1990 & 1991 EAST AND WEST COAST DEPLOYMENTS

CV and CVN Activities after CV-43 Decommissioned

Operation Desert Shield (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait commencing 2 August 1990) and

Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991).

(27 April 1990 to 26 April 1992)

Part 1 – (27 April to 1 August 1990)

Part 2 – (2 August to 11 October 1990)

Part 3 – (12 October to 31 December 1990)

Part 4 – (1 January to 26 March 1991)

Part 5 – (27 March to 16 June 1991)

Part 6 – (17 June 1991 to 27 April 1992)

 

 

     “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) shifted berths from Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia, conducting a "Dead Stick Move" over to Pier 2, Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, for her third Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and the Navy's largest complex overhaul ever attempted, 18 days ahead of schedule to avoid Hurricane Lili, on 12 October 1990. The move to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company was accomplished without benefit of days of pre-move planning meetings. An emergency deadstick move to Newport News Shipyard due to hurricane warnings was met with great success as was the norm for M-Division. The Engineering Department’s E Division provided emergency electrical power for ship movement from Norfolk to Newport News Shipyard during hurricane Lili. The majority of machinery was placed in the category of inactive equipment maintenance for the complex overhaul. Review and update continued on overhaul packages. Man-up of ships Overhaul Department neared completion drawing down Air Department to 250 people, or about 40 percent of operational strength. Many challenges arose as personal protective equipment and security passes had to be quickly issued to all hands, and three weeks worth of work planned for Norfolk had to be replanned for the shipyard. Work proceeded pretty much on schedule, however; Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) was completed, the Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) became operational. Large-scale manpower shifts were made in order to begin the job of rebuilding and refueling "Big E." Bachelors and geographical bachelors moved into over 450 apartments, provided rent-free by the government. Approximately 90 buses and vans began rolling, as the new Transportation Department began shuttling the crew between parking lots, .the ship, and home. New off-ship facilities opened, including a PSD at 32nd Street, DD Jones warehouse in Chesapeake, the Integrated Logistics Overhaul facility in Portsmouth, the Ship's Force Overhaul Management System facility in Newport News, and the Fleet Aviation Logistic Support Center at NAS Norfolk, Virginia. Deck Department transferred the majority of its veteran personnel to the new1y formed Overhaul Department” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted her initial refueling of another ship at sea as she rendezvoused with USS Doyle (FFG-39) for an underway replenishment on 13 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Refresher Training (REFTRA), primarily off the waters of NS Guantánamo Bay, Cuba from 4 to 14 October 1990. At one point during the cycle of exercises, she sailed in company with USS Doyle (FFG-39) and MSC-operated oiler Pawcatuck (T-AO-108) on 6 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1989).

 

     “USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) communication functions were secured and on 15 October 1990 the message center was established on the Ex-USNS GAFFEY during it's Complex Overhaul (COH) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. Equipment removal and tear out commenced in preparation for installation of new, upgraded equipment and systems” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) entered Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 15 October1990, where she hosted a reception for 400 guests in Hanger Bay No. 215” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “ADM Demar, Naval Reactors, visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 17 October 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “Anti-nuclear protestors, demonstrated against USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) presence in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 17 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 19 October 1990, embarking a contingent of Argentinean naval officers. During her in port period, she hosted a reception for 400 guests in Hanger Bay No. 215, visiting from 15 to 18 October 1990, anti-nuclear protestors, marred the visit with demonstrations (17 October)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced participation in Exercise "Gringo Gaucho 11" with Argentina on 21 October 1990, hosting Argentine distinguished visitors, Argentine Naval Officers and Landing Signal Officers” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

      “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted practice bombing missions to Punta Indio target complex 22, 23 and 24 October 1990. Stock Control assumes control of all Q-COSAL on 22 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “The presence of the Argentineans’ became vital during Gringo-Gaucho II, an exercise with their forces from 21 to 25 October 1990. USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) began the exercise by hosting a visit of distinguished Argentinean visitors, including naval officers and landing signal officers. Carrier Air Wing Eleven Aircraft flew bombing runs against targets at the Punta Indigo range (22, 23 and 24 October 1990). The Americans also benefited from the unique opportunity of flying low-level reconnaissance missions over southern Argentina. Meanwhile, Argentinean Dassault Super Étendards and Grumman S-2E Trackers practiced ‘touch-and-go’ landings on board Abraham Lincoln. Stock Control assumes control of all Q-COSAL on 22 October 1990. Argentine Super Entendard and S-2E tracker aircraft conducted touch-and-go landings on Oct 23 and 24 and conducted low-level navigation flights over southern Argentina in the vicinity of TRELEW” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) rounded Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn) from 26 to 27 October 1990, traditionally one of the most dangerous and difficult voyages across the globe and graveyard of many ships, due to the foul weather that mariners usually encounter there” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “On 27 October, John F. Kennedy held a turnover with USS Saratoga (CV-60) and headed back to the Suez Canal en route to the Mediterranean Sea on her second transit of the deployment” (Ref. 549).

 

     “Successfully rounding Cape Horn, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) plowed through chill South Atlantic seas toward Chilean waters, where she took part in Blue Sky III, an AAWEX vs Chilean Air Force exercise with the Chileans on 28 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “Chilean Northrop F-5E Tiger IIs reciprocated and flew a strike against USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), and several Chilean diesel-powered submarines stalked the carrier from 29 to 30 October 1990 conducting Low levels Southern Chile in the vicinity of Puerto Mont on 29 October 1990, while Argentine Naval Officers disembarked, onboard from 19 to 30 October 1990, hosting Chilean DVs on the 30th. During All PPDB’s and APPS software arrives in MSI and SAS program commences” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “Throughout October 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) conducted operations in the Red Sea while at general quarters.  Aircraft launched nearly every day and conducted training sorties over Saudi Arabia” (Ref. 549).

 

      “On 30 October 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) conducted a night transit to Gaeta, anchoring on 1 November” (Ref. 549).

 

      “While anchored in Gaeta, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) hosted the 6th Fleet change of command ceremony with Secretary of the Navy Lawrence Garrett, III, as the guest speaker. Immediately following the ceremony and reception, the carrier weighed anchor and steamed south” (Ref. 549).

 

      “After their arduous journey crewmembers of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Valparaíso, Chile on 31 October 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) enjoyed a visit to Valparaíso, Chile from 31 October to 4 November 1990, and then continued Blue Sky III, when the same day, tragedy interrupted, when aircraft accidentally bombed CVW-11 sailors near Viña del Mar, three of whom suffered superficial wounds on 4 November 1990. The Chileans helped the Americans as much as possible through the episode, though no one on either side claimed responsibility” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “The Coral Sea (CV-43) was towed from Norfolk Naval Ship Yard to Philadelphia for parts salvage 1 November 1990” (Ref. 34).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) hosted Chilean DVs on 5 November 1990” (Ref. 378B-1989).

 

 

Valparaiso, Chile, November 1990. Photo by Gerhard Mueller-Debus. NS027248.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027248.jpg

 

     “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) First, Second and Third Divisions of Deck Department and Side Cleaners were consolidated into one division in November 1990 and six Deck Department petty officers were sent TAD to USS Tarawa (LHA-1) for six months in support of Operation Desert Shield during the month. The Overhaul Department was established in November of 1990 as the central organization responsible for administration and coordination of the overhaul work package scheduled for accomplishment by the ship's force personnel. Its function also includes direct liaison with the Newport News Shipyard work force, Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Newport News, Norfolk Naval Shipyard and other IMA's and Naval Supervisory agencies. The Overhaul Department essentially grew out of the old Maintenance Department and is comprised of several subfunctions and divisions. Its organization is shown on the next page. The Overhaul Department responds to a wide variety of maintenance and rework tasks including the refurbishment of heads and berthing areas, ventilation systems, lagging and insulation, electronic equipment and computer overhaul. The Overhaul Department will inspect and rework as necessary all tanks and voids on the ship, reduce weight by removing unnecessary cables and other equipment, and monitor the entire ship for fire prevention. Facilities under its purview allow the Overhaul Department to rebuild pumps, valves and motors, as well as manufacture simple pm to support the ship's force work package. Other personnel in the overhaul organization support the ship in such ways as 3M, technical manual and ship's blueprint updating, quality assurance, scheduling, supply and administration” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “Most of the crew of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) onloaded Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF), a $20 million barge fitted with berthing, galleys, office space and medical facilities from 1 to 5 November 1990. The Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) required the crew to remove everything from the ship that was not essential for the yard period. This included removing items as large as the ships four 480,000 lb. catapults, and smaller items which eventually filled 4,000 pallets” (Ref. 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

    “RADM McGinley visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 7 November 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) held a cutting the ribbon ceremony, establishing Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) on 8 November 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced cyclic operations on 9 November 1990. Peruvian distinguished visitors embarked on board Abraham Lincoln as she conducted cyclic flight operations on 10 November 1990. During one of these flights, Abraham Lincoln recorded her 6,000th arrested landing, though an aircraft made a barricade landing at one point during these busy events” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1989).

 

    “June 1990 found VMA-231 deployed to WestPac” as a squadron for the first time since World War II. Training continued in Iwakuni and Okinawa, Japan, as well as the Philippine Islands and Korea. Exercises included multiple air defense exercises with the Japanese Air Defense Force; VALIANT BLITZ 90, conducted in Eastern Korea during November 1990” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) celebrated the one year anniversary of their ship's first birthday with a ‘steel beach’ [flight deck] picnic at sea on 11 November 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “CJTF 4 counter-narcotics tasking for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) again fulfilled counter-narcotics directions from Combined Joint Task Force 4, this time off the Galapagos Islands from 12 to 13 November 1990. In addition, aircraft flew low-level missions over Ecuadorian ranges (12 November)” (Ref. 378A).

 

     “SSO functions, SCI billets transferred to PACFLT from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) INCHOP C3F/EASTPAC COMMS AREA on 14 November 1990. Also Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) ESD bench was established” (Ref. 378B-1989).

 

    “During a reception at The Mariner’s Museum, Hampton, Va., sponsored by the local Chamber of Commerce, the mayors of Newport News and Hampton officially welcomed crewmembers to the Hampton Roads Peninsula area when the cities of Newport News and Hampton declared "USS Enterprise Day" in simultaneous proclamations on 14 November 1990. Also in November, Enterprise sent six deck department petty officers to the amphibious assault ship Tarawa (LHA-1) for six months in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “Due to the situation in the Persian Gulf, the cancellation of USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) scheduled call at Naples, and the requirement for her to be within 72 hours steaming time of the Red Sea, John F. Kennedy visited Gezelbache, Turkey instead from 7 to 14 November 1990” (Ref. 549).

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) accomplished counter-narcotics missions under the command of Combined Joint Task Force 5, while in the vicinity of Clipperton and Clarion Islands from 15 to 16 November 1990 and then steamed to Alameda California” (Ref. 378B-1989).

 

     “Captain Doyle J. Borchers II served as Commanding Officer, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70). Captain Robert G. Sprigg served as Executive Officer until 17 November 1990 when he was relieved by Captain Gregory C. Brown” (Ref. 375A & 376A/1990).

 

    “TRE DE-INSTALL/cross-decked from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to USS Tarawa (LHA-1) on 18 November 1990” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed to Alameda California from 17 to 18 November 1990” (Ref. 378A).

 

     “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) got underway from Gezelbache, Turkey for Antalya, Turkey. En route, a National Broadcasting Company (NBC) news team recorded interviews for “The Today Show.” The ship arrived at Antalya on 19 November 1990, just in time for Thanksgiving” (Ref. 549).

 

     “On 20 November 1990, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain William B. Hayden as the Commanding Officer, and began its holiday standdown period in their new home port, after sailing upward of 18,000 miles, disembarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base at Naval Air Station Lemoore, ending an inter fleet transfer from the Atlantic to the Pacific Fleet, on her first Southern Atlantic and Southern and Eastern Pacific deployment around Cape Horn, en route to its new home base, steaming through the Western & Southern Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, in  support of CVW-11 MISSILEX, CVW-11 Cyclic OPS in the Puerto Rican Operations Area and Blue Sky III in the Chilean waters, an exercise with the Chileans, around South America & Cape Horn, traveling through the Southern and Eastern Pacific to her new home port from Naval Station, Norfolk, Va., operating with the Pacific Fleet. Abraham Lincoln’s crew trained extensively throughout the cruise, and conducted many carrier qualifications. Sailors and marines also accomplished exercises with both U.S. and allied forces including the Argentineans, Brazilians, Chileans, Peruvians and Uruguayans. In September 1990, Abraham Lincoln departed Norfolk, Virginia, en route Alameda, California, and assignment to the Pacific Fleet. The embarked air wing was composed of aircraft from CVW-8, CVW-11 and CVWR-30 (approximately 60 total aircraft, making up CVW-11, transiting to Alameda, California with CVW-11 embarked, Carrier Qualifications off the Virginia capes (VACAPES) was  conducted. Governor of Illinois visited on the 25th and 26th. Guided missile frigate USS Doyle (FFG-39) accompanied Abraham Lincoln as part of her escort on its maiden voyage, riding it around South America en route to its new homeport in Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, while Carrier Air Wing Eleven embarked the Navy's newest carrier, making her homeport at Naval Air Station Lemoore. Abraham Lincoln conducted operations in the JAX OPAREA, transit PROA on 27 September 1990. Abraham Lincoln conducted a CVW-11 MISSILEX, CVW-11 Cyclic OPS in the Puerto Rican Operations Area from 28 to 30 September 1990. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at St. Thomas, Virgin Islands on 3 October 1990, onloading stores for the first time in a port outside of the continental U.S. from 1 to 3 October 1990. Lincoln then returned to sea to conduct two weeks of Refresher Training (REFTRA) in the Guantanamo Bay operating area with instructors’ room the U.S. Navy training facility. First parachute assembly packed fro 1 to 3 October. Abraham Lincoln responded to counter-narcotics orders from Combined Joint Task Force 4 in the Caribbean Sea from 4 to 6 October 1990. At one point during the cycle of exercises, she sailed in company with USS Doyle (FFG-39) and MSC-operated oiler Pawcatuck (T-AO-108) on 6 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln crossed the equator and conducted a "Shellback" initiation ceremony for the first time, and her historian proudly noted that “King Neptune” embarked on 9 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln conducted her initial refueling of another ship at sea as she rendezvoused with USS Doyle (FFG-39) for an underway replenishment on 13 October 1990. Lincoln conducted Refresher Training (REFTRA), primarily off the waters of NS Guantánamo Bay, Cuba from 4 to 14 October 1990. At one point during the cycle of exercises, she sailed in company with USS Doyle (FFG-39) and MSC-operated oiler Pawcatuck (T-AO-108) on 6 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln entered Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 15 October1990, where she hosted a reception for 400 guests in Hanger Bay No. 215. Anti-nuclear protestors, demonstrated against Abraham Lincoln presence in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 17 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln departed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 19 October 1990, embarking a contingent of Argentinean naval officers. During her in port period, she hosted a reception for 400 guests in Hanger Bay No. 215, visiting from 15 to 18 October 1990, anti-nuclear protestors, marred the visit with demonstrations (17 October). Abraham Lincoln commenced participation in Exercise "Gringo Gaucho 11" with Argentina on 21 October 1990, hosting Argentine distinguished visitors, Argentine Naval Officers and Landing Signal Officers. Abraham Lincoln conducted practice bombing missions to Punta Indio target complex 22, 23 and 24 October 1990. Stock Control assumes control of all Q-COSAL on 22 October 1990. The presence of the Argentineans’ became vital during Gringo-Gaucho II, an exercise with their forces from 21 to 25 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln began the exercise by hosting a visit of distinguished Argentinean visitors, including naval officers and landing signal officers. Carrier Air Wing Eleven Aircraft flew bombing runs against targets at the Punta Indigo range (22, 23 and 24 October 1990). The Americans also benefited from the unique opportunity of flying low-level reconnaissance missions over southern Argentina. Meanwhile, Argentinean Dassault Super Étendards and Grumman S-2E Trackers practiced ‘touch-and-go’ landings on board Abraham Lincoln. Stock Control assumes control of all Q-COSAL on 22 October 1990. Argentine Super Entendard and S-2E tracker aircraft conducted touch-and-go landings on Oct 23 and 24 and conducted low-level navigation flights over southern Argentina in the vicinity of TRELEW. Abraham Lincoln rounded Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn) from 26 to 27 October 1990, traditionally one of the most dangerous and difficult voyages across the globe and graveyard of many ships, due to the foul weather that mariners usually encounter there. Successfully rounding Cape Horn, Abraham Lincoln plowed through chill South Atlantic seas toward Chilean waters, where she took part in Blue Sky III, an AAWEX vs Chilean Air Force exercise with the Chileans on 28 October 1990. Chilean Northrop F-5E Tiger IIs reciprocated and flew a strike against Abraham Lincoln, and several Chilean diesel-powered submarines stalked the carrier from 29 to 30 October 1990 conducting Low levels Southern Chile in the vicinity of Puerto Mont on 29 October 1990, while Argentine Naval Officers disembarked, onboard from 19 to 30 October 1990, hosting Chilean DVs on the 30th. During All PPDB’s and APPS software arrives in MSI and SAS program commences. After their arduous journey crewmembers of Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Valparaíso, Chile on 31 October 1990. Abraham Lincoln enjoyed a visit to Valparaíso, Chile from 31 October to 4 November 1990, and then continued Blue Sky III, when the same day, tragedy interrupted, when aircraft accidentally bombed CVW-11 sailors near Viña del Mar, three of whom suffered superficial wounds on 4 November 1990. The Chileans helped the Americans as much as possible through the episode, though no one on either side claimed responsibility. Abraham Lincoln hosted Chilean DVs on 5 November 1990. Abraham Lincoln conducted Blue Sky III in the Chilean waters, an exercise with the Chileans from 28 October to 8 November 1990, that involved air combat training, an anti-air warfare exercise with the Chileans, and aircraft flew low-level navigation flights in the vicinity of Puerto Mont, Northern Chile, delta target complex usage in the vicinity of ANTOFAGASTA Airfield and Iquique Airfield from 6 to 8 November 1990. The allies culminated the exercise with an opposed U.S. training strike against Chilean defenders at Antofagasta and Iquique, Chile, and a pair of anti-air warfare exercises against the Chileans. Nov. 8 conducted raids on ANTOFAGASTA Airfield and Iquique, conducted two AAWEXs against Chilean Air Force. The first wall-to-wall inventory of an S-8 storeroom was completed using the integrated bar coding system on the 8th. CJTF 4 counter-narcotics tasking for Abraham Lincoln conducted in the vicinity of Galapagos Island from 12 to 13 November 1990. SSO functions, SCI billets transferred to PACFLT from Abraham Lincoln INCHOP C3F/EASTPAC COMMS AREA on 14 November 1990. Also Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) ESD bench was established. CJTF 5 counter-narcotics tasking for Abraham Lincoln conducted in the vicinity of Clipperton/Clarion Island from 15 to 16 November 1990. TRE DE-INSTALL/cross-decked from Abraham Lincoln to USS Tarawa (LHA-1) on 18 November 1990. Abraham Lincoln commenced cyclic operations on 9 November 1990. Peruvian distinguished visitors embarked on board Abraham Lincoln as she conducted cyclic flight operations on 10 November 1990. During one of these flights, Abraham Lincoln recorded her 6,000th arrested landing, though an aircraft made a barricade landing at one point during these busy events. Abraham Lincoln celebrated the one year anniversary of their ship's first birthday with a ‘steel beach’ [flight deck] picnic at sea on 11 November 1990. Abraham Lincoln again fulfilled counter-narcotics directions from Combined Joint Task Force 4, this time off the Galapagos Islands from 12 to 13 November 1990. In addition, aircraft flew low-level missions over Ecuadorian ranges (12 November).  Abraham Lincoln Inchoped THIRDFLT on 14 November 1990. Abraham Lincoln accomplished counter-narcotics missions under the command of Combined Joint Task Force 5, while in the vicinity of Clipperton and Clarion Islands from 15 to 16 November 1990 and then steamed to Alameda California. Abraham Lincoln steamed to Alameda California from 17 to 18 November 1990. Squadrons: VF-114, F-14A; VF-213, F-14A; VFA-303, F/A-18A; VFA-305, F/A-18A; VA-95, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-117, E-2C; HS-17 (*1), SH-3H; VAQ-135, EA-6B and VRC-30 Det., C-2A. (*1) disestablished on Jun.30, 1991. Ports of call: St. Thomas, Virgin Islands; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Singapore and Valparaíso, Chile. Her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO (25 September to 20 November 1990)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 21 to 26 November 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “COMNAVAIRPAC visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 28 November 1990. Air Department developed a Ship's Force Hydro Plan for the JP-5 Fuel System, and submitted this plan to COMNAVAIRPAC for approval. The Overhaul Work Definition Conference (WDC) was completed this month” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) sailed from Antalya on 28 November 1990” (Ref. 549).

 

     “On 29 November 1990, the United Nations Security Council passed Resolution 678 authorizing “member states cooperating with the Government of Kuwait to use all necessary means to uphold and implement the Security Council Resolution 660,” calling for an immediate and unconditional withdrawal from Kuwait, “and all subsequent relevant Resolutions and to restore international peace and security in the area.” The deadline for Iraq would be 15 January 1991” (Ref. 549).

 

     “On 30 November 1990, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) sailed for the Suez Canal” (Ref. 549).

 

    “Adm. Bruce DeMars, Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) at Naval Air Station Alameda, California on 30 November 1990” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1990).

 

     “On 2 December 1990, just after midnight, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) made her third Suez Canal transit of her deployment” (Ref. 549).

 

     “USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) entered the Red Sea on 3 December 1990 and began turnover duties with USS Saratoga (CV-60). The two carriers operated together and conducted simulated strikes on targets in western Saudi Arabia” (Ref. 549).

 

      “Royal Air Force Vice Marshall William J. Wratten and Wing Commander Mick Richardson visited USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) on 4 December 1990 from Tobuk, Saudi Arabia, to discuss the conduct of an air war with Iraq” (Ref. 549).

 

    “A Christmas Party at Raddison for the crew of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was held from 4 to 5 December 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

     “Captain John P. Gay relieved Captain Herbert A. Browne as commanding officer of USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) on 7 December 1990. Rear Admiral Mixson, Commander, TG 150.5, on hand for the ceremony, presented Captain Browne with the Legion of Merit. This change of command ceremony proved unique in John F. Kennedy’s history as it was held while the ship was underway in the Red Sea. This was the first change of command ceremony conducted in the khaki working uniform with ball caps” (Ref. 549).

 

 

USS Ranger (CVA-61) was commissioned at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Aug. 10, 1957, CAPT Charles D. Booth II, in command. Here, three Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 14 (HS-14) SH-3H Sea King helicopters fly in formation past Ranger (then CV-61) as the ship leaves San Diego to begin her WestPac '90 (Gulf War) cruise, Dec. 8, 1990. US Navy photo by PH2 Henry (available from the Defense Visual Information Center, id.: DN-SC-93-05041). NS026130. Submitted by: Alex Tatchin.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026130.jpg

 

    “USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked departed San Francisco Bay, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 8 December 1990, with Captain Ernest Edward Christensen, Jr., USNA 1964, as Commanding Officer, on her 21st “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet, her seventh Indian Ocean deployment, her second North Arabian Sea and first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment operating in the Far East, in support of her 1st Operation Desert Shield, 1st Operation Desert Storm and Maritime Interception Operations in support of United Nations sanctions against Iraq, , operating under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet serving as naval component commander for Central Command during Operation Desert Shield (commencing 2 August 1990 Iraqi occupation of Kuwait) and Operation Desert Storm (commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991); reclassified to CV-61 on 30 June 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War, earning 13 battle stars for service in Vietnam. She will under go her 25th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 August 1957” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 (NE)

(8 December 1990 to 8 June 1991)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-1

Wolf Pack -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NE100

F-14A

VF-2

Bounty Hunters -            Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NE200

F-14A

VA-155

Silver Foxes -             Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber

NE400

A-6E

VA-145

Swordsmen -             Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NE500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-116

Sun Kings - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-131

Lancers - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-14

Chargers - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-38

Red Griffins - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - S-3 Viking -                 Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

VRC-50 Det.

Foo Dogs - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound

(RG) 4xx

C-2A

 

 

    “USS Princeton (CG-59); USS Valley Forge (CG-50); USS Paul F. Foster (DD-964); USS Harry W. Hill (DD-986); USS Francis Hammond (FF-1067); USS Kansas City (AOR-3) and USS Shasta (AE-33) was part of USS Ranger (CVA-41) task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “Media representatives from the Joint Information Bureau in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, flew out to USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) on 13 December 1990 to discuss morale and holiday plans with the sailors. Representatives from BBC-TV, the Associated Press, United Press International, WBZ (Boston) Radio, Independent Radio News, U.S. News and World Report, and Reuters stayed on board for two days” (Ref. 549).

 

    “All Hands Respirator Fit Training on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was by completed and holiday leave periods began on 14 December 1990. Shipyard shut down for two weeks over Christmas and New Years was authorized” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “UPQ-5 installed in DEBRIEFING on 20 December 1990 aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72)” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “After steaming 33,302.3 nautical miles, moving from California to Virginia, and offloading an entire aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) crew members enjoyed a well deserved leave, taking Christmas and New Years leave as they prepared for the Complex Overhaul. On Christmas morning, the crew of Enterprise was informed that they had won the 1990 Golden Anchor award for retention programs. A very quiet month for Deck Department as Christmas leave standdown was in effect” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “June 1990 found VMA-231 deployed to WestPac” as a squadron for the first time since World War II. Training continued in Iwakuni and Okinawa, Japan, as well as the Philippine Islands and Korea. Exercises included multiple air defense exercises with the Japanese Air Defense Force; VALIANT BLITZ 90, conducted in Eastern Korea during November 1990; and BEACHCREST 90, conducted in Okinawa in December 1990” (Ref. 362F).

 

    “USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) with CVW-8 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 28 December 1990, with Capt. Charles S. Abbot in command, on her second Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming through the Atlantic, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Med, on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment and 1st Red Sea deployment in support of her 1st Operation Desert Shield, 1st Operation Provide Comfort, a military operation by the United States, starting in 1990, to defend Kurds fleeing their homes in northern Iraq in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War and 1st Operation Desert Storm, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait), operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT), an Echelon II command, that supports all naval operations in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR), fulfilling the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number, while the Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command. Theodore Roosevelt will steam through the Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea, making her 1st Suez Canal transit, 1st Red Sea voyage and 1st Gulf of Aden voyage en route to the Persian Gulf via the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz into the Persian Gulf and upon return will steam from the Persian Gulf through the Strait of Hormuz into the Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Sea to the Gulf of Aden (2nd voyage) and through the Bab el Mandeb by westerly and northerly courses and enter the Red Sea, on her 2nd Red Sea voyage, making her 2nd Suez Canal transit to the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming through the Atlantic on her way home. She will under go her third second Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 25 October 1986, with Capt. Paul W. Parcells named as the Prospective Commanding Officer, and christened by Mrs. Barbara Lehman, wife of Secretary Lehman (20 December 1988 to 30 June 1989)” (Ref. 72, 84A & 384).

 

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) with CVW-8 (AJ)

(28 December 1990 to 28 June 1991)

1st Operation Desert Shield, 1st Operation Provide Comfort, a military operation by the United States, starting in 1990, to defend Kurds fleeing their homes in northern Iraq in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War and 1st Operation Desert Stormcommencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-41

Black Aces -                 Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

AJ100

F-14A

VF-84

Jolly Rogers -                 Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AJ200

F-14A

VFA-15

Valions - Strike          Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

AJ300

F/A-18A

VFA-87

Golden Warriors -        Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

AJ400

F/A-18A

VA-65 (*1)

Tigers -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber

AJ500

A-6E

VA-36

Roadrunners -           Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber

530

A-6E

VAW-124

Bear Aces - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-9

Sea Griffins - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VAQ-141

Shadowhawks -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler       Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-24

Scouts - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking  - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

VRC-40 Det.

Rawhides - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound

xx

C-2A

 (*1) disestablished on Mar. 31, 1993

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “USS Richmond K. Turner (CG-20) joined USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “USS America (CV-66) spent the first part of 1990 conducting local operations and then underwent a three-and-a-half month shipyard Availability” (Ref. 1-America, 72 & 324).

 

      “USS America (CV-66) conducted Refresher Training, Advanced Phase Training and FLEETEX prior to deploying five months early in support of Operation Desert Shield (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

      “USS America (CV-66) with CVW-1 embarked departed NOB, Norfolk, Virginia 28 December 1990, with Captain John J. (Maz) Mazach, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 14th Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM) (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, en route to the Med and upon return from the Med, her first Red Sea deployment, participating in Operation Desert Shield, on her first Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, participating in what would turn out to be her 1st Operation Desert Storm, commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991, with Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait), operating under the direction of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command. America will steam through the Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea, making her 9thSuez Canal transit, Red Sea, Bab el Mandeb Strait and Gulf of Aden voyage en route to the Persian Gulf via the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz into the Persian Gulf and upon return will steam from the Persian Gulf  through the Strait of Hormuz to the Arabian Sea, via the Gulf of Oman to the Gulf of Aden, Bab el Mandeb Strait and Red Sea voyage, on her 10th Suez Canal transit, returning to the Mediterranean Sea, the Atlantic and home. Ports visited not reported. Reclassified CV-66 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" on 30 June 1975 while at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, entering Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 27 November 1974, upon return from her North Sea deployment on 12 October 1974; making three Vietnam Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War operating with the 7th Fleet (receiving five battle stars). She will under go her 25th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia on 23 January 1965, with Captain Lawrence Heyworth, Jr., in command” (Ref. 1-America, 72 & 76, 324 & 824).

 

USS America (CVA-66) with CVW-1 (AB)

(28 December 1990 to 18 April 1991)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-102

Diamondbacks -             Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

AB100

F-14A

VF-33

Starfighters -             Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

AB200

F-14A

VFA-82

Marauders -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

AB300

FA-18C

VFA-86

Sidewinders -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet

Jet Strike Fighter

AB400

FA-18C

VA-85

Black Falcons -                   Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AB500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-123

Screwtops -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-11

Dragon Slayers -           Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VAQ-137

Rooks - Carrier

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-32

Maulers - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking  - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

 

 

    “USS Normandy (CG-60) was part of USS America (CV-66) battle group” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “After conducting several small-scale exercises, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) entered port in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on the morning of 29 December 1990, thus becoming the first U.S. aircraft carrier to visit Saudi Arabia. The Saudis hospitably set up a bank of 100 telephones in a warehouse across the pier from where the carrier lay moored, from which the men could call their loved ones” (Ref. 549).

 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65)

YEAR END 1990 DEPARTMENT AND DIVISION HISTORY

 

    “Combat Systems In addition, a perfect personnel safety record was maintained throughout the Year by the Operations Department of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and all carrier landing systems and communication suites functioned at peak performance during three post-deployment carrier landing qualification periods.

 

    Communications Department main emphasis in the last quarter was an effective transition to the extended overhaul at Newport News from October to December 1990. Over 80 spaces were Scooped and much equipment was placed in storage. The guard for message traffic was transferred to SUPSHE' Newport News while Enterprise's Message Center continued to remain operational 24 hours a day during overhaul

 

Engineering Department

 

    A Division preparations for Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and drydock were the highlights of this time period from October to December 1990. The aircraft elevators and Hydraulics Shop were kept busy loading shipyard equipment. The catapults were down for overhaul. The AC&R Shop drained down the complete chill water system in preparation for major A/C shipalts. The whole division was kept busy checking the shipyard work packages for errors, omissions and duplications.

 

    Resin discharge, steam plant dryout, main shaft bearing reaction test, and propulsion plant asbestos removal kept all personnel of M Division at a high tempo of production from September to December 1990.

 

    E Division provided over 500 mega watts of electrical energy for the ship's needs during 1990, removing 18,000 pounds of dead-end cables, processed over 12,000 trouble calls, expended 1,200 man hours repairing flight deck lighting in support of flight operations, rewound 109 motors, 14 of which were for other ships and completed more than 100 Casualty repairs.

 

      E Division installed new shore power stations, POT&I of all 1-MC speaker systems and the 5MC system, repaired and rewired X16J1/2/3/4 sound powered phone circuits, replaced and rewired 6JZ sound powered phone circuit, replaced and rewired pyrometers on emergency diesel generators, recalibrated ship's cathodic protection system, replaced bus failure alarms throughout the ship, repaired various fire pump motors and repaired CHT motors and controllers from October to December 1990.

 

    As CBR equipment was sent from Enterprise to the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield, the DC/R Division personnel received a well-earned Christmas holiday. A total of 49 people finished the move off the ship into the government supplied housing and over 30 families completed the long trek from the west coast to the Virginia Peninsula. Threats of a hurricane forced Enterprise to make a, move from Norfolk to Newport News early, and the Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) went into full swing. More DC/R personnel transitioned into SFOMS areas and DC/R DCPO Shop finished the last of the watertight doors and successfully implemented a four section watch bill rotation. It was also a period of time when funding required much of the shipyard planned work to be shifted into the ship's work force package areas or deferred work to Puget Sound Availability. The DC/R DCPO Shop finished the last of the watertight doors and completed repairs on another 75 armored hatches. Despite the reduction in personnel and the increase in planned work, DC/R Division met all of the requirements for fire fighting, casualties, and preventive maintenance.

 

Military Justice

 

    In 1990, 54 cases were disposed of at special courts-martial, with 14 of them resulting in the accused receiving a BCD in addition to forfeitures, brig time, and reductions in rate. Over 41 cases were disposed of at summary courts-martial. The Discipline Officer processed 915 report chits, of which 390 individuals appeared at NJP. The Captain held mast on 84 occasions during this period. The Legal Office processed 10 individuals at administrative discharge boards.

 

    The Carrier Judge Advocate and Assistant Carrier Judge Advocate saw over 144 clients on consumer protection, divorce, tax, landlord/tenant etc, problems. A total of 540 notarial acts and 410 powers of attorney were performed, and numerous wills were prepared. In 1990, 87 claims with a total dollar value of $28,608 were processed for crew members who were victims of larcenies of personal property or damage attributed to acts beyond their control. Legal Department provided 18 briefs and lectures to crewmembers including Command Duty Officers and Assistant Command Duty Officers, and Indoctrination Division personnel.

 

    Calendar year 1990 was a busy, productive year, with the Medical Department completing a major deployment, then offloading all of its equipment and personnel to set up shop on the FAF.

 

Accomplishments included:

 

12,251 personnel treated

15,654 prescriptions filled

13,633 lab tests done

1,922 immunizations given

2,897 X-rays shot

189 admissions to the ward

36 surgical cases

External inspectors found much that was praiseworthy, including:

 

"Excellent" for Radiation Health during ORSE

100% Competitive Exercises

 

Medical Department Personnel

 

Senior Medical Officer

CDR R. J. Adams

TEMAD Medical Officer

CDR T. E. Eckstein

CVW-11 Flight Surgeons

LCDR D. A. Bailey / LT J. H. Healey

Nurse

LCDR R. A. Yakshaw

General Medical Officer

LT J. H. Tarver

Medical Admin Officer

LT M. J. Mathews

Physicians Assistant

LTJG J. K. Ryan

Leading Chief Petty 0fficer

HMCS P. A. Broadhead

Preventive Medicine Chief

HMC J. Revels

Ship's Company

27 Corpsmen

CVW-11 Personnel

9 Corpsmen

 

    During 1990, Dental Department continued to excel by rendering the highest quality treatment to both CVW-11 and USS Enterprise (CVN-65) personnel. Throughout the cruise, dental personnel participated in community relations programs. LCDR Curran organized the "Partners in Education Program" for the ship, and CAPT Judkins, Senior Dental Officer, was in charge producing a very high quality Cruise book. The versatility of the Dental Department continued throughout the year as dental technicians assisted the Medical Department with immunizations and ship wide blood draws for HIV testing.

 

     Additionally, dental personnel were cited repeatedly for excellence in casualty treatment during General Quarters drills. DTC (SW) Bruce organized a highly successful CPR training program utilizing a team concept. By year's end, nearly 300 personnel had been trained in two-rescuer CPR and obstructed airway management.

 

    The versatility of the Dental Department continued throughout the year as dental technicians assisted the Medical Department with immunizations and ship wide blood draws for HIV testing. LT Worm was appointed as chairman for the command's Combined Federal Campaign, and LT Carrier was appointed as the assistant chairman. The campaign resulted in Enterprise achieving 143 percent of its goal, and Dental Department received the "Super Department" recognition for its total contribution and highest percentage over its goal. Another highlight of 1990 was the courtesy Administration Inspection conducted by the COMNAVAIRLANT Dental Officer. The department received an overall grade of "Outstanding" and maintained the highest level of operational dental readiness of any carrier in the Atlantic Fleet, and second in the Pacific Fleet. In preparation for SCOOIP, LT Carrier organized the model system for ensuring the smooth transition of the Dental Department from the ship to the Floating Accommodation Facility. CDR Bowers relieved CAPT Judkins as Senior Dental Officer in September. CAPT Judkins was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal upon his departure.

 

    “After steaming 33,302.3 nautical miles, moving from California to Virginia, and offloading an entire aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) crew members enjoyed a well deserved leave, taking Christmas and New Years off. On Christmas morning, the crew of Enterprise was informed that they had won the 1990 Golden Anchor award for retention programs. December was a very quiet month for Deck Department” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) shifted berths from Norfolk, Virginia, moving over to and moored at Pier 2, Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, for her third Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and the Navy's largest complex overhaul ever attempted from 12 October to 31 December 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) 1990 Complex Overhaul (COH) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. accomplishments

 

     “Entering Complex Overhaul, in September 90 at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard Bremerton, WA, Air Department personnel faced many new challenges.

 

     V-1 Division (flight deck) conducted a major overhaul of spaces and elevators and is tasked to refurbish all catwalks and the island structure.

 

     V-2 (catapults and arresting gear) removed the catapults and arresting gear in addition to a major overhaul of spaces.

 

     V-4 Division (fuels) defueled and flushed over 12 miles of pipe and storage tanks under budget and ahead of schedule.

 

     "E" Division created a challenging ship's force work package for COH 90 which included an upgrade of the Rewind Shop, overhaul of three 400HZ generators, replacement of the ship's gyro and the cableway improvement program involving the repair and overhaul of the cable system in every space on board.

 

     Repair Division had a very busy 1990. R-1 Division repaired the piping in the secondary analysis cabinet, AMW reducing station, NR 2A main feed pump, NRS Three and four potable water pumps, and completed a major shipalt to all four HPACS. Around the ship R-1 overhauled 10 list control flapper valves and fabricated parts for an A-6, an E-2 and other battle group units.

 

     They also fixed a number of items for the ship such as a hole in a potable water tank, NR 13 conveyor shielding, the aft accommodation ladder, and 63 handrails. They also machined and installed a new captain's chair. Wag day provided the carpenter's shop an opportunity to show off their woodworking skills by crafting the coffins, stocks and the royal stage and other finishing touches that made crossing the line a day to remember for all involved. The Damage Controlmen of R-2 Division kept their edge with frequent GQ's culminating in a flawless mass conflagration drill. “WestPac” 90 was a fire free deployment. R-2 also supported Operation Desert Shield by sending over $600,000 in CBR equipment to ships in the Persian Gulf. R-3 Division set a new shipboard record by completing over 2000 habitability and 300 non-watertight door trouble calls. After completing “WestPac” 90 they went back into R-1 Division to prepare for Complex Overhaul. During COH, Repair Division will overhaul and clean the firemain, CHT and AFFF systems and fix various damage control fittings around the ship.

 

     Hydraulics shop conducted a number of emergency repairs including depot level work on NR 2 aircraft elevator, NR 3 gypsy winch, NR 2 capstan and the starboard anchor windless control. The Steam Heat Shop had a very successful auxiliary boiler inspection in which they reduced the number of discrepancies by 72 percent from the previous inspection. They received high laurels from the COMMNAVAIRPAC boiler inspectors and were recognized by the Commanding Officer for their outstanding efforts. EA02 also performed numerous critical repairs to the ships laundry plant to keep it running.

 

     Outside repair put forth a herculean effort in overhauling three fire pumps, kept all ship's boats in 100 percent operability during the deployment and completed a difficult class "B" overhaul on NR 13 vertical stores conveyor.

 

     The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Shop conducted depot level repairs by cleaning all seven 363 ton air conditioning condensers, contributing greatly to their 100 percent operability during deployment. Galley maintenance conducted innumerable repairs to galley gear, including eight ice machines, five garbage grinders, rewiring food hot wells and the aft RC-16 dishwashers, replacing the compressors in the CPO thaw box and other repairs with only on board parts. EA07, the 02N2 work center, maintained the 02N2 plants at 100 percent operability to support flight operations.

 

     In between flight cycles, they rebuilt the solenoid valves, repacked the desiccant in both plants and rebuilt the NR one tank vacuum pump. Auxiliaries Division's comprehensive COH work package includes a ship's force overhaul and the cleaning and repair of virtually every piece of gear in the division.

 

COH Department

 

     Complex Overhaul (COH) Department was established as of 23 September 1990 consisting of 14 Officers, 13 Chief Petty Officers, and 200 E-6 and below. The COH Department is responsible for overseeing all non-nuclear repaired/upgrade work performed by both Ships Company and the shipyard.

 

     The Department is divided into Firewatch, Rehab, and Ship's Force Work Package (SFWP) Divisions. Firewatch is responsible to ensure that industrial welding does not cause any fires. In 1990, approximately 9,000 firewatches were utilized. Rehab is responsible for the refurbishing/updating of 35 berthing compartments which include over 1,600 racks, the installation of stainless sinks in 48 heads, and the cleaning of all non-nuclear vents on board. In 1990, 25 percent of the project was completed. SEWP is responsible for overseeing all the ship's self-help projects. There are a total of 3,069 jobs in the SFWP package. In 1990 a total of 39 jobs were completed.

 

     Complex Overhaul includes 43 K-SHIPALTS and 59 D-SHIPALTS, which include major upgrades to the ships’ combat systems, communications’ suite, and aircraft avionics and handling facilities to make ready for the FA-18 and the SH-60 aircraft. Total cost of the project is estimated at 607.5 million dollars.

 

     COH serves as the interface between the ship and the shipyard. COH provides space access, tagout assistance and help with work permits.

 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT

 

     The following are average monthly morbidity for 1990.

 

Outpatient visits 1,328

Physical Exams 156

X-Rays 380

Electrocardiograms (ECG s) 57

Audiograms 168

Laboratory Tests 5,568

Filled Prescriptions 1,588

 

     Additionally, there were 181 inpatient admissions, and 101 surgical procedures.

 

     The department was awarded the Medical Blue "M" by COMNAVAIRPAC as the best Medical Department for its Claimancy in 1989.

 

     1990 was a safe year for the Ship and Air Wing. There were no fatal injuries or occupational illnesses.

 

     No injuries that produced a permanent total disability occurred.

 

     No injuries occurred that produced permanent partial disability: One broken heel and one broken ankle.

 

     Improved Dental Readiness was the theme of the Dental Department for 1990.

 

     The Dental Department was assigned numerous additional duties in support of ship operations. These collateral assignments included: Coordinating the ship's cruise book, providing personnel to conduct PMS spot checks, providing an officer representative and coordinator for the ship's boxing team, providing a ship's Radiation Safety Officer, providing a custodian for the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Fund, providing instructors for the ship's CPR program, and providing a treasurer for the ship's First Class Petty Officer's Association.

 

     The Dental Department also contributed to the USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) Medical Department winning of the coveted Blue "M", by coordinating and operating the Walking Blood Bank Donor Program and by staffing Battle Dressing Stations.

 

     The Dental Team was frequently called upon to provide assistance as Medical emergencies arose.

 

     During 1990, the Dental Department lost and gained one general dentist and lost its only oral surgeon through FCS orders. The remaining staff completed a successful transition to treatment facilities aboard the Ex-USNS Hugh J. Gaffey (T-AP-121)/IX-507) and the Branch Dental Clinic Bremerton.

 

     During 1990, 11,003 patient visits were recorded. The value of the Dental Department was further emphasized by the completion of 1,034 prosthetic laboratory procedures, 1,237 surgery cases, 10,180 periodontal procedures, 245 root canal procedures, the placement of over 3,000 fillings and the delivery of 298 fixed and removable prostheses.

 

     The mission of the Legal Department during 1990 was to advise and assist the Commanding Officer and Executive Officer in the interpretation and application of the Uniform Code of Military Justice and other military laws and regulations; to maintain good order and discipline throughout the command; and to ensure prompt, fair administration of military justice. Consisting of three Divisions (L-1, Legal Office; L-2, the Ship's Master-at-Arms force; and L-3, the Ship's Brig), the Legal Office has 4 full-time enlisted personnel, one full-time attorney, an LDO Discipline Officer, 27 TAD personnel from ship's company assigned to L-2 and 13 assigned to L-3. During 1990, L-1 Division processed 32 Special Courts-martial, 28 Summary Courts-martial, 76 Administrative discharges, and approximately 1,300 report chits resulting in approximately 700 actual non-judicial punishment cases.

 

     In addition, L-1 Division handled numerous personnel claims, provided extensive legal assistance to the crew concerning a variety of civil and military matters, administered the Liberty Risk program, acted as a liaison to civilian law enforcement agencies, and coordinated customs clearance upon return from “WestPac” for the entire Battle Group. The MAAS maintained shipboard patrols, ensured security on board the ship during numerous evolutions (including pay days, UNREPS), ensured safe debarkation of liberty parties, and conducted active ship wide crime prevention program. They processed as many as 1,300 urinalysis samples per month, conducted investigations, provided crowd control, and totally controlled procurement distribution of linens to Air Wing enlisted personnel.

 

     The Brig provides pretrial confinement up to 30 days and confinement for three days bread and water whenever the ship is at sea or deployed, during in port periods at Alameda and Bremerton, the Brig is closed and all confinement is directed to Naval Brig facilities. The Brig is capable of handling up to 17 prisoners a t one time: One each in its two one-man cells and 15 in the dormitory.

 

TRAINING DEPARTMENT

 

     Training is a small department with a tremendous impact on USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) overall readiness. Composed of personnel with diverse backgrounds, training compunctions’ in five areas of expertise.

 

     Training Administration is responsible for issuing all the commands TAD orders. During 1990, Training Administration issued 1,788 sets of cost and no-cost orders. The Command Career Counselors coordinate and train departmental career counselors and provide individual assistance for career planning and negotiating of orders. In compliance with the latest COMNAVAIRPAC guidance, first term attrition ineligible rate in 1990 dropped from 9.1 percent to 2.4 percent, adding to the rise of 6 percent in overall retention. For this achievement the Gold Eagle was awarded Honorable Mention in the Fiscal Year 90 Golden Anchor Award competition, for a noteworthy retention program.

 

     The Substance Abuse Division includes two branches: The Counseling and Assistance Center (CAAC) and Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor (DAPA). CAAC and DAPA include effective programs within the command to provide counseling, education and treatment programs. In 1990, the Substance Abuse Division provided Navy Alcohol Drug Safety Awareness (NADSAP) Program education on board during cruise as well as ashore. USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) was the only ship with a civilian NADSAP facilitator on board. Twenty-one classes were held on board for 672 Gold Eagle and embarked Air Wing personnel. Alcohol and Drug Awareness Management Seminars (ADAMS) were provided to 40 senior command personnel. CAAC screening was provided for 192 command personnel. Seven Level II counseling courses were provided for 74 command and Air Wing personnel. While in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Carl Vinson CAAC counselors conducted 16 screenings for CAAC Bremerton. An additional 15 personnel completed Level III treatment. Aftercare therapy by DAPA personnel continued throughout 1990.

 

     The Familiarization and Indoctrination (FAM & I) area facilitated classes for over 630 newly reporting enlisted personnel and NROTC midshipmen in 18 classes throughout the year, a 56 percent increase over 1989, The Human Resources and Command Managed -1 Opportunity (CW) area was responsible for conducting Navy Rights and Responsibilities workshops in every FAM 611 class, as well as a 92 percent completion rate for all CPOs and Officers on board.

 

     Weapons Department had a highly successful 1990, additional noteworthy achievements included:

 

a. Maintained Weapons Elevators at a 99.6% availability throughout the deployment.

 

b. Enforced a rigorous Physical Security Program for the deployment.

 

Conducted a small arms training program on the M-14 rifle, the 12 gauge shotgun and the 45 caliber pistol. Qualification for ribbons were conducted where range resources were available,

Held physical security training for the Beach Detachment and Shore Patrol organization prior to each foreign port visited.

Posted external security watches during condition 111 steaming in the North Arabian Sea.

Participated in the Red Cell Security exercise in Hawaii, maintaining a flawless security posture.

 

c. Built ordnance throughout deployment supporting:

 

       (1) Air Wing qualification from Cubi PT, RP.

       (2) Exercise "Beacon lash".

       (3) Air Wing daily operational and training missions.

 

d. Ammunition transfers were conducted throughout deployment employing both vertical and connected replenishments. These operations culminated in a 2,900 ton download at Naval Weapons Station Indian Island, Washington.

 

e. Downloaded the Aviation Weapons Support Equipment for refurbishment and storage at NAS Alameda and forklifts at Puget Sound Shipyard, Bremerton for trans- shipment to San Diego for refurbishment.

 

f. Conducted the Air Wing onload in Alameda and the offload in San Diego. Superbly coordinated these demanding evolutions with maximum effectiveness.

 

g. Managed the badging requirements for the command prior to and during the Complex Overhaul.

 

CHAPLAIN DEPARTMENT

 

     In preparation for WestPac 90, as we11 as for the change in homeport due to the Comprehensive Overhaul (COH), USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) Chaplains Department conducted a pre-deployment fair for service members and their wives in the hangar bay of the ship. Information and assistance was provided by Legal, Champus, Dental Navy Relief Society, American Red Cross, Family Service Center, base vehicle registration and storage, Personnel, Disbursing, Ombudsman, enlisted and officer’s wives clubs, as well as religious programs.

 

     Change of homeport information included representatives £ran the Bremerton School System, the Chamber of Commerce, Naval Shipyard Family Service Center, Recreation Services and base housing. These preparation efforts greatly eased future distress often associated with the deployment and relocation.

 

     During port call/liberty periods, alternative activities were offered to the sailors in the way of COMREL projects and Spiritual Retreats. Advanced planning resulted in eight COMRELs involving 343 men that were some of the best received evolutions in the entire command Religious Program. Among other highlights of the cruise were five Spiritual Retreats conducted in Perth, Grande Island, and in Hong Kong. For the first time in memory, all of a carrier's restricted men were granted permission to participate in the Hong Kong Retreats. Eleven of 40 restricted men chose to attend, and all eleven returned to the ship on time.

 

     The USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) Ombudsman team provided invaluable assistance to families both during the deployment as well as in the transition to Bremerton. The commands’ ombudsmen were located in both Alameda, CA and Bremerton, WA. The ombudsmen provided information and assistance to families of the crew. They maintained an information line, (with a weekly message from the Commanding Officer), a monthly newsletter (mailed to the families of the entire crew), and a letters from Home Bulletin Board containing letters, photos, newspaper clippings and maps from families in various states.

 

     The highly successful WestPac 90 concluded with an Ecumenical Service of

Thanksgiving which was conducted in the forecastle in which both ship's company and the Air Wing participated. The remainder of the year, from August - December, focused on the preparations and transition to COH at PSNS, Bremerton, WA. The Chaplain's office was physically moved from the USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) to the Ex-USNS Hugh J. Gaffey (T-AP-121)/IX-507) where services are presently being offered.

 

     Alternative activities for sailors during this in port period include bimonthly weekend spiritual retreats conducted at the Pacific Beach Cottages; the monthly Keyport Personal Growth Workshop, assisting sailors in stress management, goal setting, and financial management; and a COMREL project involving the restoration of the Admiral Theater.

 

1990 RETENTION STATISTICS

 

     Ex-USNS Hugh J. Gaffey (T-AP-121)/IX-507) has aggressive, well trained and well organized retention team. Ensuring training levels within the command remain at the highest level. A monthly career information and counseling program for all department and divisional career counselors was held on board. The command has 18 Department Career Counselors and 119 Division Career Counselors. This provides one counselor for every 26 men.

 

 

ELIGIBLE

INELIGIBLE

REENLISTED

GROSS %

NET %

First term

427

44

181

38

42

Second term

76

00

42

55

55

Career

113

09

98

80

87

Total

616

53

321

48

52

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1990 YEAR END REPORT

 

The ship operated under the following chain of command as of 31 December 1990:

 

Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1990 (Ref. 378B-1990):

 

The ship's chain of command as of 31 December 1990 was:

Commander in Chief

President George Herbert Walker Bush, 1989-1993 – 41st

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable Richard B. Cheney - 17th
21 Mar 1989 - 20 Jan 1993

Secretary of the Navy

The Honorable Henry L. Garrett III – 63rd

15 May 1989 - 26 Jun 1992

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Carlisle Trost (1986–1990) - 23rd

ADM Frank B. Kelso (1990–1994) – 24th

CINCPACFLT

ADM David E. Jeremiah (1982–1986) – 50th

30 Sep 1987 - 15 Feb 1990

ADM Charles R. Larson – 51st

15 Feb 1990 - 15 Feb 1991

COMNAVAIRPAC

VADM John H. Fetterman Jr. – 23rd

Aug 1987 - Dec 1990

VADM Edwin R. Kohn, Jr. – 24th

Dec 1990 - Oct 1993

COMCARGRU THREE

RADM Timothy W. Wright

 

Organization Structure. Captain William B. Hayden commands Abraham Lincoln, with an assembled officer and crew complement of over 2,900 persons.

 

Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1990 were:

Commanding Officer - CO

CAPT William B. Hayden

Executive Officer - XO

CAPT Robert L. Peterson

Administrative Officer

LT George M. Schott

Air Officer

CDR Larry A. Pacentrilli

AIMD Officer

CDR Ken Marks

Combat Systems Officer

LCDR Daniel Rustchak

Religious Ministries Officer / Chaplain

CAPT John Robert Fiol

Dental Officer

CDR Peter G. Seder

Engineering Officer

CDR Richard Stuntz

First Lieutenant

LCDR Mark A. Sassaman

Communications Officer

LT Don Budde

Legal Officer

LCDR Jim Norman

3-M Officer

Anthony E. Dames

Navigator

CDR Dave Smania

Senior Medical Officer

CDR Jerry Rose

Operations Officer

CDR Rocky Deal

Reactor Officer

CDR Kenneth J. Taplett

Safety Officer

CDR Larry Harvey

Supply Officer

CDR Dennis L. Wright

Deck Officer

ENS Stanley A. Mullen (acting)

Training Officer

LCDR Glenn Tyson

Weapons Officer

CDR Leslie Smith

Marine Security Detachment

Capt. Kenneth R. Lardie, USMC

 

Command.

 

Ship's complement:

Officers 152

Crew 2,752

 

    “The following major accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 1990:

 

     Abraham Lincoln is the nation's fifth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, and the newest in the U.S. arsenal. Built at a cost of over $3 billion dollars, Abraham Lincoln is the largest U.S. warship ever constructed. Commissioned November 11, 1989, Lincoln is the second ship of the line to be named for the sixteenth president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln.

 

     Abraham Lincoln is charged with supporting America's tactical air capability and maintaining open sea lanes. As it carries out this mission on the oceans of the world, Lincoln brings a message of peace through strength. Captain William B. Hayden commands Lincoln, with an assembled officer and crew complement of over 2,900 persons.

 

     Lincoln was active in 1990. The ship completed operational, training and certification programs vital to its evolution as a fleet warship, including the qualification of the combat systems suite, proficiency certification for reactor watch standers, INSURV inspection, damage control and battle training, and operations competency training with various carrier air wings to train flight deck personnel.

 

     This year's highlight was Lincoln’s South America transit. During the two month expedition, Lincoln participated in multinational training opportunities with the Navies and Air Forces of several South American countries including Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay and Peru.

 

     The year culminated with Lincoln’s completion of a shift in homeports from Norfolk, Virginia, to Alameda, California, and inter-fleet transfer from the Atlantic to the Pacific Fleet. Lincoln continues to stay faithful to its motto, "Shall Not Perish," as it enters 1991 confident of its ability to protect and defend America's vital interests.

 

     Certification was completed on Lincoln Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) Oil Lab. This provided Lincoln the ability to do oil trend analysis on board the ship for aircraft and machinery, alleviating the need to send these samples off the ship. Cryptologic Combat Support Console (CCSC) was installed in SSES” (Ref. 378B-1990).

 

     “In January 1991, with the beginning of Operation Desert Storm, the Middle East Force was absorbed into U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, the naval component of the U.S. Central Command. Central Command is responsible for all U.S. Military activity in the Middle East and eastern Africa. In the aftermath of the 1990/91 Gulf War, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command ships and those of the coalition partners undertook the largest mine clearing operation since World War II. Nearly 1,300 sophisticated sea mines of various types were swept from the Arabian Gulf, providing the safest passage for naval and merchant ships in decades” (Ref. 359).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 1991 REPORT

 

     “Mission. To support and operate Naval tactical and support aircraft at sea, maintain open sea lanes for maritime traffic, project power both at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Lincoln also serves as a command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group operations. Wherever it goes, Lincoln serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve to provide a sea-based deterrent to threats of national interest. Command Master Chief -- AVCM James L. Withycombe. Abraham Lincoln is the nation's fifth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, and the newest in the U.S. arsenal. Built at a cost of over $3 billion, Lincoln is the largest U.S. warship ever constructed. Commissioned November 11, 1989, Lincoln is the second ship of the line named for the sixteenth, and arguably, the greatest president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln is charged with supporting America's tactical air capability and maintaining open sea lanes. As it carries out this mission on the oceans of the world, Lincoln brings a message of peace through strength. Captain James O. Ellis Jr. Commands Lincoln and its officer and crew complement of over 2,600 persons” (Ref. 378B-1991).

 

1990 & 1991 EAST AND WEST COAST DEPLOYMENTS

CV and CVN Activities after CV-43 Decommissioned

Operation Desert Shield (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait commencing 2 August 1990) and

Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991).

(27 April 1990 to 26 April 1992)

Part 1 – (27 April to 1 August 1990)

Part 2 – (2 August to 11 October 1990)

Part 3 – (12 October to 31 December 1990)

Part 4 – (1 January to 26 March 1991)

Part 5 – (27 March to 16 June 1991)

Part 6 – (17 June 1991 to 27 April 1992)

Part 3 – (12 October to 31 December 1990)

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