Thirteenth “WestPac” and first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment (Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw during the Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis (Iran History, Air Arm) and Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on the way home via Korea), operating with other Aircraft Carriers and upon completion conducted training operations and Carrier Qualifications (Iran History, Air Arm, Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis

(13 November 1979 to 30 June 1980)

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 1 – (13 to 30 November 1979)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 December 1979)

Part 3 – (1 to 31 January 1980)

Part 4 – (1 to 24 February 1980)

Part 5 – (25 February to 20 April 1980)

Part 6 – (21 to 24 April 1980)

Part 7 – (25 April to 30 June 1980)

 

 

 

TMS-3

 

    Aircraft from CV-43 and CVN-68 escorted Russian Bears away from the USS Coral Sea (CV-43) in the Indian Ocean. We are being relieved by the Constellation. As a part of the day the Connie put on an air show for us. Right at the end of the show their squadrons formed up for an airwing flyover. Before they made their approach another plane appeared off the port stern. It was a Russian bear being escorted right by us. Just about that time the airwing came up right behind the bear and just a little above him. The airwing overtook the bear and as soon as they did the bear put it to the fire wall and bugged out. That Russian pilot must of dropped a load."Bob Dorais, 1979-80 “WestPac” http://www.usscoralsea.net/pages/cstories.html

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted sixty students from Layton (Utah) High School on 25 April 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) steams around the Cape of Good Hope through the Mazambique Channel to the Indian Ocean

 

     “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), USS South Carolina (CGN-37) and USS Virginia (CGN-38) steamed to the Indian Ocean from the Southern Atlantic from the bottom of South Africa, traveling around Cape of Good Hope through the Mazambique Channel to the Indian Ocean crossing from the Atlantic to the Pacific and.7th Fleet AOR, Out Chopping Atlantic Fleet and In Chopped Pacific Fleet on 29 April 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) cross decked supplies and spare parts, relieving USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

 

    USS Constellation (CV-64) cross decked supplies and spare parts, relieving USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 Air Wing and COMCARGROUP THREE embarked in the North Arabian Sea on 30 April 1980, departing the Arabian Sea, she was on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea 89 continuous days since Coral Sea’s arrival in the Indian Ocean on 1 February 1980, steaming through the Malacca Straits on 31 January 1980, and then on track to the Indian Ocean, departing Singapore Bay on 29 January 1980” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

 

 Voo Shee

 

 

Kyoei Maru

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departs the Arabian Sea

 

    USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departed the Arabian Sea on 30 April 1980, steaming through the Indian Ocean and Malacca Straits via the South China Sea en route to Subic Bay” (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard Brochure/March 1980-Vol 8; No. 2).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) crossed the equator

 

     “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) crossed the equator during early May 1980, allowing shellbacks among the crew to cleanse over 5,000 pollywogs of “their dreaded condition”” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) relieved USS Nimitz (CVN-68)

 

    “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), USS South Carolina (CGN-37) and USS Virginia (CGN-38) relieved USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and her group, including guided missile cruisers California (CGN-37) and Texas (CGN-39) from 7 to 8 May 1980, after the crew endured 108 days, operating 144 of them continuously at sea, including 115 of Iranian contingency operations on station during Operation Eagle Claw (Operation Rice Bowl and Operation Evening Light), the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran in the Indian Ocean, North Arabian Sea and into the Gulf of Oman to a staging area off the southeast Coast of Iran referred to as “Gonzo Station.”, the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran. CAPT James H. Mauldin established an almost weekly “CO’s Day” to allow the men to take time off and participate in “Flight Deck Olympics” and picnics. Coming about, Nimitz began her 11,500 mile voyage back to Norfolk, stopping en route off Ascension Island to embark inspectors. “…I told you that I had confidence in your high state of preparedness for any task which might be demanded of you,” ADM Hayward told the crew during their time in the Gulf. “You proved without question in the ensuing months that my confidence and that of your countrymen across America and your shipmates throughout the Navy was especially well placed…Your countrymen are very proud of you, and they have every right to be. In addition, the Navy authorized a special ration of six cans of beer per man, which the captain dispensed in increments over a 60 day period. Dwight D. Eisenhower crossed the equator during this month, allowing shellbacks among the crew to cleanse over 5,000 pollywogs of “their dreaded condition.” Constant Russian surveillance in the Gulf of Oman forced the launch of two Lockheed S-3A Vikings from VS-31 and two A-6Es from VA-65 for three and a half hour sorties to work the “coastline or littoral regions.” During this deployment VS-31 discovered and tracked two Soviet Echo II-class submarines and a Foxtrot-class sub shadowing the carrier, intercepted over 50 Soviet aircraft of various types (in addition to15 Iranian Lockheed P-3F Orions), and maintained surveillance of an Iranian Saam-class guided missile frigate that loitered in the vicinity. The “added tension” of the Persian Gulf War between the Iranians and Iraqis exacerbated the strain on the crew, forcing them to be ever vigilant. The large number of flight hours produced an unusual number of AIM-9L Sidewinder air-to-air missile failures, however, prompting concerns about the missile’s reliability. Men requiring emergency leave had to fly to al Masirah Island, Oman, and thence to Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Territory, where USAF Lockheed C-141 Starlifters and C-5 Galaxies flew them on to Clark AFB, Philippines, where they embarked for other destinations, an exhausting series of flights” (Ref. 372A & 383C-1980).

 

     “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) commenced operations in Northern Arabian Sea on 8 May 1980” (Ref. 383C-1980).

 

Edmund Muskie sworn in as U.S. Secretary of State

 

     “Edmund Muskie sworn in as U.S. Secretary of State May 9, 1980” (Ref. 12).

 

    “Following turn over with USS America (CV-66) on 9 May 1981 in the Indian Ocean en route to the Gulf of Aden” (Ref. 1148B).

 

 

http://www.usscoralsea.net/images/bh0039.jpg and Bruce Henion

 

 

Excellent b&w image of Midway, as she appeared near the end of her career (1980+). Note the 2 aircraft lifts added to her starboard side, forward and abaft the island. H. King. (EWC USN-RET). http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024110.jpg

 

 

Pamyat Lenina

 

    “The fifth Independence (CVA-62), former CVA-62), the 62nd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 50th, commissioned at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard, New York, on 10 January 1959; reclassified to CV-62 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" 28 February 1973 conducted Overhaul at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia from shortly after 14 December 1979, most likely in January 1980 after leave and stand down period to sometime in May 1980, steaming down the Elizabeth River and proceeded to Pier 12 at Norfolk, Virginia, Naval Base and shortly after will conduct three days Sea Trials and Refresher Training, departing the shipyard through its Southern Branch and the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, a gateway to points to the south for the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, an inland path to the ocean upon conclusion” (Ref. 1-Independence, 72, 76, 84A, 325, 1148B, 1149A, 1157 & 1158).

 

The Cycle

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv62-81/index_003.htm

 

    “Life on an aircraft carrier is life taken in cycles, much like the seasons of the year. The full cycle of a carrier takes about one half years. First the ship comes out of the yards and goes through Carrier Qualifications (CQ’s) and Refresher Training (REFTRA). Workups include, Type I, II, and III Training to prepare the ship and crew for its final exam in battle-worthiness, the Operational Readiness Exercises (ORE). Then the ship returns to port for the Pre-Overseas Movement (POM) period, goes on its “big cruise, and returns once again to the yards to complete its cycle” (Ref. 1148B).

 

 

Mandan (YTB-794) and another, unidentified tug assist the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43) as she arrives at Naval Station Subic Bay, Luzon, P.I., from her deployment in the Arabian Sea, 9 May 1980. Air Wing is Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14. NS140979407: DVIC photo # DNSC8511123 by PH3 Joseph Gallegos, USN. NS024382: U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum photo # 1996.488.120.089. NS140979407 86k. Robert L. Lawson Photograph Collection.

DefenseImagery.mil. http://www.navsource.org/archives/14/140979407.jpg

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) returned to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines

 

    Nine days at sea prior to USS Coral Sea (CV-43) arrival at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 9 May 1980, to be the ship’s first stop on the way back to her home base, NAS Alameda, Ca., marked 102 consecutive days at sea, departing the Arabian Sea on 30 April 1980.

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted eighteen members of People's Republic of China Delegation on 14 May 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

     “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) conducted operations in Northern Arabian Sea from 8 to 21 May 1980” (Ref. 383C-1980).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) returned to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines

 

    USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departed Subic Bay, R.P. around 16 May 1980, spending a week in port.

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) ordered to Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on the way home via Korea when Mount St. Helens erupted in Washington State

 

    While en route to Korea Coral Sea was ordered to the south of the Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan, following the potential of civil unrest in the Republic of Korea, the crew of Coral Sea was notified that the long-dormant Mount St. Helens erupted in Washington State, hurling ash 15,000 feet into the air and setting off mudslides and avalanches, proceeded by a weeklong series of earthquakes and smaller explosions of ash and smoke, erupted. The eruptions cause minimal damage in the sparsely populated area, but about 400 people -- mostly loggers and forest rangers -- are evacuated.

 

 

Atronom

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) arrived off Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan, embarking an eighteen man delegation from the Peoples Republic of China for a tour and luncheon

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) arrived off Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on 22 May 1980. An eighteen man delegation from the Peoples Republic of China visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) for a tour and luncheon on 22 May 1980. The Honorable Mr. -Liu Huaqing, Vice Chief of General Staff, Peoples Republic of China; VADM L. Baggett, Naval Surface Force, U.S Pacific Fleet and RADM P. T. Gillchrist, Fighter Airborne Early Warning Wing, Pacific and civilians in the PRC defense industry. Although the Chinese had received "red carpetn VIP treatment during their tour of U.S. military facilities from coast to coast, Mr. LIU, through an interpreter said that as in a Chinese Opera wherein the best is always saved for last the visit to Kitty Hawk was the highlight of their entire visit” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

 

Yon Ding

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) returns to Norfolk, Va., concluding operations in the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf during the Iranian Crisis

 

 

    “On 26 May 1980, USS Nimitz (CVN-68) with CVW-8, Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet, Commander, Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet, Admiral Robert E. Kirksey, USN and Chief of Staff , Captain C. W. Streightiff and Captain J. S. Donnell; Commander, Battle Group Two, Rear Admiral James R. Sanderson, USN and Chief of Staff, Captain W. V. Garcia embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain John R. Batzler, USN, as Commanding Officer and Captain Richard C. Macke, USN, as Executive Officer, embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia, ending her third Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming through the Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, playing a key role in CrisEx-79, a joint naval amphibious exercise with the Spaniards that envisioned a scenario to repel invaders from gaining a foothold along the Spanish Mediterranean Sea coast; the evolution involved more than two dozen ships and submarines and 35,000 troops. Nimitz operated closely with Spanish destroyer SPS Mendez Nuńez (D-63), which she integrated into her screen; participated in MultiPlEx, an exercise incorporating two carrier task forces in combined operations in the Mediterranean Sea, and then steamed from the Med to the Southern Atlantic via Cape of Good Hope, operating under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, on her first Indian Ocean deployment, sailing in the North Arabian Sea and into the Gulf of Oman to a staging area off the southeast Coast of Iran operating with the 7th Fleet, North Arabian Sea and into the Gulf of Oman to a staging area off the southeast Coast of Iran referred to as “Gonzo Station,” operating with the 7th Fleet, to strengthen the U.S. Naval presence in the crucial Indian Ocean area as tensions heightened over Iran's taking of 52 American diplomats hostage, in what would turn out to be Operation Eagle Claw (Operation Rice Bowl and Operation Evening Light), the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran (commencing  at about dawn on 24 April 1980, when eight helicopters were launched from the Nimitz for there 600-mle flight to Desert One, the attempt to rescue 52 US Embassy American diplomats held hostage in Tehra, Iran), and upon arrival the ship's crew was greeted by President James E. “Jimmy” Carter, his wife Rosalynn, Secretary of Defense Harold Brown, Secretary of the Navy Edward Hidalgo, ADM Train, VADM Kinnear and thousands of families and friends, the largest given to any carrier battle group returning to the United States since the end of World War II. During this 270 day extended deployment the men operating 144 of them continuously at sea, including 115 of Iranian contingency operations on station during Operation Eagle Claw (Operation Rice Bowl and Operation Evening Light), the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran in the Indian Ocean, North Arabian Sea and into the Gulf of Oman to a staging area off the southeast Coast of Iran. CAPT James H. Mauldin, Nimitz, CO, established an almost weekly “CO’s Day” to allow the men to take time off and participate in “Flight Deck Olympics” and picnics. In addition, the Navy authorized a special ration of six cans of beer per man, which the captain dispensed in increments over a 60 day period. Nimitz turned over with USS America (CV-66) occurred while en route to the Mediterranean Sea on 15 September 1979. Both ships steamed slowly westward, several hundred miles west of the Iberian Peninsula, accomplishing a unique “Blue Water” procedure. Nimitz made a ports call at Rota, Spain from 18 to 21 September 1979, Naples, Italy from 27 to 29 September 1979 and Alexandria, Egypt from 17 to 20 October 1979; pulling in for a port call at Naples, Italy on 26 October 1979. AZ2 Kathy Hughes, Naval Air Facility (NAF) Mildenhall, U.K., re-enlisted in VA-35’s Ready Room, the first female sailor to re-enlist on board Nimitz on 27 October 1979. Hughes flew to Naples, Italy, for the ceremony while the ship visited that port. Nimitz made a port call at Naples, Italy from 26 to 30 October 1979. Nimitz played a key role in CrisEx-79 commencing on 31 October 1979, a joint naval amphibious exercise with the Spaniards that envisioned a scenario to repel invaders from gaining a foothold along the Spanish Mediterranean Sea coast; the evolution involving more than two dozen ships and submarines and 35,000 troops, operating closely with Spanish destroyer SPS Mendez Nuńez (D-63), which she integrated into her screen. LCDR John M. Luecke and LT(JG) Frederick Eliot (VA-35) completed the 50,000th landing on board Nimitz, in an A-6E attached to CVW-8 in November 1979. On 3 November 1979 during Fast Eagle 111, an F-14A (BuNo 160383), CDR David J. Formo, squadron CO, and LCDR Nicholas J. DeLello (VF-41) attached to CVW-8, failed to recover from a high speed, low level (80º–90º) practice combat air patrol interception vs. USAF General Dynamics (Grumman) F-111 Aardvarks off the eastern Spanish coast, and flew into the water “nose low,” killing both men. Nimitz played a key role in CrisEx-79 from 31 October to 12 November 1979, a joint naval amphibious exercise with the Spaniards that envisioned a scenario to repel invaders from gaining a foothold along the Spanish Mediterranean Sea coast; the evolution involved more than two dozen ships and submarines and 35,000 troops. Nimitz operated closely with Spanish destroyer SPS Mendez Nuńez (D-63), which she integrated into her screen. Nimitz made a port call at Tunis, Tunisia from 12 to 15 November 1979, Naples, Italy from 16 to 25 November 1979 and Naples, Italy from 8 to 13 December 1979. Nimitz and USS Forrestal (CV-59) participated in MultiPlEx, an exercise incorporating two carrier task forces in combined operations in the Mediterranean Sea in December 1979. During the evolution the two carriers operated as adversaries and sent mock air strikes against each other, as well as hunted submarines USS Shark (SSN-591) and Italian NMM Gianfranco Gazzana Priaroggia (S-502). Nimitz’s screen comprised guided missile cruiser USS Texas (CGN-39), guided missile destroyer USS Semmes (DDG-18) and frigate Bowen (FF-1079). CAPT John R. Batzler praised the crews of the three ships as performing “in an outstanding manner. Aircraft No. 505, an A-6A (BuNo 157011), LT (JG) Mark S. Gontkovic and LT(JG) Anthony J.R. Bilotti (VA-35) attached to CVW-8, crashed off Avgo Nisi, a small deserted Greek island north of Crete utilized as a bombing range on 6 December 1979. The third aircraft in a bombing run, 505 rolled in for its strike but suffered what appeared to be a “catastrophic wing failure,” possibly due to being struck accidentally by weapons released by the number two Intruder, impacting the water during its dive and killing both men. Aircraft No. 612, an EA-6B (BuNo 158037) from VAQ-134) attached to CVW-8, experienced “fuel starvation” during an emergency divert to Palermo, Sicily. LT(JG) Robert W. Dark, the pilot, was killed during ejection on 16 December 1979. Nimitz anchored off Naples. Captain Batzler noted that “the worst weather we have ever seen” greeted the ship, with heavy seas and winds gusting to 75 knots that threatened to prohibit the ship from entering port and crewmembers from going home for holiday leave on 21 December 1979. As the storm passed, her crew flew successive trips to the airport to enable men to catch their Christmas Charter Flight. During this period, however, Iran’s pro-Western government collapsed, forcing the Shah into exile in the United States. Tensions among opposing groups produced a state of near-anarchy within the troubled land. One of the more radical groups, “Students Following the Imam’s Line,” blamed America for the discord, and sought to mobilize support for their policies by seizing the United States Embassy in Teheran on 4 November 1979. Receiving tacit approval from the Ayatollah R. Khomeini, the extremists continued to hold 52 hostages. America was outraged by the act, the government responding by ordering naval forces to the region. No sooner did crewmembers on leave begin going home then the Navy ordered Nimitz to relieve USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) in the Indian Ocean. The ship used much of her “standdown period” for taking on supplies and preparing for operations in that region. Nimitz pulled in for a port call at Naples, Italy on 1 January 1980. VADM George E.R. Kinnear, II, Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic, held a high level planning conference concerning the ship’s deployment to the Indian Ocean, on board Nimitz off Naples on 3 January 1980. Nimitz made a port call at Naples, Italy from 1 to 3 January 1980. Nimitz sailed in response to the Iranian crisis, leading a nuclear-powered battle group including guided missile cruisers USS California (CGN-36) and USS Texas (CGN-39) from the Mediterranean Sea to the Indian Ocean on 4 January 1980. The three ships stood out of separate Italian ports and rendezvoused, sailing at a speed of advance of 25 knots around Africa via the Cape of Good Hope and into the Indian Ocean to “Gonzo Station” (derisively named by sailors serving there, supposedly deriving the term from Gulf of Oman Naval Zoo Operation). Nimitz crossed the equator, her “shellbacks” initiating 4,423 “pollywogs” into King Neptune’s Realm on 12 January 1980. On 23 January 1980, Nimitz arrived on “Gonzo Station” on 22 January 1980. A goodly company of ships assembled under TG 70.1 for several hours of formation steaming and station keeping, comprising: aircraft carriers Nimitz, USS Midway (CV-41) and Kitty Hawk; guided missile cruisers USS Bainbridge (CGN-25), USS California (CGN-36), USS Jouett (CG-29) and USS USS Texas (CGN-39); guided missile destroyers USS Berkeley (DDG-15) and USS Parsons (DDG-33); frigates USS Knox (FF-1052) and USS Stein (FF-1065); replenishment oilers USS Roanoke (AOR-7) and USS Wabash (AOR-5); and oilers USS Mispillion (AO-105) and USS Passumpsic (AO-107). Soviet aircraft, ships and submarines regularly shadowed Nimitz while she operated at Gonzo Station; the bombers consistently forced Tomcat aircrew from VF-41 and VF-84 to intercept and escort them away from the carrier. Soviet modified Kashin class guided missile destroyer USS Sderzhanny (DDG-286) closely shadowed Nimitz during much of this period. The ship’s standard schedule called for flying five–six flights of aircraft launches–known as cycles–a day for six days, followed by a two day stand down for aircraft maintenance, a grueling experience for her crew. Most of Nimitz’s stand down days nonetheless included launching alert aircraft or conducting helo operations. In addition, the crew performed 10 “no notice drills”–exercises designed to counter missile threats to the battle group–while in the area. The carrier operated principally under Battle Group 2, commanded by RADM James R. Sanderson. On April 24, 1980 eight RH-53D helicopters departed the ship to execute. Operation Eagle Claw (Operation Rice Bowl and Operation Evening Light), the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran, launched from Nimitz flight deck to rescue the hostages held by the Iranians from 24 to 25 April 1980, while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) aircraft supported aircraft from Nimitz. As hundreds of men of the ship’s company cheered and gave them “thumbs’ up” signs, eight Sikorsky RH-53D Sea Stallions took off for Desert One, a pre-selected refueling site in the Iranian desert, a distance of almost 600 nautical miles, to load a 120 man Army assault team and proceed to two additional sites. Six Lockheed C-130 Hercules with the ground rescue forces flew on a different track and time schedule from al Masirah Island, Oman, to Desert One. Helicopter No. 6 experienced a mechanical malfunction approximately two hours into the operation and was forced to come about. A haboob, a huge dust cloud, slammed into the formation barely an hour later. The helo crews resolutely broke out of it and continued, but encountered a second larger haboob almost immediately. Helicopter No. 5 suffered a “critical” failure and returned to Nimitz. Helicopter No. 2 suffered multiple mechanical failures while en route, though the crew chose to continue to Desert One to effect repairs, which subsequently proved impossible without facilities and parts. Planning called for a minimum of six operational helos to rescue the hostages, and with only five capable of continuing, commanders aborted the mission. While repositioning a helo at Desert One to permit another to top off its fuel tanks for the return, however, one of the helos collided with a refueling Hercules. Flames immediately engulfed both aircraft, killing eight men and injuring five others. Only the swift evacuation of the burning plane prevented further casualties, but ammunition on both aircraft began cooking off, throwing molten fragments into the area. The tragic mishap damaged one or more of the Sea Stallions beyond repair, so the helo crews transferred into the Hercules and returned. In the confusion of the darkness combined with possible discovery by the Iranians, an assessment was difficult without more time, something the would-be rescuers did not possess. Air Force MAJs Richard L. Bakke, Harold L. Lewis and Lyn D. McIntosh, CAPT Charles T. McMillan, II, and TSGT Joel C. Mayo (8th Special Operations Squadron); and Marine SSGT Dewey L. Johnson, SGT John D. Harvey and CPL George N. Holmes, Jr., died. The operation was feasible and probably represented the plan with the best chance of success at the time the mission was launched,” those who examined the mission’s failure believed, “Planning was adequate except for the number of backup helicopters and the provisions for weather contingencies.” Gonzos I and II pitted elements of the battle group in two-day multiple threat scenarios against each other from March to April 1980. Nimitz passed her 100th day at sea. ADM Thomas B. Hayward, Chief of Naval Operations, authorized the crew to celebrate with a “two-beer ration,” the first time that alcoholic beverages were officially permitted on board a U.S. Navy man of war since the abolition of the wine mess during WWI on 12 April 1980. From the Indian Ocean, Nimitz helicopters and later planes, flew from either “Gonzo Station,” or the North Arabian Sea and into the Gulf of Oman to a staging area off the southeast Coast of Iran operating with the 7th Fleet, to strengthen the U.S. Naval presence in the crucial Indian Ocean area as tensions heightened over Iran's taking of 52 American diplomats hostage, in what would turn out to be Operation Eagle Claw (Operation Rice Bowl and Operation Evening Light), the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran. USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), USS South Carolina (CGN-37) and USS Virginia (CGN-38) relieved Nimitz and her group, including guided missile cruisers California (CGN-37) and Texas (CGN-39) from 7 to 8 May 1980, after the crew endured 108 days, operating 144 of them continuously at sea, including 115 of Iranian contingency operations on station during Operation Eagle Claw (Operation Rice Bowl and Operation Evening Light), the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran in the Indian Ocean, North Arabian Sea and into the Gulf of Oman to a staging area off the southeast Coast of Iran referred to as “Gonzo Station.” CAPT James H. Mauldin, Nimitz, CO, established an almost weekly “CO’s Day” to allow the men to take time off and participate in “Flight Deck Olympics” and picnics. In addition, the Navy authorized a special ration of six cans of beer per man, which the captain dispensed in increments over a 60 day period. Coming about, Nimitz began her 11,500 mile voyage back to Norfolk, stopping en route off Ascension Island to embark inspectors. “…I told you that I had confidence in your high state of preparedness for any task which might be demanded of you,” ADM Hayward told the crew during their time in the Gulf. “You proved without question in the ensuing months that my confidence and that of your countrymen across America and your shipmates throughout the Navy was especially well placed…Your countrymen are very proud of you, and they have every right to be.” Ports of call include: Rota, Spain; Naples, Italy; Alexandria, Egypt; Naples, Italy; Naples, Italy; Tunis, Tunisia and Naples, Italy; Athens, Greece and Naples, Italy. USS California (CGN-36), USS South Carolina (CGN-37), USS Texas (CGN-39) and USS Reeves (CG-24) joined Nimitz as part of her task force. Ports of call included: Naples, Italy and Ascension Island. USS California (CGN-36), USS South Carolina (CGN-37), USS Texas (CGN-39) and USS Reeves (CG-24) joined Nimitz as part of her task force with Carrier Air Wing 8 embarked; reclassified CVN-68 on June 1975. Her fourth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since she was commissioned on 3 May 1975 by President Gerald Ford (10 September 1979 to 26 May 1980)” (Ref. 4, 72, 84A, 371, 372A, 1200, 1202, 1203, 1204, 1205, 1206, 1207 & 1207A).

 

     “Commodore Gelke, DESRON Five was with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) until late May 1980, relieving Commodore Treiber, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) Twenty Three in March 1980” (Ref. 1275W10).

 

    “Captain Thomas Edward Shanahan assumed command of USS Independence (CVA-62) on 28 May 1980, relieving Captain Thomas Campbell ("Tom") Watson, Jr., USNA 1954, 19th Commanding Officer, serving from 9 September 1978 to 28 May 1980” (Ref. 1156A).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) relieved USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on station off Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) remained on station off Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan until the USS Midway (CV-41) could relieve Coral Sea and following a period in Yokosuka, Midway was again on duty, this time relieving USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 30 May 1980 on standby south of the Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan following the potential of civil unrest in the Republic of Korea” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 20 February to 30 May 1980” (Ref. 72).

 

    “Following a period in Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Eddie Inman ("Hoagy") Carmichael, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked was again on duty, this time relieving USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 30 May 1980 on standby south of the Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan following the potential of civil unrest in the Republic of Korea” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(30 May to June 1980)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (Forward Deployed)

Sea of Japan

CVW-5

NF

30 May 1980

Jun 1980

Cruise

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier

Relieved USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 30 May 1980 on standby south of the Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan following the potential of civil unrest in the Republic of Korea.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4J

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4J

VA-93

Ravens - Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VMAQ-2 Det.

Playboys - Marines Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

 

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) receives the Meritorious Unit Commendation and the Naval Air Force Pacific Battle Efficiency 'E' an the best carrier in the Pacific Fleet

 

    “In June 1980, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation and the Naval Air Force Pacific Battle Efficiency 'E' an the best carrier in the Pacific Fleet for her operations connected with the Iranian crisis, when she spent 64 days in operations and year long efficiency evaluation” (Ref. 1- Kitty Hawk).

 

    “Rear Admiral James E. Service was assigned Carrier Group Eight from May 1980 to June 1981” (Ref. 1-Independence, 72, 76, 325 & 1148B).

 

    “USS Independence (CV-62) spent a brief period in June 1980 conducting Carrier Qualifications (CQ’s) for east coast squadrons, with Indy’s new skipper Captain R. E. Shanahan in command” (Ref. 1148B).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) visits Korea on her way home

 

    Arriving in Korea in June 1980, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) spent only a few days anchored prior to arriving Alameda, Calif.

 

    “VADM R. F Schoultz, Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet visits USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 4 June 1980 and Kitty Hawk hosted 130 Havisupi Indian children from Arizona on 5 June 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

    “In June 1980, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Eddie Inman ("Hoagy") Carmichael, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending operations south of the Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan following the potential of civil unrest in the Republic of Korea, time relieving USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 30 May 1980. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G (30 May to June 1980)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

 30/05/80 to 06/80

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

Cruise

30/05/80 to 06/80

 “The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

 

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from June to 14 July 1980” (Ref. 72).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) returns to Alameda, California from the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea during the Iranian Crisis

 

     “On 11 June 1980, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 (tail code NK), Captain David N. Rogers; RADM Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USN, Commander, Carrier Group THREE, CTG 70.3 and Captain Ming E.  Chang, Chief of Staff, Carrier Group THREE and Commodore Gelke, DESRON Five was with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) until late May 1980, relieving Commodore Treiber, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) Twenty Three in March 1980 embarked arrived Alameda, California with Captain Richard Michael Dunleavy, as Commanding Officer, relieving Captain Stanley Roger Arthur, 30th Commanding Officer, serving from 3 June 1978 to 22 December 1979 at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, while Commodore Gelke, DESRON Five was with the ship until late May 1980, relieving Commodore Treiber, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) Twenty Three in March 1980 (NHC Battle Order p _), ending her her 13th WestPac deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, on her first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment during the Iranian Revolution & Iran Hostage Crisis to strengthen the U.S. Naval presence in the crucial Indian Ocean area as tensions heightened over Iran's taking of 52 American diplomats’ hostage, in what would turn out to be Operation Evening Light during Operation Eagle Claw, the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran. Arriving Hawaii the morning of the 21st of November 1979, supplies and provisions were loaded, and Coral Sea departed the following day, arriving at Pusan, Korea on 10 December 1979, for two days of liberty, departing on 12 December 1979, Coral Sea arrived at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 20 December, remaining in port until 9 January 1980, during which time on 22 December, Captain Richard M Dunleavy, USN, relieved Captain Stanley R. Arthur USN as CO, to become the first Naval Flight Officer in history to command an aircraft carrier, with Commander Curtain, USN (frocked to Captain), the previous Operations Department Head, Dunleavy’s XO. Coral Sea departed Subic Bay, arriving Thailand on 18 January 1980, departing two days later on the 20th for Singapore, and five days out of Thailand, Coral Sea pulled into Singapore Bay for a four-day rest and relaxation liberty on the 25th of January 1980. Coral Sea departed on the 29th, and the crew quickly got underway with operations, headed for the OPAREA just east of Singapore where the ship crossed deck with the USS Kitty Hawk (CV-43) on 30th January, loading of weapons, all variety of needed supplies, and mail, passing over the equator, the same day, the Shellback initiation was held off until the 2nd of February, due to the supplies from the cross decking on the flight deck. Coral Sea headed through the Malacca Straits, and then on track to the Indian Ocean on 31st January, arriving approximately 5° North of the equator, on 2 February 1980, Coral Sea entered the IMPERVIM NEPTVINI REGIS, spending two days standing down, cross-decking with USS Midway (CV-41) on 4 February 1980, transferring supplies and crossing the two E-2B aircraft, while a turn over brief was also conducted between both ship’s officers. Coral Sea with CVW-14 Air Wing and Rear Admiral D. C. Chambers, COMCARGROUP THREE embarked, joined up with the USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and her escort ships, operating in the North Arabian Sea on Gonzo Station 4 February 1980, established following the November 1979 takeover of the American Embassy in Tehran, Iran. Coral Sea was at sea 87 continuous days (29 January to 24 April 1980), when Operation Evening Light in support of the  top-secret mission “Operation Eagle Claw” commencing at about dawn on 24 April 1980, in connection with the Iranian crisis, when eight helicopters were launched from the Nimitz sailing in the Arabian Sea off the southeast Coast of Iran for there 600-mile flight to Desert One, the attempt to rescue 52 US Embassy American diplomats held hostage in Tehran Iran, while the mission was aborted in the Iranian Desert when the number of RH-53's operational helicopters fell below the minimum needed to transport the attack force and hostages out of Iran. Operating along side Nimitz, with her airwing, concluding operations the next day, Coral Sea remained on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea until relieved by USS Constellation (CV-64) on 30 April 1980, herself reaching the eastern Indian Ocean when the unsuccessful on 24 April 1980 raid to free American hostages took place. After cross decking supplies and spare parts, Coral Sea had been in the Indian Ocean/North Arabian Sea 93 continuous days since her departure from Singapore on 29 January 1980, arriving in the Indian Ocean on 1 February 1980, steaming through the Malacca Straits on 31 January 1980, arriving on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea between 4 and 5 February, and was at sea nine days prior to Coral Sea’s arrival at Subic Bay on 9 May 1980. Coral Sea was at sea 102 consecutive days at sea since her departure from Singapore Bay on 29 January 1980, departing Subic Bay, R.P., spending a week in port, Coral Sea proceeded to Korea but while in direction, Coral Sea was ordered to the south of the Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan, following the potential of civil unrest in the Republic of Korea, arriving off Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on 22 May 1980, remaining on station off Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan until relieved by Midway on 30 May 1980, arriving in Korea in June 1980, Coral Sea spent only a few days anchored prior to arriving Alameda, Calif. Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hi.; Pusan, the largest port city in South Korea and is located on the southeastern-most tip of the Korean peninsula; Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines; Phattaya Beach, a city in Thailand, a beach resort popular with tourists and expatriates. It is located on the east coast of the Gulf of Thailand, about 165 km southeast of Bangkok within but not part of Amphoe Bang Lamung (Banglamung) in the province of Chonburi; and Singaporee, officially the Republic of Singapore, is a Southeast Asian island city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometres (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south). Squadrons: VMFA-323, F-4N; VMFA-531, F-4N; VA-97, A-7E; VA-27, A-7E; VA-196, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-113, E-2B; *VFP-63 Det. 2, RF-8G and HC-1 Det. 3, SH-3G. Reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975; involved in two Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh on 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam peace coast  patrol cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). Her 13th foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960). Coral Sea first decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Her 24th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 1 October 1947 (13 November 1979 to 11 June 1980)” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72, 1275W9 & 1275W10).

 

 13/11/79 – 11/06/80

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  “WESTPAC”

 Navy Expeditionary Service Medal –

 Indian Ocean - Iran Hostage support*D

 5 Feb to 5 May 1980* D

 13th

 Meritorious Unit Commendation

 7 March 1978 to 1 May 1980

 13th

 Superior Medical Service

 1980

 13th

 Sea Service Deployment Ribbon - Indian

 Ocean - Iran Hostage support*D

 5 Feb to 5 May 1980* D

 13th

Reference 34, 35 & 43 reflect Chat info.

 

    When USS Coral Sea (CV-43) arrived in San Francisco tugboats spraying water greeted us. Other boats were they’re honking their horns.  Many smaller boats were on hand but stayed a distance away from the ship.  Flowers and confetti blanket of the ship were hung over the Golden Gate Bridge.  The families of the crew were on the pier and ship horns were announcing our arrival. It was quite a thing to see from the Ships Flight Deck.

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) 79/80 “WestPac” return to San Francisco, Ca.

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) 79/80 “WestPac” return to San Francisco, Ca.

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) 79/80 “WestPac” return to San Francisco, Ca.

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) 79/80 “WestPac” return to San Francisco, Ca.

 

Operations Department Yeoman Bruce Wayne Henion was among other Sailors manning the flight deck bow

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) conducted GONZO 3-80 exercise

 

     “USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) conducted GONZO 3-80 exercise in Northern Arabian Sea from 21 to 23 June 1980” (Ref. 383C-1980).

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) collides with a Bangladesh merchant ship in the Arabian Sea

 

    “On 26 June 1980, USS Constellation (CV-64) collides with a Bangladesh merchant ship in the Arabian Sea. The U.S. Navy says there was minor damage to both ships” (Ref. 84A).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) completed Ship’s Restricted Availability (SRA)

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted Ship’s Restricted Availability (SRA) Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 27 March to 27 June 1980. Food Service spaces were completely refurbished during SRA including the installation of the fast food shipalt and the forward EDF was then named the Kitty Hawk Express.” The shipalt also included the complete renovation of the forward butcher shop, forward vegetable preparation room and bakery, and the installation of PRC decking in the entire forward EDF. Numerous galley and mess deck equipment was procured, installed and calibrated including an aft galley electric serving line, CPO and EDF electric griddles, convection ovens, deep fat fryers, electric toasters, etc. Virtually all the Food Service spaces were painted and retiled including the galleys, mess decks, head, berthing compartment, passageways and dry provisions storerooms. In order to easily accomplish all S-2 renovation projects during SRA without a negative impact on the crew, the ship’s EDF was closed and the crew was issued Comrats in order to subsist at the NAS North Island HF. The impact of subsisting off ship was lessened by establishing “Le Cafe Hawk” in hangar bay one. The cafe operation included twenty-two vending machines, over thirty umbrella tables, decorative artificial shrubs, and several electronic games to give both the crew and SRA contractor personnel a pleasant place to eat and relax on board. The cafe operation as well as the subsisting off ship procedure was highly effective and is being copied by other carriers entering SRA. The rest of the year was spent training S-2 personnel in the operation of the new fast food facility and in continuing to refurbish EDF facilities and install new equipment. Storerooms and reefers were finally topped-off in late November to prepare Kitty Hawk for any early deployment contingency. A four month SRA period allowed the Supply Office ample time to make many innovative and much needed improvements including installation of portable salad bars, new sneeze shields, pie shelves, false overheads, reupholstered wardroom furniture, new steam tables, ice cream machine, ice cream freezers, new tables in Wardroom I, new steamers, construction of Wardroom I office lounge, new terrazo decks in both galleys, installation of flake ice machines in both wardrooms, modernization of the divisional office and replacement of beverage machines. In addition, electronic game machines were placed in the Wardroom I1 lounge and all department head staterooms received false overheads, improved lighting and new carpeting.  The MS personnel benefited with the construction of two small enlisted lounges in both wardrooms. The mess operated smoothly inport and during the CQ periods with the majority of the mess members electing to utilize the pay-by-the-mealpunch-ticket system. This task involved removal of all stores from storerooms, chipping, priming, painting and restowing stores. All AVCAL storerooms except one were already empty at this time, but six COSAL storerooms had to be completely emptied. S-8 Division was able to completely rehabilitate three passageways, six storerooms, and the mezzanine area.

 

The following major events/accomplishments occurred during the 1980 SRA overhaul:

 

a. (U) 187,000 square ft of non-skid was completed on the flight deck.

b. (U) Completed 69,500 square ft of non-skid on hanger deck.

c. (U) Restacked no. 2 arresting gear engine.

d. (U) Flame sprayed 1,200 padeyes in the Fly 1 area

 

Upon return from the “WestPac” deployment the AIMD undertook an extensive space rehabilitation program and assisted in the installation of the new AN/AAM-60 (V6) Electro Optical System Test Set and the AN/USM-453A DIGITAL Integrated Module Test Equipment (DIMOTE). The addition of these two new automated test benches added support capabilities for the A-7E Aircraft forward looking infrared (FLIR) System. Additionally, a new POD Storage area, configured to safely and efficiently store EA-6B POD’S and the new A-7E FLIR POD’S, was built as a permanent installation aboard Kitty Hawk. SRA-80 brought the opportunity to rework all Communications Department spaces and selected communications equipment. During this availability, all High Frequency (HF) antennas were removed and completely refurbished. Additionally, the Communications Department completed class “B’ overhauls of all teletype equipment. A renewed effort was put forth to totally revamp CR and CS division head and berthing spaces. These efforts paid off nicely and now both divisions enjoy clean, comfortable and pleasant heads/berthing spaces consistent with a CV environment. Additionally, all working spaces were painted and retiled which greatly improved the physical appearance of a11 working spaces. Various new systems and equipments were added to the already large communications suite aboard Kitty Hawk. Significant equipages include the AN/WSC-6V(2) SHF satellite transceiver and four USQ-69 stand alone message processing devices. Also, NAVMACS V2/MPD was successfully incorporated to allow for the USQ-69’s and is now a standard modus operandi. Additionally, Kitty Hawk’s secure voice capabilities were expanded to include two Parkhill secure voice units and an additional CV-3333. The SFOMS period from 28 January to 11 April 1980 was utilized to paint and tile many of the departmental spaces. During SRA, nerve agent antidote refrigerators were installed on Ward I and the After Auxiliary Battle Dressing Station. 2. (U) During calendar year 1980, the Engineering Department completed three major projects: a. Installation of ship’s CET System, b. Re-tubing of 1B Boiler (JAN/FEB) (normally an ROH/COH job) and c. Replaced 3 Main Thrust Bearing (JAN/E’EB) (normally an ROH/COH job). Installation of WSC-6 communications equipment caused replacement of the SLA-1OA with the SLA-1OB system. The SLA-1OB is still being evaluated. ASWM SRA renovations included redesigning the watch officer station for both external and internal communications, installation of a WIG-controlled scan-converted closed circuit TV system, and the Integrated Command ASW Prediction System (ICAPS) package. With ICAPS, the ASWM processes oceanographic data with an onboard computer, enabling them to rapidly provide tailored acoustic and tactical information for direct support of Fleet ASW operations. A file of worldwide oceanographic historical data significantly reduced dependence on outside assistance for tactical planning. In May, the ASWM operational program was replaced with the new 401B program. Members of the ASWM attended the Integrated Logistics Support Management Team (ILSMT) Conference and the Acoustic Intelligence Conference. Meteorological and Oceanographic participated in an ONR sponsored project of satellite derived sea surface temperature verification in conjunction with the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. The SMQ-10 satellite antennae were overhauled at the factory and the SMQ-6 satellite receiver was installed in the ASWM to assist onboard prediction. Electronics Material Carrier Intelligence Center briefing capabilities were significantly improved by the installation of the AN/SXQ-8 NIPS CCTV system during SRA 80. The AN/WSC-6 SHF satellite communications system was installed for technical and operational evaluation. During CATCC SRA, the entire CCA crew made two trips to NATTC Memphis, Tennessee for team training. The CATCC Dair System continues to provide high reliability and has made a dramatic improvement in the quality of control provided air crews. A complete renovation of AIROPS spaces greatly increased the functionality and appearance of the spaces. The ships Intelligence Center received a new closed circuit television system (AN/SXQ-8) to facilitate the flow of intelligence to key areas of the ship. Additional equipment installed in CVIC during the year included the Modular Imagery Interpretation system, a data display indicator and teleprinter, a MUX-2 multiplexer, the RD 358 ½” tape drive and the VHY-2 disc storage unit” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1980).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted Don Diego and the "Fairest of the Fairn (Tracy Alexander) from the Southern California Exposition visit on 28 June 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

Enlisted Service Members Evaluation for the period: 01/02/80 to 30/06/80

 

Rate/Rank: YNSN Bruce Wayne Henion

                                                          

Scale from 4.0; 3.8; 3.6; 3.4; 3.2; 3.0; 2.8. 2.6; 2.4 and 2.2

 

Professional Performance: 3.8

 

Ectremely effective and reliable. Works well independently:

 

Highly effective and reliable. Needs only limited supervision.

 

Military Behavior: 3.2

 

How well member accepts authority and conforms to standards of military behavior.

 

Conforms to standards of military standards.

 

Leadership and Supervisory Ability: 3.4

 

Member’s ability to plan and assign work to others and effectively direct there activities:

 

Handles personnel very effectively.

 

Military Appearance: 3.6

 

Member’s military appearance and neatness in person and dress.

 

Smart. Neat and correct in appearance.

 

Adaptability: 3.4

 

How well member gets along and works with others.

 

Gets a along very well with others. Contributes to good morale.

 

DESCRIPTION OF ASSIGNED TASKS:

 

Assigned dudes include the typing and filing of correspondence, messages, memorandums, LOIs, Green Sheets, Notices, Instructions and other duties normally associated within the Yeoman rating. Collateral dudes include: Division Supply Petty Officer and Quebec Hose Team as Unit Romeo Phonetalker. Stands Ops Duty Yeoman for Ops Department at sea and in port. Repeated from previous evual.

 

EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE (Includes comments on: Members performance in the area of equal opportunity; also, member’s assigned Jury to overseas or CONUS BASE; deploying units which result in inner actions with foreign nationals should be evaluated in this area.) *Comments must be justified of specifically. History lost.

                                                                                                               

Height: 61” Width: 170 lbs

 

J. W. TAYLOR, CAPT, USN

30 June 1980

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) AIMD won the COMNAVAIRPAC BLACK “En for outstanding achievement in the area of aircraft intermediate level maintenance management and production efficiency in support of the embarked air wing, for the eighteen month competitive period ending on 30 June 1980. Also during the “heat of simulated battle” of REFTRA, Kitty Hawk Communications received the COMNAVAIRPAC Green “C” for the eighteen month competitive cycle which ended 30 June. Kitty Hawk Pre-loaded Mer/Ter bomb assembly crew deployed to NAS Fallon, Nevada to support CVW-15 for two weeks in June 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

Thirteenth “WestPac” and first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment (Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw during the Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis (Iran History, Air Arm) and Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on the way home via Korea), operating with other Aircraft Carriers and upon completion conducted training operations and Carrier Qualifications (Iran History, Air Arm, Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis

(13 November 1979 to 30 June 1980)

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 1 – (13 to 30 November 1979)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 December 1979)

Part 3 – (1 to 31 January 1980)

Part 4 – (1 to 24 February 1980)

Part 5 – (25 February to 20 April 1980)

Part 6 – (21 to 24 April 1980)

Part 7 – (25 April to 30 June 1980)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 7 – (25 April to 30 June 1980)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4