USS Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42

DECOMMISSIONING 26 April 1990 at

NORFOLK, VA., NAVY SHIPYARD, PIER 12

Sold by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) on 7 May 1993

Scrapping completed as last 80' section is pulled ashore 9 August 2000

CHAPTER XLI

(13 April 1990 to 9 August 2000)

 

 

    “An article of USS Coral Sea (CV-43) by Clayton, P. & Cressman, R.  MORE THAN A SHIP, was printed in HOOK Sp 90 in April 1990” (Ref. 34).

 

 

NS024350a 112k

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024350a.jpg

 

    “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, decommissioned on 26 April 1990 at Norfolk, Va. Navy Ship Yard, Pier 12” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 43, 72 84A).

 


NS024322 45k Decommissioning patch. Mike Smolinski

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    “One more link with the World War II Navy passes from the scene. Even before her commissioning pennant is hauled down comes a movement to reassign her name to a future aircraft carrier, so that it can continue to provide inspiration to the men who take the ship to sea. No doubt such an assignment would prove not only appropriate but also popular. Looking back over Coral Sea's proud history, one must echo RADM Ferris' comments in the summer of 1972. While meant to pertain to the recent deployment on Yankee Station that she had just completed, it could also be applied to sum up her career as well. Coral Sea . . . "more than just a ship” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).

 

    “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, was Stricken from the Naval Vessel Register (Navy List) on 30 April 1990” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 43, 72 84A).

 

    “The Coral Sea (CV-43) traveled 2+ million nautical miles and her air wings made 375,000 landings with 70,000 crewmembers from her beginning to 26 April 1990 when she was decommissioned at Norfolk, Va. Navy Ship Yard, Pier 12” (Ref. 34).

 

    “The Coral Sea (CV-43) was towed from Norfolk Naval Ship Yard to Philadelphia for parts salvage 1 November 1990” (Ref. 34).

 

    “The Coral Sea (CV-43) was nicknamed "The Ageless Warrior” and an article appeared in the Naval Review commemorating the Ship June 1991” (Ref. 43).

 

    “The Coral Sea Association presented the “CORAL SEA HISTORY BOOK, Turner Publication Co. 31 May 1992; nicknamed "The Ageless Warrior” and an article appeared in the Naval Review commemorating the Ship June 1991; towed from Norfolk Naval Ship Yard to Philadelphia for parts salvage 1 November 1990; traveled 2+ million nautical miles and her air wings made 375,000 landings with 70,000 crewmembers from her beginning to 26 April 1990 when she was decommissioned at Norfolk, Va. Navy Ship Yard, Pier 12” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 & 72).

 

    “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, was sold by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping on 7 May 1993” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 43, 72 84A)

 

    “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, arrived at Baltimore for scrapping 6 July 1993 by Seawitch Marine Salvage Fairfield Tm., Baltimore, Md.  Museum plan failed and she was sold; Sale Bid # 31-3359 dated 4 March 1993, appraised $300K” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 43, 72 84A).

 

    “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, scrapping was completed as the last 80' section is pulled ashore 9 August 2000” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 43, 72 84A.

 

    “A fictitious USS Coral Sea (CV-43) appears in the television show JAG; her part is played by USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74)” (Ref. 72).

 

 

An anchor from Coral Sea donated to the "Citadel" Military Academy/University, South Carolina. It sits on the outside of the parade grounds along with several other military artifacts. March 2008. (Note that Coral Sea was actually awarded the Navy Unit Commendation, the Meritorious Unit Commendation, and 12 Campaign Stars for her Vietnam, not World War II, war service.). NS024357 177k. Photos by Robert Hall. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024357.jpg

 

 

NS024357a 173k http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024357a.jpg

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42

Overhauls from her beginning to her decommission

CHAPTER XLII

 

CV-43, former CVA-43, CVB-43 and CV-42 Final Scrapping occurred during 2000; Arrived at Baltimore for Scrapping 6 July 1993 by Seawitch Marine Salavage Fairfield Tm., Baltimore, Md. Museum plan failed; Sold by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping on 7 May 1993; Sale Bid # 31-3359 dated 4 March 1993, appraised $300K Stricken from the Naval Vessel Register (Navy List) and two days later was Sold by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping on 7 May 1993; Towed from Norfolk Naval Ship Yard to Philadelphia for parts salvage 1 November 1990; Decommissioned 26 April 1990; Restricted Availability and Yard Period during 1988; Ship’s Restricted Availability during 1986; Drydocking for hull repairs commencing upon return to Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Va. on 12 April 1985 ($11 million collision; Complex Overhaul (COH) from 1983 to 1985; Availability during 1980; Major Overhaul during 1978 & 1979; Reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975; Extended Selected Restricted Availability (ESRA) during 1975 & 1976; Major Overhaul during 1972; Major Overhaul from 1970 to 1971; Restricted Availability Feb. to Jun. 1967; Major Overhaul from 1965 to 1966; Overhaul during 1962; Installation of the Pilot Landing Aid Television (PLAT) system was completed on Coral Sea (CVA-43) on 14 December 1961; minor repairs and alterations during 1961; six-week Post-Conversion Availability during 1960; Recommissioned on 25 January 1960; Major Overhaul and Decommissioned from 1957 to 1960; Short Refit from 1955 to 1956; Major Overhaul and Reclassified CVA-43 during 1952 & 1953, undergoing her first overhaul since commissioning during 1951 & 1952; Repairs and Alterations during 1948 & 1949; Post-Shakedown repairs and alterations during 1948.

 

SHIP

Naval Vessel Register (Navy List).

DATE

Sold

DATE

Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42

East Coast

5 May 1993

Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping

7 May 1993

 “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, as CVB-43, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, and reported to the Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Va., which was designated as her home port. The ship’s patch insignia in color, signal flag and radio call sign was issued by the U.S. Navy—BIG C, CORAL MARU, AGELESS WARRIOR—which was launched on 2 April 1946 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va.; it was sponsored and christened by Mrs. Thomas C. Kincaid, wife of RADM Thomas Kincaid, who had commanded a cruiser division under RADM Frank Jack Fletcher at Coral Sea, a Coral Sea hero.  While under construction, the unnamed (CV-42) was first named the Coral Sea, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the U.S. Navy on 10 October 1944; keel was laid down on 10 July 1944 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va.. It was originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42, then reclassified as a “Large Aircraft Carrier” (CVB-43) on 15 July 1943, while the contract to build her was awarded on 14 June 1943” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & 72).

A 45,000-ton Midway-class aircraft carrier, one of three Midway-class Large Fleet carriers built out of the six planned and was one of the last battle-class carriers under construction during World War II. While the contract to build her was awarded 14 June 1943, her keel was laid down on 10 July 1944 at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News,Va. (NN&SB Hull #440).

The contract to build Coral Sea was awarded 14 June 1943.

Originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42. Reclassified a “Large Aircraft Carrier” with hull classification symbol CVB-43 on 15 July 1943 and on 10 October 1944 renamed Coral Sea.

“While under construction, the unnamed (CV-42) was first named the Coral Sea (CVB-43), former CV-42 on 10 October 1944; keel was laid down on 10 July 1944 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va., originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42, and reclassified as a ‘Large Aircraft Carrier’ (CVB-43) on 15 July 1943, while the contract to build her was awarded on 14 June 1943” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).

Hull half-plated 18 May 1945; Hull completely Framed 14 September 1945; Hull completely plated 22 October 1945; Flight deck laid 7 March 1946; Island House erected 13 March 1946.

Sponsored and christened by Mrs. Thomas C. Kincaid, a wife of RADM Thomas Kincaid, who had commanded a cruiser division under RADM Frank Jack Fletcher at Coral Sea, a Coral Sea hero.

Dry docked 30 March 1947; Preliminary trial board 17 July 1947; Builders dock trial 6-7 August 1947; USN Trial Board 16-17 September 1947.

Ship’s patch insignia in color, signal flag and radio call sign issued by the U.S. Navy. BIG C, CORAL MARU, AGELESS WARRIOR.

Secretary of the Navy John L. Sullivan spoke at the commissioning ceremonies.

The largest warships afloat at the time, the Midway-class carriers were designed to carry an air group compliment of 133 aircraft.  CVB was a new designation for the Midway-class carrier’s, which were reclassified Large Fleet Carriers before they were commissioned.

“Following Post-Shakedown repairs and alterations in April 1948, USS Coral Sea (CVB-43) stood out of Hampton Roads on 10 May 1948 for a Naval Reserve training cruise” (Ref. 35).

Scheduled to receive 3-in./50 cal. AA battery, but they were not ready by commissioning, and she completed her first overseas deployment prior to their installation” (Ref. 35/43).

“Following voyage repairs at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, USS Coral Sea (CVB-43) conducted refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay, returning to Norfolk, Va. on 21 September 1948” (Ref. 34 and 43).

Coral Sea (CVB-43) commenced a five-month scheduled period of repairs and alterations, including modernization of Coral Sea’s bridge and island in late September or early October 1948.

“A five-month scheduled period of repairs and alterations, including modernization of Coral Sea bridge and island completed, at Norfolk Naval Ship Yard, Va. on 9 February 1949; commencing in late September or early October 1948” (Ref. 34 and 43).

On 27 June 1949, USS Coral Sea (CVB-43) became the flagship of RADM William L. Rees, Jr., ComCarDiv Two and over the ensuing weeks conducted CarQuals off Atlantic City, N.J. (Ref. 34).

“Following post-deployment voyage repairs from her third Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6 th Fleet, Coral Sea (CVB-43) operated in the Virginia Capes area, qualifying CVG-1 and preparing for her fourth Mediterranean deployment” (Ref. 43 and 72).

Reclassified Hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952.

Underwent overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard, Va. from 10 October 1951 to February 1952.

Coral Sea (CVB-43) became flagship for RADM Charles R. ‘Cat’ Brown, ComCarDiv Six on 19 April 1952, to commemorate her fifth overseas deployment” (Ref. (34, 35, 43 and 72).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) conducted overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard from 12 October 1952 to in early 1953” (Ref. 34).

“Returning to Norfolk, Va., on 21 October 1953, Coral Sea (CVA-43) carried out tests for the Bureau of Aeronautics and trained members of the Naval Reserve at Mayport, Florida, and Guantanamo Bay“ (Ref. 1-Coral Sea and 72).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) underwent short refit from September 1955 to February 1956” (Ref. 43).

“In between Mediterranean cruises, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) operated out of Norfolk, ranging from the Va. Capes to Mayport, Florida and into Cuban waters and the West Indies” (Ref. 43).

“On 15 April 1957, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) arrived Bremerton, Washington, with Captain Joseph Abraham Jaap, USNA, as Commanding Officer, ending her first Southern Atlantic, cruise around Cape Horn, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming through the Southern and Easter Pacific to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington for her first modernization, SCB 110A conversion ordered for all three Midway-class carriers, making port of calls at  Santos, Brazil; Valparaiso, Chile; and Balboa, Canal Zone, C.Z., completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6 th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Her 11th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947 (26 February to 15 April 1957)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 34 & 72).

“She was assigned to the First Fleet, and had a new homeport of Alameda, California” (Ref. 1275F).

Decommissioned on 24 April 1957 for her first modernization, SCB 110A conversion commenced on 16 April 1957 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, completed her first modernization, SCB 110A on 25 January 1960. The modernization included installation of three C-11-1 steam driven catapults, which were designed to accommodate the newer and heavier jet aircraft; angled deck, enclosed hurricane bow, Mk-7-Mod 2 arresting gear identical to that installed in the Forrestal-class carriers, relocation of the elevators and three new deck-edge elevators and new weapons elevators. In addition, electronics package was installed and hull blisters widened her beam to a matronly 120 feet to accommodate the increase in her displacement.  Her hull was widened eight feet and her overall displacement increased to 63,600 tons. The SCB-110A upgrade took 33 months to complete and she was the last of all three Midway Class Carriers to complete SCB 110A.

Recommissioned on 25 January 1960. During the three years that followed, the carrier underwent a complete conversion. Her flight deck was lengthened to span 973 feet and the addition of an angled flight deck expanded her width to 210 feet. Most of her five-inch mounts were removed to provide room for two side elevators. Three steam catapults were added to enable jet aircraft to be launched on a “runway” less than 300 feet.

Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed Bremerton Washington on 1 February 1960, for Sea Trials. She returned to Bremerton for evaluation and INSERVE Inspections” (Ref. 1275N).

“An open house aboard Coral Sea (CVA-43) was held on 15 February 1960, in appreciation for the high quality workmanship of shipyard employees. Over several thousand workers and their families attended” (Ref. 1275N).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) became a unit of Carrier Division Seven with Alameda, California as her homeport” (Ref. 1275N).

“On 1 April 1960, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) arrived her new home port, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, ending her transit from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington via Vancouver, B.C., with Captain James S. Gray Jr., a former XO of the ship, in command, making a port visit at Vancouver, B. C. from 18 to 22 March 1960, upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of her 1st SCB 110A conversion (11 March 1960 to 1 April 1960), decommissioned 24 April 1957; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Her first Cruise since her 1st SCB 110A conversion (11 March to 1 April 1960); making 11 deployments in foreign waters since her commission 1 October 1947 (11 March to 1 April 1960)” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).

 “Coral Sea (CVA-43) was assigned to 7th Fleet in the Pacific (CarDiv Seven) on 1 April 1960” (Ref. 43).

“Returning to Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Wa. on 7 July 1960, the Coral Sea commenced a scheduled six-week Post-Conversion Availability” (Ref. 43).

“Early July 1961, Coral Sea (CVA-43) steamed off the coast of southern California, she trapped a McDonnell F4H-l Phantom II, flown by LCDR Patrick L. Working of VF-121, for the Phantom’'s first PacFlt carrier operations” (Ref. 43).

“Following minor repairs and alterations at San Francisco Naval Shipyard, Hunter's Point, Coral Sea (CVA-43) visited San Diego, Ca. for naval aviation 50th anniversary on 18 August 1961, the largest ship of the time to enter that port. Coral Sea (CVA-43) operated off the coast of California upon her return from her first “WestPac” (Ref. 43).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) became one of six Pacific Fleet carriers to reach 100,000 landing milestone, when Lt. Fred M. Backman and ADJ2 C.L. Moore, in a Douglas A3D-2 Skyraider, caught her number two wire on 23 October 1961” (Ref. 34 and 43).

Captain Maurice Franklin ("Mickey") Weisner assumed command of Coral Sea (CVA-43), on 1 November 1961, relieving Captain John Joseph Lynch, 14th Commanding Officer, serving from 5 December 1960 to 1 November 1961” (Ref. 34 & 35A).

“Installation of the Pilot Landing Aid Television (PLAT) system was completed on Coral Sea (CVA-43) on 14 December 1961, becoming the first carrier to have this system installed for operations use. Designed to provide a videotape of every landing, the system proved useful for instructional purposes and in the analysis of landing accidents, thereby making it an invaluable tool in the promotion of safety” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea and 72).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) was the first attack carrier to operate in Bering Sea” (Ref. 34).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) completed overhaul period at Hunters Point Naval Ship Yard San Francisco, Ca. from 8 September 1962 to 21 December 1962” (Ref. 34 & 1275U7).

“By 1963, all attack carriers had been equipped with PLAT and plans were underway for installation in the CVSs and at shore stations” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea and 72).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) was in port Alameda pier on 13 February 1963” (Ref. 34).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) operated locally off Ca. upon conclusion of her major overhaul at Hunters Point, San Francisco, Calif. on 30 April 1966, commencing on 22 November 1965. Excessive vibration during the sea trials, however revealed that the number three low pressure turbine was out of balance since the turbine could not be repaired in-place, it was replaced by one removed from sister ship Midway-then out of commission and undergoing a conversion similar to Coral Sea's six years before This measure enabled CVA-43 to meet her scheduled commitments Underway training off San Diego followed” (Ref. 43).

“Two months of restricted availability followed the Coral Sea (CVA-43) at Hunters Point Naval Ship Yard, San Francisco, Calif. beginning after 23 February 1967” (Ref. 34 and 43).

“During subsequent CarQuals and refresher training, Coral Sea (CVA-43) operated Grumman A-6A Intruders for the first time and landed a Vought A-7A Corsair II in June 1967 for the first time, marking the first fleet CarQuals for that aircraft” (Ref. 43).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) was adopted by the city of San Francisco. Two ceremonies consummated the adoption. On 19 July 1967, Coral Sea was inducted into the Great Golden Fleet of San Francisco and on 24 & 29 July 1967, Mayor Shelly officiated at the formal adoption ceremony in the City Hall in a colorful ceremony in the Rotunda of City Hall on the 24th.  The city extended her hospitality by making Coral Sea the first U.S. Navy carrier to serve as an official representative of a city without carrying the city’s name. Among the items presented to the ship were the battle flag of the heavy cruiser USS San Francisco (CA-38) and pieces of presentation silver given to the first San Francisco (also a cruiser) in 1889” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 43, 1275U17, 1275U18 & 1275U19).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) operated locally off the California coast through the 1968 summer; she conducted carrier suitability trials for the F-III B from 23 to 24 July 1968 - the latter proving to be a large, unwieldy aircraft for the size of the ship in which it was embarked. Subsequent CarQuals and weapons training evolutions followed, marking the first time that an A-6A squadron had operated from a Midway-class carrier, as VA-52 reported to CVW-15. The ship was awarded the Battle Efficiency "E" (Ref. 43).

 “Following a brief stop at NAS Alameda, Ca. on 2 July 1970, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) headed for Hunter’s Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, Ca., where the ship underwent a $44-million extensive overall. Among the work performed: improved habitability, the installation of a Navy Tactical Data System, elevator improvements, and other repairs” (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure & 43).

“San Francisco Mayor Joseph Alioto presented token helm at Alameda, Ca. on board Coral Sea in August 1970. Coral Sea new CO: Captain Wesley L. McDonald arrived at Hunters Point Naval Ship Yard on 16 October 1970” (Ref. 34).

“After returning to the Bay area upon completion of an overall at Hunter’s Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, Calif. on 1 June 1971, Coral Sea set yet another record for Alameda carriers when the crew donated more than 500 units of blood in a local drive. Work included a number of improvements in habitability, a new NTDS (Navy Tactical Data System) computer package, elevator improvements and many other innovations and repair” (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure).

Coral Sea conducted a succession of operations including sea trials and refresher training (RefTra) through mid-July. A fire on board on 15 July 1971 damaged cables leading to and from the main communications spaces, and extensively damaged the pipe shop. Coral Sea new CO: Captain William H. Harris arrived at Alameda Naval Air Station pier on 7 September 1971” (Ref. 34).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) conducted a succession of operations including sea trials and refresher training (RefTra) through mid-July. A fire on board on 15 July 1971 damaged cables leading to and from the main communications spaces, and extensively damaged the pipe shop” (Ref. 43).

“At the completion of the Coral Sea (CVA-43) overhaul at Hunter's Point, San Francisco, Calif. commencing shortly after arrival from her last combat tour of duty on 17 July 1972 to late October 1972” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 & 72).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) conducted ReTra and air wing operations following overhaul” (Ref. 34).

 “Coral Sea (CVA-43) became part of the Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployment with CVG-15 embarked (tail code NL) on 29 April to 9 May 1961 during her first “WestPac” (19 September 1960 to 27 May 1961). During her 2nd “WestPac” (12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962) Coral Sea with CVG-15 embarked (tail code NL) once again became part of the VEF deployment 12 to 27 January 1962. Line Days, Line Periods and whether there were Planes lost is unknown by the author of this publication for first and second VEF deployments” (Ref. 34).

“During the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam conflict (starting in 1961 and ending on 28 January 1973) the Navy lost 726 fixed-wing aircraft and 13 helicopters to hostile action. The Marine Corps lost 193 fixed-wing aircraft and 270 helicopters to enemy action during the same period” (Ref. 1-Ranger & Enterprise).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) was credited with 10,000 sorties and 10,500 take-offs and landings from 7 December 1964 to 1 November 1965. Coral Sea’s 10,000th sortie was flown by LT. William J. Kish in a VA-155 A-4E Skyhawk during her 4th “WestPac” (7 December 1964 to 1 November 1965). Coral Sea was awarded the first of three Admiral Flatley Memorial Awards for aviation safety during the Vietnam period during her 4th “WestPac,” part of which (February through June) covered the ship's operations on Yankee Station” (Ref. 34 & 43).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) was credited with 875 combat line days during combat operations which topped all other carriers for combat operations off the coast of Vietnam in support of allied forces in South Vietnam in the South China Sea during the Vietnam conflict/war (12 July 1964 to 17 July 1972)” (Ref. 34 & 43).

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Vietnam Combat Cruises were from 7 December 1964 to 1 November 1965; 29 July 1966 to 23 February 1967; 26 July 1967 to 6 April 1968; 7 September 1968 to 18 April 1969; 23 September 1969 to 1 July 1970; 12 November 1971 to 17 July 1972” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & 72).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) was the first carrier to deploy after the negotiation of the Vietnam Cease Fire agreement of 27 January-nearly a month later than scheduled” (Ref. 43).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVW-15 (tail code NL) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 9 March 1973, with Captain Paul A. Peck, as Commanding Officer, on her tenth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, her ninth South China Sea deployment, on her first Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruise (Operation Homecoming) and the first carrier to deploy after the negotiation of the Vietnam Cease Fire agreement of 27 January-nearly a month later than scheduled.

 “On 12 to 14 May 1975, Coral Sea (CVA-43) participated with other United States Navy, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps forces in the Mayaguez incident, the recovery of the U.S. merchant ship SS Mayaguez and her 39 crew, illegally seized on 12 May in international waters by a Cambodian gunboat controlled by the Communist Khmer Rouge” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & 72).

Coral Sea (CV-43) provided both medical and air support for U. S. Marines on Koh Tang Island.  Protective air strikes were flown from Coral Sea against the Cambodian mainland naval and air installations as Air Force helicopters with 288 Marines from Battalion Landing Teams 2 and 9 were launched from Utapao, Thailand, and landed at Koh Tang Island to rescue the Mayaguez crew and secure the ship. Eighteen Marines, Airman, and Navy corpsmen were lost in the action” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 72 & 1275W3).

Steaming to the Gulf of Thailand, Coral Sea (CVA-43) flew 63 combat sorties on the 15 May 1975 against Koh Tang Island and the Cambodian mainland, in support of Mayaguez's recovery. Wounded Marines were flown to the carrier for medical attention and transfer to Subic Bay; the ship remained in the Gulf of Thailand through 18 May 1975, at which time she began a two-day transit to Subic Bay” (Ref. 43 & 72).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) became the first American carrier since USS Saratoga (CV-3) to visit Perth, Australia from 30 May to 6 June 1975” (Ref. 4, 43 & 405).

Departed Perth, Australia and sailed for Alameda, Calif. by way of Subic, Philippines, being reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975 (hull identification symbol) “Multiple Purpose Aircraft Carrier.”

In another first, Coral Sea (CVA-43) received her third consecutive “Golden Anchor” Award for excellence in counseling and retention during 1973, 1974 and 1975, in the Pacific Fleet” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea).

Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. on 26 April 1976 to rejoin the Pacific Fleet, completing one of the most extensive carrier overhauls ever undertaken (14 months), enabling her to carry the Navy's newest air supremacy fighter, the F-14A Tomcat, and the S-3A Viking, a submarine hunter; reclassifying to CV-43 on 1 July 1975; departing San Diego, Calif. for the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, to undergo one of the most extensive carrier overhauls ever undertaken 31 January 1975.

During the Bicentennial Fourth of July weekend, Coral Sea (CV-43) hosted more than 275,000 people for the open house festivities at the San Francisco pier from the 3, 4 and 5 July 1976.  During that weekend, the Pipes and Drums of the Coral Sea, the only official bagpipe band in the U. S. Navy, performed to cheering crowds” (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure & 1275W4).

Coral Sea (CV-43) arrival from her 12th “Westpac” deployment brought to a close a 17-year association with CVW-15 on 5 October 1977. During that cruise- the only one she would make with F-4J Phantoms embarked. VMAQ-2 EA-6A "electric" Intruders also made a one-time-only appearance for this cruise” (Ref. 43).

“The Coral Sea (CV-43) completed $80,000,000 11 month overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Washington and sailed for Alameda, Ca. 8 February 1979, arriving the next day; underwent overhaul on 6 March 1978, during which the last of her 5-inch battery and all gun directors were removed” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).

Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-15 embarked, conducted an intensive workup cycle, Refresher Training and CarQuals, to include many visits at North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, Ca. commencing February 1979” (Ref. 43).

The Coral Sea (CV-43) conducted Availability period from 14 July to 10 October 1980, conducting a $30 million modernization repair period to restore the ship to first-rate operating condition in all systems, and increase her value as a deployable carrier asset for years to come. During Coral Sea’s modernization repair period Typing 250 enlisted evaluations quarterly for the Operations Department Personnel was a challenge. When the Navy changed the reporting period, extending an evaluation period from 3-months to 6-months or 8-months in some cases (July 1, 1980 to February 28, 1981), Yeomen throughout the Navy were pleased. Unfortunately, the Navy changed the reporting period after all the enlisted evaluations were completed. It was a bad decision and hundreds of hours of work were lost in vain by everyone involved in the canceled reporting period. Coral Sea departed Alameda for sea trials following availability period” (Ref. 34, 35, 43, 72 & 84A).

 

During Coral Sea’s modernization repair period, crew members that lived on base or off were able to go home every day after four to five o’clock, although everyone stood duty on the ship at least once a week, remaining onboard over night. The SRA for a Yeoman was all about typing and delivering messages to Communications many times a day. Other crewmen repaired or conducted maintenance of equipments and or spaces. YN3 Henions work load was about the same as when the ship was deployed, but sleepless nights were no longer suffered out at sea, but Sea Trials, followed by Independent Steaming Exercises, with the ship preparing for Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE), Refresher Training and CQ’s would keep everyone busy and away from home weeks at a time.

Hollywood used Coral Sea (CV-43) as a movie "prop" in filming of portions of the motion picture "The Right Stuff in July 1982, about early astronauts articles and Coral Sea and CVW-14 were written about in magazines like HOOK Summer (82 - 31 October 1981) and “CVW-14/CV-43 RETURNS FROM WESTPAC” and San Francisco, California" (Ref. 34).

The Coral Sea (CV-43) conducted a 15-month complex overhaul involving repairs and alterations to the ship at Norfolk, Va. Navy Yard from 17 October 1983 to 18 January 1985. Included in the package were all of the equipment required to operate F/A-18s -two large Mk 7 jet blast deflectors, flush deck nose gear launch, catapult mods, rotary launch valves and avionics support equipment. The latest electronics SPS-48 and SPS-49, air search radars were also fitted to enable her to operate to the end of the decade ($186 mil). (Combat systems and catapult specifications at date (WI-185) were completed 18 January 1985).

The Coral Sea (CV-43) conducted a drydocking for hull repairs commencing upon return to Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Va. on 12 April 1985 ($11 million collision), concluding a training voyage in the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba AOR, pulling for repairs at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba after colliding with the Ecuadorean tanker NAPO during air operations 45 miles southeast of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba on 12 April 1985. A 30-foot hole in the carrier's bow is punched in and some radar and communications equipment is damaged. The NAPO is holed above the waterline and spills 7,600 barrels of oil before reaching Guantanamo for repairs. Eleven aircraft airborne at the time of the accident are diverted to Guantanamo Bay” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 43, 72 & 85A).

 

“A formal investigation later blames the Commanding Officer of the CORAL SEA for the incident, saying he "used poor judgment in electing to be absent from the bridge during the entire launch and recovery cycle...with a Soviet vessel within 1,500 yards and with other vessels well within" the closest point of approach limits the captain had established” (Ref. 84A).

Coral Sea entered Norfolk Naval Shipyard in June 1986 for an extensive Ship’s Restricted Availability which ended several months later” (Ref. 1275Z13).

Coral Sea (CV-43) conducted training operations off the Virginia Capes & Cherry Point, while visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia during 1986” (Ref. 34).

“As Coral Sea (CV-43) turned 40 on 1 October 1987 she spent her birthday in the fashion for which she was built – at sea, her engines humming, her flight deck busy with the launch and recovery of aircraft as she steamed across the ocean toward the Mediterranean Sea” (Ref. 1275ZA10).

 “In April 1988, Coral Sea (CV-43) conducted a brief yard period and then made an excursion north to Halifax, Nova Scotia occupied the spring and early summer. Coral Sea continued her award winning diplomatic endeavors with a Sunset Parade, open house, Hangar bay dance and hundreds of individual tours for thousands of Nova Scotians. A “Fourth of July performance of the Nova Scotia Music Tatoo at the Scotian Center was dedicated to the ship with over 300 crew members receiving complimentary tickets” (Ref. 1275ZA12).

 

Following the visit to Halifax by May 1988, Coral Sea (CV-43) put to sea and passed her first Operational Propulsion Plant Exam in five years” (Ref. 1275ZA13).

 

Coral Sea (CV-43) conducted a short Restricted Availability following her five year Operational Propulsion Plant Exam (Ref. 1275ZA14).

 

Upon conclusion of Restricted Availability, Coral Sea (CV-43) departed Norfolk, Virginia for carried out local operations that included Sea Trials, Carrier Qualifications and Work-ups in the VaCapes and Cherry Point operating areas which took up the rest of 1988 (Ref. 43 & 1275ZA15).

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was cited for dumping medical wastes off North Carolina coast in July 1988” (Ref. 34).

“The Coral Sea (CV-43) traveled 2+ million nautical miles and her air wings made 375,000 landings with 70,000 crewmembers from her beginning to 26 April 1990 when she was decommissioned at Norfolk, Va. Navy Ship Yard, Pier 12” (Ref. 34).

“One more link with the World War II Navy passes from the scene. Even before her commissioning pennant is hauled down comes a movement to reassign her name to a future aircraft carrier, so that it can continue to provide inspiration to the men who take the ship to sea. No doubt such an assignment would prove not only appropriate but also popular. Looking back over Coral Sea's proud history, one must echo RADM Ferris' comments in the summer of 1972. While meant to pertain to the recent deployment on Yankee Station that she had just completed, it could also be applied to sum up her career as well. Coral Sea . . . "more than just a ship” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).

Stricken from the Naval Vessel Register (Navy List) and two days later was sold by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping on 7 May 1993

“A fictitious USS Coral Sea (CV-43) appears in the television show JAG; her part is played by USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74)” (Ref. 72).

“An article of USS Coral Sea (CV-43) by Clayton, P. & Cressman, R.  MORE THAN A SHIP, was printed in HOOK Sp 90 in April 1990” (Ref. 34).

 “The Coral Sea (CV-43) was towed from Norfolk Naval Ship Yard to Philadelphia for parts salvage 1 November 1990” (Ref. 34).

“The Coral Sea (CV-43) was nicknamed "The Ageless Warrior” and an article appeared in the Naval Review commemorating the Ship June 1991” (Ref. 43).

“The Coral Sea Association presented the “CORAL SEA HISTORY BOOK, Turner Publication Co. 31 May 1992; nicknamed "The Ageless Warrior” and an article appeared in the Naval Review commemorating the Ship June 1991; towed from Norfolk Naval Ship Yard to Philadelphia for parts salvage 1 November 1990; traveled 2+ million nautical miles and her air wings made 375,000 landings with 70,000 crewmembers from her beginning to 26 April 1990 when she was decommissioned at Norfolk, Va. Navy Ship Yard, Pier 12” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 & 72).

*Sale Bid # 31-3359 dated 4 March 1993, appraised $300K

Sold by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrapping on 7 May 1993.

Arrived at Baltimore for scrapping on 6 July 1993 by Seawitch Marine Salavage Fairfield Tm., Baltimore, Md.  Museum plan failed

Nicknames of the USS Coral Sea:  Ageless Warrior; Coral Maru; San Francisco's Own; The Natural; The Big Sea or The Big 'C'; The Operational Queen of the Seventh Fleet; Best In The West.

“As much as successful missions and great safety records are part of the ships history, so too are its mishaps. When two shipmates get together to remember the old times it usually isn't long before the conversation turns to the mishaps that happened on the cruise. Some of these stories are tragic, some are heroic, some are humorous and some are just amazing” (Ref. 35).

http://www.usscoralsea.net/pages/mishaps.htm

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42

AWARDS AND CITATION DATES (19/01/48 - 30/09/89)

CHAPTER XLIII

 

Unit Awards, Campaign and Service Medals and Ribbons

AWARDS AND CITATION DATES (19/01/48 - 30/09/89)

      AWARD OR

       CITATION

 AIR WING

    (TAIL

   CODE)

AWARD  DATES

6thor 7th

FLEET

TOURS OF DUTY

ATLANTIC/MED /CARRB & PACIFIC /SOUTH CHINA & YELLOW SEA / INDIAN OCEAN (FAR EAST)

Navy Occupation

 Service Medal for

 Operations in

 European waters

CVG-2 - M

CVG-1 - T

CVG-8 - E

CVG-10-P

CVG-17-R

19 Sep 1949

6 April &

4 Sep 1951

14 Oct 1953

11 Dec 1954

21 Sep 1955

       6th

 2nd, 4th, 6th, 7th

 & 8th Med Cruises

 Battle Efficiency

 Award 6th Fleet in

 the Atlantic - FY

 1952/54/55

CVG-4 - F

CVG-10-P

CVG-17-R

30 Sep 1952

30 Sep 1954

30 Sep 1955

       6th

 5th, 7th  & 8th  Med Cruises

 Battle Efficiency

 Award

CVW-15- NL

22 Aug 1967 –

30 September 1968

        7th

 6th & 7th  “WestPac”

 CINCPACFLT

 Golden

 Anchor Award

CVW-15- NL

1973

1974

        7th

 10th & 11th “WestPac”

 Communications

 Excellence

CVW-15- NL

1968

        7th

 7th “WestPac”

 Engineering

 Excellence

CVG-15- NL

1961

        7th

 1st  “WestPac”

 Engineering

 Excellence

CVW-15- NL

1968

1982

        7th

 7th  & 14th “WestPac”

 Excellent Deck

 Efficiency Admiral

 Flatley –

 Aviation

 Safety

CVW-15- NL

1965

1970

1973

1977

        7th

 4th, 8th, 10th & 12th

 “WestPac”

 Exceptional

 Meritorious

 Service

CVW-15- NL

1967

        7th

 6th “WestPac”

 

 Bonneville

 International

 Corporation’s

 Thomas Jefferson

 Award

CVW-15- NL

Ship Public Affairs Staff

 Professional

 Excellence in

 Armed Forces

 Communications

 Media

        7th

 9th “WestPac”

 Marjorie Sterrett

 Battleship Award

CVW-15- NL

1968

        7th

 7th “WestPac”

 Meritorious Unit

 Commendation –

 

 Mayaguez

 operations*O

 

 Iran Hostage

 support*D

CVW-15- NL

27 October 1969 - 1 June 1970

22 to 30 April 1975 /

15 May 1975*O

7 March 1978 –

1 May 1980

        7th

 8th & 11th (*O) & 13th

 (*D) “WestPac”

 

 Meritorious Unit

 Commendation

CVW-14- NK

March 1988 –

30 Sep 1989

        6th

 13th MED Cruise

 Navy Unit

 Commendation

CVW-15- NL

7 February to 18 October 1965

13 August 1967 - 19 Feb 1968

18 April 1969

        7th

 4th, 6th, 7th, 8th & 9th

 “WestPac”

 Navy Unit

 Commendation

CVW-2 - NE

12 August 1966 - 23 Feb 1967

23 Sep 1969-1 July 1970

14 Dec 1971

        7th

 5th “WestPac”

Navy Unit

 Commendation –

 Gulf of Sidra

 operations &

 Libya raids

CVW-13-AK

2 Oct 1985-

19 May 1986

23 March –

17 April 1986*F

        6th

 11th MED Cruise

National Defense

 Service Medal

CVG-15- NL

25 -28 & 30 April -   1 May 1961

        7th

 1st  & 2nd “WestPac”

National Defense

 Service Medal or

 

 Korea

 Expeditionary

 Service Medal*J

 

 Mayaguez

 Operation*O

CVW-15- NL

12-19 & 24-27        Jan 1962

2 Feb - 5 March, 16 March – 17 April,

2 – 28 May,

23 June - 3 July 1965

23 Jan - 22-March 1968 * J

10 - 11 Dec 1969

29 to 30 April 1975* N /

 15 May 1975* O

        7th

 4th, 6th  (* J), 7th, 8th  &

 11th (*O) “WestPac”

 Vietnam Armed

 Forces

 Expeditionary

 Service Medal

CVW-15- NL

25 Jan - 4 July 1965

        7th

 4th “WestPac”

Vietnam Service

 Medal for Combat

 Operations

CVW-2 - NE

12 September –

19 October 1966,
30 October 1966,

1 November –

4- December 1966

        7th

 5th “WestPac”

 

 Republic of

 Vietnam

 Gallantry Cross

 Unit Citation

CVW-2 - NE

20 - 21 November & 29 December 1966

        7th

 5th “WestPac”

 Ship of the Year

 Ship of the Year

CVW-15- NL

1965

        7th

 4th “WestPac”

CINCPACFLT

 Golden Anchor

 Award - For

 Excellence in

 Counseling and

 Retention

CVW-15- NL

1973

1974

        7th

 10th  & 11th “WestPac”

Vietnam Service

 Medal for Combat

 Operations

CVW-15- NL

4 - 24 July, 11 August - 11

Sep, 21 Sep - 15 Oct 1965

26 Dec 1966 - 1 Feb 1967,
26 August –

1 Oct 1967,
12–28 Oct 1967,
4--5 Nov  1967
11 Nov  – 8 December 1967

16 - 11 October –

 3 November,

14 November - 8 December 1968 –

4 April on the 18th April 1969

 

        7th

 4th, 6th 7th, 8th, 9th & 10th

 “WestPac”

Vietnam Service

 Medal for Combat

 Operations

CVW-15- NL

17 Feb - 9 March,

19 March-11 April & 28 April-1 June 1970

31 Dec 1971 - 17 Jan 1972,

 26 Jan - 17 Feb,

1 April - 11 May,

1 - 11 June &

21 June-2 July 1972

8 November 1973

        7th

 4th, 6th 7th, 8th, 9th & 10th

 “WestPac”

Republic of

 Vietnam

 Gallantry Cross

 Unit Citation

CVW-15- NL

12 October 1965

23 Nov & 2, 4, 20 & 22 Dec 1967,

20, 23 & 29 Jan 1968

15, 17 - 18, 21, 25 - 27 October,

14 - 16, 23, 25 & 28 November,

1- 2, 4 - 5 & 30 December 1968

1 - 3, 5, 7 - 10, 14 - 19, 22, 24 & 26 Jan, 9 - 20 Feb, 22 Feb –

3 March, 19 - 31 March,

23 Sep - 1 July 1972

        7th

 4th, 6th, 7th, 8th & 9th

 “WestPac”

Humanitarian

 Service Medal –

 Operation

 Frequent*N

CVW-15- NL

29-30 April 1975 N

        7th

 11th “WestPac”

 Navy

 Expeditionary

 Service Medal -

 Iran Hostage

 support*D

CVW-14- NK

5 Feb to 5 May 1980*D

 

        7th

 13th (*D) “WestPac”

 

 Navy

 Expeditionary

 Service Medal –

 Gulf of Sidra ops

 & Libya raids*F

CVW-13-AK CVW-14- NK

20 Jan to 5 May 1986*F

1 August 1989

        6th

 11th & 13th MED Cruises

Navy Occupation

 Service Medal for

 Operations in

 European waters

CVG-2 - M

CVG-1 - T

CVG-8 - E

CVG-10-P

CVG-17-R

19 Sep 1949

6 April &

4 Sep 1951

14 Oct 1953

11 Dec 1954

21 Sep 1955

6th

 2nd, 4th, 6th, 7th

 & 8th Med Cruises

 Battle Efficiency

 Award 6th Fleet in

 the Atlantic - FY

 1952/54/55

CVG-4 - F

CVG-10-P

CVG-17-R

30 Sep 1952

30 Sep 1954

30 Sep 1955

6th

 5th, 7th  & 8th  Med Cruises

 Battle Efficiency

 Award

CVW-15- NL

22 Aug 1967 –

30 September 1968

7th

 6th & 7th  “WestPac”

 CINCPACFLT

 Golden

 Anchor Award

CVW-15- NL

1973

1974

7th

 10th & 11th “WestPac”

Communications

 Excellence

CVW-15- NL

1968

7th

 7th “WestPac”

 Engineering

 Excellence

CVG-15- NL

1961

7th

 1st  “WestPac”

 Engineering

 Excellence

CVW-15- NL

1968

1982

7th

 7th  & 14th “WestPac”

 Excellent Deck

 Efficiency Admiral

 Flatley –

 Aviation

 Safety

CVW-15- NL

1965

1970

1973

1977

7th

 4th, 8th, 10th & 12th

 “WestPac”

Exceptional

 Meritorious

 Service

CVW-15- NL

1967

7th

 6th “WestPac”

 

 Bonneville

 International

 Corporation’s

 Thomas Jefferson

 Award

CVW-15- NL

Ship Public Affairs Staff

 Professional

 Excellence in

 Armed Forces

 Communications

 Media

7th

 9th “WestPac”

 Marjorie Sterrett

 Battleship Award

CVW-15- NL

1968

7th

 7th “WestPac”

 Meritorious Unit

 Commendation –

 

 Mayaguez

 operations*O

 

 Iran Hostage

 support*D

CVW-15- NL

27 October 1969 - 1 June 1970

22 to 30 April 1975 /

15 May 1975*O

7 March 1978 –

1 May 1980

7th

 8th & 11th (*O) & 13th

 (*D) “WestPac”

 

 Meritorious Unit

 Commendation

CVW-14- NK

March 1988 –

30 Sep 1989

6th

 13th MED Cruise

 Navy Unit

 Commendation

CVW-15- NL

7 February to 18 October 1965

13 August 1967 - 19 Feb 1968

18 April 1969

7th

 4th, 6th, 7th, 8th & 9th

 “WestPac”

 Navy Unit

 Commendation

CVW-2 - NE

12 August 1966 - 23 Feb 1967

23 Sep 1969-1 July 1970

14 Dec 1971

7th

 5th “WestPac”

Navy Unit

 Commendation –

 Gulf of Sidra

 operations &

 Libya raids

CVW-13-AK

2 Oct 1985-

19 May 1986

23 March –

17 April 1986*F

6th

 11th MED Cruise

National Defense

 Service Medal

CVG-15- NL

25 -28 & 30 April -   1 May 1961

7th

 1st  & 2nd “WestPac”

National Defense

 Service Medal or

 

 Korea

 Expeditionary

 Service Medal*J

 

 Mayaguez

 Operation*O

CVW-15- NL

12-19 & 24-27        Jan 1962

2 Feb - 5 March, 16 March – 17 April,

2 – 28 May,

23 June - 3 July 1965

23 Jan - 22-March 1968 * J

10 - 11 Dec 1969

29 to 30 April 1975* N /

 15 May 1975* O

7th

 4th, 6th  (* J), 7th, 8th  &

 11th (*O) “WestPac”

 Vietnam Armed

 Forces

 Expeditionary

 Service Medal

CVW-15- NL

25 Jan - 4 July 1965

7th

 4th “WestPac”

Vietnam Service

 Medal for Combat

 Operations

CVW-2 - NE

12 September –

19 October 1966,
30 October 1966,

1 November –

4- December 1966

7th

 5th “WestPac”

 

 Republic of

 Vietnam

 Gallantry Cross

 Unit Citation

CVW-2 - NE

20 - 21 November & 29 December 1966

7th

 5th “WestPac”

 Ship of the Year

 Ship of the Year

CVW-15- NL

1965

7th

 4th “WestPac”

CINCPACFLT

 Golden Anchor

 Award - For

 Excellence in

 Counseling and

 Retention

CVW-15- NL

1973

1974

7th

 10th  & 11th “WestPac”

Vietnam Service

 Medal for Combat

 Operations

CVW-15- NL

4 - 24 July, 11 August - 11

Sep, 21 Sep - 15 Oct 1965

26 Dec 1966 - 1 Feb 1967,
26 August –

1 Oct 1967,
12–28 Oct 1967,
4--5 Nov  1967
11 Nov  – 8 December 1967

16 - 11 October –

 3 November,

14 November - 8 December 1968 –

4 April on the 18th April 1969

17 Feb - 9 March,

19 March-11 April & 28 April-1 June 1970

31 Dec 1971 - 17 Jan 1972,

 26 Jan - 17 Feb,

1 April - 11 May,

1 - 11 June &

21 June-2 July 1972

8 November 1973

7th

 4th, 6th 7th, 8th, 9th & 10th

 “WestPac”

CINCPACFLT

 Golden Anchor

 Award - For

 Excellence in

 Counseling and

 Retention

CVW-15- NL

1973

1974

7th

 10th  & 11th “WestPac”

Republic of

 Vietnam

 Gallantry Cross

 Unit Citation

CVW-15- NL

12 October 1965

23 Nov & 2, 4, 20 & 22 Dec 1967,

20, 23 & 29 Jan 1968

15, 17 - 18, 21, 25 - 27 October,

14 - 16, 23, 25 & 28 November,

1- 2, 4 - 5 & 30 December 1968

1 - 3, 5, 7 - 10, 14 - 19, 22, 24 & 26 Jan, 9 - 20 Feb, 22 Feb –

3 March, 19 - 31 March,

23 Sep - 1 July 1972

7th

 4th, 6th, 7th, 8th & 9th

 “WestPac”

Humanitarian

 Service Medal –

 Operation

 Frequent*N

CVW-15- NL

29-30 April 1975 N

7th

 11th “WestPac”

Navy

 Expeditionary

 Service Medal -

 Iran Hostage

 support*D

CVW-14- NK

5 Feb to 5 May 1980*D

 

7th

 13th (*D) “WestPac”

 

 Navy

 Expeditionary

 Service Medal –

 Gulf of Sidra ops

 & Libya raids*F

CVW-13-AK CVW-14- NK

20 Jan to 5 May 1986*F

1 August 1989

6th

 11th & 13th MED Cruises

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XLI

(13 April 1990 to 9 August 2000)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4