CHAPTER XL

TWELFTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

The evacuation of the American embassy in Beirut, Lebanon

(1 June 1989 to 26 April 1990)

Part 1 – (31 May to 31 December 1989)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 January 1990)

Part 3 – (1 February to 26 April 1990)

 

 

 

Battle Group Alfa, Persian Gulf, 1990. NS024143. Chester Morris, of USS Midway (CV-41) Crew Member 1962-65.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024143.jpg

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) continued a southerly transit on 1 February 1990, during which time a ten event fly day was reduced to three events” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) with Commander, Carrier Group (COMCARGRU) Three RADM, Daniel P, March, Commander embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 1 February 1990, with Captain Doyle J. Borchers, II, as Commanding Officer, embarking Commander, Destroyer Squadron NINE, Captain Harry M. Dyck, Jr. Carrier Air Wing FIETEEN, Captain Lyle G. Bien (CVW-15) at Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California, with CVW-15 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station Lemoore, on her fourth “WestPac” deployment operating with the operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet in the Western Pacific and Sea of Japan, conducting Carrier Qualifications in Southern California operating areas and participated in ReadiEx 89-5B en route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii waters; Phase 1 & 2  of Team Spirit 90 in Korean waters, providing air support for amphibious landings, low level strikes, jamming support and air-to-air combat training; Merlion 90 with Singaporean forces, on her fourth Indian Ocean, participating in HarpoonEx and Sea Slam 90, on her third North Arabian Sea deployment and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, conducting a passing exercise with the Royal Australian Navy. She will under go her eighth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 13 March 1982” (Ref. 72, 375, 375A & 376A/1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) is one of the most modern and formidable fighting vessels in the world. The latest in technology plus the skills and stamina of the American sailor are combined aboard Carl Vinson to enable us to answer any conceivable threat to world peace. Her nuclear power plant enables us to respond rapidly and in advance of support vessels required for other types of fighting ships, bringing her embarked Air Wing to any scene of trouble around the globe. Her own Carrier Air Wing FIETEEN is a formidable force with over 85 aircraft covering every aspect of modern Naval Air Warfare capabilities. The Primary Mission of Carl Vinson is to be ready to employ its power anywhere in the world as directed by the President of the United States. Only by maintaining its equipment and personnel in the highest state of readiness will Carl Vinson be capable of carrying out its wide variety of missions, including anti-air warfare, anti-surface warfare and electronic warfare. Other tasks that Carl Vinson shares with most U. S. Navy ships include maintaining mobility, replenishing ships at sea and performing a variety of non-combat missions such as the rescue a t sea of vessels in distress and the transportation of refugees and other personnel. Carl Vinson is one of the most powerful self-contained combat platforms in the world. The survivability of the ship in a hostile environment is enhanced by two of the U. S. Navy's latest close-in weapons systems. If any incoming aircraft or missiles penetrate the ship's fighter aircraft and guided missile cruiser defense envelope, they will find themselves facing the NATO Sea Sparrow Missile System and the Phalanx Close-In Weapons System, a sophisticated version of the rotating-barrel Gatling Gun. The ships nuclear per plants allow Carl Vinson to travel for extended periods in excess of 30 knots without the need to replenish propulsion fuel. Once on station, Carl Vinson can remain longer and fly more missions than fossil fueled aircraft carriers due to its ability to carry aviation fuel in tanks that would otherwise be devoted to ship's fuel in the conventional aircraft carrier. The dedication, professionalism, hard work and combat readiness of the officers and crew of Carl Vinson ensure the ship is ready to meet any challenge the future may hold. Carl Vinson’s Immediate Senior Commander is:

 

a. Administration. Commander, Carrier Group THREE.

b. Operational. Commander, Naval Air Force, U. S. Pacific Fleet” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) with CVW-15 (NL)

(1 February to 31 July 1990)

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East

Carrier Qualifications in Southern California operating areas and participated in ReadiEx 89-5B en route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii waters; Phase 1 & 2  of Team Spirit 90 in Korean waters, providing air support for amphibious landings, low level strikes, jamming support and air-to-air combat training; Merlion 90 with Singaporean forces, on her fourth Indian Ocean, participating in HarpoonEx and Sea Slam 90, on her third North Arabian Sea deployment and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, conducting a passing exercise with the Royal Australian Navy.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-51

Screaming Eagles -      Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NL100

F-14A

VF-111

Sundowners -              Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NL200

F-14A

VA-97 (*1)

Warhawks -                        Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NL300

A-7E

VA-27 (*2)

Royal Maces -                        Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NL400

A-7E

VA-52

Knightriders -                        Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NL500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-114

Hormel Hogs -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-134

Garudas - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-4

Black Knights -          Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-29

Dragonflies - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed -                     S-3 Viking -                Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

VRC-50 Det. 70

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound -  Lockheed - Viking - Utility

 

C-2A

 (*1) redesignated VFA-97 on Jan.24, 1991.

(*2) redesignated VFA-27 on Jan.24, 1991.

F-14 Tomcat, A-7E, EA-6B Prowler and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “USS Truxtun (CGN-35) joined USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) with DESRON Nine ships as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “Captain Harry M. Dyck, Jr. Carrier Air Wing FIETEEN, embarked on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), consisted of nine squadrons. They were Fighter Squadrons VF-51 and VF-111, flying the F-14 Tomcat; Medium Attack Squadron VA-52, flying the A-6E Intruder; Light Attack Squadron's VA-27 and VA-97, flying the A-7E Corsair; Air Anti-Submarine Squadron VS-29, flying the S-3A Viking; Air Anti-Submarine Helicopter Squadron HS-4, flying the 5H-3F Sea King; Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron VAQ-134, flying the EA-6B Prowler; and Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron W-114, flying the E-2C Hawkeye. Also embarked during “WestPac” 90 was one C-2A Greyhound aircraft from Fleet Logistics Support Squadron W-50 Det. 70 based at Naval Air Station Cubi Point, Republic of the Philippines, Aircraft embarked aboard CIW Carl Vinson used airwing tail code NL (Carrier Air Wing FIETEEN) except VRC-50 who used the airwing tail code RG” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

      “A C-2A Greyhound of VRC-50 Detachment 70 supported the ship as she deployed to the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans, using NAS Cubi Point as a central base of operations on 1 February 1990 and USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Carrier Qualifications in Southern California operating areas during the transit to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii” (Ref. 375A).

 

     “During USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) transit to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Carrier Air Wing FIETEEN conducted Carrier Qualifications in the Southern California Operating Area from 2 to 3 February 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Long Beach (CGN 9) (ex-CGN 160, CLGN 160) stood out of al Masirah, outchopping from the northern Arabian Sea at the end of the mid watch, 0400(D), 2 February 1990 and inchopped COMSEVENTHFLT operating area in the Indian Ocean, conducting LOG helo runs to USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160). Received two US-3's from JDG. No flight operations scheduled on her last day on station in the North Arabian Sea, conducting operations in the NAS from 9 to 22 January 1990, while flight operations were reduced, alert launch requirements remained in effect and were impressively demonstrated during an attempted steel beach picnic, followed by two four hour Earnest Will exercises in the Gulf of Hormuz on 22 and 23 January 1990, returning to the Indian Ocean through the Gulf of Oman on 2 and or 3 February 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) put on speed to “get ahead” of two typhoons, canceling flight operations and maintaining an SOA of 27 knots while LOG helo runs between USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) and Enterprise on 3 February 1990. The ship received two more US-3's from JDG and increased speed to 27 knots to get ahead of two typhoons, cancelling flight operations the same day” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “During USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) transit to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Carrier Air Wing FIETEEN conducted Carrier Qualifications in the Southern California Operating Area from 2 to 3 February 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

      “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) commenced participation in ReadiEx 89-5B en route to Hawaiian waters on 4 February 1990” (Ref. 375A).

 

    By 4 February 1990, the typhoons “were no longer a factor,” though USS Enterprise (CVN-65) maintaining the speed, just in case, also learning that no more COD flights would be available until 2 March 1990. LOG helo runs between USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) and Enterprise. The Commanding Officer of Long Beach arrived on Enterprise for meeting with the CCDG 3 staff. Caught last US-3's from JDG. Typhoons no longer a factor, maintaining 2'7 knots to clear channel” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    Planned make-up day for no flight operations on 5 February 1990, for USS Enterprise (CVN-65) air wing was announced on 5 February 1990, to be the 7th” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    FleetEx (Fleet Exercise) 1-90 concluded on 5 February 1990 and USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) headed back to Norfolk, Va.” (Ref. 549).

 

    Off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) encountered heavy seas that removed the dome of CIWS Mt. 22 and battered some of the bow catwalks enough to require their replacement upon arrival at her homeport” (Ref. 549).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) had one helo trip to USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) in the morning of 5 February 1990. No flight operations scheduled” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    On 6 February 1990, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) finally held her “steel beach” picnic, an event impossible soon thereafter as high winds and rain predominated during her passage around the Cape of Good Hope en route to Brazil, often forcing cancellation of flight operations. Enterprise lost 32,000 gallons of fresh water, no fresh water first half of the day while replenishing. No flight operations scheduled, although one late afternoon helo run to USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) was authorized. The Oceanography office provided forecasts and oceanographic information and vigorously monitored systems and cyclones in the vicinity of Southern Africa which were encountered during the transit. The lack of synoptic data produced a challenging environmental problem” (Ref. 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a three event fly day. Planned make-up day for no flight operations on the 5th, commenced and there was no LOG helos to USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) on 7 February 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    Bad weather for USS Enterprise (CVN-65) air wing limited flights from a five event fly day scheduled to canceling the second event to three through five reduced in numbers on 8 February 1990, while LOG helo for crossdecking was authorized” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted leap frogs with USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) on 9 February 1990. No fly day. No LOG helo” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) reached Norfolk on 9 February 1990” (Ref. 549).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a five event fly day on 10 February 1990. No night events and one LOG helo was authorized for crossdecking” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) participated in ReadiEx 89-5B en route to Hawaiian waters from 4 to 10 February 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 embarked returned to Norfolk, Virginia on 10 February 1990, participating in Fleet Exercise 1-90 from 25 January to 10 February 1990. Secretary of the Navy H. Lawrence Garrett, III, visited Dwight D. Eisenhower on 2 February 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    While USS Enterprise (CVN-65) inchopped into thee Second Fleet Operating area at 0001(Z), 11 February 1990, conducting a five event fly day, while Holy Helo plus helos were authorized for crossdecking the TALDEX event were flown this day” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    No flight operations were conducted on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and one LOG helo for crossdecking was authorized on 12 February 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Constellation (CV-64) with CVW-9 embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California 12 February 1990, with Captain Leonard N. Oden, USN, as Commanding Officer, on her home port transfer steaming through the Eastern and South Pacific via Cape Horn through the South and Western Atlantic to the east coast for a $800-million, three-year Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pa., via Norfolk, Va; reclassified to CV-56 on 1 July 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises in Vietnam, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, received a Presidential Unit Citation from President Nixon in 1973. She will under go her 21st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at New York Naval Shipyard on 27 October 1961, with Captain T.J. Walker in command” (Ref. 1-Constellation, 72 & 76).

 

USS Constellation (CVA-64) with CVW-14 (NG)

(12 February to April 1990)

Home Port Transfer to the East Coast for a $800-million,

three-year Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) at the

Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pa., via Norfolk, Va.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-211

Checkmates -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NG100

F-14B

VF-24

Fighting Renegades -      Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NG200

F-14B

VA-146 (*1)

Blue Diamonds -                        Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II - attack aircraft

NG300

A-7E

VA-147 (*2)

Argonauts -                        Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II - attack aircraft

NG400

A-7E

VA-165

Boomers -                        Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NG500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-112

Golden Hawks -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-138

Yellow Jackets -            Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-2

Golden Falcons -          Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-33

Screwbirds - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed -                     S-3 Viking -                   Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

 (*1) redesignated VFA

(*2) redesignated VFA

 

    Chopping to Com2ndFlt overnight on 11 February 1990, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) experienced a narrow brush two days later on 13 February 1990, when a helo reported a “mine” floating in the water. An EOD team boarded a second helo to reach the scene, but discovering that they did not have film to photograph the object of their interest, prompting a new Enterprise rule: “all helos will be photo capable”” (Ref. 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

    “During the period from 11 to 13 February 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) was involved in a Battle Group CHARLE Battle Group exercise” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a five event fly day on 13 February 1990, continuing crossdecking personnel and conducted WASEX against USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160)” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    No flight operations were conducted on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 14 February 1990, while crossdecking continued” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited Port Everglades, Fla. on 14 February 1990, conducting CSQT structure test firing; CSQT missile exercise and FORACS noise measurements of the propulsion plant and hull was conducted off St. Croix, prior to arriving Port Everglades; while CVW-8 embarked conducted Cyclic Operations and Carrier Qualifications from 19 to 23 January 1989 off the east coast and off the Puerto Rican Operations Area, including North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Sea Sparrow missile system certification, noise measurement testing and similar procedures. Established first logistics mobile beach detachment to support command's first REFTRA in the Caribbean Sea from NAS Jacksonville, Fla. to NAS Roosevelt Roads, P.R., and back to NAS Jacksonville. The ship continued to utilize assets from CVW-8 to build proficiency in aircraft operations of the flight deck crew. Tomcats shot the initial imagery during missions from the ship utilizing Tactical Aerial Reconnaissance Pod System (TARPS) film. Additional accomplishments included NAL-4-1 exercise TARPS conducted by photo Lab and MSI; Ammunition offload from ammunition ship, USS Butte (AE-27); AIMD ran first F-404-GE-400, T58-GE-10 and J52P8B jet engines for training and AIMD composite repair shop certified for X-ray operations in February 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “On 15 February 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) made its first port visit of the deployment at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a five event fly day on 15 February 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted her first wing fly-off with all of the aircraft either fully or partially mission capable on 16 February 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a five event fly day and staff transfer to USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) was cancelled due to weather on 16 February 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    No flight operations on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) were conducted while staff were transferred to USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) on 17 February 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “Following a two day visit to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) got underway on 17 February 1990 and continued west conducting independent operations in the Hawaii Operating Area” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “On 19 February 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) crossed the international date line” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed the North Arabian Sea Operations Area on 5 February 1990. While flight ops were reduced, alert launch requirements remained in effect and were impressively demonstrated during an attempted steel beach picnic. Security of aircraft was of major concern during transit from 5 to 18 February 1990 around the Cape of Good Hope en route to Rio de Janeiro. High seas and rain were the norm. Following some refreshing liberty in Rio, Enterprise headed north to the Puerto Rican Operations Area with Air Department supporting limited air crew proficiency flights. While transiting from the Indian Ocean through the Cape of Good Hope to the Atlantic Communications area, Enterprise Communications Department maintained the Long Haul Point to Point HF mulit-channel termination. Prior to the debarkation of COMCRUDESGRU THREE and COMDESRON TWENTY-ONE in February, approximately 2,000 messages were processed each day” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Port Everglades, Fla. on 20 February 1990, embarking dependants and guest for a Tiger Cruise, in port from 14 to 19 February 1990, during which time the ship also accomplished her first wing fly-off with all of the aircraft either fully or partially mission capable on 16 February 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1989).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 21 February 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) anchored at Rio de Janeiro from 18 to 22 February 1990, her first liberty port in 52 days” (Ref. 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) were underway from Rio de Janeiro at 0815, 22 February 1990, anchored at Rio from 18 to 22 February 1990, her first liberty port in 52 days. No fly day. Crash and Salvage win Ogden Award for best unit Navywide” (Ref. 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted VERTREP with USS Mauna Kea (AE-22) on 22 February 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “On 23 February 1990, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-8 embarked arrived Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia, with

Captain William B. Hayden as the Commanding Officer, ending her second Atlantic deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic

Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, extending operations in the Caribbean Sea, on her

2nd Shakedown Cruise, for Cyclic Operations and Carrier Qualifications. Abraham Lincoln visited Port Everglades, Fla. On 14

February 1990, conducting CSQT structure test firing; CSQT missile exercise and FORACS noise measurements of the propulsion

plant and hull was conducted off St. Croix, prior to arriving Port Everglades; while CVW-8 embarked conducted Cyclic Operations

and Carrier Qualifications from 19 to 23 January 1989 off the east coast and off the Puerto Rican Operations Area, including North

Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Sea Sparrow missile system certification, noise measurement testing and similar procedures.

Established first logistics mobile beach detachment to support command's first REFTRA in the Caribbean Sea from NAS

Jacksonville, Fla. to NAS Roosevelt Roads, P.R., and back to NAS Jacksonville. The ship continued to utilize assets from CVW-8 to

build proficiency in aircraft operations of the flight deck crew. Tomcats shot the initial imagery during missions from the ship

utilizing Tactical Aerial Reconnaissance Pod System (TARPS) film. Additional accomplishments included NAL-4-1 exercise

TARPS conducted by photo Lab and MSI; Ammunition offload from ammunition ship, USS Butte (AE-27); AIMD ran first F-404-

GE-400, T58-GE-10 and J52P8B jet engines for training and AIMD composite repair shop certified for X-ray operations in February

1990. Abraham Lincoln conducted her first wing fly-off with all of the aircraft either fully or partially mission capable on 16

February 1990. Abraham Lincoln departed Port Everglades, Fla. on 20 February 1990, embarking dependants and guest for a Tiger

Cruise, in port from 14 to 19 February 1990, during which time the ship also accomplished her first wing fly-off with all of the

aircraft either fully or partially mission capable on 16 February 1990. Aircraft from Fighter Squadron VF-41, F-14A; VF-84, F-14A;

Strike Fighter Squadrons VFA-15 and VFA-87 F/A-18As; Attack Squadrons VA-36 and VA-65 36, A-6Es; Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron VAW-124, E-2C, Air Antisubmarine Squadron VS-24, S-3B; Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS-9) SH-

3H; Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron VAQ-141, EA-6B and Fleet Logistics Support Squadron VRC-40 Det., C-2A make up

CVW-8. Port of call: Port Everglades, Fla. (19 January to 23 February 1990)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B 1990).

 

    “In December 1989, Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-11) and Battle Group Foxtrot joined forces with the USS Midway (CVB-41) and Battle Group ALPHA near Manila Bay. Their mission was to support Operation Classic Resolve, conducting contingency operations if necessary to support U.S. interests following the Philippine coup attempt. Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-11) returned home through the Arabian Sea and the Atlantic Ocean leaving its ship, the "Big E", in Norfolk, Virginia for refueling. Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-11) underwent major changes in 1990. A-7E's were replaced by F/A-18 Hornets, and SH-3's were replaced with SH-60 Sea Hawks specially configured for combat search and rescue. The E-2C and the A-6E underwent major upgrades” (Ref. 72, 514 or Global Security)” (Ref. 378A).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) inchopped to Commander SEVENTH Fleet on 24 February 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    After departing Rio de Janeiro, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) steamed northerly courses, aeromedically evacuating a patient from USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) on 25 February 1990, flying him on the next day to the naval hospital at Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico” (Ref. 362G & 329B-1990).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted independent operations in the Hawaii OPAREA/WestPac transit from 18 to 25 February 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was scheduled to conduct a three event fly day on 25 February 1990. The third event was cancelled due to PIM, resulting in a medevac’ of one passenger from USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160) by the Holy Helo to Long Beach” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    No flight operations on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) were conducted while an emergency Medevac' was launched for a USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (ex-CGN-160, CLGN-160) patient to Naval Hospital in Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico on 26 February 1990 and an unscheduled LOG run to Long Beach was authorized” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) commenced Team Spirit 90 Phase One off the Korean Coast in the Sea of Japan and continuing to the South China Sea on 26 February 1990, providing air support for amphibious landings, low level strikes, jamming support and air-to-air combat training. March found Carl Vinson participating in Team Spirit '90 with naval units from Korea and Japan. During this time and throughout “WestPac” 90, the INMARSAT commercial satellite telephone was a major factor in maintaining aircraft readiness rates at an all time high for any deployed carrier/Air Wing. Squadron supply and maintenance officers could talk directly to shore counterparts to discuss critical requirements thereby shortening the supply "pipe" and eliminating miscommunications” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Pier 12 South at Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia from 23 to 27 February 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    A three event fly day scheduled for USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was delayed for two hours due to an Engineering casualty, reducing time of events slightly to make all three events on 27 February 1990. The Beach Detachment was established in Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 embarked departed Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia on 28 February 1990, for Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) and Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) off the Virginia capes (VACAPES)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 28 February 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) recovered S-3 Medevac back from Roosevelt Roads and Enterprise began preparing for Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) inspection on 28 February 1990. A total of 579 fixed wing launches and recoveries were completed without incident for the month of February 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    There were no UNREPS conducted during the entire month of February 1990 for USS Enterprise (CVN-65). Deck Department concentrated on training to increase underway watch qualifications in order to achieve maximum watch rotation. The COMCRUDESGRU Three Admiral's Barge and the Captain's Gig received some minor maintenance and alterations in preparation for Enterprise's next port visit in Rio de Janeiro. Enterprise's anchorage was a 10-15 minute boat ride to fleet landing. Deck

Department lowered the fantail accommodation ladder to a 40' x 60' flat barge, which served as a liberty boat landing. An onload of cargo and provisions was conducted with a rented floating crane, breasted out by a flat barge on the port quarter outboard of elevator number four. All cargo came in sea vans which were loaded onto elevator four (in down position) and offloaded by fork lift and working party. This proved to be a very efficient process unless the crane had mechanical problems. Chiefs and Officers were shuttled by 12 passenger "pilot boats" small enough to utilize the forward starboard accommodation ladder under Sponson One Quarterdeck” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 28 February 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    While chopping from "WestPac" in February, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Communications Department completed a very successful HF termination with NAVCOMSTA, Diego Garcia, in which a 98 percent ship send/receive reliability rate was maintained and DC/R divisions of the Engineering Department were busy training the flying squad for the upcoming Operational Reactor Safeguard Exam (ORSE) and two Mobile Training Team (M'IT) Inspections” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) inspection team arrived USS Enterprise (CVN-65) at 0700, 1 March 1990 via first COD from Roosevelt Roads, conducting a five event fly day. All events were flown” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 2 March 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a one event day for FCF (0630-0730). ALT 60 for E-2 & S3 Drug interdiction alerts on 2 March 1990. The Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) team continues inspection of the ship’s reactors” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) spent a week of flying in the Puerto Rican Operating Area, including E-2C and S-3 drug interdiction alerts, with Air Department supporting limited air crew proficiency flights on 2 March 1990. A HF termination with NAVCOMSTA Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, was initially assigned a 95 percent ship receive reliability rate and a 62 percent ship send reliability rate were maintained in an area where no historical frequency data was available, and HICOM was ineffective for coordination” (Ref. 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted UNREP with USNS Neosho (TAO-143) taking on 545 KGAL JP.5 and 13 PALLETS, during which time Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) inspection concludes, followed by RAS on 4 March 1990. The Propulsion Plant workcenter, M Division of the Engineering Department sailors conducted extensive manhours spent in preparation for MTT and ORSE which culminated in above average grade for ORSE. This was the best grade achieved by a Pacific Fleet Carrier during the year. Effective and quick emergency repairs were performed by M-Division of Engineering Department, as well as A Division being the key contributor to the ship's successful completion of the ORSE” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

      “Phase 1 of Team Spirit 90 for USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) began off eastern Korea on 26 February 1990, interrupted by a brief visit to Sasebo, Japan on 4 March 1990. This makes the third time Carl Vinson has visited Japan since commissioning and the second to Sasebo” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

      “Phase 1 of Team Spirit 90 for USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) began off eastern Korea on 26 February 1990, interrupted by a brief visit to Sasebo, Japan on 4 March 1990. This makes the third time Carl Vinson has visited Japan since commissioning and the second to Sasebo” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a port call at St. Thomas on 5 March 1990” (Ref. 362F).

 

      “Phase 1 of Team Spirit 90 for USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) that began off eastern Korea, concluded by a brief visit to Sasebo, Japan from 4 to 6 March 1990. This makes the third time Carl Vinson has visited Japan since commissioning and the second the to Sasebo. Underway for the Second Phase of Team Spirit 90” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

     “Before completing Phase 2 of Team Spirit 90 in Korean waters, RADM Larry G. Vogt, Commander U.S. Naval Forces Korea, visited USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) on 6 March 1990. The wing reported that InMarSat commercial satellite telephones became “a major factor” toward maintaining aircraft readiness rates, together with split SatCom antenna configuration, which allowed Carl Vinson to communicate between two satellites simultaneously” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 embarked returned to Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia on 7 March 1990, conducting Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) from 4 to 8 March 1990 and Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) from 28 February to 7 March 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 7 March 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

     USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) DV VISIT (JAPAN) - 7 MAR 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- LGEN SHUI OTSUKA - CO, WESTERN AIR FORCE JASDF

- LGEN HISATO TOYAMA - CO, 4TH DIVISION

- LGEN SHUI OTSUKA - CO, WESTERN AIR FORCE JASDF

- LGEN HISATO TOYAMA - CO, 4TH DIVISION JGSDF

- MR. MASUO MORODOMI - DIRECTOR, FUKUOKA DFAA

- MR. NORIO KAWAKUBO - DIRECTOR, SASEBO DFAO

- DR. TOSHISUKE MATSUURA - PRESIDENT, JAPAN-AMERICA SOCIETY OF MIYAKONOJO

- MR. TERUO MICHINAGA - CHIKUSHINO OFRCE MANAGER, OFFICE OF TAKUYAMASAKI

- MR. SHOGO NISHIDA - MANAGING DIRECTOR, POLE STAR K.K. (SHAKEYS PIZZA)

- MR. MASUMI IMAI - DIRECTOR, BUREAU OF ART AND CULTURAL AFFAIRS, ASAHI SHINBUN, KMISHU OFFICE

- MR. AKIRA OTSU - PRESIDENT, HAKATA WRT SERVICE CENTER

- DR. TARO NANAKUMA - MANAGING DIRECTOR, JAPAN-AMERICA SOCIETY OF SASEBO

- DR. MASAYUKI OGASAWARA - NO TITLE PROVIDED

- MR. IICHIRO KAKESASHI - PRESIDENT, KAKESASHI GLASS CO. OF SASEBO

- MR. YUICHI FURUKAWA - PRESIDENT, FURUKAWA ELECTRIC APPLIANCE CO. OF SASEBO

- MR. H. ON0 - CHIEF GOJ TAXATION OFFICE, SASEBO DISTRICT

- MR. ISHIRO KUSHIMOTO - GENERAL JAPAN LONG TERM TRUST BANK OF TOKYO (CO'S GUEST)

- MR. KOICHIOKADA - PRESIDENT, OKADA DENKI SANGYO IND. FUKUSHIMA (COS GUEST)

- MR. EVANS J.R. REVERE - CHIEF CONSULATE AMCONSUL FUKUOKA (ESCORT)

- MR. TETSUSHI MABUO - POLITICAL SPECIALIST, AMCONSUL FUKUOKA (INTERPRETER)

 

    FAA representatives embarked USS Enterprise (CVN-65) to brief ship on Norfolk, Va. area flight operations and Virginia State policeman boards to brief crew on Virginia driving laws on 8 March 1990. Enterprise anchored 112 mile south of Sprat Point in 66' of water. The starboard anchor was set with 60 fathoms at the waters edge. Again the stem accommodation ladder and sea cushions were used. Five 200-250 passenger liberty boats were used for the two mile transit to the fleet landing. Provisions were brought on board via a hook, line and capstan rig used to lower the sea cushions. A T-34 jet engine and four air cargo pallets of ammo offload equipment were brought on a small boat. The B&A Crane was used to lift the material on board with lashings provided by AIMD and Air Department. Minor spray painting was conducted on the ship's sides, primarily below the elevators and water lines in preparation for "Tiger Cruise 90" on 12 March and Enterprise's homecoming in Norfolk on 16 March” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 8 March 1990, with Captain Gary

L. Beck in command, on her sixth Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet),

participating with USS Forrestal (CV-59) in maritime threat scenarios as part of National Week 90B, Joint Exercise Distant

Thunder 90-1 with British and Turkish forces from 14 to 21 April 1990. Tomcats and Hornets flew dissimilar air combat training

against British Panavia GR, Dragon Hammer 90, consisting of combined operations, coordinated air defense, and maritime and

amphibious training, pitting her Tomcats against British Tornados, French and Spanish Mirages and Spanish Harrier, Journey to

Victory, a commemoration of the Allied landings in Normandy from 2 to 6 June 1990 and National Week 90, steaming through the

North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to

the Mediterranean Sea conducting Operation Spellex, forming five stars and the numbers 1890–1990 in honor of the centennial

celebration of President Eisenhower's birth on 17 March 1990, on her first Red Sea deployment in support of her 1st Operation

Desert Shield, in retaliation of Iraqi occupation of Kuwait on 2 August 1990, when the largest armada since World War II assembled

in the Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield and Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) to enforce UN Security Council

Resolution 51, which imposed an embargo upon ships entering or leaving Iraqi-occupied Kuwaiti and Iraqi ports, operating under the

direction of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component

commander for Central Command, with Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). The

crew dubbed this deployment the “Ike Centennial Cruise” in honor of the 100th anniversary of the birth of the ship’s namesake. Ike

will serve as a ready striking force in the event Iraq invaded Saudi Arabia, and will participate in maritime interception operations in

support of a United Nations embargo against Iraq, becoming the first carrier to conduct sustained operations in the Red Sea and

Indian Ocean, the only the second nuclear-powered aircraft carrier ever to transit the Suez Canal, entering the Red Sea and upon

return will make her second Suez Canal transit upon departure from the Red Sea, steaming through the Atlantic on her way home.

She will under go her 11th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 18 October 1977” (Ref. 44, 72, 76,

84A, 383 & 383B).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 (AG)

(8 March to 12 September 1990)

Ike Centennial Cruise

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-143

Pukin' Dogs -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman -Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AG100

F-14A

VF-142

Ghostriders -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman -Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AG200

F-14A

VA-46

Clansmen -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AG300

A-7E

VA-72

Blue Hawks -                      Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AG400

A-7E

VA-34

Blue Blasters -                      Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -Tanker

AG500

A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D

VAW-121

Bluetails -

Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-140

Patriots -

Tactical Electronics

Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-5

Night Dippers - Helicopter

Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-31

Top Cats - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking –

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “USS Ticonderoga (CG-47); USS Peterson (DD-969) and USS Oklahoma City (SSN-723) joined USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A). 

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced Pre-INSURV (Board and Survey Inspection) in port Norfolk, Virginia on 8 March 1990, conducting Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) from 4 to 8 March 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1989).

 

     USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) TEAM SPIRIT DV'S (KOREA) - 8 MARCH 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- PAUL T. CHUNG - EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR KOREA COUNCIL US. NAVY LEAGUE

- CHUNG, MY0 SUN - MEMBER OF KOREAN COUNCIL NAVY LEAGUE

- CHA, JONG YUN - ORIENTAL MEDICINE DOCTOR

- KIM, YONG IL - REAL ESTATE BROKER

- LEE, HEE SOON - FARMER IN YONGIN

- HONG, SOON MYUNG - PRIVATE BUSINESS IN SOOWON

- KANG, KI BONG - PRIVATE BUSINESS IN SOOWON

- KIM, JIN TAE - PRIVATE BUSINESS IN SOOWON

- KIM, BYUNG DONG - REAL ESTATE BROKER

- LEE, JAE HWA - CHIEF JUDGE, SUBU REGION SEOUL DISTRICT COURT

- SHIM, JUNG RAE - MEMBER OF KOREAN NAVY LEAGUE

- CHOO, DONG HEON - PRIVATE BUSINESS

- PARK, YOUNG RYONG - PROFESSOR, KUNKUK UNIVERSITY

- CHONG, WOO S. - SPECIALIST, TRANSPORTATION KUNSAN AIR BASE

- CHA, YOUNG JA - MEMBER OF KOREAN COUNCIL NAVY LEAGUE

- LTJG KAREN DAWES, USN (ESCORT)

- LT SHIN PARK, ROKN (TRANSLATOR)

 

Decommissioning - Ref. 1275ZC5

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Decommissioned on 9 March 1990.

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a port call at St. Thomas, Virgin Islands from 5 to 9 March 1990. Retention team meeting was held in port. With the successful completion of over 36 readiness drills and inspections, DC/R divisions of the Engineering Department enjoyed liberty in Rio de Janerio” (Ref. 362F).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) TEAM SPIRIT DV'S (KOREA) - 9 MARCH 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- KIM, BYONG WOOK - CHIEF OFFICER, KOREA CONGRESS ADMINISTRATION

- KIM, IN SUNG - PEACE REUNIFICATION COUNCIL

- YOO, BYUNG SIK - MANAGER, KOREA ELECTRIC POWER CO.

- JUNG, KYU HWAN - PRESIDENT, KOMESIA INC.

- LEE, HANG - CHAIRMAN, THE BANK OF SEOUL AND THE ALUMNI CLUB

- AHN, HAE GYUN - PROFESSOR, SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

- HAN, DU JIN - PRESIDENT, KOREA GENERAL HOSPITAL

- LEE, GUK NYON - CHAIRMAN, KYONG DONG LEATHER INC.

- MIN, BYONG DAE - EXECUTIVE AUDITOR, KYONG DONG LEATHER INC.

- KIM, YONG SAENG - CHAIRMAN, MUN KYOMG IIMESTONE INC.

- LEE, JAE HWA - PRESIDENT, FINE AUDIO CO., LTD

- CHAE, JUN - EXECUTIVE AUDITOR, FINE AUDIO CO., LTD

- KIM, YONG DO - PRESIDENT, NATURAL SCIENCE STUDY INC.

- LCDR ROBERT J. LOVE, USNR (ESCORT)

- CPT LEE, YIK JOO, ROKMC (TRANSLATOR)

 

    “Standing out of St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, the first 30 aircraft from CVW-11 embarked aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) flew off on 10 March 1990, making room for a key ammunition offload, commencing staging ordnance for offload” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted replenishment at sea (RAS) with USS Spica (AK-16) on 10 March 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) cross decked with USS Saratoga (CV-60) conducting an AMMO OFF-LOAD on 11 March 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Pre-INSURV (Board and Survey Inspection) in port Norfolk, Virginia from 8 to 11 March 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) cross decked with USS Saratoga (CV-60) conducting an AMMO OFF-LOAD on 12 March 1990 and following the evolution, slipped into Port Everglades Anchorage, off Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., embarking over 1,200 male dependents for a Tigers Cruise, on 12 March 1990 for a cruise en route to Norfolk, Virginia” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

   “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted replenishment at sea (RAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 12 March 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) TEAM SPIRIT DV'S (KOREA) - 12 MARCH 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- LGEN YONG, YOUNG IL (ROKA) - KOREA DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY

- MGEN LEE, WOO SHIK (ROKA) - 2ND ASSISTANT, ROK MND

- MGEN BAN, SOON YOUEL (ROKA) - DIR., PERSONNEL BUREAU, MND

- MGEN RHEE, BYEONG KIL (ROKA) - DIR., INSTALLATION BUREAU, MND

- RADM CHOE, IL KUN (ROKN) - DIR., WEAPON SYSTEMS BUREAU, ROK JCS

- RADM CHOE, JAE YOL (ROKN) - DEP DIR, PLANS, OPERATIONS BUREAU, ROK JCS

- BGEN LEE, WOO DUK (ROKAF) - DEP DIR., PLANS/OPERATIONS BUREAU, ROK JCS

- BGEN (R) LEE, HEUNG SHIK (ROKA) - DIR., DEFENSE PUBLIC INFO AGENCY (SPOKESMAN, MND - WHILE ON ACTIVE DUTY)

- LCDR SON, DO IK (ROKN) - TRANSLATOR

- CAPT BARBARA LONG1 (USAF) – ESCORT

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted her final contract trials and INSURV (Board and Survey Inspection) from 12 to 13 March 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1989).

 

    “While at Port Everglades Anchorage, off Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., USS Enterprise (CVN-65) embarked over 1,200 male dependents for a Tigers Cruise on 12 March 1990, flying a “spectacular” air show for the Tigers on 13 March 1990. Tiger Teams on the 3B spring bearing and #1 distilling unit without affecting the ship's operational tempo and commitments thanks to M Division of the Engineering Department” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) TEAM SPlRlT DV'S (KOREA) - 13 MARCH 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- WANG, SANG EUN - PRES, KOREAN AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP ASSN.; CHMN, HYOPSONG SHIPPING CORP

- CHO, YOUNG KIL - PRES, KOREA NATIONALTOURISM CORP; VP, KOREAN AMERICANFRIENDSHIP ASSN

- CHO, CHOONG KUN - PRES, KOREAN AIR; DIR, KOREAN AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP ASSN

- YOU, SANGUINE - CHANCELLOR, MYONG-JI UNIV; DIR, KOREAN AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP ASSN

- CHO, NAI BYOK - CHMN, LIFE GROUP; DIR, KOREAN AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP ASSN

- AHN, HYO YOUNG - PRES, MCAHN INDUSTRIES; DIR, KOREAN AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP ASSN; PRES, US0 COUNCIL OF KOREA

- LEE, YONG HO - PRES, KOREA POLICY INSTITUTE; FMR ROK MINISTER OF SPORTS; DIR, KOREAN AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP ASSN

- CHANG, IK YONG - CHMN, SUKWANG CO, LTD; DIR, KOREAN AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP ASSN

- NAM, JAE DU - PRES, KOREA NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS, PEOPLE-TO-PEOPLE INTERNATIONAL

- HUH, SANG NYUNG - VP, KOREA FEDERATION OF SMALL BUSINESS; VP, KOREAN AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP ASSN

- LEE, YOUNG WOO - PRES, AM CORP; MBR, KOREAN AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP ASSN

- LTJG DAWES, KAREN, USN (ESCORT)

- LTCOL JAMES W. MCGUIRE, USAF - DEPUTY PAO, USFK (ESCORT)

- CHAE, YANG TO (TRANSLATOR)

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was towed up the James River, commencing Post Shakedown Availability at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia on 14 March 1990. The emphasis for this availability was on habitability, equipment installation and upgrade and maintenance to existing equipment” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “The last aircraft flew off USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 14 March 1990, visiting Port Everglades at Anchorage, off Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., with over 1,200 male dependents for a Tigers Cruise embarked while visiting from 12 to 13 March 1990, en route to Norfolk, Virginia. The E-6 Exam was held while in port and a “spectacular” air show for the Tigers was performed on the 13th. Tiger Teams on the 3B spring bearing and #1 distilling unit without affecting the ship's operational tempo and commitments thanks to M Division of the Engineering Department” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) cross decked with USS Santa Barbara (AE-28) taking on 194 PALLETSI/AMMO and cross decked with USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) during AMMO/WEPS OFF LOAD off the coast of Florida on 14 March 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) TEAM SPIRIT DV'S (KOREA) - 15 MARCH 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- KWAK, MAN-SUP - DEPUTY MAYOR OF PWSAN

- CHUNG, WON-GYU - PRES, PUSAN NATIONALTEACHERS UNIVERSITY

- YUN, HAN-SANG - PRES, PUSAN NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

- CHO, YOUNG-HOON - DIR, PUSAN PORT AUTHORITY

- KIM, IM-SHIK - CHMN, BOARD OF DONG-UI UNIVERSITY

- CHO, BYUNG-HAE - PRES CHRISTIAN BROADCASTING STATION (CBS) PUSAN

- SHIN, YUN-SAENG - PRES, KOREA BROADCASTING STATION (KBS) PUSAN

- YANG, JAE-TAIK - DIR, S. NORTHERN PROVINCES OFFICE, PUSAN

- RYOO, J. C. T. - ADVISOR, DON MYUNG CO PUSAN

- CHU, JAE-SHIK - MAYOR'S PERSONAL AIDE

- DENNIS P. HALPIN - AMERICAN CONSUL PUSAN

- HARRY JOHNSON - PRES, NIKE PUSAN

- LT. DONG, J. YI, USN - US ESCORT/TRANSLATOR

 

    “The last aircraft flew off USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 15 March 1990. Ammo offload with USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) continued until the 16th when Enterprise cross decked with Theodore Roosevelt during AMMO/WEPS OFF LOAD prior to entering her home port on 16 March 1990. Totals for the month of March 1990, included 360 fixed wing launches and 191 helo launches. All aircraft that started the deployment returned safely home after 8,410 launches and recoveries” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) TEAM SPIRIT DV'S (KOREA & U.S. NAVY) - 16 MARCH 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- KIM, SAM-HOON - DIR, GEN OF AMJAFFAIRS BUREAU

- SONG, MIN-SOON - DIR NATIONAL SECURITY DIVISION

- COL LEE, MIN JAE - BLUE HOUSE NATIONN SECURITY STAFF MEMBER

- COL YU, BO SUN - CHIEF FORIEGN POLITICAL DIV POLICY PLANS

- CHA, YOUNG KO0 - DIR OFFICE OF RESEARCH COOPERATION, KOREA INST FOR DEFENSE ANALYSIS

- PAM, CHONG CHUN - PROFESSOR, KOREA MILITARY ACADEMY

- HA, YOUNGSUN - PROFESSOR, SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

- HAN, SUNGJU - PROFESSOR, KORYO UNIVERSITY

- RHEE, SANG WOO - PROFESSOR, SOGANG UNIVERSITY

- CHOI, SHI-JOONG -TONGA ILBO, JOURNALIST EDITOR DEFENSE RELATIONS

- SHIN, YONG-SUK - CHOSUN ILW, JOURNALIST EDITOR DEFENSE RELATIONS

- RICHARD P. BONSIGNORE - U.S. EMBASSY, POLITICAL AFFAIRS OFFICER

- RICHARD A. CHRISTENSON - TRANSLATOR

- LTJG KAREN DAWES, USN - U.S. ESCORT

- GEN LOUIS C. MENETREY - CINC UNCICFCIUSFK

- MRS. SANDRA MENETREY

- GEN NA, JOONG BAE - DCINC CFC

- MGEN RICHARD CARR - CHIEF OF STAFF, CFC

- MGEN W. BRUCE MOORE - C3 (OPS) CFC

- RADM LARRY G. VOGT - CDR, US. NAVAL FORCES, KOREA

- COL SAM BOLE - CHIEF OF STAFF, 7AF

- MAJ JAMES R. MITCHELL - AIDE DE CAMP, CINCUNCICFCIUSFK

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-11 embarked arrived NOB, Norfolk, Virginia 1300, 16 March 1990, with Captain Harry T. Rittenour as Commanding Officer, ending her third World Cruise 89–90, on home port transfer from Naval Air Station, Alameda, California for Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Northrop Grumman Newport News shipyard, on her 13thWestPac” and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, participating in PacEx 89, a joint large-scale training evolution involving U.S., Japanese and ROK forces, Annualex 89, Operation "Valiant Blitz 85-1" in cooperation with elements of the South Korean Navy and Marine Corps, conducted off the coast of Okinawa. Like BALIKATAN/TANGENT FLASH, VALIANT BLITZ 90, comprised of the largest assemblage of U.S. naval air and sea power since World War II, was an amphibious exercise. USS Elliot (DD-967) provided naval gunfire support for the marine landing forces and screening actions against hostile forces opposing the transport ships. Carrier Qualifications, and training with USS Midway (CV-41), Carrier Qualifications and cyclic flight operations in support of Cope Thunder, a joint Navy and USAF power projection exercise west of Luzon, Tayabas Bay for “near land operations,” and Air Wing ELEVEN and Battle Group FOXTROT joined forces with along with Midway, participating in Operation Classic Resolve, President George H.W. Bush's response to Philippine President Corazon Aquino's request for air support during the rebel coup attempt, on her 17th & 18th Indian Ocean voyage, her fifth voyage in the Arabian Sea, on her fourth North Arabian Sea deployment, participating in Battle Week exercises and or Weapons Week, WASEX, STRIKEX, SAREX, ACM, SINKEX, BANNEREX, highlighted early-to-mid January 1990, including NSSM launch and air-to-air missile shoots (MISSELEX) in the vicinity of Diego Garcia from 4 to 8 January 1990 and Earnest Will exercises operations and upon conclusion steamed through the Indian Ocean around Cape of Good Hope on her third transit since her commission en route to Norfolk, Virgina. CVW-11 had the same composition as the previous deployment. Rear Admiral Strasser, ComCruDesGru-3, was Commander, BG Foxtrot, while Captain Linton Wells, II, ComDesRon-21, commanded the other ships of the group. Enterprise Combat Systems continued to enjoy a combat systems reliability that was unparalleled among COMNAVAIRPAC carriers. Professional excellence, superb technical competence and outstanding system performance were the norm for this Operations Department function. Significant accomplishments included a superb track record during her world cruise, with near 100 percent operating time on all combat systems. In addition, a perfect personnel safety record was maintained. Percentages of equipment availability during World Cruise 89-90 maintained by the Operations Department consists of Surface search radars (98%) such as the Tacan (100%), NTDS systems (99%), Communication systems (98%), LINK 11 (95%), NSSMS and CIWS (97%) and provided needed technical training to personnel at a Middle East I-IF transmitter facility. The Electronic Warfare Module (EW) remained the focal point for early detection and analysis of all exercise and real world threats throughout World Cruise 89-90. Division personnel made numerous improvement suggestions to the EWC, including an EMCON Bill incorporating 7th Fleet's requirements. The EW Module provided essential information on Thud and Fourth World signal detections. This information became useful to both the Battle Group Commander and Enterprise TAOs for identification of area threats. The module's eagerness to assist and willingness to use new tactical methods contributed significantly to the success of World Cruise 89-90. The Anti-Submarine Warfare Module conducted numerous training exercises with battle group ships and ASW aircraft during deployment. COMDESRON 21 recognized the ASW module's outstanding effort by presenting the coveted "Pummeled Dolphin ASW Excellence Award in February. This is the first time a carrier was chosen over other combatants. The ROOFTOP training system was developed by division personnel which enabled deployed ASW units to receive crucial training during periods of limited real-time ASW. ASW qualifications were maintained through an aggressive training program. Several system improvements were accomplished by division supervisors. Full function checks were conducted on a new upgrade to the Nixie system fix the first time. Module personnel developed a low cost, in-house modification to the ASN-123 TACNAV. The modified system increased the UHF ranges for ASW aircraft. Engineering Department’s A Division Heavy workloads for all shops due to completion of World Cruise 89-90 from January to March 1990 were met as scheduled during the   deployment. The division was a key factor in the ability of the ship to complete its deployment without a single major accident or loss of life. The Propulsion Plant work center, M Division of the Engineering Department gave excellent support for Airwing move off and transfer was provided. Preparations commenced for the upcoming yard and inport periods. The diesel shop successfully completed inspections on #1-4 EDG's with no limiting discrepancies. The world cruise was completed with all of M-Division's equipment operational. E-Division of the Engineering Department conducted trouble shooting and repair of 400 HZ system to support air operations January to March 1990. DCPO shop ordered parts and completed repairs on 125 watertight doors. Head Habitability hydro blasted 60 heads and associated piping. Repair completed over 100 piping systems repairs. Shipfitters manufactured over 60 projects. It was also a time which saw the debarkation of the Admiral and the Airwing for which DC/R contributed essential skill and manpower. During World Cruise 89-90, the Oceanography office provided outstanding support to the ship Airwing, and Cruiser Destroyer Group. Enterprise operated in regions of the world rarely transited. This gave the Oceanography office a unique opportunity to gather valuable Oceanographic and weather observations in an area of extremely sparse data, providing reports enabling the ship to transit the Indian Ocean and around Southern Africa to the Atlantic safely. The Photographic Laboratory flawlessly processed and printed every aerial mission conducted by the Enterprise/CVW-11 team. Their ability to turn around timely intelligence of minute timed hot print exercise was unprecedented. Photo personnel also provided important diplomatic coverage of many high ranking civilian and military foreign nationals. Photo Lab produced over 170,000 negatives, prints and slides in support of COMCRUDEISGRU, CVIC Command Briefs, naval exercises, criminal investigations and damaged equipment reports. Indian Ocean operations required the photo lab to produce over 3,800 feet of TARPS film in support of squadron and task force requirements. World Cruise 89-90 end of cruise briefing materials were produced for the first time utilizing computer graphics on slides. Over 500 slides were produced and all briefings received "Bravo Zulus" from Battle Force Commanders. Mission Planning provided flawless flight operations support to CVW-11 during the remainder of World Cruise 89-90. Mission planning also served as the focal point for timely intelligence updates to senior decision makers. Using secured closed circuit television, Mission Planning provided around the clock intelligence support to all Battle Group assets. Additionally, Mission Planning provided superb support for CONOPS planning by providing a daily "Hot Area Sheet" which graphically portrayed areas dangerous to ship aircraft movement. Supplementary Plot Supplot provided unparalleled timely OPINTEL support for Battle Group assets during Indian Ocean, SOLANT and NORLANT portions of the World Cruise, as well as during subsequent at-sea periods during the summer. Supplot provided "Indications and Warnings" to senior decision makers resulting in numerous successful detections and intercepts of potentially hostile air contacts. Additionally, SUPPLOT graphically reconstructed these actions in support of CCDG-3 for end-of-cruise briefings. Storage and Retrieval (S&R) served as the classified material library for over 5,000 publications and one million charts. S&R produced the Daily Intelligence Summary Report and message, keeping Battle Group Foxtrot decision makers abreast of all pertinent intelligence developments. Additionally, S&R produced the daily Satellite Vulnerability Report to aid Battle Group decision makers in establishing the most effective electronic warfare posture. This report was especially noteworthy in support of the Battle Group's EMCON transit of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Ship's Signal Exploitation Space SSES set the standard for all SI capable units in the Battle Group and provided exceptional first heard cryptological support and critical tipper information during World Cruise 89-90. Additionally, SESS's TACINTEL reliability exceeded 99 percent, leading the way in special intelligence communications support. Skillful installation of special purpose systems, including Tributary and LSPRAC, enhanced SSES's contribution to intelligence operations while deployed. The Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) deployed on World Cruise 89-90 with a complement of eight officers and more than 400 enlisted men, including 230 SEAOPDET personnel. In addition to performing their main mission of providing essential aircraft component repair and maintenance services to embarked Carrier Airwing Eleven, they also provided a variety of unique technical services to Battle Group FOXTROT units in support of operations around the world. Unparalleled support continued to be the trademark for AIMD. AIMD successfully processed over 30,000 maintenance actions with a repair rate of 75 percent and an average component turn-around time of five days. They processed more than 12,000 rotable pool assets with a commendable 98.5 percent pool effectiveness rate. The Support Equipment Division consistent1y maintained a estimated 27,640 man-hours. The Support Equipment Division consistent1y maintained a 98 percent readiness rate on over 400 items of ground support equipment (SE); an unprecedented achievement. Aircraft Division contributed to this very successful deployment supporting a total of 49 quick engine changes. Their thorough preparations and rapid response resulted in no "bare-firewalls" throughout the deployment. Avionics Division achieved the remarkable milestone of a zero backlog in their VAST work center. A noteworthy distinction was completing the deployment with no Intermediate or Organizational level Contractor Engineering Technical Services (CETS) support, making Enterprise the first COMNAVAIRPAC carrier to accomplish this major Operations objective. Prior to entering her new home port, Enterprise successfully and safely steamed more than 43,000 miles from its long-time homeport of Alameda, Calif. where CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Calif. was embarked during 18 UNREPS from 8 ships taking on 796 pallets and 4,334,000 gallons of JP5. Zero men and zero aircraft were lost during deployment. Her 22nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission November 25, 1961 with Captain V. P. de Poix in command (17 September 1989 to 16 March 1990)” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1990 & 362F).  

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) began a six-week Crew Standdown period at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia upon return from her 1989/90 World Cruise” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “Upon USS Enterprise (CVN-65) arrival at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia, AIMD's mission and complement changed virtually overnight. The department rapidly implemented plans which they had formulated long before the arrival in preparation of the Ships Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) and Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) scheduled for 15 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) underwent repairs and tests into the spring. During that time, she received the installation of the TFCC Information Management System (TIMS) that brought a greater command and control capability to the ship” (Ref. 549).

 

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) steams at the center of her powerful battle group in the Atlantic during her centennial cruise (in honor of the ship's namesake) to the Mediterranean and Red Sea in 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “In events of a ceremonial nature, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) hosted USS Enterprise (CVN-65) as the world’s first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier shifted her homeport to Norfolk on 16 March 1990” (Ref. 549).

 

 

    “Over 1,000 sailors gathered on the flight deck of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) for Operation Spellex, forming five stars and the numbers 1890–1990 in honor of the centennial celebration of President Eisenhower's birth on 17 March 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted replenishment at sea (RAS) with USS Spica (AK-16) on 17 March 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) provided air support for amphibious landings, low level strikes, jamming support and air-to-air combat training during Team Spirit 90 that began off eastern Korea from 26 February to 4 March (First Phase) and Second Phase: 7 to 18 March 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) and VERTREP with USS Mauna Kea (AE-22) on 18 March 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Special Weapon offload conference at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 19 March 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Communications Department V5 system commenced update on 19 March 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) entered the Mediterranean Sea under the command of the Sixth Fleet. While in the Med, she maintained an average of two F-14A (Plus) and two S-3Bs ashore at NAS Sigonella for operational training on 19 March 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) and VERTREP with USS Mauna Kea (AE-22) on 20 March 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) was awarded the Battle "E" from Commander, Naval Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, on 20 March 1990” (Ref. 72 & 384).

 

    “Operation Provide Comfort was a military operation by the United States, starting in 1990, to defend Kurds fleeing their homes in northern Iraq in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War” (Ref. 679).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) commenced maritime threat scenarios as part of National Week 90B with USS Forrestal (CV-59) on 20 March 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Special Weapon offload at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 22 to 23 March 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) transited the Strait of Tsushima and continued around toward the South China Sea, operating en route to the North Arabian Sea with USS Midway (CV-41) Task Force from 21 to 23 March 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 23 March 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) DV VISIT (PHILIPPINES) - 23 MARCH 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- GOVERNOR BREN GUIAO, GOVERNOR, PAMPAGNA PROVINCE

- DR. JOSE V. ABUEVA, PRES, UNIV OF PHILIPPINES AND CHMN LEGISLATIVE-EXECUTIVE COUNCIL ON BASES

- MRS. MARIA SOCORRO ABUEVA, WIFE OF DR. ABUEVA

- DR. EMERLINDA ROMAN, VP, ADMIN, UNIV OF PHILIPPINES

- UNDER SECRETARY HORACIO V. TAREDES, PRESS, OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT, MALACANANG PALACE

- MR. JAKE LAGONERA, DIRECTOR, PRESIDENTIAL STAFF, MALACANANG PALACE

- MR. JAIME YAMBAO, EXEC DIR, OFFICE OF AMERICAN AFFAIRS, DEPT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

- MR. BAYONI SIBUG, STAFF ASST, OFFICE OF AMERICAN AFFAIRS, DFA

- MS. MARIA LOUISA RAMOS, STAFF ASST, Office OF AMERICAN AFFAIRS, DFA

- MR. BOB COBLE, ASST PAO, COMUSNAVPHIL, (GS 11)

- CAPT HARRY SMITH, USN, USCINCPACREP REP, AMER EMBASSY, MANILA

- MR. SIMS MOATS, AMER EMBASSY, MANILA

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) and VERTREP with USS Mauna Kea (AE-22) on 24 March 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

   “On 24 March 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) moored pier side to Alava Pier,

Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines for a 12 day upkeep” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) participated with USS Forrestal (CV-59) in maritime threat scenarios as part of National Week 90B from 20 to 27 March 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) dropped anchor in Augusta Bay to relieve USS Forrestal (CV-59) on 28 March 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Communications Department V5 system conducted update from 19 to 30 March 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

    “Communications Department maintained continuous satellite and high frequency terminations with NAVCAMS EASTPAC, NAKAMS “WestPac” and NAXDMMSTA Philippines through February and March. These circuits handle the vast majority of all administrative traffic to and £ran the ship. During the transit from the Western Pacific to the Indian Ocean, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) was able to demonstrate the value of split SATCOM antenna configuration. This innovative system allows Carl Vinson to literally communicate using two separate satellites simultaneously. New to the Western Pacific, the split antenna configuration drew acclaim from COMSEVENTHFLT and embarked staffs” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “An F/A-18A, LCDR William J. Henderson from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 136, experienced a “catastrophic” left engine failure followed by loss of flight controls and crashed into the sea at about 1610. A Sea King from HS-5 attached to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) rescued Henderson in barely 10 minutes. The rescue prove unique in that Henderson maintained radio contact the entire time with a nearby VS-31 Viking that vectored the helo in for the recovery although it's crew never actually spotted the pilot, who suffered minor injuries on 31 March 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “On 6 April 1990, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer and Captain S. P. Hannifin, as Executive Officer, ending her 45th WestPac and her 41st deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Ports of calls include: Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines; Phattaya Beach, a city in Thailand, a beach resort popular with tourists and expatriates. It is located on the east coast of the Gulf of Thailand, about 165 km southeast of Bangkok within but not part of Amphoe Bang Lamung (Banglamung) in the province of Chonburi; and Sasebo, a city in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Squadrons: VFA-195, FA-18A; VFA-151, FA-18A; VFA-192, FA-18A; VA-185, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VA-115, A-6E / A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2C; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HS-12, SH-3H. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 44th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 50th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 63rd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (25 January to 6 April 1990)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).   

 

25/01/90 to 06/04/90

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

45th WestPac

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The SSDR is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the SSDR, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

 

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the SSDR Ribbon, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “Gunstar 302, an F/A-18A, LCDR Randolph E. “Claw” Causey of VFA-136, logged the one millionth Hornet flight hour when he landed on board USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) at 1415 on 10 April 1990. The trap also was Causey’s 1,000th hour in Hornets” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) got underway from Naval Station Subic Bay, moored pier side to Alava Pier, Republic of the Philippines on 6 April 1990 for Singapore after a 12 day upkeep” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) DV VISIT (PHILIPPINES) DV VISIT - 7, 8 APRIL 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

U.S. AMBASSADOR TO THE REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES, NICHOLAS PIATT

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 10 April 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “On 12 April 1990, USS Forrestal (CV-59) with CVW-6 embarked arrived Mayport Fla. 6 November 1989, ending her 19th

Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), operating with the 6th Fleet, having

conducted "routine" exercises and training initiatives the crew became part of history, as they provided support to President of the

United States George H. W. Bush during his Malta Summit that included a three-hour Presidential visit to the ship, having

participated in numerous exercises during this deployment including; Harmonie Sud, Tunisian Amphibious and National Week,

which had included eight port visits in five different countries, steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic

Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea; completed a 28-month,

$550 million SLEP at Philadelphia, Naval Shipyard Pennsylvania on 20 May 1985, designed to extend the life of U.S. aircraft

carriers another 15 to 20 years, having shifted from her homeport Mayport Fla. 18 January 1983 to Philadelphia; reclassified to CV-

59 30 June 1975; made one Vietnam Combat cruise during the Vietnam Conflict/War and first deployment operating with the 7th

Fleet, returning from the South China Sea, via the straits of Malacca, Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea on her second Suez Canal

transit steaming through the Gulf of Aden, Red Sea, to and from the Mediterranean Sea 14 September 1967. Her 25th (6

November 1989 to 12 April 1990) or 26th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD), if you count her east coast and Caribbean

operations operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet in the Caribbean

Sea, upon return from her third Mediterranean deployment operating with the 6th Fleet 31 August 1960, since her commission 1

October 1955, having the destination of being the first lead ship of a new class of “supercarriers” (Ref. 1-Forrestal & 72).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) participated in joint exercise Distant Thunder 90-1 with British and Turkish forces beginning on 14 April 1990. Tomcats and Hornets from USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) flew dissimilar air combat training against British Panavia GR” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “Prior to entering Singapore on 14 April 1990 for upkeep, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) participated in the Merlion 90 Exercise on 13 to 14 April 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) took part in Merlion 90 with Singaporean forces and then entered Singapore for upkeep and liberty for her crew on 14 April 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 3M assist visit commenced on 17 April 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 3M assist visit conducted from 17 to 19 April 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

 

    “Mk 1 Tornadoes flying out of Akrotiri. Israeli Air Force Commander MGEN Avihu Ben-Nunn visited the ship on the 20 April 1990, and took the opportunity to have a flight in a VF-143 Tomcat” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “On 21 April 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) got underway from Singapore and continued to Indian Ocean/North Arabian Sea deployment, inport from 14 to 21 April 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) participated in joint exercise Distant Thunder 90-1 with British and Turkish forces from 14 to 21 April 1990. Tomcats and Hornets flew dissimilar air combat training against British Panavia GR. Mk 1 Tornadoes flying out of Akrotiri. Israeli Air Force Commander MGEN Avihu Ben-Nunn visited the ship on the 20th, and took the opportunity to have a flight in a VF-143 Tomcat” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) pulled into Haifa, Israel on 22 April 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and Malaysian/Thailand BILAT PASSEX commenced on 22 April 1990, beginning its fifth Indian Ocean/North Arabian Sea deployment on the 23rd” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) DV VISIT (THAILAND) - 23 APRIL 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- GENERALSUNDHARA KONGSOMPONG, ARMED FORCES C IN C

- AIR CHIEF MARSHAL PISITH SALIKUPT, ARMED FORCES COS

- GENERAL VICHITR SOOKMAK, DEP, ARMED FORCES COS

- ADMIRAL SAWAKE TARDTONG, RTN, DEP C IN C

- AIR MARSHAL SUTHEP THEPPARAK, COS TO SUPREME COMMANDER

- AIR MARSHAL RERNGCHAI SANITPAN, RTAF, DEP COS

- AIR MARSHAL SAMART SOTSATHIT, RTAF, ACS FOR OPS

- LGEN TAMNIAB TUBMANEE, SUPREME COMMAND, J3

- AIR VICE MARSHAL SIRIPONG TONGYAI, RTAF, AIR OPS CONTROL DIRECTOR

- COL RUENGROJ MAHASARANOND, ATTACHED TO SUPREME COMMAND

- COL CHATURIT PROMSAKHA, RTA, DEP G3

- CAPT TAVEECHAI LIANGBHIBOOL, RTN, DEP G3

- GROUP CAPT MANUT DENTHONG (RTAF), ATACHED TO SUNDMARA'S STAFF

- BGEN ROBERT L. STEPHENS, U. S. ARMY, CHJUSMAGTHAI, ESCORT

- CAPT TERRIS L. HANSON, USN, CHNAVDIV, JUSMAGTHAI, ESCORT

- LT R. L HATHCOCK, USN, NAVDIV, JUSMAGTHAI, ESCORT

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) passed through the Strait of Malacca into the Indian Ocean, operating with the Malaysian/Thailand BILAT PASSEX was conducted on 22 to 23 April 1990, beginning its fifth Indian Ocean/North Arabian Sea deployment on the 23rd. Thai GEN Sundhara Kongsompong, Commander-in-Chief Armed Forces, and Air Chief Marshal Pisith Salikupt, Chief of Staff, visited the ship (23 April 1990)” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “En route to Diego Garcia (British Indian Ocean Territory), USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) crossed the equator in the Indian Ocean and conducted "crossing the line" ceremonies on 25 April 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

      “The Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, traveled 2+ million nautical miles and her air wings made 375,000 landings with 70,000 crewmembers from her beginning to 26 April 1990 when she was decommissioned at Norfolk, Va. Navy Ship Yard, Pier 12; cconducting a drydocking for hull repairs commencing upon return to Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Va. on 12 April 1985 ($11 million collision), concluding a training voyage in the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba AOR, pulling for repairs at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba after colliding with the Ecuadorean tanker NAPO during air operations 45 miles southeast of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba on 12 April 1985. A 30-foot hole in the carrier's bow is punched in and some radar and communications equipment is damaged. The NAPO is holed above the waterline and spills 7,600 barrels of oil before reaching Guantanamo for repairs. Eleven aircraft airborne at the time of the accident are diverted to Guantanamo Bay. A formal investigation later blames the Commanding Officer of the CORAL SEA for the incident, saying he "used poor judgment in electing to be absent from the bridge during the entire launch and recovery cycle...with a Soviet vessel within 1,500 yards and with other vessels well within" the closest point of approach limits the captain had established; conducted a 15-month complex overhaul involving repairs and alterations to the ship at Norfolk, Va. Navy Yard from 17 October 1983 to 18 January 1985. Included in the package were all of the equipment required to operate F/A-18s -two large Mk 7 jet blast deflectors, flush deck nose gear launch, catapult mods, rotary launch valves and avionics support equipment. The latest electronics SPS-48 and SPS-49, air search radars were also fitted to enable her to operate to the end of the decade ($186 mil) (Combat systems and catapult specifications at date (WI-185) were completed 18 January 1985); Availability period from 14 July to 10 October 1980, Coral Sea underwent a $30 million modernization repair period to restore the ship to first-rate operating condition in all systems, and increase her value as a deployable carrier asset for years to come. During Coral Sea’s modernization repair period Typing 250 enlisted evaluations quarterly for the Operations Department Personnel was a challenge. When the Navy changed the reporting period, extending an evaluation period from 3-months to 6-months or 8-months in some cases (July 1, 1980 to February 28, 1981), Yeomen throughout the Navy were pleased. Unfortunately, the Navy changed the reporting period after all the enlisted evaluations were completed. It was a bad decision and hundreds of hours of work were lost in vain by everyone involved in the canceled reporting period. Coral Sea departed Alameda for sea trials following availability period; conducted a $80,000,000 11 month overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Washington and sailed for Alameda, Ca. 8 February 1979, arriving the next day; underwent overhaul on 6 March 1978, during which the last of her 5-inch battery and all gun directors were removed; conducted a more than $20-million seven-month Extended Selected Restricted Availability (ESRA) from August 1975 to 18 April 1976 at Naval Shipyard, Long Beach, Ca.; departed Perth, Australia and sailed for Alameda, Calif. by way of Subic, Philippines. Coral Sea reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975 (hull identification symbol) “Multiple Purpose Aircraft Carrier;” major overhaul at Hunters Point, San Francisco, Calif. on 30 April 1966; underwent major overhaul at Hunters Point, San Francisco, Calif. on 22 November 1965; completed a scheduled four-month overhaul period at Hunters Point Naval Ship Yard, San Francisco, Ca. in December 1962, commencing on 8 September 1962; commenced a scheduled six-week Post-Conversion Availability at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Wa. on 7 July 1960; recommissioned on or about 25 January 1960; decommissioned on 24 April 1957 for her first modernization, SCB 110A conversion commencing on 16 April 1957 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington. The modernization included installation of three C-11-1 steam driven catapults, which were designed to accommodate the newer and heavier jet aircraft; angled deck, enclosed hurricane bow, Mk-7-Mod 2 arresting gear identical to that installed in the Forrestal-class carriers, relocation of the elevators and three new deck-edge elevators and new weapons elevators. In addition, electronics package was installed and hull blisters widened her beam to a matronly 120 feet to accommodate the increase in her displacement. Her hull was widened eight feet and her overall displacement increased to 63,600 tons. The SCB-110A upgrade took 33 months to complete and she was the last of all three Midway-class Carriers to complete SCB 110A. After the SCB-110A modernization, the Coral Sea was the first aircraft carrier with a deck edge elevator on the port quarter; was decommissioned on 24 April 1957; commenced first modernization, SCB 110A conversion on 16 April 1957 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard; Underwent short refit from September 1955 to February 1956; completed overhaul in early 1953 at Norfolk Navy Yard, Va.; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952, while still at sea; underwent overhaul at Norfolk Navy Ship Yard on 12 October 1952; completed overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard, Va. February 1952; entering 10 October 1951; a five-month scheduled period of repairs and alterations, including modernization of Coral Sea’s bridge and island completed, at Norfolk Naval Ship Yard, Va. on 9 February 1949. Coral Sea conducted Post-Shakedown Repairs and Alterations in April 1948; reported to the Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Va., designated as her home port. Ship's patch insignia in color, signal flag and radio call sign issued by Navy. BIG C, CORAL MARU, AGELESS WARRIOR; launched on 2 April 1946 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company.; sponsored and christened by Mrs. Thomas C. Kincaid, a wife of RADM Thomas Kincaid, who had commanded a cruiser division under RADM Frank Jack Fletcher at Coral Sea, a Coral Sea hero. While under construction the unnamed (CV-42) was first named the Coral Sea on 10 October 1944; keel was laid down on 10 July 1944 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va., originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42, reclassified as a ‘Large Aircraft Carrier’ (CVB-43) on 15 July 1943, while the contract to build her was awarded on 14 June 1943” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 43, 72 84A).

 

     “A fictitious USS Coral Sea (CV-43) appears in the television show JAG; her part is played by John C. Stennis (CVN-74)” (Ref. 72).

 

     “An article of USS Coral Sea (CV-43) by Clayton, P. & Cressman, R.  MORE THAN A SHIP, was printed in HOOK Sp 90 in April 1990” (Ref. 34).

 

     “One more link with the World War II Navy passes from the scene. Even before her commissioning pennant is hauled down comes a movement to reassign her name to a future aircraft carrier, so that it can continue to provide inspiration to the men who take the ship to sea. No doubt such an assignment would prove not only appropriate but also popular. Looking back over Coral Sea's proud history, one must echo RADM Ferris' comments in the summer of 1972. While meant to pertain to the recent deployment on Yankee Station that she had just completed, it could also be applied to sum up her career as well. Coral Sea . . . "more than just a ship” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).

 

CHAPTER XL

TWELFTH MEDITERRANEAN SEA DEPLOYMENT

CV’s & CVN’s OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

The evacuation of the American embassy in Beirut, Lebanon

(1 June 1989 to 26 April 1990)

Part 1 – (31 May to 31 December 1989)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 January 1990)

Part 3 – (1 February to 26 April 1990)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XL

Part 3 – (1 February to 26 April 1990)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4