FOURTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT AND

FIRST VIETNAM COMBAT CRUISE

U.S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

MAJOR OVERHAUL AT HUNTERS POINT, SAN FRANCISCO, CA. &

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS

(7 December 1964 to 28 July 1966)

CHAPTER XX

Part 1 – (7 December 1964 to 22 November 1965)

Part 2 – (23 November 1965 to 28 July 1966)

 

 

    “Following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident in August, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with Commander William G. Harris, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) (tail code NL) and Rear Admiral Edward C. Outlaw, Commander Carrier Division One and Captain Lucien C. Powell, Chief of Staff, Carrier Division One embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 7 December 1964, with Captain Pierre Numa Charbonnet, Jr., as Commanding Officer, Commander William H. Hoover, Executive Officer on 8 March 1965, on her fourth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, her third South China Sea deployment, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise. Prior to her deployment she conducted a year long training and in port cycle off the Ca. coast when Captain Charbonnet, Pierre N. Jr. USNA became the new Commanding Officer on 16 February 1964, scheduled to be relieved by Captain Cassell, George L. while on deployment (NHC Battle Order p 3), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She will undergo her fourth foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wa. upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), with Captain Roemer, Charles E. in command, decommissioned 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will undergo her 15th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72, 1275R4, 1275R5 & 1275S7).

 

WestPac Cruise Book 1964-65 - Ref. 1275R

The Cruise and Ports of Call - Ref. 1275R1

Command and Staff - Ref. 1275R2

Captain George L. Cassell, CO - Ref. 1275R3

 

CORAL SEA (CVA-43) with CVW-15 (NL)

(7 December 1964 to 1 November 1965)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43)

Pacific & 7th

4th WestPac

3rd SCS

1st Vietnam Combat

CVW-15

NL

7 Dec 1964

1 Nov 1965

Vietnam Conflict/War

15th FWFD

330-days

Operation Rolling Thunder

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-151

Vigilantes -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NL100

F-4B

VA-165

Boomers -

Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider -

Attack

NL200

A-1H  / A-1J

VA-153

Blue Tail Flies -

Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skyhawk -       Jet Attack Bomber

NL300

A-4C

VF-154

 

Black Knights -

Fighter Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter

NL400

F-8D

VA-155

Silver Foxes -

Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skyhawk -       Jet Attack Bomber

NL500

A-4E

VAH-2

Rhino or Royal Rampants - Heavy Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior - Jet Attack Bomber

NL600

A-3B

VAW-11 Det. D

Early Elevens/Roosters/ Scouts - Carrier Airborne Early Warning

Grumman - Traacer -

“Willy Fudd”

RR700

E-1B

VFP-63 Det. D

Eyes of the Fleet

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter Reconnaissance

PP920

RF-8A

+HU-1 Det. D

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Utility Squadron

Kaman - Seasprite Chopper - Retriever

UP00

HU2K-1 (UH-2A)  /

HU2K-1U (UH-2B)

HC-1 Det. A

Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Kaman - Seasprite - Transport (Utility)

 

UH-2A & UH-2B

*VAP 61 Det.

World Recorders - Heavy Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (Heavy) or Heavy Photographic Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -

 

Photographic Reconnaissance/Survey

SS900

A3D-2P (RA-3B)

*VQ-l Det.

Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior - Jet Attack Fighter -

Special electronic installation

 

A-3 (EA-3B)

*VAW-13 Det.

Zappers - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Douglas - Skyraider -

Attack

VR700

A-1 - EA-1F

*VMCJ-l Det.

Marines -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter Reconnaissance

 

RF-8A

 “CVW-l5 reflected the latest ‘stale-of-the-art’ carrier air power technology. VF-151 had traded in its Demons for F-4H Phantom IIs to compliment VF-154 F-8Ds. The light attack squadrons had been reduced to VA-153 and -155 flying more capable A-4C and Es, respectively. VA-165 was now onboard with A-1H/Js, while VAH-2 remained with A-3Bs” (Ref. 43).

VFP or VF(P) - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (Light) or Light Photographic Squadron.

+Redesignated HC-1 Det D on 1 Jul 1965.

*These squadron detachments were not aboard the carrier for the entire deployment.

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 76

 

    “Captain James Michael O'Brien, USNA '43, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 19 December 1964, relieving CAPT Whitney Wright, NAVCAD, 23rd Commanding Officer, serving from 25 January to 19 December 1964” (Ref. 1178-G). 

 

Iran History & Air Arm

 

      “The first F-5 Freedom fighters arrived in Iran in 1965. Iran ordered 103 F-5As and 23 F-5SBs, which were later sold on to Vietnam, Turkey, Greece and Ethiopia” (Ref. 27) .

 

     “Captain George Louis Cassell assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), on 15 January 1965, relieving Captain Pierre Numa Charbonnet, Jr., 18th Commanding Officer, serving from 16 February 1964 to 15 January 1965” (Ref. 34 & 35A).

 

     “Captain Pierre N. Charbonnet, Jr., became Chief of Staff, Carrier Division Seven and Captain Lucien C. Powell was Chief of Staff, Carrier Division One in 1965” (Ref. 1275R6-/6).

 

Operation Rolling Thunder

 

     “After a Viet Cong attack in February 1965 on U.S. Army barracks in Pleiku, the United States commenced Operation Rolling Thunder, a restricted but massive bombing campaign against North Vietnam. Protection of air bases then provided the rationale for introduction of 50,000 U.S. ground combat forces, which were soon increased” (Ref. 102D).

 

     “On 6 February 1965, routine operations for the day had ended, and USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) was steaming toward Manila for a few days of scheduled liberty. Then, at 0112 Saigon time, ADM Henry L. Miller aboard USS Ranger (CVA-6l) received word to assemble TF 77. The previous evening, communist guerrilla attacks against American bases in South Vietnam had cost the lives of several Americans and injured several more. RADM Eddie Outlaw, in his flagship Coral Sea, immediately ordered all ships assigned to TG 77.5 to proceed at high speed to the rendezvous” (Ref. 34 & 1275U10-/10).

 

     “Simultaneously, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) received word to ready her planes. At 1240, 7 February 1965, the ship received orders for TF 77s planes to bomb targets in North Vietnam; at 1500, little more than eight hours after the first indication of trouble in Southeast Asia, 20 aircraft launched from Coral Sea's flight deck, to join those from USS Ranger (CVA-61) and USS Hancock (CVA-19). Coral Sea's CVG-15 led the retaliatory strike on the Dong Hoi military barracks in the southern sector of North Vietnam, reputedly one of the staging areas for Viet Cong infiltrators into South Vietnam, in the largest single such effort since the Korean War. This attack was the largest, single U. S. Navy air effort since the Korean War” (Ref. 1-Ranger, 43, 72, 1275U11 & 1275U12).

 

    “On 7 February 1965, in retaliation for a damaging Viet Cong attack on installations around Pleiku in South Vietnam, a fighter-bomber strike, launched from USS Ranger (CVA-61), USS Coral Sea (CV-43), and USS Hancock (CV-19), blasted the military barracks and staging areas near Dong Hoi in the southern sector of North Vietnam” (Ref. 1-Ranger and 72).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) first combat operations were from carrier to Dong Hoi military barracks, No. Viet, during her first Vietnam extended combat cruise 7 February 1965” (Ref. 34).

 

    “Early in the Vietnam War, the Johnson administration reacted vigorously to Viet Cong mortaring of an American advisors', compound at Pleiku, South Vietnam, on 7 February 1965. President Johnson ordered a one-time, ‘tit for tat’ reprisal strike on enemy barracks in North Vietnam. That same day USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Air Wing 15 and USS Hancock (CVA-19) Air Wing 21 conducted Flaming Dart I, a multiplane attack on Dong Hoi” (Ref. 524).

 

      “Captain James Michael O'Brien, USNA '43, 24th Commanding Officer, USS Midway (CVA-41) serving from 19 December 1964 to 15 February 1966” (Ref. 1178-G).  

 

 

Paricutin (AE-18) rearming Coral Sea (CVA-43) in the South China Sea, 26 February 1965. US Navy photo. NS09051822 79k. David Hanson for his father CAPT. Ralph M. Hanson USN (Ret) CO USS Paricutin, 1964-65

http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/05/09051822.jpg

 

 

Paricutin (AE-18) rearming Coral Sea (CVA-43) in the South China Sea, 26 February 1965. US Navy photo. NS09051823 56k. David Hanson for his father CAPT. Ralph M. Hanson USN (Ret) CO USS Paricutin, 1964-65.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/05/09051823.jpg

 

 

Paricutin (AE-18) rearming Coral Sea (CVA-43) in the South China Sea, 26 February 1965. US Navy photo. NS09051825 92k. David Hanson for his father CAPT. Ralph M. Hanson USN (Ret) CO USS Paricutin, 1964-65.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/05/09051825.jpg

 

 

Paricutin (AE-18) rearming Coral Sea (CVA-43) in the South China Sea, 26 February 1965. US Navy photo. NS09051824 56k. David Hanson for his father CAPT. Ralph M. Hanson USN (Ret) CO USS Paricutin, 1964-65.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/05/09051824.jpg

 

 

Paricutin (AE-18) rearming Coral Sea (CVA-43) in the South China Sea, 26 February 1965. US Navy photo. NS09051826 68k. David Hanson for his father CAPT. Ralph M. Hanson USN (Ret) CO USS Paricutin, 1964-65.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/05/09051826.jpg

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) received word that members of her crew had been awarded the Armed Forces Expeditionary Service Medal for their performance of duty during the Vietnam crisis on 1 March 1965” (Ref. 34 & 1275U13).

 

Operation Rolling Thunder

 

      “On 2 March 1965 Operation Rolling Thunder commenced, a sustained bombing campaign intended to place increasing pressure on the North Vietnamese leadership to negotiate a peaceful settlement to the war. The idea was to strike targets just above the DMZ (Demilitarized Zone) and then progressively hit targets further north (closer to Hanoi) as the campaign went on.

 

      F-105Ds from the 67th TFS bombed an ammunition depot at Xom Bong, 20 miles north of the DMZ. After a series of TDY deployments to Korat and Tahkli, two large F-105D wings were set up in Thailand—the 355th TFW which moved from McConnell AFB to Tahkli in August 1965 and the 388th TFW which moved to Korat in April of 1966 to replace the temporary 6234th TFW. The 355th and 388th Tactical Fighter Wings based in Thailand used the F-105D to carry the brunt of the air war to North Vietnam.

The majority of missions’ for Operation Rolling Thunder were carried out by U.S. Air Force planes based in Thailand and by Navy squadrons flying from Yankee Station, the code name for carriers based in the South China Sea. A line just below Vinh, North Vietnam formed the northern boundary above which air attacks were initially forbidden. Most North Vietnamese fighter bases and surface-to-air missiles fell within these restricted areas.

 

     The rules of engagement placed many restrictions on the armed forces. Bombing was prohibited within 25 miles (40 km) of the Chinese border, within 10 miles (16 km) of Hanoi (the capital) and within 4 miles (6.4 km) of Haiphong ( the major port.) By placing the capital, Haiphong and surrounding areas off limits the U.S. Air Force was prevented from attacking nearly all military targets crucial to the war effort of the enemy. Additionally, much to the annoyance of Air Force generals, no enemy air bases could be attacked for fear of killing Soviet technicians. During the early part of Rolling Thunder even the deadly surface to air missile (SAM) sites could not be attacked until they were fully operational (firing SA-2 missiles at U.S. planes!)” (Ref. 102D).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed the line, arriving Subic Bay, Philippines on 6 March 1965” (Ref. 43).

 

     “Captain Pierre N. Charbonnet, Jr., became Chief of Staff, Carrier Division Seven and Captain Lucien C. Powell was Chief of Staff, Carrier Division One in 1965” (Ref. 1275R6-/6).

 

     “Captain William R. Eason was relieved Commander William H. Hoover, Executive Officer, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) on 8 March 1965” (Ref. 1275R4 & 1275R7).

 

    “General William Westmoreland, commanding the Military Advisory Command in Vietnam, visited USS Ranger (CVA-61) on 9 March 1965 to confer with Rear Admiral Miller who commanded Fast Carrier Task Force 77” (Ref. 1-Ranger and 72).

 

    “After a breather at Subic Bay, Philippines (6-15 March 1965), USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) returned to the line, reaching her assigned area on 16 March to hurl strikes against North Vietnamese supply buildings at Phu Van and Vinh Son” (Ref. 43 & 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) pulled into port at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 19 March 1965” (Ref. 405 & 1179-R).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 19 to 21 March 1965, departing on the morning of the 22nd. Underwent Operational Readiness Inspection (ORI) from 15 to 20 March 1965” (Ref. 405 & 1179-R).

 

 

Aboard USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), the Catapult Officer signals "launch" and an A-4C Skyhawk (from VA-153 "Blue Tail Flies" squadron) starts down the flight deck, during operations in the South China Sea, 24 March 1965. The plane is being launched from the carrier's starboard catapult. Photographed by PH1 James F. Falk, USN. Official U.S. Navy Photograph (# USN 1111691-A). NS024336a 102k. NH&HC. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024336a.jpg

 

 

Task Force 77 operating in the South China Sea, March 1965. It had recently launched strikes against North Vietnam. Carriers present are (clockwise from bottom): Ranger (CVA-61), Yorktown (CVS-10), Coral Sea (CVA-43) and Hancock (CVA-19). The guided missile cruiser Canberra (CAG-2) is in the center of the formation. The destroyer screen includes: England (DLG-22), Gurke (DD-783), Rogers (DD-876), Walker (DD-517), O'Bannon (DD-450), Somers (DD-947), Jenkins (DD-447), John A. Bole (DD-755), Higbee (DD-806), Buck (DD-761), Joseph Strauss (DDG-16) and Ernest G. Small (DD-838). This photograph was specially posed, and does not represent a normal operating formation. Official U.S. Navy Photograph (# USN 1109915). NS026119 166k. James Shriver, PHCM, USN (Ret), notes: "The photo [...] was taken in an exercise we called 'Operation Candid Camera.' On day one it was tried by a Vigilante photo plane. They missed. So the next day it was tried again and the photos were taken with a hand held camera from a HS-8 helicopter. The photographer was PH1 Elvin C. Conarty (now deceased). I was there. I processed the film and printed the photos." NHC. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026119.jpg

 

    “On 26 March 1965, the Seventh Fleet units began their participation in Operation Rolling Thunder, a systematic bombing of military targets throughout North Vietnam. Pilots from USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) struck island and coastal radar stations in the vicinity of Vihn Son” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea/Ranger).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) pulled into port at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 4 April 1965” (Ref. 1179-R).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 4 to 7 April 1965, departing for Special Operations on the morning on the 8th conducting combat missions on her first line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 405 & 1179-R).

 

    “General William Westmoreland, commanding the Military Advisory Command in Vietnam, visited USS Ranger (CVA-61) on 9 March 1965 to confer with Rear Admiral Miller who commanded Fast Carrier Task Force 77, Ranger continued air strikes on enemy inland targets until 13 April 1965, when a fuel line broke, ignited and engulfed her No. 1 main machinery room in flames. The fire was extinguished in little over an hour. There was one fatality” (Ref. 1-Ranger and 72).

 

    “After her second period on “Yankee Station,” USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) returned to Subic Bay on 18 April 1965” (Ref. 43 and 72).

 

    “After a breather at Subic Bay (18-23 April 1965), USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed Subic Bay for Hong Kong” (Ref. 43 and 72).

 

    “In 1961, then Captain Bringle became the first skipper of the carrier USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63). In April 1964 he broke his flag aboard the same carrier as Commander, Carrier Division Seven. Before leaving Midway in May 1965, RADM Bringle received the Legion of Merit climaxing his work as CTF 77. He went on to be Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans, CINCPACFLT” (Ref. 1179-T).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 12 May 1965, ending her first line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 1179-R).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port call at Hong Kong before returning to the Philippines on 29 May 1965” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) fourth “WestPac” tour extended indefinitely, with Coral Sea in port at Yokosuka, Japan on 5 June 1965” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) fourth “WestPac” tour extended indefinitely, with Coral Sea in port at Yokosuka, Japan from 5 to 13 June 1965” (Ref. 43).

 

    “Commander Kops became Executive Officer of USS Midway (CVA-41) in June 1965, relieving Captain Robert E, Gallatin, serving as Executive Officer from May 1964 to May 1965” (Ref. 1179-X).

 

Yankee Station” Map – Ref. 1179-Z

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) was in port at Buckner Bay, Okinawa on 15 June 1965” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) aircraft were prepared for combat operations, and from mid-April flew strikes against military and logistics installations in North and South Vietnam. “Illustrative of the major contribution the carrier made to the war was a notable "first" for aviators of her Attack Carrier Wing 2, who in June, downed the first three MiGs credited to U.S. Forces in Southeast Asia” (Ref. 1- Midway & 72).   

 

    “On 17 June 1965, while escorting a strike on the barracks at Gen Phu, North Vietnam, Cmdr. Louis C. Page and Lt. Jack E.D. Batson, flying F-4B Phantoms of VF-21, deployed aboard USS Midway (CVA-41), intercepted four MiG-17s and each shot down one, scoring the first U.S. victories over MiGs in Vietnam” (Ref. 1- Midway).   

 

    “On 17 June 1965, Secretary of the Navy Paul Nitze was aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) as part of a tour of the war zone. To the delight of the ship’s crew, he had the opportunity to announce over the public address system that two F-4B Phantom IIs from Midway had scored the first MiG kills of the war. The Phantoms and four MiG-17s tangled south of Hanoi and two of the North Vietnamese aircraft went down in

flames” (Ref. 1083).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) was in port at Buckner Bay, Okinawa from 15 to 18 June 1965” (Ref. 43).

 

    “On 20 June 1965, another MiG-17 was brought down by the 20mm gunfire of two propeller-driven A-1H Skyraiders from USS Midway (CVA-41). Pilot skill and the Skyraider’s outstanding maneuverability led to this unusual victory” (Ref. 1083).

 

Operation Arc Light

 

10 years after becoming operational, the B-52 bomber saw action when 27 B-52Fs from Andersen AFB, Guam, hit Vietcong strongholds in South Vietnam on June 18, 1965 during the commencement of Operation Arc Light (Ref. 102E).

 

 

Mattaponi (AO-41) refueling Rowan (DD-782) to starboard, Coral Sea (CVA-43) to port. US Navy photo, likely taken in 1964–1965. NS0578201 185k. http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/0578201.jpg

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) returned to Subic Bay, Philippines to load ammunition and ordnance on 20 June 1965” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) returned to Subic Bay, Philippines to load ammunition and ordnance from 20 to 23 June 1965” (Ref. 43).

 

    “The men that made USS Midway (CVA-41) famous…are to be decorated for downing three MIG-17’s in awards ceremony held aboard on 23 June 1965. Commander Page (VF-21, Silver Star), Lieutenant Vatson (VF-21, Silver Star), Lieutenant Greathouse (VA-25, Distinguish Flying Cross), Lieutenant Johnson (VA-25, Silver Star), LTJG Hartman (VA-25, Distingush Flying Cross” (Ref. 1179-Z1).

 

    “HU-l Det Delta (redesignated HC-l Det Delta on 1 July 1965)” (Ref.34).

 

Air Defenses

 

    “At the start of the conflict most planners thought that some triple A (Flak) was all they were going to have to deal with. But as the fighting intensified sophisticated surface-to-air missiles appeared in ever increasing numbers. With the help of Soviet and Chinese technicians they were being used with deadly effect as part of an intergrated Air Defenses. Soon U.S. pilots were flying into the most heavily defended airspace since World War II Berlin. The M38/39 37mm automatic gun formed the backbone of anti-aircraft artillery forces in the North. This weapon lacked radar control capability but used a highly effective optical lead computing gunsight. With an effective range of 3 km planes flying as high as 3,000 ft. could be hit” (Ref. 1343).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Yokosula, Japan on 2 July 1965, ending her second line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 1179-R).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) received a message that she had been awarded the coveted Admiral Flatley Memorial Award for aviation safety on 5 July 1965 for the year 1965, part of which covered the ship’s intense combat operations in Southeast Asia” (Ref. 34 & 1275U14).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Yokosula, Japan from 2 to 16 July 1965, departing on the morning of the 17th to conduct combat missions on her third line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 405 & 1179-R).

 

    “On 23 July 1965, the United States lost its first plane to a Soviet-built SAM (Surface-to-Air Missile.) SAM sites were first detected in North Vietnam on April 5, 1965. The next month a U.S. Navy plane was lost to a SAM and the United States began a series of special missions named Iron Hand against the rapidly expanding missile sites. Most were near the Hanoi-Haiphong area, but Washington had exempted these from air attack. However, sites in other areas were fair game. By the end of the 1965 a total of 56 SAM sites had been located by U.S. reconnaissance aircraft. The central component of this array of hardware was the Fan Song (NATO code name) radar, which guided first-generation Soviet SA-2 Guideline SAMs to their airborne targets. With a 195-kg (430lb) high-explosive warhead, a slant range of about 30 miles and a speed in excess of Mach 3, the SA-2 proved to be accurate and difficult to evade. To its detriment, however, its liquid-fueled sustainer rocket motor left a long tongue of fire and a visible smoke trail easily detected by pilots” (Ref. 102C).

 

Midway WestPac July 1965 – Ref. 1179-Z2

Yankee Station – Ref. 1179-Z3

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, ending her third line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin on 27 August to 2 September 1965” (Ref. 1179-R).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 27 August to 2 September 1965, departing for Special Operations to conduct combat missions on her fourth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 1179-R).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Hongkong, B.C.C. on 5 September 1965, ending her fourth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 1179-R).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Hongkong, B.C.C. from 5 to 9 September 1965, departing on the morning of the 10th to conduct combat missions on her fifth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 405 & 1179-R).

 

    “During USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Vietnam extended combat cruise Lt. Ronald E. McKowan assigned to VF 154 attached to CVW-15 (tail code NL) made 150,000th trap in a F-8D Crusader on 2 October 1965” (Ref. 34).

 

     “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 12 to 16 October 1965, concluding her fifth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 1179-R).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 12 to 16 October 1965, departing for Special Operations to conduct combat missions on her sixth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 1179-R).

 

   “To the joy of her crew, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) sailed for home on 17 October 1965, with a 973-foot homeward bound pennant trailing astern, reflecting the longest deployment made by a carrier since World War II and a record which stands to this day, receiving her first Navy Unit Commendation (NUC). The joys of her award and return home were tempered, however, by the knowledge that eight of her aircrew did not return. Five were killed in action, one was missing and two were prisoners. CVW-15 had lost 21 aircraft in combat over Vietnam” (Ref. 43).

 

 

"The USS Midway (CVA-41)/VA-25's Toilet Bomb." NS024195

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024195.jpg

 

    "572 [BuNo 135297] was flown by CDR C. W. 'Bill' Stoddard. His wingman in 577 was LCDR Robin Bacon, who had a wing station mounted movie camera (the only one remaining in the fleet from WWII)."

 

    "The flight was a Dixie Station strike (off South Vietnam) going to the Delta. When they arrived in the target area and CDR Stoddard was reading the ordnance list to the FAC, he ended with 'and one code name Sani-flush.'"

 

    "The FAC couldn't believe it and joined up to see it. It was dropped in a dive with LCDR Bacon flying tight wing position to film the drop. When it came off, it turned hole to the wind and almost struck his airplane."

 

    "It made a great ready room movie. The FAC said that it whistled all the way down. The toilet was a damaged toilet, which was going to be thrown overboard."

 

    "One of our plane captains rescued it and the ordnance crew made a rack, tailfins and nose fuse for it. The squadron flight deck checkers maintained a position to block the view of the Captain and Air Boss while the aircraft was taxiing onto the catapult. Just as it was being shot off we got a 1MC message from the bridge, 'What the hell was on 572's right wing?'"

 

    Whether known or not to those involved, a somewhat similar "special weapons test" had occurred 13 years earlier, during the Korean War — in August 1952 another Skyraider, assigned to VA-195 "Dambusters," off USS Princeton (CV-37) dropped a kitchen sink attached to a 2,000 pound bomb on a target near Pyongyang. Photos and account courtesy of Troy Prince, MidwaySailor.com.

 

 

"The USS Midway (CVA-41)/VA-25's Toilet Bomb." NS024195a

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024195a.jpg

 

Source for "Dambusters" 1952 "incident": Skyraider: The Douglas A-1 Flying Dump Truck, by CAPT Rosario Rausa.

 

 

"The USS Midway (CVA-41)/VA-25's Toilet Bomb."

 

"In October 1965, CDR Clarence J. Stoddard, Executive Officer of VA-25 'Fist of the Fleet,' flying an A-1H Skyraider, NE572 'Paper Tiger II' from Carrier Air Wing Two aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) carried a special bomb to the North Vietnamese in commemoration of the 6-millionth pound of ordnance dropped." "This bomb was unique because of the type... it was a toilet!" "The following is an account of this event, courtesy of Clint Johnson, Captain, USNR Ret. Captain Johnson was one of the two VA-25 A-1 Skyraider pilots credited with shooting down a MiG-17 on June 20, 1965 [see NS024126, above]." NS024195b.

 http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024195b.jpg

 


USS
Midway (CVA-41) underway, about to conduct flight operations, on 27 October 1965. Note the enclosed bow. US Navy photo by R. W. Lewis [# 1176316]. NS024132. USN. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024132.jpg

 

Operation Arc Light

 

“By November of 1965, the B-52s were able to support the 1st Air Cavalry Division in mopping up operations near Pleiku (Other Actions)” (Ref. 102H).

 

Homecoming - Ref. 1275S5

CORAL SEA's Views - Ref. 1275S6

 

    “On 1 November 1965, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with Commander William G. Harris, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) (tail code NL), Rear Admiral Edward C. Outlaw, Commander Carrier Division One and Captain Lucien C. Powell, Chief of Staff, Carrier Division One embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain George Louis Cassell, as Commanding Officer, USNA, (serving since 15 January 1965), relieving Captain Pierre Numa Charbonnet, Jr., 18th Commanding Officer, serving from 16 February 1964 to 15 January 1965 and Captain William R. Eason relieved Commander William H. Hoover, Executive Officer on 8 March 1965, ending her fourth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, her third South China Sea deployment, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise, after 329-days deployed (NHC Battle Order p 3). Coral Sea pulled inn for a port off call at Pearl Harbor, Hi. Routine operations for the day had ended on 6 February 1965 and Coral Sea was steaming toward Manila for a few days of scheduled liberty, when at 0112 Saigon time, ADM Henry L. Miller aboard USS Ranger (CVA-6l) received word to assemble TF 77, as a result of communist guerrilla attacks the previous evening, against American bases in South Vietnam, resulting in the loss of lives of several Americans and injuring several more. RADM Eddie Outlaw, in his flagship Coral Sea, immediately ordered all ships assigned to TG 77.5 to proceed at high speed to the rendezvous, CVW-l5 receiving word to ready her planes and at 1240, 7 February 1965, the ship received orders for TF 77s planes to bomb targets in North Vietnam at 1500, little more than eight hours after the first indication of trouble in Southeast Asia, 20 aircraft launched from Coral Sea's flight deck, to join those from Ranger and USS Hancock (CVA-19), with CVW-15 aircraft leading the retaliatory strike on the Dong Hoi military barracks in the southern sector of North Vietnam, CVW-15 1st combat operation (VF-151 first Combat mission with the F-4H Phantom IIs, complimenting VF-154 F-8Ds, while the light attack squadrons had been reduced to VA-153 and -155 flying more capable A-4C and Es, respectively, VA-165 was now onboard with A-1H/Js, while VAH-2 remained with A-3Bs), reputedly one of the staging areas for Viet Cong infiltrators into South Vietnam on 7 February 1965, in the largest single such effort since the Korean War (the raids were in retaliation for a damaging Viet Cong attack on installations around Pleiku in South Vietnam), during which time Captain Cassell, George L. became the new Commanding Officer relieving Captain Charbonnet, Pierre N. Jr. USNA 41 on 15 January 1965. Departing the line, Coral Sea arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines (6-15 March 1965), returning to the line, reaching her assigned area 16 March to hurl strikes against North Vietnamese supply buildings at Phu Van and Vinh Son, participating in Operation Rolling Thunder, on 26 March, with other units of the Seventh Fleet, systematic bombing of military targets throughout North Vietnam, striking island and coastal radar stations in the vicinity of Vihn Son, returning to Subic Bay (18-23 April 1965) after her second period on “Yankee Station.” Coral Sea departed Subic Bay and she visited Hong Kong before returning to the Philippines on 29 May, while her fourth “Westpac” tour extended indefinitely, with Coral Sea in port at Yokosuka, Japan (5-13 June 1965), followed by a port visit to Buckner Bay, Okinawa (15-18 June); during which time, the first U.S. victories over MiGs in Vietnam was credited to Cmdr. Louis C. Page and Lt. Jack E.D. Batson, flying F-4B Phantoms of VF-21, deployed aboard USS Midway, intercepted four MiG-17s and each shot down one on 17 June 1965, while escorting a strike on the barracks at Gen Phu, North Vietnam, returning to Subic Bay to load ammunition and ordnance (20-23 June). Returning to “Yankee Station,” Coral Sea remained on station during the periods 4 - 24 July, 11 August - 11 September, 21 September - 15 October 1965, when on 2 October 1965 Lt. Ronald E. McKowan assigned to VF 154 attached to CVW-15 (tail code NL) made 150,000th trap in a F-8D Crusader 2 October 1965, sailing for home 17 October 1965, with a 973-foot homeward bound pennant trailing astern, reflecting the longest deployment made by a carrier since World War II and a record which stands to this day, receiving her first Navy Unit Commendation (NUC). The joys of her award and return home were tempered, however, by the knowledge that five of her aircrew were killed in action, one was missing and one became a prisoner, while CVW-15 lost 21 aircraft in combat over Vietnam. CVW-15 was credited with 10,000 air combat sorties and 10,500 take-offs and landings from 7 December 1964 to 1 November 1965. Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hi.; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines; Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Yokosuka, Japan, a city in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, covering an area of 100.7 km² and is the 11th most populous city in Greater Tokyo, 12th in the Kantō region; and Buckner Bay, Okinawa Island (沖縄本島, Okinawa-hontō?, alternatively 沖縄島 Okinawa-jima; Okinawan: 沖縄/うちなー Uchinaa or 地下/じじ jiji;[1] Kunigami: ふちなー Huchináa) is the largest of the Okinawa Islands and the Ryukyu (Nansei) Islands of Japan. The island has an area of 1,201.03 square kilometers (463.72 sq mi). It is roughly 640 kilometres (400 mi) south of the rest of Japan. The city of Naha, the capital of Okinawa Prefecture, is located there and Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines (Source: Coral Sea Command History for 1 Oct 1964 – 31 Mar 1965 and ref. 43 & 72). Note: There are no history records for the period Apr 1965-Dec 1965. Squadrons: VA-151, A-4B; VA-165, A-1H/J; VF-153, A-4C; VF-154, F-8D; VA-155, A-4E; VAH-2, A-3B; VAW-11 Det. D, E-1B; VFP-63 Det. D, RF-8A; HU-1 Det. D, HU2K-1 (UH-2A)  / HU2K-1U (UH-2B); HC-1 Det. A, UH-2A & UH-2B; VAP-61 Det.*, A3D-2P (RA-3B); VQ-1 Det.*, A-3 (EA-3B); VAW-13 Det.*, EA-1F and VMCJ-1 Det.*, RF-8A. USS Richmond K. Turner (CG-20) and USS Joseph Strauss (DDG-16); completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). Her fourth foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wa.; upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960); decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Ports of call: Subic Bay, Philippines three times; Hong Kong; Yokosuka, Japan and Buckner Bay, Okinawa Subic Bay. Her 15th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) (7 December 1964 to 1 November 1965), since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 1275R31275R4, 1275R5, 1275R6-/6 & 1275R7).

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Air Wing: Carrier Air Wing Fifteen (CVW)-15

 

DEPLOYMENT

 DATES

K

I

A

M

I

A

P

O

W

PLANES LOST

LINE DAYS

LINE PERIODS

WESTPAC

    & Combat

Mission

CVW-15 (NL)

07/12/64 - 01/11/65 (329-day deployment)

5

1

2

 21

 167

 6

 4th  & 1st

 South

 China Sea

Reference 34, 35 and 43 reflect Chat info.

 

 07/12/64 - 01/11/65

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  “WESTPAC”

 Vietnam Armed Forces Expeditionary

 Service Medal

 25 January - 4 July 1965

 4th, & 1st Vietnam

 Combat

 National Defense Service Medal

 2 Feb - 5 March, 16 March –

 17 April, 2 – 28 May, 23 June -

 3 July 1965

 4th

 Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross

 Unit Citation

 12 October 1965

 4th

 Vietnam Service Medal for Combat

 Operations

 4 - 24 July, 11 August - 11

 September, 21 September - 15

 October 1965

 4th

 Navy Unit Commendation

 7 February to 18 October 1965

 4th

 Excellent Deck Efficiency Admiral Flatley

 1965

 4th

 Ship of the Year

 1965

 4th

Reference 34 and 35 reflect Chat info.

            

Fourth “Westpac” deployment and First Vietnam Combat Cruise

(7 December 1964 to 1 November 1965)

(5 Aviators KIA, one MIA and one POW)

NAME

RANK

SQUADRON

DATE of LOSS

LOSS-COUNTRY
HOW

COMMENT

Edward A. Dickson

LT
U. S. Navy Reserve

VA 155
A-4E

7 .1965

North Vietnam
AAA

Status in 1973: Killed/ Body not Recovered

David A. Kardell

LT
U. S. Navy

VF 154
F-8D

9 May
1965

North Vietnam
Unknown

Status in 1973: Killed/ Body not Recovered

David A. Kardell

LT
U. S. Navy

VF 154
F-8D

9 May
1965

North Vietnam
Unknown

Status in 1973: Killed/ Body not Recovered

Peter Mongilardi, Jr

Comdr.
U. S. Navy

VA 153
A-4C

25 June
1965

North Vietnam
AAA

Status in 1973: Killed/ Body not Recovered

Harry E. Thomas

Comdr.
U. S. Navy

Commanding Officer-VA 153
A-4C

13 Aug.
1965

North Vietnam
AAA

Status in 1973: Killed/ Body not Recovered/ Remains returned and Identified: 30 October 1996

C. B. Goodwin

LT JG

VFP-63
RF-8A

7 Sept. 1965

North Vietnam
Unknown

Missing in Action

Wendell B. Rivers

Comdr.
U. S. Navy

VA 155
A-4E

10 Sept.
1965

North Vietnam

Status in 1973: POW/ Released

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Association http://www.usscoralsea.org/ (Ref. 34)

Reference 43 reflects Five KIA, one was missing and two prisoners. CVW-15 had lost 21 aircraft in combat over Vietnam.

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 4 November 1965, ending her sixth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 1179-R).

 

    “USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14) spent some time in the Hawaiian Islands for an operational readiness exercise then continued on to the Far East. She reached Dixie Station on 5 November 1965 and immediately began combat air operations” (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga).

 

    “Once at “Dixie Station,” USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14) divided her time almost evenly between Dixie and Yankee Stations, the carrier operating areas off South and North Vietnam, respectively” (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga).

 

    “In the early morning hours of 8 November 1965, after four days of rest and relaxation in Hawaii, USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) departed for Subic Bay, The Philippines, to join the 7th Fleet, where her port visit was short, replenishing for her upcoming job, preparing for combat operations on Dixie Station off the coast of Vietnam”(Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk and 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 4 to 10 November 1965, departing for Special Operations to conduct combat missions on her seventh line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin en route to the West Coast” (Ref. 1179-R).

 

    “In mid November 1965, USS Valley Forge (LPH-8) stood by in reserve during Operation Blue Marlin and then airlifted her marines ashore for Operations Dagger Thrust and Harvest Moon“ (Ref. 1-Valley Forge and 72).

 

Operation Arc Light

 

     “10 years after becoming operational, the B-52 bomber saw action when 27 B-52Fs from Andersen AFB, Guam, hit Vietcong strongholds in South Vietnam on June 18, 1965 during the commencement of Operation Arc Light” (Ref. 102E).

 

    “On 20 November 1965, USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) aircraft lifted off the Flight Deck for her first combat operations. On that day, Kitty Hawk aircraft flew 90 attack sorties against the VC, unleashing more than 140 tons of ordnance” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk).

 

    “USS Independence (CVA-62) and embarked Air Wing 7 received the award of the Navy Unit Commendation for exceptionally meritorious service from 5 June to 21 November 1965” (Ref. 1-Independence and 72).

 

    “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, underwent major overhaul at Hunters Point, San Francisco, Ca. on 22 November 1965” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) stay in Subic Bay, Philippines was very short, replenishing for her upcoming job, preparing for combat operations on “Dixie Station” off the coast of Vietnam, taking part in the battle against Viet Cong insurgents into South Vietnam” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk).

 

 

Two A-4C Skyhawks from VA-22 "Fighting Redcocks" share deck space with an F-4B Phantom II from VF-21 "Free Lancers" during USS Midway (CVA-41) first Vietnam Cruise, March 6–November 23, 1965. Skyhawk NE227 and Phantom II NE101 had totally different fates: NE101, BuNo 150646, was lost in an operational accident on July 28, 1965 not long after this photo was taken; the plane suffered engine and electrical power failure, but fortunately both crewmen ejected and were rescued. On the other hand NE227, BuNo 149532, was noted in March 2006 at the National Museum of Naval Aviation, Pensacola, FL. Three VPAF MiG-17's were shot down by USS Midway (CVA-41)/CVW-2 aircraft during this deployment: two by VF-21 F-4B's on June 17, 1965 and one by a VA-25 A-1H (see NS024126, above.) A fourth MiG was credited to one of the VF-21 crews more than 30 years later. NS024194. Photo from Angelo Romano's NAVA Collection http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024194.jpg

 

FOURTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT AND

FIRST VIETNAM COMBAT CRUISE

U.S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

MAJOR OVERHAUL AT HUNTERS POINT, SAN FRANCISCO, CA. &

LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS

(7 December 1964 to 28 July 1966)

CHAPTER XX

Part 1 – (7 December 1964 to 22 November 1965)

Part 2 – (23 November 1965 to 28 July 1966)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XX

Part 1 - (7 December 1964 to 22 November 1965)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4