Part 1 – (27 April to 1 August 1990)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1990 & 1991 EAST AND WEST COAST DEPLOYMENTS

CV and CVN Activities after CV-43 Decommissioned

Operation Desert Shield (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait commencing 2 August 1990) and

Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991).

(27 April 1990 to 26 April 1992)

Part 1 – (27 April to 1 August 1990)

Part 2 – (2 August to 11 October 1990)

Part 3 – (12 October to 31 December 1990)

Part 4 – (1 January to 26 March 1991)

Part 5 – (27 March to 16 June 1991)

Part 6 – (17 June 1991 to 27 April 1992)

 

 

    “On 27 April 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) participated in Weapons Week in the Indian Ocean” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “During USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) visit to Haifa, Israel, during which time, RADM Michael Ram, that nation’s naval Commander-in-Chief, toured the ship from 22 to 29 April 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “During the period from 27 to 29 April 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) participated in Weapons Week, prior to anchoring in the blue lagoon of Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean on 30 April 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) commenced participation in Dragon Hammer 90, consisting of combined operations, coordinated air defense, and maritime and amphibious training, pitting her Tomcats against British Tornados, French and Spanish Mirages and Spanish Harriers beginning on 29 April 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “On 27 April 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) headed to sea for exercises off the Virginia capes and Jacksonville” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a Crew Standdown at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 17 March to 30 April 1990. Maintenance Activity, Air Department personnel applied 44,000 square feet of new nonskid on the flight deck in preparation for upcoming fleet Carrier Qualifications. Review and "clean-up" of overhaul packages began. No underway time during April 1990. Working with Voyage Repair Team, Ship's Intermediate deck plates, cylinders and Catapult 1 and 3 Jet Blast Deflector Panels proceeded rapidly and was completed two weeks ahead of schedule for Enterprise, while some early Ship's Force Overhaul Maintenance System (SFOMS) work started” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) received major onload of avionics benches beginning in April 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

     “In April 1990, USS Constellation (CV-64) with CVW-9 embarked arrived Norfolk, Va., with Captain Leonard N. Oden, USN, as Commanding Officer, ending her home port transfer steaming from Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, through the Eastern and South Pacific via Cape Horn through the South and Western Atlantic to the east coast for a $800-million, three-year Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pa. scheduled for July. Ports of call include: Squadrons: VF-74, F-14B; VA-35, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-125, E-2C; VAQ-132, EA-6B; VS-30, S-3B; VRC-40 Det., C-2A; HC-16 Det., SH-3H. *Redesignated VFA.; reclassified to CV-56 on 1 July 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises in Vietnam, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, received a Presidential Unit Citation from President Nixon in 1973. Her 21st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at New York Naval Shipyard on 27 October 1961, with Captain T.J. Walker in command (12 February to April 1990)” (Ref. 1-” (Ref. 1-Constellation, 72, 76 & 84A).

 

 12/02/90 to /04/90

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

None reported

 

Transfer to the East Coast

Ref. - 406A

 

    “In April USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) established a high frequency termination with NAKOMMSTA Diego Garcia Unique to this termination was the introduction of dual independent sideband (ISB) BR602WBR6029 modem operation. The high quality signal provided by the "berry" modems reduced frequency changes and provided an unprecedented level of connectivity. During the 44 day termination period, a total of nearly fifteen thousand messages were processed with a minimum of retransmissions.

 

    During this termination a vigorous training program was implemented with NAWMMSTR Diego Garcia that provided for shore/ship personnel to exchange duty. This allowed the operator to see his job from the other persons perspective while on station in the Gulf of Oman, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) was tasked to provide maintenance on shore communication assets. A five man team consisting of FTs and Radiomen spent five days TAD to the Sultan of Oman providing badly needed maintenance on transmitters, receivers, and antennas.

 

    The Communications Department participated in the Air Electronic Key Transfer (OTAWEKT) exercises with NAXAMS “WestPac”. The electronic key transfer of cryptographic material was considered very successful.

 

    NAVCAMS “WestPac” also tested the full capability of USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and Battle Group CHARLIE communications by implementing bearing impervious and high frequency improvement program procedures. These exercises demonstrated the ability to communicate in a reduced/hostile environment. Prior to deployment, CS Division completely overhauled the interior and exterior areas on the 010 level. Three 24" searchlights were replaced with 12'' mercury xeon searchlights.

 

    CS Division supported Battle Group CHARLIE using all forms of visual communications. The handling (transmission and reception) of administrative, logistic, and tactical messages was conducted efficiently, expeditiously and with expertise. Signalman were cross decked to various units as a training tool to improve their confidence, expertise and to familiarize them with operational procedures and problems experienced on different visual signaling platforms.

 

     “Captain Lloyd Edward Allen, Jr., of USS Coral Sea (CV-43), was the ships 37th and final Commanding Officer, serving from 22 June 1988 to 30 April 1990” (Ref. 35A).

 

   “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) anchored at Diego Garcia from 30 April to 2 May 1990 in the Indian Ocean” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) and VERTREP with USS Mauna Kea (AE-22) on 2 May 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) arrived on station and chopped to CJTFME (Commander Joint Task Force Middle East) in the North Arabian Sea on 5 May 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “On 6 May 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) arrived in Puerto Rican operating areas and began a war-at-sea exercise with the French carrier Foch” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced fast cruise at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 7 May 1990” (Ref. 362F).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) and replenishment at sea (RAS) with USS Spica (AK-16) on 7 May 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “Vice President J. Danforth “Dan” Quayle visited USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). The Vice President observed flight operations and met crewmembers in Hanger Bay No. 2, where he reenlisted 19 sailors on 7 May 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “War-at-sea exercise with the French carrier Foch concluded on 8 May 1990 and USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) steamed for Norfolk, Va.” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in port at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 17 March to 9 May 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 9 May 1990, for Independent Steaming Exercise and involved limited helo operations and maintenance and preparations for upcoming CQ’s on 9 May 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in port at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 17 March to 9 May 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) arrived 11 May 1990” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) anchored off Masirah from 13 to 14 May 1990, conducting numerous exercises and orientations/briefings from 5 to 13 May 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) resumed operations in the North Arabian Sea with Combined Joint Task Force Middle East beginning on 14 May 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) DV VISIT (OMAN) - 15 MAY 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- LGEN HAMID BIN SAID AL AUFI COS, SULTAN'S ARMED FORCES

- BRIGADIER ZAID BIN SAIF AL HOUSAINI DIRECTOR, OPS'COSSAF

- CDR AHMED BIN SAID AL SHANFARI SO-1 OPS (NAVY), COSSAF STAFF

- LT COLJUMA BIN HAMID ALMUKHAINI SO-1 GCC, COSSAFSTAFF

- COL JIM LESSEIG, USAF DAII (ESCORT)

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted replenishment at sea (RAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) and with USS Spica (AK-16) on 16 May 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia, moored at Pier 11 on 16 May 1990, conducting Independent Steaming Exercise and involved limited helo operations. Maintenance and preparations for upcoming CQ’s from 9 to 16 May 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “On 17 May 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) hosted the change of command ceremony at which Admiral Leon A. Edney relieved Admiral Frank B. Kelso as Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command and Supreme Allied Commander, Atlantic. John F. Kennedy remained moored for the remainder of May” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Installation of new SUPPLOT begins aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) in May 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “Four Hornets attached to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) CVW-7 air wing deployed to Sidi Ahmed Airfield, Tunisia, to conduct dissimilar air combat training with 14 F-5E and F Tiger IIs of the 15th Tunisian Air Unit on 20 May 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 23 May 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 24 May 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “Four Hornets attached to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) CVW-7 air wing deployed to Sidi Ahmed Airfield, Tunisia, to conduct dissimilar air combat training with 14 F-5E and F Tiger IIs of the 15th Tunisian Air Unit from 20 to 24 May 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) anchored off Masirah from 24 to 25 May 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

   “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) resumed operations in the North Arabian Sea with Combined Joint Task Force Middle East beginning on 25 May 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted DRY FUEL HOOK-UP with USS Sylvania (AFS-2) for one underway replenishment for training purposes only at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia or got underway for a day. No mention of any underway period. Deck Department maintained the preservation of all interior and exterior spaces during this at-sea period on 28 May 1990. Deck Department established Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) and Departmental Coordinators for the accurate inventory, packing and offload of all Deck Department and supplies in preparation for the Enterprise's upcoming complex overhaul and refueling were assigned” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “During the period 26 to 28 May 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) participated in a SON (Omani Navy) PASSEX” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Hometown flight from 24 to 29 May 1990 at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 24 to 29 May 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USNS Walter S. Deihl (TAO-A3) on 30 May 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Elliot (DD 967) on 31 May 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) FACSFAC airspace planning conference was held on 1 June 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “On 1 June 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) outchopped CJTFME (Commander Joint Task Force Middle East) in the North Arabian Sea en route Freemantle, Australia” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) operated in the North Arabian Sea with Combined Joint Task Force Middle East from 5 May to 1 June 1990. Carl Vinson conducted a variety of exercises, twice anchoring off Masirah (13-14 May; 24-25 May). She also trained with the Omanis and with British destroyer HMS Cardiff (D-108) before Fremantle, Australia steaming through the Indian Ocean” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) headed for the Virginia capes on 1 June 1990 for more exercises, then proceeded to the Puerto Rico operating area, where she acted as Orange (adversary) forces for the USS Saratoga (CV-60) battle group” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) took part in Journey to Victory, a commemoration of the Allied landings in Normandy beginning on 2 June 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced fast cruise at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 4 June 1990” (Ref. 362F).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) floated out of drydock at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia on 5 June 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

    “John S. D. Eisenhower, U.S. Ambassador to France Walter J.P. Curley, Jr., and American and British D-Day veterans was among those who embarked USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) on 5 June 1990. Tomcats from VF-142 and VF-143 flew a “missing man” formation over Omaha Beach the next day in honor of the men who fell seizing that crucial beachhead on D-Day in 1944” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) took part in Journey to Victory, a commemoration of the Allied landings in Normandy from 2 to 6 June 1990. John S. D. Eisenhower, U.S. Ambassador to France Walter J.P. Curley, Jr., and American and British D-Day veterans were among those who embarked on the 5th. Tomcats from VF-142 and VF-143 flew a “missing man” formation over Omaha Beach the next day in honor of the men who fell seizing that crucial beachhead on D-Day in 1944” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “On 7 June 1990, Commander, Carrier Group THREE, RADM Daniel P. March was relieved by RADM Timothy W. Wright” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “Captain Arthur Karl Cebrowski, NAVCAD, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on June 12, 1990, relieving Captain Bernard John Smith, NAVCAD, 38th Commanding Officer, serving from February 25, 1989 - June 12, 1990” (Ref. 1178-G). 

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) V VISIT (AUSTRALIA) - 11 JUN 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- HIS EXCEUENCY WILLIAM GEORGE HAYDEN, THE HONOURABLE GOVERNOR-GENERAL, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRAUA

- HER EXCELLENCY, MRS. DAUAS HAYDEN, WIFE OF GOVERNORGENERAL

- MR. E. GIBSON LANPHER, DEPUTY CHIEF OF MISSION -- U.S. EMBASSY - MS. JUNE KRONHOLZ, U.S. EMBASSY (WIFE OF MR. LANPHER)

- MR. ALLAN ROCHER, MP LIBERAL PARTY MEMBER OF THE, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES - WA

- MR. BOB HALVERSON, OBE MP LIBERAL PARTY MEMBER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES - VICTORIA AND OPPOSITION WHIP - MR. NICHOLAS DUNDAS, SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE, NORTHERN TERRITORIES, AUSTRAUA - COMMODORE GRAHAM STUBINGTON, NAVALOFFICER COMMANDING WEST AM, RAN AUSTRAUA AREA

- COMMODORE TONY WOLSTENHOLME, RN DEFENSE ADVISOR, BRITISH HIGH COMMAND MISSION, CANBERRA

- MISS INGRID HAYDEN, DAUGHTER OF GOVERNORGENERAL

- COMMANDER PHIL LANDON, RAN MILITARY SECRETARY TO THE GOVERNOR GENERAL

- LT LOUISE SCULLION, RAN AIDE-DE-CAMP TO THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL

- HER WORSHIP THE MAYOR, MRS. FAYE SIMPSON, MAYOR OF GERALDTON

- MR. ROBIN STANIER, TACTICAL FIGHTER PROJECT OFFICE DIRECTOR

- MR. JOHN LEACH COUNCILLOR, AUSTRALIAN FRIENDSHIP SOCIETY

- MR. COUN HUGHES, AUSTRALIAN GENERAL MANAGER, CONTINENTAL AIRLINES

- MR. PAUL MANN, AUTHOR

- CAPTAIN DON DILL NAVAL ATTACHE, U.S. EMBASSY CANBERRA

- MRS. GAIL DILL, WIFE OF CAPTAIN DILL

- MR. CHARLES REESE, CONSUL (COMMERCIAL) U.S. CONSULATE GENERAL

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) pulled in for a port call at Fremantle, Australia dropping anchor on 12 June 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) visited Fremantle, Australia from 12 to 17 June 1990, with Governor General William G. Hayden included among her many visitors, en route to Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 15 June 1990, for Carrier Qualifications” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 15 June 1990, conducting Carrier Qualifications from 6 to 15 June 1990. Air Department demonstrated their World Cruise operating expertise as June's CQ period hit full swing. Despite weather delays, all requirements for Fleet Replacement and Reserve pilots were exceeded with nearly 5000 arrestments. No problems with fueling, handling, launching or recovering marred the at sea period.

 

    Deck Department’s main concern was accurate CSMP documentation of all jobs scheduled for the overhaul. The second quarter, from April to June 1990, included two HF terminations which were very successful during underway periods in May and June. The guard for message traffic was held by NAVCAMSLANT, Norfolk, Va. during inport periods. Most Radiomen and Signalmen took advantage of the post-deployment standdown by enjoying extended leave periods. The crew of E Division of the Engineering Department enjoyed post-cruise standdown and repaired number one emergency diesel, making emergent repairs on deck edge lights to ensure readiness for night flight operations during local operations and carrier qualifications and overhauled the 23-MC system, conducting ship checks on 1-MC system, repairing number one steering circuit N, repaired the aft gyro, replaced HD and HE windbirds and repaired various fire pump motors” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “At the conclusion of the exercises with USS Saratoga (CV-60) battle group on 18 June 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) set a course for New York City” (Ref. 549).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) DV VISIT (AUSTRALIA) - 19 JUNE 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- MS. CHERYL EDWARDES, MEMBER OF THIE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY, SHADOW MINISTER FOR

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

- THE HONOURABLE PHILIP LOCKYER, MEMBER OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, LIBERAL MEMBER FOR MINING AND PASTORAL

- HER WORSHIP, THE MAYOR HELEN PASSMORE, MAYOR OF SUBIACO

- CAPTAIN REG COOK, COMMANDING OFFICER, HMAS STIRUNG

- MR. BRUCE ALEXANDER, GENERAL MANAGER FOR WA, WESTPAC BANKING CORP

- MR. JIM HORWOOD, PRESIDENT, ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY

- MR. JOHN PATERSON, TREASURER, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA

- LCDR ULUKALALA LAVAKA, TONGA DEFENSE SERVICES, KINGDOM OF TONGA

- MR. JOHN BELL, WHALEWORLD, ALBANY

- MR. RONALD STONE, DEPUTY WARDEN, STATE WAR MEMORIAL

- MR. MAX CRAMER, COMMITEE OF MANAGEMENT, GERALDTON MUSEUM

- MR. DAVID BERRY, DIRECTOR AND GENERAL MANAGER, NTERSTRUCT HOLDINGS LTD. - MR. DOUG CLEMENTS, REGIONAL DIRECTOR, ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER COMMISSION

- MR. ROB TIPPETT, ROYAL PERTH YACHT CLUB

- MR. GARY PEARCE EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN, ALLIED CAP1 TAL, GROUP LTD

- MR. DON BROWN, ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER, AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES, CIVIL AVIATION

- MR. FRUZA PASQUALE, SEALANES

- DETECTIVE INSPECTOR BOB KUCERA, ANTI-THEFT SQUAD, WA POLICE DEPT

- MR. GEORGE BENNEY, GENERAL MANAGER, HYAV REGENCY PERTH

- FLIGHT LT JIM EFTOS ADC TO THE GOVERNOR GENERAL

- MR. LOUIS MCCALL, CONSUL, U.S. CONSULATE GENERAL PERTH

 

    “On 20 June 1990, USS Midway (CV-41) experiences two explosions in an emergency equipment storeroom while operating off Japan, killing 2 and seriously injuring 9 with burns covering from 14 to 80 percent of their bodies. One of the injured sailors dies 8 days later as a result of his injuries. The explosions caused a fire that took 10 hours to extinguish.  All sailors killed and injured in the accident were part of the "Flying Squad" which was the Midway’s elite fire fighting crew. They were sent to the storeroom to check out a report of smoke. The first explosion occurred shortly after the sailors entered the storeroom” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted a PASSEX exercise with the Royal Australian Navy on 20 June 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 20 June 1990. The next day she sailed by northerly courses through the Lombok Strait” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) arrived at New York City on 21 June 1990. Nearly 50,000 visitors toured the ship during Fleet Week ’90” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 22 June 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 23 June 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) transited the Sibutu Passage–between the Sulu Archipelago and Borneo–northbound on 24 June 1990. The following day Captain John F. Sussilleaux relieved Captain Dyck in a ceremony on board USS Knox (DE-1052/FF-1052)” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “DESRON NINE assigned USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Change of Command onboard USS Knox (DE-1052/FF-1052) on 25 June 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) put to sea on the 26 June 1990 to conduct a week of operations off the North Atlantic coast, during which time she embarked Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) producer Alan Goldberg and Mitch Weitzner and a crew who filmed a “48 Hours” feature that would air on 26th. The piece documented the ship’s operations, told the story of life on board a “super carrier,” and reviewed pro and con arguments for large-deck carriers” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 26 June 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 22 to 26 June 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “VADM John Fetterman, COMNAVAIRPAC, presented USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with the Admiral Flatley award for aviation safety which Enterprise won for the second year in a row on 28 June 1990. Earlier in the year, Enterprise captured its third consecutive Allen G. Ogden award for having the Navy's best crash and salvage team” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) participated in two exercises from 27 to 28 June 1990: a HarpoonEx and Sea Slam 90. Foul weather plagued Carl Vinson throughout the exercises as Typhoon Ophelia plowed through the area just ahead of the ship and Typhoon Percy slammed heavy seas and winds into her as the carrier began the exercise, forcing her to cut short the two-day event and cram all of the live missile firings into a single day. Destroyer Oldendorf (DD-972), forward-deployed to Japanese waters, a Lockheed P-3C Orion from patrol squadron (VP)-9, and Marine All-Weather Attack Squadron (VMA(AW)-533 also participated in the tests, which consisted of firing multiple RGM-84 Harpoons, including one by a USMC Intruder, an AGM-45 Shrike, an AGM-88 High Speed Anti-Radiation Missile (HARM), an AGM-62 Walleye II and four laser-guided bombs against an aging utility landing craft fitted with threat emitters as radar simulators, which fleet ocean tug Sioux (ATF-171) towed into the area for the gunners to sink as the target” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) pulled in for a port of call at Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines on 28 June 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “The CBS crew left USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) on 29 June 1990” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Over half of the DC/R Division personnel on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) turned over during this quarter, from April to June 1990, but DC/R still managed to: SCOOP and seal off 14 divisional spaces, including four repair lockers, performing 22 nuclear work packages, 125 watertight door repairs and transitioned to new DC 30 1 PMS” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “June 1990 found VMA-231 deployed to WestPac” as a squadron for the first time since World War II. Training continued in Iwakuni and Okinawa, Japan, as well as the Philippine Islands and Korea. Exercises included multiple air defense exercises with the Japanese Air Defense Force” (Ref. 362F).

 

     “In June 1990, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) accomplishments included Drafting Shop installed in MSI; TAMPS cross-decked from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and installed in Mission Planning and in Debriefing; TFCC 11+ installation begins (FFDS installed in MSI) and Mine; torpedo readiness certification assist and Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) NDI lab developed first X-ray film. Duty shuttle accident, Newport News on 10 June 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced propulsion plant Light off and testing during conclusion of PSA on 1 July 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) reached Boston on 2 July 1990” (Ref. 549).

 

    USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) DV VISIT (HONG KONG) - 2 JULY 1990 - Ref. 376A/1990

 

- GROUP CAPTAIN JOHN D. KENNEDY, BA, RAF COMMANDER, ROYAL AIR FORCE

- MR. GORDON CHANG, BOARD OF DIRECTORS, AMERICAN CLUB

- MR. JOHN EDWARDS, G/M, ROYAL HONG KONG YACHT CLUB

- MR. NEVILLE MCKAY, CHAIRMAN, DELTA AVIATION

- MR. RICKY LEITAO, ASS'T DIRECTOR, FAR EAST JET FOILS

- MR. RICHARD HARTMAN, SENIOR VIP, IT-SHERATON CORP.

- MISS JUDY BINSTEAD, DIRECTOR, PERSONNEL, SHERATON - AUSTRALIA

- MR. JOHN KOSTER, MANAGER, SHERATON HONG KONG

- MRS. ALICE LO, SALES MANAGER, MARRIOT (HONG KONG)

- MR. GORDON YAPP, DIRECTOR, SCI-TEC

- MAJOR (P) PHIL YANG, ASST ARMY LIAISON OFFICER, USDLO

- W01 STEVE DEHNEL GARRISON SERGEANT MAJOR, HMS TAMAR

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) made a port of call at Hong Kong from 1 to 3 July 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) returned from the North Atlantic coast in time to participate in Fleet Week in New York and the July 4th celebrations in Boston” (Ref. 549).     

 

    “While Massachusetts Senator John Kerry and Mayor Raymond Flynn welcomed USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), a small group of Greenpeace protesters in Zodiac boats proved less hospitable, attempting to “escort” her into port. Navy supporters, however, interposed their craft between the environmentalists and the carrier, and she moored at the Subaru Piers about one mile from the center of the city. Over 130,000 visitors from the region visited the carrier as Boston hosted the Coast Guard’s Bicentennial and the historic frigate Constitution’s turn-around ceremony of the Fourth of July” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) FACSFAC airspace planning conference was held on 6 July 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a fast cruise at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 7 to 9 July 1990” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) made a port of call at Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines from 28 June to 9 July 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) accomplished a fast cruise on 9 July 1990” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 9 July 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) embarked about 600 Tigers for the return trip to Norfolk, arriving two days later” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained in port Norfolk, Virginia from 16 June to 10 July 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 11 July 1990, for Carrier Qualifications” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USNS Walter S. Deihl (TAO-A3) on 11 July 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was in port Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, for Post Shakedown Availability from 14 March to 15 July 1990, successfully completing propulsion plant Light off and testing during conclusion of PSA from 1 to 15 July 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) outchopped from Commander, Seventh Fleet on 15 July 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “On 16 July 1990, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck the island of Luzon, Philippines. The epicenter was near the town of Rizal, Nueva Ecija, roughly 60 kilometers from Mount Pinatubo. This earthquake caused a landslide, some local tremors, and a brief increase in steam emissions from a preexisting geothermal area at Mount Pinatubo” (Ref. [2] of 1183).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 18 July 1990, conducting Carrier Qualifications from 11 to 18 July 1990. July's CQ period proved even more successful than June's. The total of 1,323 arrestments far exceeded requirements for the Fleet Replacement, Reserve, and Fleet Squadrons. Mission Planning provided flawless flight operations support to Fleet Readiness Squadrons during carrier qualification evolutions in the summer. No UNREPS conducted. HF terminations were maintained during at sea periods in July and August 1990. During a six day period in July, a 100 percent ship receive reliability rate was received, and a 95 percent ship send reliability rate demonstrated unerring competence (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “A standdown period was enjoyed by M Division for USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Engineering Department personnel before preparations were commenced for the next underway period” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) crossed the International Date Line eastbound and conducted VERTREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) and USS Robison (DDG-12) on 19 July 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in port in port Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 19 July 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 20 July 1990, for a one day Dependents Day Cruise, while a “superb” air show proved a “fitting wrap-up” to the last fixed wing air flight operations scheduled on board until 1990” (Ref. 362G & 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 21 July 1990 for a two day port visit” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was towed down the James River to the Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia between 15 and 22 July 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia for Post Shakedown Availability from 14 March to 22 July 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) got underway from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 23 July 1990, import on the 21st, embarking 850 male relatives of crew members for a "Tiger Cruise" to Alameda, California” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) stood out of the channel after departing Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 23 July 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, for a brief two-day Shakedown sail off the Virginia capes (VACAPES), to determine the success of the work accomplished, in port Newport News SBDD, for Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) from 14 March to 22 July 1990, towed down the James River to the Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia between 15 and 22 July 1990. Abraham Lincoln was towed up the James River, commencing PSA at Newport News Shipbuilding on 14 March 1990. The emphasis for this availability was on habitability, equipment installation and upgrade and maintenance to existing equipment. Abraham Lincoln Communications Department V5 system conducted update from 19 to 30 March 1990, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) received major onload of avionics benches from April to July 1990, 3M assist visit conducted from 17 to 19 April 1990 and installation of new SUPPLOT begins aboard Abraham Lincoln in May 1990. In June 1990, Abraham Lincoln additional accomplishments included Drafting Shop installed in MSI; TAMPS cross-decked from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and installed in Mission Planning and in Debriefing; TFCC 11+ installation begins (FFDS installed in MSI) and Mine; torpedo readiness certification assist and Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) NDI lab developed first X-ray film. Duty shuttle accident, Newport News on 10 June 1990. Abraham Lincoln floated out of drydock at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia on 5 June 1990, successfully completing propulsion plant Light off and testing during conclusion of PSA from 1 to 15 July 1990, and was towed down the James River to the Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia. In July, Abraham Lincoln accomplishments included Non-operational FIST cross-decked from CVN-65 and installed n MSI (to be returned to PACFLT; Pacific MC&G allowance begins arriving on board; Training and Readiness Evaluation (TRE) inspection by Cryptologic Readiness Group, NAVSECGRACT Northwest, Va. and Ammunition onload pierside” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 24 July 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, conducting a brief two-day Shakedown sail off the Virginia capes (VACAPES), to determine the success of the work accomplished during Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) from 14 March to 22 July 1990 at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, successfully completing propulsion plant Light off and testing during conclusion of PSA from 1 to 15 July 1990, towed down the James River to the Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia between 15 and 22 July 1990. Abraham Lincoln was towed up the James River, commencing PSA at Newport News Shipbuilding on 14 March 1990. The emphasis for this availability was on habitability, equipment installation and upgrade and maintenance to existing equipment. Abraham Lincoln Communications Department V5 system conducted update from 19 to 30 March 1990, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) received major onload of avionics benches from April to July 1990, 3M assist visit conducted from 17 to 19 April 1990 and installation of new SUPPLOT begins aboard Abraham Lincoln in May 1990. In June 1990, Abraham Lincoln additional accomplishments included Drafting Shop installed in MSI; TAMPS cross-decked from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and installed in Mission Planning and in Debriefing; TFCC 11+ installation begins (FFDS installed in MSI) and Mine; torpedo readiness certification assist and Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) NDI lab developed first X-ray film. Duty shuttle accident, Newport News on 10 June 1990. Abraham Lincoln floated out of drydock at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia on 5 June 1990, successfully completing propulsion plant Light off and testing during conclusion of PSA from 1 to 15 July 1990, and was towed down the James River to the Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia. In July, Abraham Lincoln accomplishments included Non-operational FIST cross-decked from CVN-65 and installed n MSI (to be returned to PACFLT; Pacific MC&G allowance begins arriving on board; Training and Readiness Evaluation (TRE) inspection by Cryptologic Readiness Group, NAVSECGRACT Northwest, Va. and Ammunition onload pierside” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced Training Readiness Evaluation (TRE) and received an orientation visit from its assigned air wing, CVW-11 on 25 July 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) and USS Robison (DDG-12) on 25 July 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

      “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) received major onload of avionics benches from April to July 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Training Readiness Evaluation (TRE) was conducted from 25 to 27 July 1990, during which time CVW-11 visited from 25 to 26 July 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

    “The Constellation (CVA-64), the 64th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 52nd, commissioning on 27 October 1961, with Captain T.J. Walker in command at New York Naval Shipyard, entered Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pa., in July 1990 to begin a $800-million, three-year Service Life Extension Program (SLEP); ending her home port transfer steaming from San Diego, Calif. through the Eastern and South Pacific via Cape Horn through the South and Western Atlantic to the east coast for a three-year overhaul at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pa.; departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. in February 1984, upon completion of the $235 million overhaul two weeks early and under budget, something which a carrier had not accomplished since the 1940s, according to the shipyard, a 13 1/2-month Complex Overhaul (COH). In December 1982, Constellation sailed north to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash., to begin COH to allow the carrier to operate the new F/A-18AI. During the overhaul, Connie was the first carrier to receive the new aircraft. She was also fitted with the new Phalanx Close-In Weapon System radar-guided gatling-gun, ship’s Terrier missile system was replaced with NATO Sea Sparrow and modifications were made to allow the carrier to operate the new F/A-18A Hornet strike aircraft and two new flush deck catapults. Constellation set sail on her 14th deployment to the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean on 21 February 1985. This was the first operational deployment of the F/A-18 Hornet strike fighter and the LAMPS, which used the SH-60B Seahawk ASW helicopter. The Hornets replaced the A-7E Corsair IIs operated by two squadrons assigned to CVW-14, making Constellation the Navy's first carrier to have F/A18s assigned to her air wing. The SH-60B Seahawk helicopter operated as the air subsystem of the LAMPS MK III weapon system, deployed aboard the frigate USS Crommelin (FFG-37); entering the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for a complex overhaul in January 1983. Constellation departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash., 26 April 1976 to rejoin the Pacific Fleet at her home port of Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, completing one of the most extensive carrier overhauls ever undertaken (14 months), during an Extended Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (EDSRA) commencing in February 1975, enabling her to carry the Navy's newest air supremacy fighter, the F-14A Tomcat, and the S-3A Viking, a submarine hunter; reclassifying to CV-64 on 1 July 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises in Vietnam, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, received a Presidential Unit Citation from President Nixon in 1973 and two Vietnam Peace Keeping Cruises; completed Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) in December 1970; beginning DSRA, on her second since commissioning, shoofly after arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment on 8 May 1970 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash.; commenced workups in November 1965 for her first full-blown war cruise upon conclusion of overhaul; commencing her first DSRA upon arrival from her second WestPacdeployment, on 1 February 1965; lasting eight months from 1 February to November 1965 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash.; delivered to the Navy on 1 October 1961; launched on 8 October 1960, sponsored by Mary Herter (wife of Secretary of State Christian Herter). Constellation keel was laid down on 14 September 1957, at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York, as a Kitty Hawk-class aircraft carrier, while the contract to build her was awarded on 1 July 1956, she was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the "new constellation of stars" on the flag of the United States, which was named for one of the six frigates bought by the Continental Congress in the late 1790s. The first of those frigates made American naval history and was named for the ring of 13 stars that formed a "new Constellation" on the flag of the new United States” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

    “On 28 July 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) completed the Air Wing fly-off to North Island, Naval Air Station, San Diego, California” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted Refueling at Sea (FAS) with USS Ranger (CV-61) on 30 July 1990” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “On 30 July 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) pulled into North Island, Naval Air Station, San Diego, California to off-load remaining Air Wing and DESRON NINE personnel and equipment with overnight liberty for the crew and their "Tigers”” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) got underway from North Island, Naval Air Station, San Diego, California on 31 July 1990 en route to Alameda, California, to reunite the Gold Eagle's crew with their families. VRC-50 Detachment 70 attached to CVW-15 embarked aboard Carl Vinson helped U.S. and Filipino relief efforts in July 1990 when an earthquake struck the Baguio area of Luzon. RADM Timothy W. Wright, Commander Battle Group Charlie, broke his flag from the ship during her deployment to the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans. CVW-15 began to transition to F-14Ds, F/A-18Cs and Sikorsky SH-60F Seahawks” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “On 31 July 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) passed under the Golden Gate Bridge arriving Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, disembarking Tigers from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and NAS North Island, San Diego, California and Commander, Carrier Group (COMCARGRU) Three RADM Timothy W. Wright, relieving RADM, Daniel P, March on 7 June 1990, disembarking Commander, Destroyer Squadron NINE (DESRON NINE Change of Command onboard USS Knox (DE-1052/FF-1052) on 25 June 1990) relieving Captain Harry M. Dyck, Jr. and Carrier Air Wing FIETEEN, Captain Lyle G. Bien (CVW-15) at North Island, Naval Air Station, San Diego, California, and equipment with overnight liberty for the crew and their "Tigers, with CVW-15 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station Lemoore, prior to departing from home, ending her fourth “WestPac” deployment operating with the operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet in the Western Pacific and Sea of Japan, conducting Carrier Qualifications in Southern California operating areas and participated in ReadiEx 89-5B en route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii waters; Phase 1 & 2  of Team Spirit 90 in Korean waters, providing air support for amphibious landings, low level strikes, jamming support and air-to-air combat training; Merlion 90 with Singaporean forces, on her fourth Indian Ocean, participating in HarpoonEx and Sea Slam 90, on her third North Arabian Sea deployment and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, conducting a passing exercise with the Royal Australian Navy. VRC-50 Detachment 70 attached to CVW-15 embarked aboard Carl Vinson helped U.S. and Filipino relief efforts in July 1990 when an earthquake struck the Baguio area of Luzon. RADM Timothy W. Wright, Commander Battle Group Charlie, broke his flag from the ship during her deployment to the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans. CVW-15 began to transition to F-14Ds, F/A-18Cs and Sikorsky SH-60F Seahawks.

 

Operations Department

 

Sumner of 90 Operational and Administrative Achievements

 

- Total Days of Sea/deployment: 145/142' (WESTPAC)

- Total Traps: 8168 (5812 day; 2356 night)

- Total ACLS Approaches: 3822 (15 Mode I; 31 Mode IA; 2476 Mode II; 677 Mode III; 573 ICLS; 50 other)

 

Major Graded Inspections, Evaluations, Audit and Exercises:

 

- Battle Group CHARLIE's Evaluations for Deployment: Satisfactory

- 3M Inspection: satisfactory

- Readiness: 89 percent

- Competitive: 98.84 percent

Significant Accomplishments:

 

During “WestPac” 90, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted numerous joint exercises with U.S. and allied forces in conjunction with real world operations. Noteworthy accomplishments include:

 

- Superbly executed duties as sector AAW: (CW/CX::) during all phases of EastPac 90. Received BRAVO ZULU from COMCARGRUPTHREE for an outstanding job as CV during multi-carrier operations and during participation in RFADIEX 89-SB in countering B-1/B-52 strikes against Battle Group CHARLIE.

- Conducted successful Battle Group Evaluation (OOE) consisting of opposed ir/land strikes and surface unit engagements.

- Participated in Team Spirit 90 providing air support for amphibious task force, low level strikes, jamming support, and air-to-air combat training during U.S./South Korean operations.

- Conducted successful dual Battle Group/Battle Force operations with USS Midway (CV-41), including coordinated day/night strikes and opposed air strikes in a Near Land Operation Area (NLOA) environment.

- Participated in Merlion 90 conducting joint air-to-air, jamming, and surface unit training with the Singapore Navy and Air Force.

- Conducted air to air and surface training with foreign nations, including Malaysian Forces, the Royal Thailand Air Force, and the Omani Air Force and Navy.

- Conducted joint surface exercise with Australian Navy Unit HMAS CARDIFF.

- Successfully participated in Harpoonex 90 providing air assets for range surveillance and safety.

- Conducted opposed transit operations against USS INDEPENDENCE battle group including long range air strikes and air-to-air combat training.

 

- Operations Department Meteorology Division operational and administrative accomplishments include:

 

- Synoptic weather Observations Transmitted: 649

- Weather Observation Accuracy Rate: 99.1 percent

- Coordination of environmental information between Battle Group CHARLIE units resulted in highly accurate and timely oceanographic forecasts, ensuring safe navigation for Battle Group Charlie in all operating areas.

 

F. light, tactics and operations were significantly enhanced through superb Integrated Refractive Effects Predictions Systems (REPS) forecasts.

 

- USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) Intelligence Center (CVIC) and Ship's Signals Exploitation Systems (SSES) were centers of peak activity during “WestPac” 90. Highlights included:

 

-I & W and cryptologic support for the first intercept and escort of BACKFIRE Aircraft by a PACFLT Carrier/Air Wing.

- Exercised for the first time new communications procedures for U. S. – U.S.S.R. Prevention of Dangerous Military Activities (DMA). Battle Group CHARLIE surface units and CVW-15 aircraft exchanged codeword with surveilant BEAR G aircraft.

- Demonstrated 98 percent TACINTEL reliability.

- Led the way in documenting and recommending improvements for target folders, target plans and FIST support for strike planning.

- Produced and distributed over 264,000 units of photography in support of intelligence, PAO, and administrative requirements.

- Conducted multiple successful CIWS and NSSMS firings against towed targets (TDU), achieving direct hits.

- USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) ASW team/ASW module earned grades of outstanding for all “WestPac” 90 exercises. Highlights include:

- Generated 72 hours of continuous acoustic and non-acoustic support during tracking of a real world Soviet FOXTROT submarine.

- Finished in second place in COMCARGRU THREE Acoustic Analysis Rooftop Trainer competition.

- USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) Air Intercept Controllers (AIC) took three of the top five places in Battle Group CHARLIE's AIC competition.

 

Electrical Division provided valuable services to the ship and the Battle group during “WestPac” '90. From rewinding 25 motors for Battle Group Units, and conducting emergency repairs on UNREP stations 15 and 21, to a graded refueling with the USS Robison (DDG-12), "E" Division always carried the load. Electrical Division also conducted repairs on vital controllers for NR 13-15 vertical stores conveyors, the NR3 accommodation ladder, numerous fire pumps and two ABTS. In foreign ports the general services shop could be counted on to rig the dress ship lights came rain or shine.

 

Superior efforts by the "Mechanics and Magicians" of Auxiliaries Division enabled USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) to maintain their equipment CASREP free during the entire “WestPac.”

 

Maintenance Department

 

MAJOR GRADED INSPECTIONS, EVALUATIONS, AUDITS, AND EXERCISES

 

- “WestPac” 1990: 01 February - 31 July 1990

- Accelerated POM upkeep: (FQM Jan 90) 53 jobs accomplished.

- Singapore upkeep: First CVN upkeep i n Singapore was conducted in April 1990 with 17 jobs accomplished.

- During “WestPac” 1990 Maintenance Department coordinated repairs to Battle Group CHARLIE units: 60 jobs accomplished, ship to ship technical assist.

 

- SFR, Subic Bay upkeep: 142 jobs accomplished.

- IMA Availability during the year 1990: USS Samuel Gompers (AD-37) accomplished 88 jobs. SIMA San Francisco accomplished 79 jobs.

- 3M Inspection: 92.2 percent, highest ever achieved by a carrier.

- Inspection conducted by COMNAVAIRFAC.

 

AIMD Department

 

The year 1990 was the finest year in AIMD's history. All production divisions set records for aviation maintenance and provided unequaled support to COMCARAIRWING FIETEEN and COMCARGRU THREE.

 

For the period of deployment, 1 February 1990 through 31 July 1990, AIMD broke all previously established readiness marks with a 94 percent Mission Capable (MC) rate and a 93 percent Fully Mission Capable (FMC) rate.

 

The following accomplishments illustrate why “WestPac” 90 was the pinnacle of carrier aviation maintenance:

 

“WestPac” 90

 

TITLE

WESTPAC

GSE Availability

97%

Test Bench Availability

99%

Average No. Broad Arrows

1.94

Average No. TED'S

13.77

Pool Effectiveness

99%

Average No. Pool Critical

2 9

Average No. Pool Zero

4

Average Response Time

37 minutes

FOD Rate

.217

No. of Cruise Inductions

25,402 items

NO. RFI’d

23,118 items

NO. BCM'd

2,402 items

RFI Rate

90 %

BCM Rate

9%

Bare Firewalls

Zero

 

Other significant accomplishments for the deployment include: First AIMD to complete a “WestPac” deployment relying solely on NAICOMIS; and maintained an unbelievable low 1.94 average on Broad arrow documents. For one six week period during extended operations: Zero Broad arrows were maintained; lowest number of Repair and Return assemblies in history at the end of deployment -165; reduced on board awaiting maintenance items to zero prior to returning to homeport; and achieved three "Measured Outstanding Activity Awards" in a row covering October 1989 to August 1990 maintaining a yearly average of .86 percent overdue for calibration rate which is significantly below goal of 2 percent” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT

 

The major objective of the department is to assure quality medical care to all elements of Battle Group CHARLIE. As the Battle Medical Officer, the Senior Medical Officer provided medical assist visits, quality assurance visits and the Medical Officer Preceptor Program for the independent duty corpsman assigned to all ship's in the battle group. Additionally, the Senior Medical Officer acted as the DESRON NINE Medical Officer.

 

During “WestPac” 90 (Feb-Jun) the Medical Department evaluated over 12,500 patients, admitted over 178 patients to the ward, and medivaced over 28 patients to medical facilities ashore. During the deployment the average monthly outpatient visits were 2,011.

 

Four material (property) damage mishaps occurred. There were no Class Alpha or Bravo flight mishaps. Two Class Charlie flight mishaps did occur:

 

90 FEB 03, VA-97, Class C flight mishap. During carrier touch and go F-14A aircraft (VF-111) right wing tip impacted parked A-7E aircraft.

 

90 APR 29, VA-97, Class C flight mishap. During night recovery A-7E aircraft landed cocked up, striking tail cone on pitching flight deck.

 

DECK DEPARTMENT

 

Deck Department commenced 1990 organized in three divisions and completing preparations for a forthcoming Western Pacific/Indian Ocean deployment. AS the ship got underway, the Department was reorganized into two divisions to take advantage of the talent of only two Division Officers and to further streamline administration. The deployment proved to be highly successful for both divisions with all non-rated personnel qualifying for all bridge, after steering, and incinerator watch stations during the cruise.

 

There were over thirty very successful underway replenishments that included both receiving and delivering JP-5, receiving stores and munitions, and a personnel highline transfer of RADM March, the Battle Group Commander. The deployment included seven anchorages at various ports that required extensive B & A crane operations for boat launch and recovery as well as stores transfers. By the end of the deployment, Deck Department had completed all competitive exercises with an average grade of 99.5 percent. The highlight of the cruise for the department was the COPCARGRU THREE change of command, held on the best forecastle in the Pacific Fleet. Upon return to CONUS, Deck Department made final preparations for beginning a complex overhaul.

 

The Dental Department not only provided top quality treatment for the personnel of Carl Vinson, embarked Air Wing and staffs, but also completed numerous operational underway visits to all ships in Battle Group CHARLIE. Treatment provided yielded ODR increases from 88.24 percent to 97.37 percent for ship's company; from 83.3 percent to 94.2 percent for the embarked Air Wing and staff personnel; and from 75.3 percent to 87.7 percent for Battle Group CHARLIE escorts.

 

AIR DEPARTMENT

 

Air superiority was maintained during CY 90. V-1 Division (flight deck) and V-3 Division (hangar bays), respectively performed a total of 59,000 aircraft moves, suffering only ten reportable crunches. The Air Department crunch rate was an admirable .00017.

 

V-2 Division (catapults and arresting gear) executed 8,168 mishap free launches and recoveries while maintaining an aircraft launching and recovery equipment (ALRE) availability in excess of 98 percent. Throughout this period, they performed numerous major maintenance evolutions, many of them at sea.

 

Several milestones were reached: The 30,000th launch on catapult one, the 25,000th launch on catapult two and the 20,000th launch on both catapult three and catapult four. The 35,000th arrestment on engine three and the 10,000th arrestment on engine one was recorded. The ship's total was in excess of 92,000 arrested landings.

 

V-4 division (fuels) pumped over 19 million gallons of JP-5 to aircraft on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), demonstrating superb quality control. They transferred 23,000 gallons to other ships in company and received in excess of 17.5 million gallons via under way replenishment. All fuel evolutions were performed with no major spills.

 

The Air Department was a key player during record-setting “WestPac” 90 deployment of the Gold Eagle/CVW-15 Wolfpack Team. The Air Department was at its very best during the first third of the cruise while conducting high tempo, safe flight operations in direct support of exercise Team Spirit. During the mid-cruise period, "fluid" flight deck operations influenced heavily by short notice Indian Ocean logistic evolutions were the order of the day. During the final third of the deployment, a safe and efficient operational tempo was sustained which maximized the Gold Eagle/CVW-15 Wolfpack Team trap/sortie ratio, flight and hangar deck maintenance and end-of-cruise aircraft maintenance requirements.

 

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) WEAPONS DEPARTMENT

 

Weapons Department commenced 1990 making final preparations for deployment. Aviation Weapons Support Equipment was inventoried and preventative maintenance conducted. Also, Weapons Elevators received their last grading and Weapons load adjustments and physical security training was completed.

 

A month by month breakdown is provided below:

 

DATE EVOULTION

 

2-Jan

Small Arms Qualifications Alameda

3-Jan

Small Arms Qualifications Ahmeda

11-Jan

Security Drill: Intruder Alert

12-Jan

Security Drill: Truffle Hound Small Arms Qualification

16-Jan

Security Drill: Bomb Threat

22-Jan

Ammunitions On load: .50 CAI & Fins

 

Security Drill:

 

Sneaky Pete

 

Security Alert

25-Jan

Quality Assurance Service Test (QAST) Weapons on load from USS Shasta

26-Jan

Security Drill: Sneaky Pete

29-30 Jan

Airwing on load (Equipnent)

30-Jan

Training Weapon on load

 

Ammunition Onload

31-Jan

Aiming Onload (Personal)

8-Feb

NW Safety Council Meeting

13-Feb

QAST Exercise Barking Sand range HI

14-Feb

Exercise Torpedo onload (-P)

 

Security Force Training

15-16 Feb

Security Exercise "Red Cell" External Security Watches Posted.

17-Feb

Ships and Airwing Proficiency Loading exercise (PROLOADS)

24-Feb

.50 CAL Shoot

 

Security Drill: (Truffle Hound)

4-Mar

In port Sasebo, External Security Watches Posted

5-Mar

Security Drill: (Intrusion Attempt)

12-Mar

Nuclear Safety Council Meeting

16-Mar

40 MM Saluting Battery Firing

18-Mar

Proficiency Loading Exercise (VS)

19-Mar

Proficiency Loading Exercise (VA)

21-24 Mar

Security Force Training

24-Mar

VERTREP NAS CUB1 POINT RP

04-05 Apr

Small Arms qualifications M14 for ribbon

14-Apr

In port Singapore, External Security Watches Posted

21-Apr

Underway, Proficiency Loading Exercise (VA)

26-Apr

Proficiency Loading Exercise (VS)

 

Small arms training (M6O)

30-Apr

In port - Diego Garcia Small Arms Training M14 Qualifications.

14-May

Safety Stand down

17-May

40 Saluting Battery Training

18-May

Proficiency Loading Exercises (Flight Deck) WVS

19-20 May

Beacon Flash Bomb Build

31-May

Security Drills

 

Small Plane

 

Intruder

31-May

VERTREP Ordnance (Load Adjust)

7-Jun

Security Drills

 

Small Plane Attack (Helicopter)

 

Proficiency Loading Exercises (VS)

10-Jun

Proficiency Loading Exercises (VA

12-18 Jun

In port Perth, External Security Watches Posted

20-Jun

VERTREP Ordnance (Load Adjust)

21-Jun

Small Arms Training

28-30 Jun

In port Subic Bay, R.P. Set External Security

 

WR 54 package onload

 

Elevator Weight Test

03-09 Jul

In port Hong Kong External Security Watches Posted

15 Jul

Small Arms Qualification

 

Proficiency Loading Exercises (VA/VS)

 

Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hi; Sasebo, Japan; Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines; Singapore; anchored at Diego Garcia; anchored off Masirah twice; Fremantle, Australia; Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines; Hong Kong and Pearl Harbor, Hi. Squadrons: Captain Harry M. Dyck, Jr. Carrier Air Wing FIETEEN, embarked on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), consisted of nine squadrons. They were Fighter Squadrons VF-51 and VF-111, flying the F-14 Tomcat; Medium Attack Squadron VA-52, flying the A-6E Intruder; Light Attack Squadron's VA-27 (*2) and VA-97 (*1), flying the A-7E Corsair; Air Anti-Submarine Squadron VS-29, flying the S-3A Viking; Air Anti-Submarine Helicopter Squadron HS-4, flying the 5H-3F Sea King; Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron VAQ-134, flying the EA-6B Prowler; and Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron W-114, flying the E-2C Hawkeye. Also embarked during “WestPac” 90 was one C-2A Greyhound aircraft from Fleet Logistics Support Squadron W-50 Det. 70 based at Naval Air Station Cubi Point, Republic of the Philippines, Aircraft embarked aboard CIW Carl Vinson used airwing tail code NL (Carrier Air Wing FIETEEN) except VRC-50 who used the airwing tail code RG. (*1) redesignated VFA-97 on Jan.24, 1991 and (*2) redesignated VFA-27 on Jan.24, 1991. USS Truxtun (CGN-35) joined USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) with DESRON Nine ships as part of her task force Her eighth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 13 March 1982 (1 February to 31 July 1990)” (Ref. 72, 84A, 375, 375A & 376A/1990).

 

 01/02/90 to 31/07/90

AWARD OR CITATION

AIR WING

TAIL

CODE

DEPLOYMENT

Secretary of the Navy Letter of Commendation (SC)

1 Sep 1989–31 Jul 1990

CVW-15

NL

Western Pacific

Middle East

8th FWFD

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal [AE]

5 May–1 Jun 1990

CVW-15

NL

same

First COMNAVAIRPAC Battle "E" award for 1990

CVW-15

NL

same

The year 1990 was a tremendously successful year for the Engineering Department. During the pre-deployment preparations, a six month deployment to the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans, the homeport change to Bremerton, Washington and the commencement of COH 90; Engineering met every mission requirement on or ahead of schedule. The year 1990 also realized the reorganization of Reactor and Engineering Departments. E-1 Division and the catapult and diesel work centers were transferred to Reactor Department. Throughout, Engineering Department showed the same spirit that allowed USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) to win the Battle Efficiency and Engineering Awards.

Two major awards were earned by USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and AIMD which reflected the crew's superb attitude and capabilities. In conjunction with Carl Vinson being awarded the 1989 COMNAVAIRPAC Battle Charlie", AIMD was awarded the AIMD Black "E" in recognition of their battle excellence and readiness. Additionally, the ship was awarded the Secretary of Defense Maintenance Award (Phoenix Award) for 1989, which is presented for maintenance awareness, material readiness, efficiency, and waste reduction through innovative leadership, management and maintenance/repair techniques. AIMD'S contribution was significant in enabling the USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) to be the first aircraft carrier to win this prestigious award as one of the six outstanding maintenance facilities in the Department of Defense.

In February, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) was awarded AIRPAC Battle "E" for the 1989 competitive cycle, and the Communications Department won second place for the Communications Green "C".

The Dental Department also contributed to the USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) Medical Department winning of the coveted Blue "M", by coordinating and operating the

Walking Blood Bank Donor Program and by staffing Battle Dressing Stations.

The Dental Department not only provided top quality treatment for the personnel of

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), embarked Air Wing and staffs, but also completed numerous operational underway visits to all ships in Battle Group CHARLIE. Treatment provided yielded ODR increases from 88.24 percent to 97.37 percent for ship's company; from 83.3 percent to 94.2 percent for the embarked Air Wing and staff personnel; and from 75.3 percent to 87.7 percent for Battle Group CHARLIE escorts.

Ref. 72, 375, 375A & 376A/1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) conducted post-deployment stand down on 1 August 1990” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 26 July to 1 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia from 25 July to 1 August 1990, during which time Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) received major onload of avionics benches from April to July 1990 and Training Readiness Evaluation (TRE) was conducted from 25 to 27 July 1990, during which time an orientation visit from its assigned air wing, CVW-11 took place from 25 to 26 July 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 26 July to 1 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

1990 & 1991 EAST AND WEST COAST DEPLOYMENTS

CV and CVN Activities after CV-43 Decommissioned

Operation Desert Shield (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait commencing 2 August 1990) and

Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991).

(27 April 1990 to 26 April 1992)

Part 1 – (27 April to 1 August 1990)

Part 2 – (2 August to 11 October 1990)

Part 3 – (12 October to 31 December 1990)

Part 4 – (1 January to 26 March 1991)

Part 5 – (27 March to 16 June 1991)

Part 6 – (17 June 1991 to 27 April 1992)