting ReadiEx 02-89 in the southern California operating area, conducting carquals, tactical exercises and cyclic flight operations with BG Foxtrot and Japanese units from 5 to 30 June 1989. The crew onloaded 142 pallets of ammunition from USS Mount Hood (AE-29) on 5 June 1989. The crew of Enterprise enjoyed the opportunity of participating in the creation of the motion picture “The Hunt for Red October,” when Paramount Studios filmed scenes on board from 8 to 9 June 1989. Enterprise participated in ComptuEx 89-4, operations that included mock raids from “multiple aircraft in a hostile electromagnetic operating environment,” and from the Japanese from 19 to 26 June 1989 and conducted Advanced Training Assessment (ATA) operations that included CIWS and missile firings from 27 to 29 June 1989” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 30 June 1989, the CNO issued homeport change information, assigning Norfolk as USS Enterprise (CVN-65) home port effective 15 April 1990” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) made a port of call at Marseille (UK /mɑrˈs/; French: [maʁ.sɛj], locally: [mɑχˈsɛjə]; Occitan: Marselha [maʀˈsejɔ, maʀˈsijɔ]; also Marseilles in English), known in antiquity as Masalia, Massalia or Massilia (from Greek: Μασσαλία; [probably adapted from an existing language related to Ligurian) is the second largest city in France, after Paris, with a population of 850,636 (January 2011) on a land area of 241 km2 (93 sq mi) from 30 June to 6 July 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “On 11 July 1989, Rear Admiral Jeremy D. Taylor, Chief of Naval Training, flew out to USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) to observe training CarQuals” (Ref. 549

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) pulled in for a port of call at Cannes, France on 11 July 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was present during Bastille Day at Cannes, France on 14 July 1989” (Ref. 34).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) made a port of call at Cannes (French pronunciation: ​[kan], in Occitan Canas) is a city located on the French Riviera (It is a commune of France located in the Alpes-Maritimes department, a busy tourist destination and host of the annual Cannes Film Festival, Midem, and Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity) from 11 to 16 July 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) pulled in for a port of call at İzmir is a large metropolis in the western extremity of Anatolia and the third most populous city in Turkey, after Istanbul and Ankara. İzmir's metropolitan area extends along the outlying waters of the Gulf of İzmir and inland to the north across Gediz River's delta, to the east along an alluvial plain created by several small streams and to a slightly more rugged terrain in the south on 21 July 1989 ” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) returned to Norfolk, Virginia on 22 July 1989 after successfully completing over 1,200 traps during training carquals” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 23 July 1989, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) hosted Vice Admiral Jerome L. Johnson, Commander, 2nd Fleet, as he, in turn, hosted Vice Admiral Igor Vladimirovich Kasatonov, First Deputy Commander in Chief, Northern Fleet, and an entourage that included the commanding officers of Soviet warships Marshal Ustinov, Otlichny, and Gasanov. They dined in John F. Kennedy’s flag mess, and then enjoyed a sunset parade in the hangar bay” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) made a port of call at İzmir is a large metropolis in the western extremity of Anatolia and the third most populous city in Turkey, after Istanbul and Ankara. İzmir's metropolitan area extends along the outlying waters of the Gulf of İzmir and inland to the north across Gediz River's delta, to the east along an alluvial plain created by several small streams and to a slightly more rugged terrain in the south from 21 to 24 July 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) concluded her visit to Port Everglades moored along the Inland Waterway on 24 July 1989” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 25 July 1989, for ReadiEx 89-4A, working in scenarios that included multiple raids, communications jamming and radar jamming” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) pulled in for a port of call at Alexandria, Egypt on 29 July 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “Two men aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) fail overboard on 29 July 1989 and were recovered uninjured” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) made a port of call at Alexandria (/ˌælɪɡˈzændrɪə/ or /ˌælɪɡˈzɑːndrɪə/; اسكندرية, pronounced [eskendeˈrejjæ] in Egyptian Arabic) is the second largest city and the second largest metropolitan area in Egypt after Greater Cairo by size and population, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea in the north central part of the country. It is also the largest city lying directly on the Mediterranean coast from 29 July to 1 August 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) carried out contingency operations off strife-torn Lebanon on 1 August 1989, "on station and ready to implement national policy . . ." The evacuation of the American embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, accomplished on short notice, proved "a last superlative footnote" to The Ageless Warrior's chronicle of operations in that historic sea” (Ref. 34 & 43).

 

     “USS America (CV-66) evacuated the American Embassy in Lebanon in 1989” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “On 11 August 1989, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) and USS America (CV-66) departed early from separate port visits when they were diverted to the eastern Mediterranean as a show of force in the wake of the suspected hanging of Marine Corps Lt. Col. William R. Higgins by Middle East terrorists, and threats to other hostages. Lt. Col. Higgins had been kidnapped in February 1988 while a member of the United Nations peacekeeping forces in Lebanon” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

 

Underway in formation off the coast of Lebanon are, from left, the guided missile cruiser USS Belknap (CG-26), the battleship

USS Iowa (BB-61), the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43) and the amphibious assault ship USS Nassau (LHA-4), 16 Aug 1989. NS0161023 192k. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # DN-SC-90-11755, by PH3 Michael Skeens. Defense Visual Information Center.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/01/0161023.jpg

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 16 August 1989, conducting ReadiEx 89-4A from 25 July to 16 August 1989, working in scenarios that included multiple raids, communications jamming and radar jamming” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    “Upon completion of training and Carquals on 21 August 1989, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) moored along the Inland Waterway at Port Everglades” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 22 August 1989, while USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) was moored along the Inland Waterway at Port Everglades during general visiting, several visitors received minor injuries when they were startled by the lifting of a pressure relief valve on the ship’s number two elevator hydraulic system. Although several visitors fell to the non-skid surface of the elevator in the panic, only two people required transportation to local hospitals for treatment” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Antalya, Turkey (Turkish pronunciation: [anˈtalja]), is the eighth most populous city in Turkey and the capital of its eponymous province. Located on Anatolia's flourishing southwest coast bordered by the Taurus Mountains, Antalya is the largest Turkish city on the Mediterranean coast from 28 to 31 August 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “More training and CarQuals followed, after which USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) did not return to Norfolk, Virginia until 1 September 1989” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Haifa, the largest city in northern Israel, and the third-largest city in the country from 1 to 4 September 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) pulled in for a port of call at Malaga, a city and a municipality, capital of the Province of Málaga, in the Autonomous Community of Andalusia, Spain from 11 to 13 September 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 embarked departed Alameda, California 17 September 1989, embarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif., with Captain Harry T. Rittenour as Commanding Officer, on her third World Cruise 89–90, her home port transfer to the east coast for Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Northrop Grumman Newport News shipyard, on her 13thWestPac” and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, participating in PacEx 89, a joint large-scale training evolution involving U.S., Japanese and ROK forces, Annualex 89, Operation "Valiant Blitz 85-1" in cooperation with elements of the South Korean Navy and Marine Corps, conducted off the coast of Okinawa. Like BALIKATAN / TANGENT FLASH, VALIANT BLITZ 90, comprised of the largest assemblage of U.S. naval air and sea power since World War II, was an amphibious exercise. USS Elliot (DD-967) provided naval gunfire support for the marine landing forces and screening actions against hostile forces opposing the transport ships. Carrier Qualifications, and training with USS Midway (CV-41), Carrier Qualifications and cyclic flight operations in support of Cope Thunder, a joint Navy and USAF power projection exercise west of Luzon, Tayabas Bay for “near land operations,” Air Wing ELEVEN and Battle Group FOXTROT joined forces with along with USS Midway (CV-41), participated in Operation Classic Resolve, President George H.W. Bush's response to Philippine President Corazon Aquino's request for air support during the rebel coup attempt, on her 17th & 18th Indian Ocean voyage, her fifth voyage in the Arabian Sea, on her fourth North Arabian Sea deployment, participating in Battle Week exercises and or Weapons Week, WASEX, STRIKEX, SAREX, ACM, SINKEX, BANNEREX, highlighted early-to-mid January 1990, including NSSM launch and air-to-air missile shoots (MISSELEX) in the vicinity of Diego Garcia from 4 to 8 January 1990 and Earnest Will exercises operations and upon conclusion will steam through the Indian Ocean around Cape of Good Hope on her third transit since her commission en route to Norfolk, Virgina. She will under go her 22nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission November 25, 1961 with Captain V. P. de Poix in command” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

Key Personnel:

 

Captain Harry T. Rittenour, Commanding Officer, USS Enterprise (CVN-65)

- Commanded the ship throughout the calendar year

Captain Richard J. Naughton, Executive Officer, USS Enterprise (CVN-65)

- Executive Officer for the ship until 20 March.

Captain Alfred G. Harms Jr., Executive Officer, USS Enterprise (CVN-65)

- Executive Officer for the ship after 20 March.

Rear Admiral Joseph C. Strasser, Commander Cruiser Destroyer Group Three

- Commander of Battle Group Foxtrot during World Cruise 89-90

Captain Thomas J. Ford, Commander Airwing Eleven

- Commander of Enterprise Airwing during World Cruise 89-90

Captain Linton Wells, II, Commander Destroyer Squadron Twenty One

- Commander of escort and support ships for Battle Group Foxtrot

 

A. Command Historian's Overview.

B. Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department.

C. Air Department.

D. Communications Department.

E. Deck Department.

F. Dental Department.

G. Engineering Department.

H. Legal Department.

I. Medical Department.

J. Operations Department.

K. Overhaul.

L. Reactor Department.

M. Safety Department.

N. Supply Department.

0. Weapons Department.

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 (NH)

(17 September 1989 to 16 March 1990)

Two battle forces (including the carriers Enterprise and USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and the battleships USS New Jersey (BB-62) and USS Missouri (BB-63) ("Mighty Mo" or "Big Mo")) operated in conjunction with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force, Republic of Korea Navy and Air Force, U.S. Air Force and U.S. Marine Corps to provide highly successful joint training for Operation Classic Resolve, President George H.W. Bush's response to Philippine President Corazon Aquino's request for air support during the rebel coup attempt, to include open ocean AAW exercises, together with an opposed transit, ASUW and support of amphibious operations, though interrupted by “near daily” Soviet aerial reconnaissance flights to maintain the readiness of components and units of the Combined Forces Command defending the Republic of Korea. USS Alamo (LSD-33) headed to Korea to participate in the bilateral exercise Operation "Valiant Blitz 85-1" in cooperation with elements of the South Korean Navy and Marine Corps, conducted off the coast of Okinawa. Like BALIKATAN / TANGENT FLASH, VALIANT BLITZ 90, comprised of the largest assembly of U.S. naval air and sea power since World War II, was an amphibious operations training conducted off the coast of Okinawa, while coordinated operations involved a three-carrier battle group comprised of the Enterprise, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) , and USS Constellation (CVN-64). USS Elliot (DD-967) provided naval gunfire support for the marine landing forces and screening actions against hostile forces opposing the transport ships. Two battle forces (including the carriers Enterprise and Carl Vinson and the battleships USS New Jersey (BB-62) and USS Missouri (BB-63) ("Mighty Mo" or "Big Mo")) operated in conjunction with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force, Republic of Korea Navy and Air Force, U.S. Air Force and U.S. Marine Corps to provide highly successful joint training for Operation Classic Resolve, President George H.W. Bush's response to Philippine President Corazon Aquino's request for air support during the rebel coup attempt. Battle Week exercises and or Weapons Week, WASEX, STRIKEX, SAREX, ACM, SINKEX, BANNEREX, highlighted early-to-mid January 1990, including NSSM launch and air-to-air missile shoots (MISSELEX) in the vicinity of Diego Garcia, followed by a five event fly day on 13 February 1990, continuing crossdecking personnel and conducted WASEX against USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) and conducted Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) Team inspects the ship’s reactors.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-114

Aardvarks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NH200

F-14A

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks -                  Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NH300

A-7E

VA-94

Shrikes -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NH400

A-7E

VA-95

Green Lizards -                  Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -Tanker

NH500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-135

Black Ravens -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-21

Redtails - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - S-3 Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

Air Wing ELEVEN made the final cruise aboard Enterprise from September 1989 to March 1990.

 

    “CVW-11 was again embarked, with the same composition as the previous deployment. Rear Admiral Strasser, ComCruDesGru-3, was Commander, BG Foxtrot, while Captain Linton Wells, II, ComDesRon-21, commanded the other ships of the group” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transited the Northern Pacific, steaming northwesterly courses, skirting the Aleutians. Conducting her transit in EmCon, she relied heavily upon EW information in lieu of radar to track Soviet aircraft. A man fell overboard on 22 September 1989, though being recovered without injury” (Ref. 362F & 524).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) made a port of call at Halifax (/ˈhælɨfæks/), formally the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM), is the capital of the province of Nova Scotia, Canada from 21 to 25 September 1989” (Ref. 1275ZC4).

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) and USS Wasp (LHD-1) at the end of "Coral Maru"'s final deployment, 28 September 1989. Deactivation and stripping at Norfolk started a few days later. Official USN photo by PH3 Rick Stamm. (DVIC id: DNSC9011762). Defense Visual Information Center Memorabilia http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024302.jpg

 

    The Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) completed the full transition to F/A-18 Hornet avionics and engine support on 29 September 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “On 30 September 1989, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with Captain Warren B. Christie, Jr., Commander, Carrier Air Wing 13 (CVW-

13) (tail code AK) Rear Admiral Richard C. Macke, assumed command of Commander Carrier Group Two in March 1988 embarked

departed Norfolk, Va. 31 May 1989, with Captain Lloyd Edward Allen, Jr., as Commanding Officer and Captain Michael S. O’

Hearn was relieved as XO of Coral Sea by Commander Ralph K. Zia in June 1989, ending her third Mediterranean Sea

deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), from 12 September 1983 to Present; completing nine tours of

duty in the Mediterranean (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956), her 12th Mediterranean Sea deployment, and her 13th voyage in the

Mediterranean Sea, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic

Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. Captain Michael S. O’ Hearn was relieved as XO of USS Coral

Sea (CV-43) by Commander Ralph K. Zia in June 1989. Arriving in the Mediterranean Sea, Coral Sea relieved USS Theodore

Roosevelt (CVN-71) in June 1989. Coral Sea made a port of call at Palma, in full Palma de Mallorca, is the major city and port on the

island of Majorca (Mallorca) and capital city of the autonomous community of the Balearic Islands in Spain - Benidorm (/ˈbɛnɪdɔrm/,

Valencian: [beniˈðɔɾm], Spanish: [beniˈðor]) is a coastal town in Alicante, Spain, on the Western Mediterranean from 20 to 27 June

1989; Marseille (UK /mɑrˈs/; French: [maʁ.sɛj], locally: [mɑχˈsɛjə]; Occitan: Marselha [maʀˈsejɔ, maʀˈsijɔ]; also Marseilles in

English), known in antiquity as Masalia, Massalia or Massilia (from Greek: Μασσαλία; [probably adapted from an existing language

related to Ligurian) is the second largest city in France, after Paris, with a population of 850,636 (January 2011) on a land area of

241 km2 (93 sq mi) on 30 June 1989; Cannes (French pronunciation: ​[kan], in Occitan Canas) is a city located on the French Riviera

(It is a commune of France located in the Alpes-Maritimes department, a busy tourist destination and host of the annual Cannes Film

Festival, Midem, and Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity) from 11 to 16 July 1989; İzmir is a large metropolis in the

western extremity of Anatolia and the third most populous city in Turkey, after Istanbul and Ankara. İzmir's metropolitan area extends

along the outlying waters of the Gulf of İzmir and inland to the north across Gediz River's delta, to the east along an alluvial plain

created by several small streams and to a slightly more rugged terrain in the south on 21 July 1989 and Alexandria (/ˌælɪɡˈzændrɪə/

or /ˌælɪɡˈzɑːndrɪə/; اسكندرية, pronounced [eskendeˈrejjæ] in Egyptian Arabic) is the second largest city and the second largest

metropolitan area in Egypt after Greater Cairo by size and population, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the

Mediterranean Sea in the north central part of the country. It is also the largest city lying directly on the Mediterranean coast from 29

July to 1 August 1989. Coral Sea carried out contingency operations off strife-torn Lebanon on 1 August 1989, "on station and ready

to implement national policy . . ." The evacuation of the American embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, accomplished on short notice, proved

"a last superlative footnote" to The Ageless Warrior's chronicle of operations in that historic sea. Coral Sea made a port of call at

Antalya, Turkey (Turkish pronunciation: [anˈtalja]), is the eighth most populous city in Turkey and the capital of its eponymous

province. Located on Anatolia's flourishing southwest coast bordered by the Taurus Mountains, Antalya is the largest Turkish city on

the Mediterranean coast from 28 to 31 August 1989; Haifa, the largest city in northern Israel, and the third-largest city in the country

from 1 to 4 September 1989; Malaga, a city and a municipality, capital of the Province of Málaga, in the Autonomous Community of

Andalusia, Spain from 11 to 13 September 1989 and Halifax (/ˈhælɨfæks/), formally the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM), is the

capital of the province of Nova Scotia, Canada from 21 to 25 September 1989. Ports of call include: Palma, in full Palma de Mallorca,

Spain; Marseille, France; Cannes, France; İzmir, Turkey; Alexandria, Egypt; Antalya, Turkey; Haifa, Israel; Malaga, Spain and

Halifax, Canada. Squadrons: VMFA-451, FA-18A; VFA-132, FA-18A; VFA-137, FA-18A; VA-55 (*1), A-6E; VA-65, A-6E; VAW-

127 (*2), E-2C; VAQ-133, A-6 - EA-6A and HS-17(*3), SH-3H. (*1) CVW-13 disestablished on Jan. 1, 1991; (*2) disestablished on

Jan. 1, 1991; (*3) disestablished on Sep. 30, 1991 and (*4) disestablished on Jul. 2, 1991. Completing 15 “WestPac’s” while under

the direction of the 7th Fleet in the Pacific (25 January Peace Coast Patrol Cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the

evacuation of Saigon on 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh on 12 April 1975 in Operation

Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August

1973), following six Vietnam War Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972),

completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the

Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). Her 19th foreign water deployment since her visit to

Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon

completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB

110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned 24 April 1957; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-

43 on 1 October 1952. Her 30th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947 (31 May to 9

September 1989)” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72, 1275ZC4, 1275ZC8, 1275ZC9,

1275ZC10 & 1275ZC11-/11).

 

 31/05/89 – 30/09/89

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

    “MED

  CRUISE”

 Meritorious Unit Commendation

 March 1988 to 30 Sep 1989

131h

Navy Expeditionary Service Medal

 1 August 1989

13th

Reference 34, 35 & 43 reflect Chat info.

 

    “Chopping to Com7thFlt operational control, on 1 October 1989, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) spent the entire month operating in the vicinity of Japan and South Korea” (Ref. 362F).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transited to Cape Flattery Operations Area to rendezvous with 3rd Fleet forces, including USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and USS Constellation (CV-54), for PacEx 89, a joint large-scale training evolution involving U.S., Japanese and ROK forces. Dual carrier operations were conducted with “real time” coordination used to “resolve air traffic control airspace conflicts.” However, northern latitudes “complicated” the exercise with “adverse weather and sea states”” (Ref. 362F).

 

    USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) stood out on 3 October 1989 to conduct exercises, among which were VS-22 ASW operations against the attack submarine Key West (SSN-722) on 4 and 5 October 1989” (Ref. 549).

 

    On 6 October 1989, during night flight operations, a VF-32 F-14 Tomcat (Modex AC 200) impacted the port jet blast deflector aboard USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), catching fire and plunging into the sea while en route from Norfolk, Virginia to Portland.  Lieutenants Russell C. Walker, the pilot, and Robert S. Schrader, the NFO, both ejected safely from the F-14 and were recovered unhurt by an HS-7 helo” (Ref. 549).

 

    A Navy Imaging Command camera team began production of a hanger deck fire training film. The sailors remained on board for two weeks while USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) berthed in port, and embarked again in October to shoot clips underway for the important training movie that circulated throughout the Fleet on 21 August 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 6 October 1989, with Captain Gary L. Beck in command, for Advanced Phase, a multi force exercise, in the Cherry Point Operating Area off the North Carolina coast” (Ref. 383B).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 (AG)

(6 October to 2 November 1989)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-143

Pukin' Dogs -

 Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AG100

F-14A

VF-142

Ghostriders -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman -Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AG200

F-14A

VFA-136

Knight Hawks -                      Attack Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas -

Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

AG300

FA-18A

VFA-131

Wildcats -

Attack Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas -

Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

AG400

FA-18A

VA-34

Blue Blasters -                      Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -Tanker

AG500

A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D

VAW-121

Bluetails -

Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-140

Patriots -

Tactical Electronics

Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-5

Night Dippers - Helicopter

Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-31

Top Cats - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) commenced Advanced Phase, a multi force exercise, in the Cherry Point Operating Area off the North Carolina coast on 6 October 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    On 7 October 1989, an S-3B Viking (Modex AC 710) (BuNo 159759) from VS-22 attached to CVW-3 embarked on board USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) crashed soon after launching from number one catapult late in the afternoon watch, with all four crewmen ejecting. Rescuers picked up Aviation Antisubmarine Warfare Operator 2d Class Tracy S. Mann in stable condition, but Lieutenant Douglas G. Gray and Lieutenant (j.g.) David S. Jennings, USNR, perished; their bodies were recovered. Searchers never found Lieutenant John T. Hartman, USNR” (Ref. 549).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) operated off Hokkaidō, Japan from 1 to 7 October 1989” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “Captain John J. (Maz) Mazach, NAVCAD assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS America (CV-66) on 14 October 1989, relieving Captain John J. (JJ) Coonan, Jr., NAVCAD, 18th Commanding Officer, serving from 13 August 1988 to 14 October 1989” (Ref. 324).

 

    “The final two months of 1989 proved exciting. Beyond the "routine" exercises and training initiatives, USS Forrestal (CV-59) crew became part of history, as they provided support to President of the United States George H. W. Bush during his Malta Summit. The support included a three-hour Presidential visit to the ship” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

    “USS Forrestal (CV-59) participated in numerous exercises during this deployment including; Harmonie Sud, Tunisian Amphibious and National Week” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

    VALIANT BLITZ 90, conducts amphibious operations training, comprised of the largest assemblage of U.S. naval air and sea power since World War II. Coordinated operations involved a three-carrier battle group comprised of the USS Enterprise (CVN-65), USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), and USS Constellation (CVN-64). Two battle forces (including the carriers Enterprise and Carl Vinson and the battleships USS New Jersey (BB-62) and USS Missouri (BB-63) ("Mighty Mo" or "Big Mo") operated in conjunction with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force, Republic of Korea Navy and Air Force, U.S. Air Force and U.S. Marine Corps to provide highly successful joint training and Operation Classic Resolve” (Ref. 362F).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted open ocean AAW exercises, together with an opposed transit, ASUW and support of amphibious operations, though interrupted by “near daily” Soviet aerial reconnaissance flights” (Ref. 362F).

 

    Various exercises are conducted to maintain the readiness of components and units of the Combined Forces Command defending the Republic of Korea. USS Alamo (LSD-33) headed to Korea to participate in the bilateral exercise Operation "Valiant Blitz 85-1" in cooperation with elements of the South Korean Navy and Marine Corps. From 8 to 13 June 1983, USS Elliot (DD-967) participated in exercise VALIANT BLITZ 90 conducted off the coast of Okinawa. Like BALIKATAN/TANGENT FLASH, it was an amphibious exercise. Elliot provided naval gunfire support for the marine landing forces and screening actions against hostile forces opposing the transport ships” (Ref. 362F).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) began operations off Okinawa, Japan on 8 October 1989. Admiral Huntington Hardisty, CinCPac, visited Enterprise while operating off Okinawa on 11 October 1989” (Ref. 362F).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) operated off Okinawa from 8 to 14 October 1989” (Ref. 362F).

 

     “On the 14 October 1989, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) steamed in a joint U.S. and Japanese formation of 48 ships, including USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), USS Missouri (BB-63) and USS New Jersey (BB-62), hosting over 300 Japanese and ROK dignitaries and military personnel, and conducting a fire power demonstration” (Ref. 362F).

 

    USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) made a port call at Portland from 13 to 16 October 1989” (Ref. 549).

 

    USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) carried out a Tiger Cruise that concluded at Norfolk on 18 October 1989” (Ref. 549).

 

    USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) operated locally for the remainder of 1989 interspersing operational periods with in-port upkeep” (Ref. 549).

 

    Russian interference increased during VALIANT BLITZ 90 from 15 to 28 October 1989, as USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transited the Strait of Tsushima into the Sea of Japan, her proximity to Soviet air bases reducing range and flight time. Almost “daily,” Russian flights included “anti-carrier exercises” against the force, once involving a huge simulated strike of at least 34 Badgers. Enterprise steamed off the east coast of South Korea, supporting amphibious landings, altogether accumulating 45 continuous days at sea” (Ref. 362F).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) came about off the east coast of South Korea on 28 October 1989 and then proceeded, via the Luzon Strait, to Hong Kong” (Ref. 362F).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made anchorage for a port call at Hong Kong on 31 October 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    During the midwatch on Halloween on 31 October 1989, a rogue wave swept over No. 2 elevator, washing AO2 Dave Walker, AOAN Craig A. Harris and AN Carroll A. Washington, 38 non-nuclear air-to-air missiles and two ammunition transports overboard, approximately 90 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, N.C. Heavy rain showers blanketed the area, the sea rolled with swells ranging from 12 to 20 feet and the wind increased to 45 knots. Operating under instrument meteorological conditions, Aircraft No. 614, an SH-3H, LT John J. Reape, Jr., LT(JG) Brent W. Bateman, AW1 Joseph W. Turner, II, and AW3 Scott M. Pierce, from HS-5, launched at 0120 and sped to the scene, arriving overhead of smoke and three strobes 10 minutes later. Despite the appalling weather conditions, that reduced visibility and caused numerous aircraft systems problems, including preventing the men from holding a steady hover over their shipmates, the crew of 614 persevered. With waves crashing over the heads of the men in the water as they struggled, Pierce, the rescue swimmer, entered the water and helped the survivors aloft. At one point Pierce himself vanished from sight and almost succumbed to the elements but he bravely pressed on and the crew recovered Walker and Washington. Although the ship and aircrew conducted an 11-hour search covering 400 square miles, they could not locate Harris. Aircraft No 611, another SH-3H, LCDR Michael F. Wanjon, LT(JG) Glenn L. Jimenez, AW1 S. Brinkman and AW3 Robert J. Jacobowitz (HS-5), volunteered to back up 614. Aircraft No. 616, the third Sea King involved in this large rescue effort, LT Mark M. Huber, LT G. Hansen, AW1 H.G. Aponte, AW3 W. Lewis and AWAN T. Pratt, HS-5, relieved 614 and 611 after low fuel forced them to return” (Ref. 84A).

 

    USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) participated in Advanced Phase, a multi force exercise, in the Cherry Point Operating Area off the North Carolina coast from 6 October to 2 November 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 embarked returned to Norfolk, Virginia 2 November 1989, with Captain Gary L. Beck in command, conducting Advanced Phase, a multi force exercise, in the Cherry Point Operating Area off the North Carolina coast from 6 October to 2 November 1989, punctuated by a brief visit to Port Everglades, Fla., from the 20th to 23rd. During the midwatch on Halloween on 31 October 1989, a rogue wave swept over No. 2 elevator, washing AO2 Dave Walker, AOAN Craig A. Harris and AN Carroll A. Washington, 38 non-nuclear air-to-air missiles and two ammunition transports overboard, approximately 90 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, N.C. Heavy rain showers blanketed the area, the sea rolled with swells ranging from 12 to 20 feet and the wind increased to 45 knots. Operating under instrument meteorological conditions, Aircraft No. 614, an SH-3H, LT John J. Reape, Jr., LT(JG) Brent W. Bateman, AW1 Joseph W. Turner, II, and AW3 Scott M. Pierce, from HS-5, launched at 0120 and sped to the scene, arriving overhead of smoke and three strobes 10 minutes later. Despite the appalling weather conditions, that reduced visibility and caused numerous aircraft systems problems, including preventing the men from holding a steady hover over their shipmates, the crew of 614 persevered. With waves crashing over the heads of the men in the water as they struggled, Pierce, the rescue swimmer, entered the water and helped the survivors aloft. At one point Pierce himself vanished from sight and almost succumbed to the elements but he bravely pressed on and the crew recovered Walker and Washington. Although the ship and aircrew conducted an 11-hour search covering 400 square miles, they could not locate Harris. Aircraft No 611, another SH-3H, LCDR Michael F. Wanjon, LT(JG) Glenn L. Jimenez, AW1 S. Brinkman and AW3 Robert J. Jacobowitz (HS-5), volunteered to back up 614. Aircraft No. 616, the third Sea King involved in this large rescue effort, LT Mark M. Huber, LT G. Hansen, AW1 H.G. Aponte, AW3 W. Lewis and AWAN T. Pratt, HS-5, relieved 614 and 611 after low fuel forced them to return” (Ref. 383B).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) enjoyed “good weather and a quiet anchorage” at Hong Kong from 31 October to 5 November 1989. Clearing the Crown Colony of Great Britan, United Kingdom, she then conducted carrier qualifications and cyclic flight operations in support of Cope Thunder, a joint Navy and USAF power projection exercise west of Luzon” (Ref. 362F).

 

     “USS Forrestal (CV-59) with CVW-6 embarked departed Mayport Fla. 6 November 1989, on her 19th Mediterranean Sea

deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S.

Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. Forrestal’s

departure was made possible by the efforts of the ships crew and civilian contractors completing necessary repairs as a result from a fire

that caused major damage to a primary command and control trunk space, having made preparations for her next deployment which the

fire delayed, while participating in New York City's Fleet Week in May 1989 with local operations followed by a brief stand down

period since her third Mediterranean Sea; completed a 28-month, $550 million SLEP at Philadelphia, Naval Shipyard Pennsylvania on

20 May 1985, designed to extend the life of U.S. aircraft carriers another 15 to 20 years, having shifted from her homeport Mayport Fla.

18 January 1983 to Philadelphia; reclassified to CV-59 30 June 1975; made one Vietnam Combat cruise during the Vietnam Conflict/

War and first deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, returning from the South China Sea, via the straits of Malacca, Indian Ocean

and Arabian Sea on her second Suez Canal transit steaming through the Gulf of Aden, Red Sea, to and from the Mediterranean Sea

14 September 1967. She will under go her 25th deployment or 26th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD), if you count her east

coast and Caribbean operations operating with the USLANTCOM (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet in the Caribbean

Sea, upon return from her third Mediterranean deployment operating with the 6th Fleet on 31 August 1960, since her commission 1

October 1955, having the destination of being the first lead ship of a new class of “supercarriers (6 November 1989 to 12 April

1990)” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

USS Forrestal (CV-59) with CVW-6

(6 November 1989 to 12 April 1990)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-11

Red Rippers -               Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

AE100

F-14A

VF-31

Tomcatters -               Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

AE200

F-14A

VA-37 (*1)

Bulls - Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AE300

A-7E

VA-105 (*2)

Gunslingers -              Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AE400

A-7E

VA-176

Thunderbolts -              Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AE500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-122

Steeljaws - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-142 (*3)

Grim Watchdogs - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-15

Red Lions - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-28

Diamond Cutters - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - S-3 Viking -                        Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

(*1) redesignated VFA-37 on Nov.28, 1990
(*2) redesignated VFA-105 on Dec.17, 1990
(*3) disestablished on Jul.1, 1991

 

    On 10 November 1989, USS America (CV-66) with CVW-1 embarked arrived NOB, Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain John J.

(Maz) Mazach, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, assuming command during a change of command ceremony aboard on 14

October 1989, relieving Captain John J. (JJ) Coonan, Jr., NAVCAD while on deployment, ending her 13th Mediterranean Sea

deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S.

Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, on her fourth

Indian Ocean deployment operating with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. Departing early from separate port visits America and USS

Coral Sea (CV-43) were diverted to the eastern Mediterranean Sea as a show of force in the wake of the suspected hanging of

Marine Corps Lt. Col. William R. Higgins by Middle East terrorists, and threats to other hostages (Lt. Col. Higgins had been

kidnapped in February 1988 while a member of the United Nations peacekeeping forces in Lebanon), with America only two days

out, a fire in the pump room killed two sailors and caused minor damage while the ship was in the Atlantic en route to the

Mediterranean Sea for her six-month deployment, that found America evacuating the American Embassy in Lebanon in 1989, a

country in Western Asia, on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea. It is bordered by Syria to the north and east and Israel to the

south. Upon conclusion of operations Captain John J. (Maz) Mazach, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, assuming command during

a change of command ceremony aboard America on 14 October 1989, relieving Captain John J. (JJ) Coonan, Jr., NAVCAD, 18th

Commanding Officer, serving from 13 August 1988 to 14 October 1989 America made her way to the Indian Ocean, steaming to the

Suez Canal, making her seventh transit, steaming through the Red Sea, Bab el Mandeb Strait, Gulf of Aden, on her fourth Indian

Ocean deployment operating with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. Upon conclusion of operations, America steamed back to the Gulf of

Aden, Bab el Mandeb Strait, and headed to the Red Sea, transiting the Suez Canal, on her eighth transit, steaming through North

Atlantic on her way home. Ports visited not reported. Squadrons: VF-102, F-14A; VF-33, F-14A; VFA-82, FA-18C; VFA-86, FA-

18C; VA-85, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; VAQ-137, EA-6B; HS-11, SH-3H and VS-32, S-3A. Her 24th Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 23 January 1965, with Captain

Lawrence Heyworth, Jr., in command (11 May 1989 to 10 November 1989)” (Ref. 1-America, 72 & 76, 324 & 824).

 

 11/05/89 to 10/11/89

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  EAST COAST

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (AE) Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal

04/07/89 to 10/07/89 R – 1st Award

13th Mediterranean Sea deployment

Ref. - 24

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port call and moored at NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 11 November 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) pulled into port for a brief visit to Port Everglades, Fla. on 20 November 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) cleared Subic Bay to evade Typhoon Hunt on 21 November 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) made a port for a brief visit to Port Everglades, Fla. from 20 to 23 November 1989” (Ref. 383B).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) evaded Typhoon Hunt from 21 to 23 November 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 24 November 1989, after evading Typhoon Hunt from 21 to 23 November 1989, as the storm passed over northern Luzon, avoiding Subic. Upkeep, carquals, and training with USS Midway (CV-41) followed” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    Transiting Verde Island South Passage, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) entered Tayabas Bay for “near land operations” from 30 November to 1 December 1989. Tayabas Bay proved a “demanding” operating area, requiring special procedures with “modifications to accommodate the close proximity to mountainous terrain which made standard carrier approach procedures unusable”” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned via Verde Island North Passage and Calavite Passage to Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 1 December 1989, but a contingency sortie began soon thereafter due to an attempted Filipino military coup d’état against the Philippine government” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    In early December 1989, USS Enterprise (CVN-65), Air Wing ELEVEN and Battle Group FOXTROT joined forces with along with USS Midway (CV-41), participated in Operation Classic Resolve, President George H.W. Bush's response to Philippine President Corazon Aquino's request for air support during the rebel coup attempt. Enterprise remained on station conducting flight operations in the waters outside Manila Bay, until the situation subsided, and then proceeded to her scheduled deployment to the Indian Ocean” (Ref. 1-Enterprise).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) cleared the harbor of Subic Bay, Philippines in barely an hour, rendezvousing with USS Midway (CV-41) for Operation Classic Resolve, supporting the regime in Manila and preparing for the possible evacuation of Americans. Steaming with BG Alpha at Banca Station off the west coast of Luzon, the carriers stood by, launching Hawkeyes providing “continuous” radar coverage of the Manila Bay area” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    “The final two months of 1989 proved exciting. Beyond the "routine" exercises and training initiatives, USS Forrestal (CV-59) crew became part of history, as they provided support to President of the United States George H. W. Bush during his Malta Summit. The support included a three-hour Presidential visit to the ship” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

    “USS Forrestal (CV-59) participated in numerous exercises during this deployment including; Harmonie Sud, Tunisian Amphibious and National Week” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

    During the second of two underway replenishments conducted during Classic Resolve, a nighttime transfer of 90 pallets of cargo with the MSC-operated combat stores ship Spica (T-AFS-9) on 7 December 1989, a group of small Filipino fishing vessels suddenly appeared ahead. Both USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and Spica conducted emergency breakaways, the latter coming too close as the ships slowly turned together to port. Both ships “compensated in an opposite direction,” opening rapidly, and quick thinking by Enterprise’s Boatswain’s Mate Senior Chief Everett averted further damage or casualties by approaching a rig from behind the padeye and releasing the pelican hook, causing the entire rig to carry away, “bouncing once near the deck edge before going over the side”” (Ref. 362F).

 

    With the resolution of the crisis in the Philippines, meanwhile, USS Midway (CV-41) came about for her homeport of Fleet Activities, Yokosuka, Japan, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returning to NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 8 December 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 8 December 1989 and continued with her deployment to the Indian Ocean” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    On 11 December 1989, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) lay moored at Naval Station Norfolk where she made preparations for a possible role in President Bush’s recently declared “War against Drugs” (Ref. 549).     

 

    “On 11 December 1989, USS Midway (CV-41) with Rear Admiral Lyle F. Bull, Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Captain J. M. Burnn, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer and Captain S. P. Hannifin, as Executive Officer, ending her 44th WestPac, her 24th South China Sea, on her 11th Indian Ocean deployment and her 40th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. On 28 August 1987, Midway participated in Exercise Thalay in conjunction with Royal Thai Navy Ships. The exercise lasted three days. On 9 September 1987, Midway logged its 200,000th cat shot since being recommissioned in 1972. On 10 November 1987, Midway became the first aircraft carrier to pull pierside in Fremantle, Australia. Midway participated in Operation Classic Resolve when the coup attempt occurred in the Republic of the Philippines. The operation, run in conjunction with the Air Force and assisted by the USS Enterprise (CVN-65) lasted from 2 to 9 December 1987. Because of its involvement, the Midway was awarded the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal. Ports of calls include: Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines; Singapore, officially the Republic of Singapore, a Southeast Asian island city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometers (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south); Diego Garcia, a tropical, footprint-shaped coral atoll located south of the equator in the central Indian Ocean. It is part of the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT); Mombasa, an important regional tourism centre. Situated on the east coast of Kenya, in Coast Province, Mombasa's bordering the Indian Ocean; Fremantle, a city in Western Australia, located at the mouth of the Swan River. Fremantle Harbor serves as the port of Perth, the state capital and Perth, the capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia; Phattaya Beach, a city in Thailand, a beach resort popular with tourists and expatriates. It is located on the east coast of the Gulf of Thailand, about 165 km southeast of Bangkok within but not part of Amphoe Bang Lamung (Banglamung) in the province of Chonburi and Pusan, the largest port city in South Korea and is located on the southeastern-most tip of the Korean peninsula (No photos of Singapore or Diego Garcia). Squadrons: VFA-195, FA-18A; VFA-151, FA-18A; VFA-192, FA-18A; VA-185, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VA-115, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2C; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HS-12, SH-3H. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 43rd deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 49th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 62nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (15 August to 11 December 1989)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 1182, 1182A, 1182B, 1182C, 1182D, 1182E, 1182F, 1182G, 1182H, 1180HI, 1182I, 1181J, 1180K, 1180L, 1180M & 1180N).

 

15/08/89 to 11/12/89

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

44th WestPac

24th SCS

11th IO

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The SSDR is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the SSDR, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

 

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the SSDR, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Exercise Thalay in conjunction with Royal Thai Navy Ships and Operation Classic Resolve in response to the coup attempt occurring in the Republic of the Philippines and Persian Gulf (Operation "Earnest Will").

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored off Pattaya Beach, Thailand for a port of call on 14 December 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored off Pattaya Beach, Thailand for a port of call from 14 to 19 December 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) completed two underway replenishments en route to Singapore, one with ammunition ship USS Kilauea (T-AE-26) on 20 December 1989, offloading 21 pallets of ammunition before outchopping from the Pacific Fleet for the last time for many years” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    Upon arriving in Singapore, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) dropped anchor in Man of War Anchorage on 22 December 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored in Man of War Anchorage at Singapore from 22 to 28 December 1989. While there, she was joined by ships of New Jersey’s BG Romeo, returning from the Indian Ocean” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    At approximately 1700 on Christmas Eve, 1989, the quartermaster reported USS Enterprise (CVN-65) position to be outside of her drag circle. The afternoon tide shift and 20 knot winds had swung her to the west of the anchorage and over the next two hours caused the carrier to drag anchor approximately 120 yards toward cruiser USS Lake Champlain (CG-57), anchored about 600 yards away. Slow dragging continued, so that after the captain’s return by gig at 1830, Enterprise weighed anchor and shifted into the eastern half of the original anchorage. Alert watchstanders had prevented what would almost certainly have been a collision, with dire results in those crowded waters” (Ref. 362F).

 

    Standing out of Singapore, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transited the Strait of Malacca, conducting “coordinated operations” with the Malaysian Navy from 28 to 29 December 1989” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transited the Nicobar Strait into the Bay of Bengal, en route to Diego Garcia from 29 to 31 December 1989, conducting one of her last evolutions of the year -- an underway replenishment of 187 pallets of food from combat stores ship USS Niagara Falls (AFS-3) on the 30th. Commander Eckstein and Hospital Corpsman Master Chief Rosario then flew to destroyer USS Hewitt (DD-966) for an overnight medical “assist visit”” (Ref. 362F). 

 

    “The final two months of 1989 proved exciting. Beyond the "routine" exercises and training initiatives, USS Forrestal (CV-59) crew became part of history, as they provided support to President of the United States George H. W. Bush during his Malta Summit. The support included a three-hour Presidential visit to the ship” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

    “During 1989, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) reinstituted Boatswain’s Mate’s piping the word over the 1MC speaker system, a tradition previously suspended” (Ref. 375A).

 

    “In February 1989, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) received its second Admiral Flatley Memorial Award for aviation safety in 1988” (Ref. 72 & 375).

 

CHAPTER XL

TWELFTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

The evacuation of the American embassy in Beirut, Lebanon

(1 June 1989 to 26 April 1990)

Part 1 – (31 May to 31 December 1989)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 January 1990)

Part 3 – (1 February to 26 April 1990)