1990 & 1991 EAST AND WEST COAST DEPLOYMENTS

CV and CVN Activities after CV-43 Decommissioned

Operation Desert Shield (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait commencing 2 August 1990) and

Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991).

(27 April 1990 to 26 April 1992)

Part 1 – (27 April to 1 August 1990)

Part 2 – (2 August to 11 October 1990)

Part 3 – (12 October to 31 December 1990)

Part 4 – (1 January to 26 March 1991)

Part 5 – (27 March to 16 June 1991)

Part 6 – (17 June 1991 to 27 April 1992)

 

 

    “Events in the Persian Gulf, however, dashed USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) hopes for uneventful, routine, operations that were to be capped by an overhaul scheduled to begin in January of the following year, when, on 2 August 1990, 0200 local time, 100,000 Iraqi troops massed on the border of Kuwait” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Saddam Hussein, Iraq’s leader, seething over Kuwait’s insistence on compensation for Iraq’s unpaid war debt from the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988), it’s overproduction of oil, and claiming evidence that the Kuwaitis were slant drilling into the Rumaila oil field, ordered them to invade. Iraq deposed Sheik Jabir Ahmed Sabah and established a puppet government.

 

    That same day, President Bush joined world leaders in condemning the invasion. A massive diplomatic effort to force Iraq to withdraw her troops ensued, as U.N. Security Council Resolution 660 called for the immediate and unconditional withdrawal of Iraqi forces.

 

     The next day, the United States and Soviet Union jointly denounced Iraq’s invasion of her neighbor” (Ref. 549).

 

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) WEAPONS DEPARTMENT DATE EVOULTION

 

2-Aug

W Division Download USS Shasta (AE-33)

 

      “Iraqi tanks and troops poured across the borders from Iraq into Kuwait as Saddam Hussein’s troops raped and looted helpless Kuwaitis on 2 August 1990. Sailors on board guided missile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG-49), patrolling in the Persian Gulf barely 50 miles offshore, could hear the victims’ pleas for help via their bridge-to-bridge radio, “over and over again,” but restrictive rules of engagement constrained the crew until the U.S. responded by forming a coalition of 29 nations, that rushed reinforcements to the region during Operation Desert Shield, designed to protect the region from Iraqi aggression. “Saddam Hussein won the toss, “CAPT Lyle G.

 

    “Ho Chi” Bien, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-15), detailed to Central Command as the Navy’s senior strike planner, noted, “and elected to receive.” The Navy augmented the Red Sea Battle Group’s mission to include maritime interception operations to enforce UN Security Council Resolution 51, which imposed an embargo upon ships entering or leaving Iraqi-occupied Kuwaiti and Iraqi ports. The Iraqi invasion led to Operations Desert Shield/Storm/Sabre, the coalition’s efforts to liberate Kuwait” (Ref. 378A).

 

     “On 2 August 1990, Iraq invaded its neighbor Kuwait, and U.S. forces moved into Saudi Arabia as part of Operation Desert Shield to protect that country against invasion by Iraq” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

     “Through the 1980s several frigate- and destroyer-type ships and minesweepers were assigned to the Middle East Force as well as support ships. After the 2 August 1990 Iraqi occupation of Kuwait, the largest armada since World War II assembled in the Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield. The Middle East Force found itself operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT), an Echelon II command, that supports all naval operations in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR), fulfilling the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number, while the Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command” (Ref. 1-Saratoga, 72, 313 & 359).

 

     “USS Valcour (AGF-1), former AVP-55, a 1,766-ton Barnegat class small seaplane tender, was built at Houghton, Washington, and was commissioned in July 1946, became the first permanent flagship for the Middle East Force in 1961 after an extensive overhaul and redesignation as a miscellaneous command ship. In July 1972, USS La Salle (AGF-3) ex. USS La Salle (LPD-3) replaced Valcour as flagship. Middle East Force ships were the first U.S. military units to take action following the August 2, 1990, invasion of Kuwait when they began Maritime Interception Operations in support of United Nations sanctions against Iraq” (Ref. 359).

 

    “As a forward-deployed unit, USS La Salle (AGF-3) ex. USS La Salle (LPD-3) primary mission was to provide flagship facilities and support to Commander. Sixth Fleet (COMSIXTHFLT), and his embarked staff. La Salle assumed the role of flagship for the U.S. Sixth Fleet on 8 November 1994, bringing expanded capabilities to the Fleet. With the ability and space available to embark a Joint Task Force staff when necessary, La Salle greatly increases the flexibility of the U.S. Sixth Fleet Commander and his staff.

 

     Additionally, La Salle was outfitted with state-of-the-art communication, command and control electronic equipment. Any operation or exercise involving sea, air, land, and amphibious forces can be controlled and directed from the flagship while at sea or in port. This further increased the U.S. Sixth Fleet's capability to respond to crisis or contingency operations. Following commissioning, La Salle served as flagship for Atlantic Fleet Amphibious Forces during the Dominican Crisis, and participated in the evacuation of Construction Battalion Six from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during the Cuban Missile Crisis. During 1969, La Salle served as the test platform for the prototype AV-8 Harrier Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) fighter bomber. In 1972, La Salle was designated a Miscellaneous Command Ship (AGF) and assumed duties as the flagship for Commander, Middle East Force. Forward-deployed to Bahrain, and painted white to reflect the Middle East Sun, "The Great White Ghost of the Arabian Coast" steamed an average of 55,000 miles annually in that role.

 

     La Salle and five other ships in the Persian Gulf were the US Navy presence during the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait on 2 August 1990. Over the course of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, La Salle assumed the added responsibility of controlling and coordinating the Maritime Intercept Force and served concurrently as flagship for Commander, US Naval Forces, Central Command. On March 12, 1991, USS La Salle became the first United States Navy warship to enter the newly liberated port of Ash Shuaybay, Kuwait. USS La Salle became the US Sixth Fleet Command Ship on November 8, 1994. Prior to assuming the role of Sixth Fleet flagship, La Salle underwent an extensive yard period to upgrade her capabilities. USS La Salle (AGF-3) was formally "laid to rest" during a pierside decommissioning ceremony 27 May 2005. La Salle was relieved of its flagship duties by USS Mount Whitney (LCC/JCC 20) during a change of flagship ceremony in Gaeta, Feb. 25, 2005. The ship arrived in Norfolk, Va. on 17 March 2005 for the decommissioning process” (Ref. Global Security). http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/agf-3.htm

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 and SURFPAC NPMTT embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 2 August 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, for Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) PALS certification off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) from 28 February to 7 March 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 (AK)

(2 to 13 August 1990)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-132

Privateers - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AK200

F/A-18A

VFA-137

Kestrels - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AK400

F/A-18A

VA-55 (2)

Warhorses - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber

AK500

A-6E

VAW-127 (3)

Seabats - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-142 (4)

Grim Watchdogs -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-17 (5)

Neptune's Riders - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

 (1) CVW-13 deployed aboard the CVN-72 on latter half of the period

(2) VA-55 disestablished on Jan.1, 1991

(3) VAW-127 disestablished on Sep.30, 1991

(4) VAQ-142 disestablished on Jul.1, 1991

(5) HS-17 disestablished on Jun.30, 1991

F/A-18 Hornet, EA-6B Prowler and E-2C Hawkeye

 

     “Aircraft from Fighter Squadron VFA-132 and VFA-137, Strike Fighter Squadron; Attack Squadron VA-55, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron VAW-127; Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron VAQ-142 and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS-17) make up CVW-13” (Ref. 378A).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) FACSFAC airspace planning conference was held on 3 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Electronic Warfare Onboard Trainer (EWOBT) was installed and training initiated on 4 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted a fast cruise at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 6 August 1990” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “On 6 August 1990, Iraq cut off its oil shipments through one of Turkey’s pipelines, shifting the focus of the crisis to Saudi Arabia, the major remaining outlet for Iraq’s petroleum production. That same day, U.S. Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney met with Saudi King Fahd to discuss the deployment of U.S. troops to Saudi Arabia. Also on 6 August, the Pentagon gave President Bush a proposal for a multinational naval force, which included Soviet ships, to enforce the U.N. trade embargo against Iraq made earlier that day if diplomatic efforts failed. USS Enterprise (CVN-65) proceeded from the eastern Mediterranean Sea through the Suez Canal into the Red Sea; USS Independence (CV-62) began maneuvers in the North Arabian Sea” (Ref. 549).

 

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) WEAPONS DEPARTMENT DATE EVOULTION

 

7-Aug

Small Arms Qualification

 

Inert Ordnance Offload

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in port at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 21 July to 7 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “On 7 August 1990, President Bush ordered U.S. military aircraft and troops to Saudi Arabia after King Fahd approved the deployment of a multinational force to defend his country against a possible Iraqi invasion from the Saudi border with Kuwait. USS Saratoga (CV-60) and the battleship Wisconsin (BB-64) sailed that day for a previously scheduled deployment to the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Operation Desert Shield had begun” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17 embarked departed Mayport, Florida 7 August 1990, on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf

deployment in support of Operation Desert Shield/Operation Desert Storm, returning home via Gulf of Aden, Red Sea, on her

fourth Suez Canal transit, steaming through the Mediterranean Sea, on her 19th Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with

the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command

(USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, operating under the direction of the

U.S. Naval Forces Central Command where it remained following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm commencing in the

early morning hours of 17 January 1991), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central

Command, with Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). Prior to her deployment,

Saratoga conducted training 70 miles off Jacksonville, Fla., when five sailors were tossed overboard while being lowered from

Saratoga during a man-overboard drill on 18 August 1989 without injury. Completed overhaul in 1988, commencing following her

19th Mediterranean Sea deployment in November 1987, when she departed Mayport, Florida, and entered the Norfolk Naval

Shipyard for overhaul at a cost of $280; departing Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for Mayport, Florida with much fanfare on 3

February 1983 with her new nickname "Super Sara,” upon conclusion of sea trials on 16 October 1982, conducting sea trials upon

completion of the Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) overhaul (24 months - 28 September 1980 to 16 October 1982),

arriving at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard only one month after her return from her 16th Mediterranean Sea deployment; reclassified

CV-60 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier” on 30 June 1975; made one Vietnam Combat cruise during the Vietnam Conflict/War and

first deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, earning 1 battle stars for service in Vietnam, returning from the South China Sea, via

the straits of Malacca, Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea, her second Suez Canal transit steaming through the Gulf of Aden, Red

Sea, to and from the Mediterranean Sea on 11 April 1972. She will under go her 25th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD)

since her commission on 14 April 1956” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

USS Saratoga (CV-60) with CVW-17

(7 August 1990 to 27 March 1991)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-74

Be-Devilers -              Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

AA100

F-14B

VF-103

Sluggers -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -      Jet Fighter

AA200

F-14B

VFA-83

Rampagers -                    Attack Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AA300

FA-18C

VFA-81

Sunliners -                    Attack Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AA400

FA-18C

VA-35

Black Panthers -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AA500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-125

Tigertails or
Torchbearers - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-132

Scorpions - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-3

Tridents - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-30

Diamondcutters - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

 

 

    “Iraqi tanks and troops poured across the borders from Iraq into Kuwait as Saddam Hussein seized the tiny country from 2 to 8 August 1990, his troops raping and looting helpless Kuwaitis; sailors on board guided missile frigate Robert G. Bradley (FFG-49), patrolling in the Persian Gulf barely 50 miles offshore, could hear the victims’ pleas for help via their bridge-to-bridge radio, “over and over again,” but restrictive rules of engagement constrained the crew until the U.S. responded by forming a coalition of 29 nations, that rushed reinforcements to the region during Operation Desert Shield, designed to protect the region from Iraqi aggression. “Saddam Hussein won the toss,” noted CAPT Lyle G. “Ho Chi” Bien, Commander CVW-15, detailed to Central Command as the Navy’s senior strike planner, “and elected to receive.”

 

      The cancellation of their planned participation in exercises Flashing Scimitar and Juniper Hawk permitted USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), guided missile destroyer USS Scott (DDG-995), guided missile frigate USS John L. Hall (FFG-32), oilier Neosho (AO-143) and ammunition ship Suribachi (AE-21) to transit the Suez Canal, her 3rd transit since her commission on the 8th.

 

     As some of the first coalition forces to arrive in the area, the ships formed the Red Sea Battle Group, maintaining station in that sea to defend Saudi Arabia should Hussein chose to continue his aggression. A “comprehensive strike plan” provided a 720 nautical mile strike radius for battlefield air interdiction and close air support to stop Iraqi tanks, mechanized infantry and personnel carriers. Initial planning focused on launching supportable strike packages carrying enough ordnance over targets as distance and tanking constraints would allow. The plan called for extensive tanker, airborne early warning and Air Force fighter support.

 

    The Air Force requirement for its McDonnell Douglas KC-10A Extenders to refuel strategic airlifters during the build up of reinforcements, however, resulted in the substitution of Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers out of Jiddah, Saudi Arabia, reducing fuel off-loads. Hawkeyes and Vikings began flying around the clock intelligence-gathering and surveillance operations. As planners acquired additional intelligence, they developed a high value target list for waging a “rollback” campaign against the Iraqis. USS Independence (CV-62) also responded to the crisis by steaming into the Gulf of Oman. The combined groups of the two carriers brought over 130 aircraft to bear against Hussein and his troops in Kuwait and southern Iraq, and protected airfields in the Arabian Peninsula close to vital sea routes.

 

    All hands endured tense days and encountered communication and identification problems operating with other U.S. and allied forces. “If we were directed by LGEN Horner [Central Command forward] to attack Iraqi forces headed south into Saudi Arabia during those first few weeks with U.S. Navy air forces,” RADM William M. Fogarty, Commander, Dwight D. Eisenhower Battle Group, reflected later, “the danger of ‘blue on blue’ [accidental attacks on friendly troops and sailors] was sobering to say the least.”

 

     Keeping the ship supplied proved especially challenging and required constant flights by two CH-53Es and two C-2s, in addition to replenishment ships. High temperatures prevailed in the Red Sea, averaging 95º F. during the daytime, as did hazy weather and dust that often reduced visibility to barely three miles. Guided missile destroyer USS Tattnall (DDG-19) and destroyer USS John Rodgers (DD-983) rendezvoused and operated with the Red Sea Battle Group during this period” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) cut the ribbon establishing Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) during a ceremony on 8 August 1990” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 8 August 1990, for Independent Steaming Exercise and involved limited helo ops” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “On 10 August 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) received “short-fused” orders to “load up and get underway.” She commenced her “loadout” for her Desert Shield deployment and began the loadout of CVW-3 the next day. On 13 August 1990, John F. Kennedy embarked Rear Admiral Riley D. Mixson, ComCarGru 2” (Ref. 549).

 

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) WEAPONS DEPARTMENT DATE EVOULTION

 

11-Aug

Security Drill (Intruder Alert)

 

     USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 and SURFPAC NPMTT embarked returned to Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 13 August 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, conducting Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) PALS certification off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) from 2 to 12 August 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 14 August 1990, conducting Independent Steaming Exercise and involved limited helo operations from 7 to 14 August 1990. Four one week underway periods kept all personnel busy maintaining and checking equipment since the ship’s arrival from her 1989/90 World Cruise. In addition, M Division spaces outside the propulsion blocks were cataloged and Scooped” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 14 August 1990, for a Dependent's Cruise, for nearly 5,000 guests” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced SCOOP in preparation of her up coming Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 15 August 1990, when Enterprise became non-operational on 15 August 1990, and two new acronyms entered the crew's jargon: SCOOP and Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF). The Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) required the crew to remove everything from the ship that was not essential for the yard period. This included removing items as large as the ship's four 480,000 lb. catapults and smaller items” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) with CVW-3 and Rear Admiral Riley D. Mixson, ComCarGru 2 embarked departed Norfolk,

Virginia 15 August 1990, with Captain Herbert A. Browne in command, on her first Red Sea deployment, steaming through the

Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the

Mediterranean Sea, en route to the Mediterranean Sea, on her 13th Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United

States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet) (14th voyage in the Med), participating in National Week ’90 Exercises, she will make her third Suez

Canal transit in support of what would turn out to be her 1st Operation Desert Storm, commencing in the early morning hours of 17

January 1991, with Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait), operating under the direction

of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central

Command. Prior to her deployment Rear Admiral Riley D. Mixson, ComCarGru 2 embarked on 13 August 1990, received “short-

fused” orders to “load up and get underway.” She commenced her “loadout” for her Desert Shield deployment and began the loadout

of CVW-3 the next day on 10 August 1990, while events in the Persian Gulf dashed John F. Kennedy hopes for uneventful,

routine, operations that were to be capped by an overhaul scheduled to begin in January of the following year, when, on 2 August

1990, 0200 local time, 100,000 Iraqi troops massed on the border of Kuwait. She will under go her 17th Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment (FWFD) since she was commissioned 7 September 1968” (Ref. 72, 76, 84, 380 & 549).

 

USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) with CVW-3

(15 August 1990 to 28 March 1991)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-14

Top Hatters -                Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AC100

F-14A

VF-32

Swordsmen -                Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

AC200

F-14A

VA-46 (*1)

Clansmen -                         Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AC300

A-7E

VA-72 (*1)

Blue Hawks -                         Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AC400

A-7E

VA-75

Sunday Panchers

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AC500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-126

Seahawks -                          Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-7

Dusty Dogs -      Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VAQ-130

Zappers -                     Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-22

Checkmates -                   Carrier Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking  - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

 (*1) disestablished on Jun.30, 1991

 

    “With the aircraft of CVW-3 recovered (VF-14 and VF-32, VA-46, VA-72, and VA-75, VS-22, VAQ-130, VAW-126 and HS-7) USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) stood out for local operations off the Virginia capes” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Air Department’s, V-4 Division commenced the ship’s JP-5 offload on 16 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Communications Department commenced Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) on 16 August 1990 and Scooped over 4,000 line items for ship's force accomplishment” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Air Department’s, V-4 Division conducted the ship’s JP-5 offload from 16 to 17 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department’s V-4 Division completed a major JP-5 offload from 16 to 17 August 1990 and fresh water flush of the entire JP-5 fuel system, a task normally reserved for shipyard contract scheduled from 20 August to 7 September 1990. The Air Department tackled their offload portion of the Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) requirements during this period and was complete prior to the end of the month of August. Air Department's full attention turned to preparations and training for overhaul” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “The Navy augmented the Red Sea Battle Group’s mission to include Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) to enforce UN Security Council Resolution 51, which imposed an embargo upon ships entering or leaving Iraqi-occupied Kuwaiti and Iraqi ports from 16 to 18 August 1990. Interceptions began on the 16th and led to a flurry of activity. John L. Hall, which would average 10 interceptions daily, made the first challenge of a merchantman. Two days later, guided missile frigate USS Reid (FFG-30) fired nine warning shots across the bow of Iraqi tanker Khanaqin, whose master stubbornly refused to alter course after being ordered to do so, the first naval shots of Desert Shield.

 

    USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG-49) fired three rounds from a 25 mm chain gun at Iraqi tanker Babr Gurgr when she also refused to come about, however, the Iraqis continued on their way, and guided missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG-50) relieved Robert G. Bradley of her charge. A boarding party from guided missile cruiser USS England (CG-22) carried out the first boarding by inspecting the cargo and manifest of Chinese freighter Heng Chung Hai. Destroyer Scott of the carrier’s screen then ordered Cypriot merchantmen Dongola away from al-Aqabah, Jordan, after Dongola’s master confessed to carrying cargo bound for Iraq. Dwight D. Eisenhower aircraft covered many of those ships as they made these interceptions that continued during the anxious days following. Secretary of Defense Richard B. Cheney also embarked in USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) and Scott on the 18th” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) V-4 Division commenced fresh water flush of the entire JP-5 fuel system, a task normally reserved for shipyard contract on 20 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia from 15 to 21 August 1990. During August FICPAC SAO package arrives, removal of portions of NIPS (V) 3 begins to accommodate NIPS (V) 4 Phase One in ANALYSIS, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) ran first GTC36-201 APU and AIMD issued first TF30-P414A engine” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

     “After conducting war-at-sea defensive evolutions with the 2nd Fleet, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) was joined by her battle group—guided missile cruisers Thomas S. Gates (CG-51), San Jacinto (CG-56), and Mississippi (CGN-40), destroyer Moosbrugger (DD-980), frigate Thomas C. Hart (FF-1092), guided missile frigate Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58), fast combat support ship Seattle, and combat stores ship Sylvania (AFS-2) John F. Kennedy hosted a post-exercise conference on 22 August 1990 before beginning the voyage to the Mediterranean Sea” (Ref. 549).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) First watch in SUPPLOT commenced on 22 August 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Saratoga (CV-60) rapidly crossed the Atlantic, the Mediterranean and transited the Suez Canal on 22 August 1990 to take up station in the Red Sea” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia on 22 August 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, for Carrier Qualifications off the Virginia capes (VACAPES)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1989).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 (AK)

(22 to 29 August 1990)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-132

Privateers - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AK200

F/A-18A

VFA-137

Kestrels - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

AK400

F/A-18A

VA-55 (2)

Warhorses - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber

AK500

A-6E

VAW-127 (3)

Seabats - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-142 (4)

Grim Watchdogs -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-17 (5)

Neptune's Riders - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

 (1) CVW-13 deployed aboard the CVN-72 on latter half of the period

(2) VA-55 disestablished on Jan.1, 1991

(3) VAW-127 disestablished on Sep.30, 1991

(4) VAQ-142 disestablished on Jul.1, 1991

(5) HS-17 disestablished on Jun.30, 1991

F/A-18 Hornet, EA-6B Prowler and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 24 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Saratoga (CV-60) relieved USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) of her Red Sea watch, enabling the carrier to steam northward and passed through the Suez Canal into the Mediterranean Sea on her 4th transit since her commission. The latter's aircrew had logged 2,833 flight hours during Desert Shield from 23 to 24 August 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) SSES computer accreditation for SCI completed on 23 August 1990” (Ref. 378B-1989).

 

    “The crew of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) held a Ship's party at Busch Gardens on 24 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “Forty people from the National Association of Science Naval Studies Board embark USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) from 23 to 24 August 1990” (Ref. 378B-1989).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 24 to 28 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) underway off the coast of Virginia, 28 August 1990, prior to the ship's departure for the Pacific Fleet. A pair of F/A-18 Hornets are in launch positions on the bow catapults. Photo by PH1 Cummings. Joe Radigan, MACM, USN, Ret. NS027203. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027203.jpg

 

    “VADM Fetterman, COMNAVAIRPAC, visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 30 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “Four one week underway periods kept all personnel busy maintaining and checking equipment. In addition, Engineering Department’s M Division spaces outside the propulsion blocks were cataloged and Scooped. Early overhaul work was started while at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from April to August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-13 embarked returned to Norfolk, Virginia on 29 August 1990, with Captain William B. Hayden as a Commanding Officer, conducting Carrier Qualifications off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) from 22 to 29 August 1990. Abraham Lincoln onloaded additional cargo from replenishment oiler Kalamazoo (AOR-6) and loaded ammunition pierside in August 1990. Abraham Lincoln SSES computer accreditation for SCI completed on 23 August 1990. Forty people from the National Association of Science Naval Studies Board embark Abraham Lincoln from 23 to 24 August 1990. August was a heavy training month for the ship in preparation for the around the horn transit. Early August was spent at sea, continuing operational training with CVW-13. “Aircraft from Fighter Squadron VFA-132 and VFA-137, Strike Fighter Squadron; Attack Squadron VA-55, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron VAW-127; Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron VAQ-142 and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS-17) make up CVW-13” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1989).

 

     “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), accompanied by Mississippi, sprinted ahead of the rest of the battle group and passed into the Mediterranean Sea on 30 August 1990 where Commander, 6th Fleet, briefers met the ship to provide the battle group deployment schedule – although, as the carrier’s chronicler later noted wryly, the schedule changed before the briefers even left the ship! Consequently, John F. Kennedy anchored in Augusta Bay on 1 September, for turnover with USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). Rear Admiral Mixson, ComCarGru 2, assumed command of TF 60, and John F. Kennedy stood into the central Mediterranean Sea to join Dwight D. Eisenhower for National Week ’90 exercises” (Ref. 549).

 

     “Vice Adm. John H. Fetterman, Jr., Commander, Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet, visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 30 August 1990. During this period the crew performed their largest onload of supplies to date to prepare for their extended voyage that comprised over 1,000 pallets of stores, direct turn-over and squadron material” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1989).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and her screen relieved USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) and guided missile cruiser USS Ticonderoga (CG-47) at Augusta Bay on 1 September 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

     “On 1 September 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) U.S. Marine Corps. Detachment was deactivated due to the upcoming Complex Overhaul (COH)” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) anchored in Augusta Bay on 1 September 1990, for turnover with USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). Rear Admiral Mixson, ComCarGru 2, assumed command of TF 60, and John F. Kennedy stood into the central Med to join Dwight D. Eisenhower for National Week ’90 exercises” (Ref. 1-Saratoga, John F. Kennedy, 72, 549 & 1145).

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) and USS Ticonderoga (CG-47) steamed from the Sixth to the Second Fleets. Spanish ADM Pedro Regalado, that fleet’s commander, embarked briefly on 3 September 1990” (Ref. 383B).

 

    “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) took over as the Mediterranean Sea aircraft carrier on 4 September 1990” (Ref. 1-Kennedy, 72, 76, 380 & 549).

 

    “On 4 September 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) took over as the Mediterranean Sea carrier” (Ref. 549).

 

     “NALCOMIS software installation completed aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) making the command ADP fully operational on 5 September 1990” (Ref. 378B-1989).

 

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) WEAPONS DEPARTMENT DATE EVOULTION

 

6-Sep

Torpedo Offload

 

Conventional Weapons Staging

 

     “CMS inspection for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Communications Department was conducted on 7 September 1990” (Ref. 378B-1989).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department’s V-4 Division completed a major JP-5 offload from 16 to 17 August 1990 and fresh water flush of the entire JP-5 fuel system, a task normally reserved for shipyard contract from 20 August to 7 September 1990. The Air Department tackled their offload portion of the Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) requirements during this period and was complete prior to the end of the month of August. Air Department's full attention turned to preparations and training for overhaul” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “On 10 September 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) anchored off Alexandria (Ref. 549).

 

     “During the period 1 August to 14 September 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) off-loaded all non-essential material/supplies in preparation for Carl Vinson’s change of homeport to Bremerton, Washington. Just prior to the completion of “WestPac,” AIMD began planning for an in depth Complex Overhaul (COH-90). Preparation for a new Air Wing deck load, Constituting 22 major ship alterations began with the cataloging of AMRL=, TOL, SE, and MAMS, and the laying up of Automatic Test equipment (ATE) for replacement or reactivation on the Spring of 1992.

 

      The Alameda Beach Detachment was established to function during the COH to accomplish the following:

 

- Completely overhaul all ground Support Equipment (SE) - Rework and maintain calibration cycles on all aviation test and measuring equipment.

- Provide total services aviation Technical Publications Library (TPL) to replace and update approximately 25,000 technical manuals.

- Establish a transfer/receipt unit for control of the myriad of equipment items newly received or transferred to other units” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

     “After a three-day port visit at Alexandria, arriving on 10 September 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) got underway, transiting the Suez Canal on 14 September 1990 and stood into the Red Sea becoming the flagship for the commander of the Red Sea Battle Force in support of Operation Desert Shield” (Ref. 72 & 76).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) held the E-4 Exam for Sailors on 5 September, E-5 Exam for Sailors on 11 September and Alumni Tour was held on 12 September 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “Before her first strikes were launched, Rear Admiral Riley D. Mixson, ComCarGru 2, Commander Red Sea Force, announced over USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) 1MC the launch schedule that would commence the following day in less than ten hours. He congratulated the ship for being able to carry out the President’s orders and participate in air strikes on Iraq, strikes that John F. Kennedy had trained for. “You have trained hard. You are ready,” Rear Admiral Mixson concluded, “Now let’s execute. For the aircrews, we are all very, very proud of you. I wish you good hunting and God speed” (Ref. 549).

 

    “On 12 September 1990, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain

Gary L. Beck in command, ending her sixth Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th

Fleet), participating with USS Forrestal (CV-59) in maritime threat scenarios as part of National Week 90B, Joint Exercise

Distant Thunder 90-1 with British and Turkish forces from 14 to 21 April 1990. Tomcats and Hornets flew dissimilar air combat

training against British Panavia GR, Dragon Hammer 90, consisting of combined operations, coordinated air defense, and maritime

and amphibious training, pitting her Tomcats against British Tornados, French and Spanish Mirages and Spanish Harrier , Journey

to Victory, a commemoration of the Allied landings in Normandy from 2 to 6 June 1990 and National Week 90, steaming through

the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet

to the Mediterranean Sea to the Mediterranean Sea, conducting Operation Spellex, forming five stars and the numbers 1890–

1990 in honor of the centennial celebration of President Eisenhower's birth on 17 March 1990, on her first Red Sea deployment in

support of her 1st Operation Desert Shield, in retaliation of Iraqi occupation of Kuwait on 2 August 1990, when the largest armada

since World War II assembled in the Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield and Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) to

enforce UN Security Council Resolution 51, which imposed an embargo upon ships entering or leaving Iraqi-occupied Kuwaiti and

Iraqi ports, operating under the direction of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT), with the Commander, 7th Fleet,

serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi

occupation of Kuwait). The crew dubbed this deployment the “Ike Centennial Cruise” in honor of the 100th anniversary of the birth

of the ship’s namesake. Dwight D. Eisenhower steams at the center of her powerful battle group in the Atlantic during her

centennial cruise (in honor of the ship's namesake) to the Mediterranean and Red Sea in 1990. Ike served as a ready striking force

in the event Iraq invaded Saudi Arabia, and participated in maritime interception operations in support of a United Nations embargo

against Iraq, becoming the first carrier to conduct sustained operations in the Red Sea, the only the second nuclear-powered aircraft

carrier ever to transit the Suez Canal. Over 1,000 sailors gathered on the flight deck of Dwight D. Eisenhower for Operation

Spellex, forming five stars and the numbers 1890–1990 in honor of the centennial celebration of President Eisenhower's birth on 17

March 1990. Dwight D. Eisenhower entered the Mediterranean Sea under the command of the Sixth Fleet. While in the Med, she

maintained an average of two F-14A (Plus) and two S-3Bs ashore at NAS Sigonella for operational training on 19 March 1990.

Dwight D. Eisenhower participated with USS Forrestal (CV-59) in maritime threat scenarios as part of National Week 90B from

20 to 27 March 1900 and then dropped anchor in Augusta Bay to relieve Forrestal on 28 March 1990. An F/A-18A, LCDR William

J. Henderson from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 136, experienced a “catastrophic” left engine failure followed by loss of flight

controls and crashed into the sea at about 1610. A Sea King from HS-5 attached to rescued Henderson in barely 10 minutes. The

rescue prove unique in that Henderson maintained radio contact the entire time with a nearby VS-31 Viking that vectored the helo in

for the recovery although it's crew never actually spotted the pilot, who suffered minor injuries on 31 March 1990. Gunstar 302, an

F/A-18A, LCDR Randolph E. “Claw” Causey of VFA-136, logged the one millionth Hornet flight hour when he landed on board at

1415 on 10 April 1990. The trap also was Causey’s 1,000th hour in Hornets. Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in joint exercise

Distant Thunder 90-1 with British and Turkish forces from 14 to 21 April 1990. Tomcats and Hornets flew dissimilar air combat

training against British Panavia GR. Mk 1 Tornadoes flying out of Akrotiri. Israeli Air Force Commander MGEN Avihu Ben-Nunn

visited the ship on the 20th, and took the opportunity to have a flight in a VF-143 Tomcat. During Dwight D. Eisenhower visit to

Haifa, Israel, RADM Michael Ram, that nation’s naval Commander-in-Chief, toured the ship from 22 to 29 April 1990. Dwight D.

Eisenhower participated in Dragon Hammer 90, consisting of combined operations, coordinated air defense, and maritime and

amphibious training, pitting her Tomcats against British Tornados, French and Spanish Mirages and Spanish Harriers from 29 April

to 15 May 1990. Vice President J. Danforth “Dan” Quayle visited Dwight D. Eisenhower. The Vice President observed flight

operations and met crewmembers in Hanger Bay No. 2, where he reenlisted 19 sailors on 7 May 1990. Four Hornets attached to

Dwight D. Eisenhower CVW-7 air wing deployed to Sidi Ahmed Airfield, Tunisia, to conduct dissimilar air combat training with

14 F-5E and F Tiger IIs of the 15th Tunisian Air Unit from 20 to 24 May 1990. Dwight D. Eisenhower took part in Journey to

Victory, a commemoration of the Allied landings in Normandy from 2 to 6 June 1990. John S. D. Eisenhower, U.S. Ambassador to

France Walter J.P. Curley, Jr., and American and British D-Day veterans were among those who embarked on the 5th. Tomcats from

VF-142 and VF-143 flew a “missing man” formation over Omaha Beach the next day in honor of the men who fell seizing that

crucial beachhead on D-Day in 1944. Iraqi tanks and troops poured across the borders from Iraq into Kuwait as Saddam Hussein

seized the tiny country from 2 to 8 August 1990, his troops raping and looting helpless Kuwaitis; sailors on board guided missile

frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG-49), patrolling in the Persian Gulf barely 50 miles offshore, could hear the victims’

pleas for help via their bridge-to-bridge radio, “over and over again,” but restrictive rules of engagement constrained the crew until

the U.S. responded by forming a coalition of 29 nations, that rushed reinforcements to the region during Operation Desert Shield,

designed to protect the region from Iraqi aggression. “Saddam Hussein won the toss,” noted CAPT Lyle G. “Ho Chi” Bien,

Commander CVW-15, detailed to Central Command as the Navy’s senior strike planner, “and elected to receive.” The cancellation

of their planned participation in exercises Flashing Scimitar and Juniper Hawk permitted Dwight D. Eisenhower, guided missile

destroyer USS Scott (DDG-995), guided missile frigate USS John L. Hall (FFG-32), oilier Neosho (AO-143) and ammunition ship

Suribachi (AE-21) to transit the Suez Canal, her 3rd transit since her commission on the 8th. s some of the first coalition forces to

arrive in the area, the ships formed the Red Sea Battle Group, maintaining station in that sea to defend Saudi Arabia should Hussein

chose to continue his aggression. A “comprehensive strike plan” provided a 720 nautical mile strike radius for battlefield air

interdiction and close air support to stop Iraqi tanks, mechanized infantry and personnel carriers. Initial planning focused on

launching supportable strike packages carrying enough ordnance over targets as distance and tanking constraints would allow. The

plan called for extensive tanker, airborne early warning and Air Force fighter support. The Air Force requirement for its McDonnell

Douglas KC-10A Extenders to refuel strategic airlifters during the build up of reinforcements, however, resulted in the substitution of

Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers out of Jiddah, Saudi Arabia, reducing fuel off-loads. Hawkeyes and Vikings began flying around the

clock intelligence-gathering and surveillance operations. As planners acquired additional intelligence, they developed a high value

target list for waging a “rollback” campaign against the Iraqis. USS Independence (CV-62) also responded to the crisis by steaming

into the Gulf of Oman. The combined groups of the two carriers brought over 130 aircraft to bear against Hussein and his troops in

Kuwait and southern Iraq, and protected airfields in the Arabian Peninsula close to vital sea routes. All hands endured tense days and

encountered communication and identification problems operating with other U.S. and allied forces. “If we were directed by LGEN

Horner [Central Command forward] to attack Iraqi forces headed south into Saudi Arabia during those first few weeks with U.S.

Navy air forces,” RADM William M. Fogarty, Commander, Dwight D. Eisenhower Battle Group, reflected later, “the danger of

‘blue on blue’ [accidental attacks on friendly troops and sailors] was sobering to say the least.” Keeping the ship supplied proved

especially challenging and required constant flights by two CH-53Es and two C-2s, in addition to replenishment ships. High

temperatures prevailed in the Red Sea, averaging 95º F. during the daytime, as did hazy weather and dust that often reduced

visibility to barely three miles. Guided missile destroyer USS Tattnall (DDG-19) and destroyer USS John Rodgers (DD-983)

rendezvoused and operated with the Red Sea Battle Group during this period. The Navy augmented the Red Sea Battle Group’s

mission to include Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) to enforce UN Security Council Resolution 51, which imposed an

embargo upon ships entering or leaving Iraqi-occupied Kuwaiti and Iraqi ports from 16 to 18 August 1990. Interceptions began on

the 16th and led to a flurry of activity. John L. Hall, which would average 10 interceptions daily, made the first challenge of a

merchantman. Two days later, guided missile frigate USS Reid (FFG-30) fired nine warning shots across the bow of Iraqi tanker

Khanaqin, whose master stubbornly refused to alter course after being ordered to do so, the first naval shots of Desert Shield. USS

Robert G. Bradley (FFG-49) fired three rounds from a 25 mm chain gun at Iraqi tanker Babr Gurgr when she also refused to come

about, however, the Iraqis continued on their way, and guided missile frigate USS Taylor (FFG-50) relieved Robert G. Bradley of her

charge. A boarding party from guided missile cruiser USS England (CG-22) carried out the first boarding by inspecting the cargo and

manifest of Chinese freighter Heng Chung Hai. Destroyer Scott of the carrier’s screen then ordered Cypriot merchantmen Dongola

away from al-Aqabah, Jordan, after Dongola’s master confessed to carrying cargo bound for Iraq. Dwight D. Eisenhower aircraft

covered many of those ships as they made these interceptions that continued during the anxious days following. Secretary of Defense

Richard B. Cheney also embarked in Dwight D. Eisenhower and Scott on the 18th. USS Saratoga (CV-60) relieved Dwight D.

Eisenhower of her Red Sea watch, enabling the carrier to steam northward and passed through the Suez Canal into the

Mediterranean Sea. The latter's aircrew had logged 2,833 flight hours during Desert Shield from 23 to 24 August 1990. John F.

Kennedy and her screen relieved Dwight D. Eisenhower and guided missile cruiser USS Ticonderoga (CG-47) at Augusta Bay on 1

September 1990. John F. Kennedy anchored in Augusta Bay on 1 September, for turnover with Dwight D. Eisenhower Rear

Admiral Mixson, ComCarGru 2, assumed command of TF 60, and John F. Kennedy stood into the central Med to join Dwight D.

Eisenhower for National Week ’90 exercises. Dwight D. Eisenhower and USS Ticonderoga (CG-47) steamed from the Sixth to the

Second Fleets. Spanish ADM Pedro Regalado, that fleet’s commander, embarked briefly on 3 September 1990. On 4 September

1990, John F. Kennedy took over as the Mediterranean carrier. Her 11th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her

commission 18 October 1977, Captain William E. Ramsey in command (8 March to 12 September 1990)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga, John F.

Kennedy, 44, 72, 76, 84A, 383, 383B, 549 & 1145).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) held the E-6 Exam for Sailors on 13 September 1990. The Deck Department held extensive training to help personnel prepare for the September Navy-wide rating examination cycle in September” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) commenced Project Noah’s Ark, steaming to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. on 15 September 1990, to commence a Complex Overhaul (COH). All antennas were removed and stored at the new combat systems overhaul facility (CSOF). With return from “WestPac” in August, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) Communications Department enjoyed a well deserved stand down from deployment. Since August 1990, many communications personnel have been assigned TAD to augment ships and staffs deployed in support of Operation Desert Shield, to NICC Bremerton, and to various COH functions such as firewatch and habitability” (Ref. 376A/1990).

 

WEAPONS DEPARTMENT DATE EVOULTION

 

7-Aug

Small Arms Qualification

 

Inert Ordnance Offload

 

WEAPONS DEPARTMENT DATE EVOULTION

 

11-Aug

Security Drill (Intruder Alert)

 

     On 1 September 1990, Carl Vinson U.S. Marine Corps. Detachment was deactivated due to the upcoming Complex Overhaul (COH).

 

Carl Vinson WEAPONS DEPARTMENT DATE EVOULTION

 

6-Sep

Torpedo Offload

 

Conventional Weapons Staging

 

     “During the period 1 August to 14 September 1990, Carl Vinson off-loaded all non-essential material/supplies in preparation for Carl Vinson’s change of homeport to Bremerton, Washington. Just prior to the completion of “WestPac,” AIMD began planning for an indepth Complex Overhaul (COH-90). Preparation for a new Air Wing deck load, Constituting 22 major ship alterations began with the cataloging of AMRL=, TOL, SE, and MAMS, and the laying up of Automatic Test equipment (ATE) for replacement or reactivation on the Spring of 1992.

 

     The Alameda Beach Detachment was established to function during the COH to

accomplish the following:

 

- Completely overhaul all ground Support Equipment (SE) - Rework and maintain calibration cycles on all aviation test and measuring equipment.

- Provide total services aviation Technical Publications Library (TPL) to replace and update approximately 25,000 technical manuals.

- Establish a transfer/receipt unit for control of the myriad of equipment items newly received or transferred to other units” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

     “On 15 September 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) joined USS Saratoga (CV-60). The two carriers operated together for the next two days before USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) assumed the watch in the Red Sea while Saratoga moved to the Mediterranean Sea” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) E-4 and below personnel reported to the Floating Accomodation Facility on 17 September 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “On 17 September 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) moored pier side at Naval Weapons Station Indian Island, Washington for ammunition off-load” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “Tributary communications pre-groom/ANDVT(KW-5) install completed aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 18 September 1990” (Ref. 378B-1989).

 

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) WEAPONS DEPARTMENT DATE EVOULTION

 

18-21 Sep

Weapons Off load (2900 tons)

 

     “On 22 September 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) got underway from Naval Weapons Station Indian Island, Washington for ammunition off-load commencing on the 17th and proceeded to her new homeport, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton and moored at Pier 3” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) shifted home ports from Alameda to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. from 15 to 22 September 1990, during Project Noah’s Ark, for a Complex Overhaul (COH) (effective 14 September). En route, she moored at Naval Weapons Station, Indian Island, Wash., to off-load 2,900 tons of ammunition (17-22 September). Project Noah’s Ark moved dependents and personal property including vehicles that crowded the flight deck, and gave family members a glimpse of life on board. The ship moored to Pier 3 upon arriving at Bremerton. Project Noah's Ark, planned and executed by AIMD, moved both dependents and POV's to the Bremerton area, saving money, time, and providing a glimpse of at-sea life to all dependents who took part: Upon arrival at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, AIMD began the COH with an aggressive Ship's Force Work Package (SEWP.) 66,254 manhours scheduled on 1770 Key Operations (KM)PS) in 229 spaces will completely rehabilitate all AIMD work centers and many CVW-15 spaces to provide a clean, modern space forUSS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) sailors to once again establish their perch as the "BEST CARRIER IN THE NAVY." On arrival at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, over half the Deck Department was assigned TAD to the overhaul organization (firewatch and habitability divisions) and deck was reorganized into a single division. Primary repairs for the department include complete sandblasting and preservation of all exterior spaces and the ship's sides, as well as overhaul of all underway replenishment winches, sliding padeyes, the anchors and chains, and repair of the B & A crane” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

     “SUPPLOT installation complete (JOTS 11, POST, TRE installed) aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 24 September 1990” (Ref. 378B-1989).

 

     “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 20 to 25 September 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia from 29 August to 24 September 1990. CVW-11 onloaded and massive supply onload included over 1,000 pallets of stores, direct turn-over and squadron material on the 23rd. Abraham Lincoln accomplishments during September included NALCOMIS software installation completed, making the command ADP fully operational on 5 September 1990; CMS inspection for Communications Department was conducted on 7 September 1990; TIMS drop installed in MSI; NIPS (V) 4 phase one installation completed in ANALYSIS; TFCC 11+ installation completed; TRE installed; SSES receiver upgrade complete; hosted QUICKSTRIKE DST, ship's suitability test for NAVSEA assessment; Naval Intelligence Processing System (NIPS) interphase installed in Communications; AIMD Oil Lab was certified for Coolanol testing; Tributary communications pre-groom/ANDVT(KW-5) install completed, 18 September and SUPPLOT installation complete (JOTS 11, POST, TRE installed) on 24 September” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 25 September 1990, with Captain

William B. Hayden as the Commanding Officer, hosting Governor of Illinois, on her first Southern Atlantic and Southern and

Eastern Pacific deployment around Cape Horn, en route to its new home base of Naval Air Station Alameda, California, making

an inter fleet transfer from the Atlantic to the Pacific Fleet, steaming through the Western & Southern Atlantic, operating with the

U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet in support of CVW-11 MISSILEX,

CVW-11 Cyclic OPS in the Puerto Rican Operations Area and Blue Sky III in the Chilean waters, an exercise with the Chileans,

around South America & Cape Horn, traveling through the Southern and Eastern Pacific to her new home port of Naval Air

Station Alameda, California operating with the Pacific Fleet. Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-11) moved on board two days before

they sailed on 23 September 1990. CVW-11’s new home port will be Naval Air Station Lemoore. Sailors draped banners that read

“California or bust” and “Made in Va.” across her fantail. She will under go her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD)

since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in

command as the third CO” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1990).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 (NH)

(25 September to 20 November 1990)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-114

Aardvarks -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH200

F-14A

VFA-303

Golden Hawks -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

(ND) 300

F/A-18A

VFA-305

Lobos -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

(ND) 400

F/A-18A

VA-95

Green Lizards -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-17 (*1)

Neptune's Riders - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

(AK) 610

SH-3H

VAQ-135

Black Ravens -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VRC-30 Det.

Providers - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound

(RW) 32, 34

C-2A

 (*1) disestablished on Jun.30, 1991

Carrier Air Wing Eleven underwent major changes in 1990. A-7E's were replaced by F/A-18 Hornets, and SH-3's were replaced with SH-60 Sea Hawks specially configured for combat search and rescue. The E-2C and the A-6E underwent major upgrades.

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

     “Guided missile frigate USS Doyle (FFG-39) accompanied USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) as part of her escort on its maiden voyage, riding it around South America en route to its new homeport in Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, while Carrier Air Wing Eleven embarked the Navy's newest carrier, making her homeport at Naval Air Station Lemoore” (Ref. 514 or Global Security).

 

     “Two weeks of operations in the Red Sea passed without any major happenings on USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67). Then, on 26 September 1990, an SH-3H Sea King from HS-7 (side number 610) splashed several miles from the ship after it lost power in one engine. The crew and passengers were rescued without injury by helo and motor whaleboat crews” (Ref. 549).

 

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) WEAPONS DEPARTMENT DATE EVOULTION

 

27-Sep

Small Arms Offload at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash.

28-Sep

Ammunition Offload at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted operations in the JAX OPAREA, transit PROA on 27 September 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced a CVW-11 MISSILEX, CVW-11 Cyclic OPS in the Puerto Rican Operations Area on 28 September 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1989).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted a CVW-11 MISSILEX, CVW-11 Cyclic OPS in the Puerto Rican Operations Area from 28 to 30 September 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1989).

 

     “On 29 September 1990, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) proceeded to Dry Dock 6 and commenced its Complex Overhaul (COH) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. To enable crewmembers (relatively) safe and clean berthing, the Navy made available the unclassified vessel (ex-transport) General Hugh J. Gaffey (IX-507) to over 2,000 men. The crew installed and developed a prototype personal computer local area network on board the vessel during overhaul. Two berthing barges, YFN-1223 and YRBM-20, also supported Carl Vinson. The ship established her Complex Overhaul Department, consisting of 14 officers, 13 chief petty officers and over 200 sailors manning Firewatch, Rehab and Ship’s Force Work Package Divisions, to oversee all non-nuclear repair/upgrade work” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

      “Throughout the rest of September 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) conducted operations in the Red Sea while at general quarters” (Ref. 549).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) nominated by NCS Roosevelt Roads as Multi-Channel HF Performer of the Month, conducting July to September 1990. The ship's COMSEC account was disestablished” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at St. Thomas, Virgin Islands on 1 October 1990, where she will onload stores for the first time in a port outside of the continental U.S.” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1989).

 

    “Underway for local operations and Carrier Qualifications, E-Division of the Engineering Department of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted testing from July to September 1990. Among the many accomplishments, restoration of 58 Bus after a fire, repaired number two SFMG, performed emergent repairs on flight deck lighting transformers, repaired water line lights on the island, repaired and rewound 5JV2 sound powered phone circuit, repaired various fire pump motors and CHT motor and controllers. Enterprise begins apartment move-in on 1 October 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 2 October 1990, with Captain Arthur Karl Cebrowski, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 46th WestPac, her 25th South China Sea, on her 12th Indian Ocean deployment and her 42nd deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet,.on her sixth North Arabian Sea and fourth Arabian/Persian Gulf; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 45th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 51st deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 64th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(2 October 1990 to 17 April 1991)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th & NAVCENT (6th North Arabian Sea & 4th Arabian / Persian Gulf) (42nd  Forward Deployed)

46th WestPac 25th  SCS

12th IO

CVW-5

NF

2 Oct 1990

17 Apr 1991

Western Pacific

Indian Ocean

Middle East

North Arabian Sea Persian Gulf

64th FWFD

198-days

1st Operation Desert Shield to deter Iraqi aggression, operating under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, becoming the first carrier to enter the Arabian/Persian Gulf since 1974, Operation Imminent Thunder and 1st Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, when Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait) became Operation Desert Storm, at which time the U. S. Navy launched 228 sorties from USS Ranger (CV-61) and USS Midway (CVA-41) in the Persian Gulf, from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) en route to the Gulf, and from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), USS Saratoga (CV-60), and USS America (CV-66) in the Red Sea (the Navy launched more than 100 Tomahawk missiles from nine ships in the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, and the Persian Gulf), continuing operations until Desert Storm officially ended 27 February, operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, operational control extending to the Indian Ocean. Midway’s aircraft joined those of the other carriers in flying combat air patrol, strike, reconnaissance, and rescue missions. The campaign was over in six weeks.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-195

Dambusters -                 Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

NF100

FA-18A

VFA-151

Vigilantes -                   Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

NF200

FA-18A

VFA-192

Golden Dragons -         Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

NF300

FA-18A

VA-185

Nighthawks -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF400

A-6E /                     A6-E/KA-6D /

*A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E /                     A6-E/KA-6D /

*A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-12

Wyverns - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed St. Thomas, Virgin Islands on 3 October 1990, onloading stores for the first time in a port outside of the continental U.S. from 1 to 3 October 1990. Lincoln then returned to sea to conduct two weeks of Refresher Training (REFTRA) in the Guantanamo Bay operating area with instructors room the U.S. Navy training facility. First parachute assembly packed fro 1 to 3 October” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) responded to counter-narcotics orders from Combined Joint Task Force 4 in the Caribbean Sea from 4 to 6 October 1990. At one point during the cycle of exercises, she sailed in company with USS Doyle (FFG-39) and MSC-operated oiler Pawcatuck (T-AO-108) on 6 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crossed the equator and conducted a "Shellback" initiation ceremony for the first time, and her historian proudly noted that “King Neptune” embarked on 9 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained in port Norfolk, Virginia from 14 August to 11 October 1990. Upon the ship's arrival in Norfolk, Virginia from her 1989/90 World Cruise, AIMD's mission and complement changed virtually overnight. The department rapidly implemented plans which they had formulated long before the arrival. AIMD was the first department to complete USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Ships Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) evolution.

 

     During this successful operation, the department offloaded more than 10,000 Operating Space items (500 pallets) in less than 45 days, while simultaneously offloading more than 14,000 Individual Material Readiness List (IMRL) items for long-term storage. Also, the department transferred over 2,200 items of IRML equipment to support the requirements of other fleet and shore activities. These achievements were remarkable considering that these events occurred while the department decreased to an overhaul manning level of 75 personnel.

 

    In support of Enterprise's overhaul manning plan, AIMD transferred 126 personnel to various overhaul departments, including berthing and head rehab, transportation, tanks and voids, repair, housing, special surfaces, crew support and the Light Industrial Facility. The balance of the department was left to face the monumental task of accomplishing over 1364 assigned jobs in support of the Current Ship Maintenance Project (CSMP), which entailed completion of 1,205 total work package key-ops requiring an estimated 27,640 man-hours.

 

    AIMD's Central Technical Publications Library (CTPL), 28 disbursed libraries and the Supply Response Support (SRS) library were consolidated into one location. The CTPL will manage, inventory and update over 9,700 publications throughout the overhaul period. This represents a 26 percent increase in library volume with a 65 percent reduction in personnel. In order to meet this challenge, AIMD has implemented the ADRL (Automatic Distribution Requirement List) system. This program will increase the accuracy and speed of change receipts, updates and inventories utilized in support of CTPL.

 

     The Support Equipment Division was once again tasked with performing a comprehensive Intermediate and Depot level rework on 325 items of Ground Support Equipment valued at over $10 million. This effort was accomplished two weeks ahead of schedule at a savings of over $200,000. In conjunction with this evolution, local Maintenance Requirement Cards were designed and implemented to ensure the performance of an aggressive PMS program on all items placed in long-term storage. These and many more industrious efforts, performed in support of the overhaul, continued to demonstrate AIMD's total commitment to Enterprise and its mission, regardless of the operating environment” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) DC/R Division went through a major restructuring of divisional personnel in support of the complex overhaul from July to September 1990. Over 50 percent of DC/R personnel were transferred to overhaul department and SFOMS. This was also a period of training with over 2,644 hours completed during the quarter. August marked the beginning of Operation Desert Shield, which required a complete inventory of CBR equipment by the Chemical Warfare Group and eventual shipment to the forward deployed units. The last DC/R spaces were Scooped and an additional 125 watertight doors and scuttles were repaired by the DCPO shop. The CO2 shop completed overhaul of the P-250s and all of the armored hatches” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Engineering Department continued excellent support for ship's underway periods from April to October 1990. Inport periods mainly utilized for Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) and associated overhaul preparations. A Division of Engineering Department continued providing routine hotel and repair services to all other departments on board. The division accomplished numerous emergency repairs on vital equipment in support of daily operations. The ship's catapult steam systems, hydraulic equipment, air conditioning systems, refrigeration plants, emergency diesel generators, air compressors, O2N2 plants, laundry and galley equipment were all maintained at their maximum levels of usefulness despite their age, lack of maintenance time, and lack of repair parts.

 

    The emergency diesel generators provided all ship's electrical power for the move from Norfolk to Newport News Shipyard. The move was accomplished with minimum problems, even though the time for planning was limited due to Hurricane Lili. The photo lab provided complete SCOOP photography of all ship spaces and major equipment prior to entering Newport News Shipbuilding” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1990 & 362F).  

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in port Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia from 14 August to 11 October 1990” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

1990 & 1991 EAST AND WEST COAST DEPLOYMENTS

CV and CVN Activities after CV-43 Decommissioned

Operation Desert Shield (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait commencing 2 August 1990) and

Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991).

(27 April 1990 to 26 April 1992)

Part 1 – (27 April to 1 August 1990)

Part 2 – (2 August to 11 October 1990)

Part 3 – (12 October to 31 December 1990)

Part 4 – (1 January to 26 March 1991)

Part 5 – (27 March to 16 June 1991)

Part 6 – (17 June 1991 to 27 April 1992)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 2 – (2 August to 11 October 1990)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4