Thirteenth “WestPac” and first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment (Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw during the Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis (Iran History, Air Arm) and Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on the way home via Korea), operating with other Aircraft Carriers and upon completion conducted training operations and Carrier Qualifications (Iran History, Air Arm, Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis

(13 November 1979 to 30 June 1980)

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 1 – (13 to 30 November 1979)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 December 1979)

Part 3 – (1 to 31 January 1980)

Part 4 – (1 to 24 February 1980)

Part 5 – (25 February to 20 April 1980)

Part 6 – (21 to 24 April 1980)

Part 7 – (25 April to 30 June 1980)

 

 

 

Faddey Bellingsauzen (AGOR)

 

Chapter XXXIV

Appendix II

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived San Diego, Ca., concluding Indian Ocean operations during the Iranian crisis

 

    “At 1019, 25 February 1980, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with CVW-15 embarked arrived Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California, with Captain W. Lewis Chatham as Commanding Officer, disembarking CVW-11 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station Lemoore, ending her 12th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet (having originally been scheduled only for “WestPac” with a return date of 17 December 1979), while participation of MultiPleEx 1-80 barely 10 hours into the exercise, in the wake of the assassination of South Korean President Park C. Lee, was cancelled, Kitty Hawk coming about and steaming to a position in the East China Sea off Cheju Do. Super Typhoon Judy “disrupted” Fortress Gale, a large-scale amphibious exercise in the Okinawa area, forcing Kitty Hawk to evade the storm and after a visit cut short to Subic Bay, Philippines, on her third Indian Ocean and second Arabian Sea deployment, extending operations North Western Arabian Sea, ordered by the President in response to the Ayatollah R. Khomeini tacit approval given to the extremists who continued to hold 52 Americans hostage at the U.S. Embassy in Teheran, beginning on 4 November 1979 when one of the more radical groups, “Students Following the Imam’s Line,” blamed the U.S. for the discord, and sought to mobilize support for their policies by seizing the U.S. Embassy in Teheran. Kitty Hawk operated at “Camel Station,” in the northwestern Arabian Sea as flagship, TF 70 and TG 70.2 (Battle Group Bravo). The Secretary of the Navy, Edward Hidalgo, flew aboard early in the morning to greet the crew, with VADM Schoultz, Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, COMNAVAIRPAC, escorting, along with VADM L. Baggett, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet; VADM R. F. Schoultz, Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet and Mr. Cushman Dow, President, San Diego Chamber of Commerce visited on 25 February 1980. The Kitty Hawk’s, with all hands "Manning the Rail," steamed majestically past Point Loma and up the channel to her berth at NAS North Island. Many crewmen wept joyfully at the splendor of what was described as the largest homecoming for any ship since WWII. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 1 June 1979. En route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Kitty Hawk conducted TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase I from 30 May to 4 June 1979. COMTHIRDFLT visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) en route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 4 to 5 June and Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 6 June 1979. En route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Kitty Hawk conducted TRANSITEX 8-79 II, MIDPAC operations and MISSILEX Barking Sands from 5 and 8 June 1979. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 6 June and Wabash (AOR-5) on 8 June 1979, during which time Kitty Hawk conducted Exercise TORPEX Barster Range from 6 and 8 June 1979; followed by NSSMS shoot Barking Sands and SINEX of opportunity on the 8th, pulling in for a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 9 June 1979, conducting TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase II: two ASW TACREAD’s from 30 May to 9 June 1979, import from 9 to 11 June 1979, Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 14 June and on 19 June 1979. Kitty Hawk conducted TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase III: ten ASW TSCWD’s and one ASLW TACREAD exorcises tested and developed Battle Croup AAW posture, enhanced ASW teamwork, and identified and rectified communications link shortcomings from 12 to 21 June 1979, in chopping COMSEVENFLT OPERA on the 21st. Commander Third Fleet considered this training exceptionally well executed. On both 19 and 20 June 1979, immediately prior to in chopping to COMSEVENFLT, Kitty Hawk and embarked Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN detected and intercepted Soviet TU-95 Bear reconnaissance aircraft. This was the first of many overt reconnaissance events conducted by Soviet naval and air elements throughout the ship’s deployment. En route to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 23 June and VQ-1 Det. B flew aboard Kitty Hawk on 24 June 1979. Between 25 and 23 June 1979, Kitty Hawk and Air Wing team expended a CUF, package in the Guam operating area while en route to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, dropping CRAE Package and ran GARF range (Guam) from 25 to 27 June 1979 and conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 27 June 1979. CTF SEVEN Commander Task Force SEVEN SEVEN (Commander Carrier Group FIVE) and staff embarked Kitty Hawk on 29 June 1979, conducting UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5), while en route to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines and FORTRESS WARRIOR on 29 June; with NOTNOEX following on the 30th, BEAVER SNARE on 1 July 1979, encountered Typhoon Ellis on 3 July 1979, en route to the Philippines from 21 June to 4 July 1979, arriving Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on the 5th, delayed by Typhoon Ellis, evading the storm from 3 to 4 July 1979. The Marine Detachment provided color guard during Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron One Three Five Change of Command ceremony on 5 July 1979. Kitty Hawk departed Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 17 July 1979, in port from 5 to 17 July 1979, for operations in the South China Sea, conducting UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) the day of departure. En route to Pattaya, Thailand, Kitty Hawk commenced Exercise COPE THUNDER 79-8 in the South China Sea on 17 July 1979, conducted MINEX ALFA in the Bananga Bay; TORPEX in the Subic OPAREA on 18 July and conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 19 July 1979. Kitty Hawk conducted Exercise Beaver Snare in the South China Sea on 20 July 1979, conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 22 July 1979, conducted READIEX LOADEX and UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 26 July 1979 in the South China Sea, followed by Search and assistance operations for Vietnamese "boat people" from 24 to 28 July 1979. This humanitarian search and assistance action was ordered by the Commander in Chief, President Jimmy Carter, for the express purpose of aiding Vietnamese refugee “boat people” who were escaping the tyranny and oppression of communism in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. There was a great deal of sympathy among the crew of the Kitty Hawk for the plight of these courageous people. As a result, a high state of vigilance was maintained and a total of 114 people were ultimately rescued through the efforts of the ship and air wing. Kitty Hawk) was underway in the South China Sea en route to Pattaya, Thailand, conducting operations that included air wing/refresher operations, extended range AAWEX’s associated with Exercise COPE THUNDER 79-8 in the South China Sea from 17 to 28 July 1979, and Vietnamese refugee search and assistance operations. The Marine Detachment provided color guard during Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Eight Change of Command ceremony on 28 July 1979. Kitty Hawk (CV-63) pulled in for a port call at Pattaya, Thailand, dropping anchor in the port on 29 July 1979, conducting refugee search and assistance operations in the South China Sea while en route from 17 to 29 July 1979, raising anchor and departed Pattaya, Thailand on 1 August 1979, inport from 29 July to 1 August 1979. On the 29th, drug overdose death of ADAN Alfred Schuler occurred. Kitty Hawk will continue refugee search and assistance operations in the South China Sea while en route Hong Kong. Kitty Hawk hosted 65 Thai military personnel and family from 27 July to 1 August 1979. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 4 August and hosted Correspondents: Alice Villadolid, N.Y. Tines Joe Cantrell, Time; Hike Baltye, Reuters; Peter Yu, NBC; Eddie Martinez, NBC; Young Sang, NBC; Katoumi Yokobori, Asaki and Shimbun (Bangkok) from 2 to 6 August 1979. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 9 August, pulling in for a port call at Hong Kong, dropping anchor in the port on 10 August 1979, conducting refugee search and assistance operations in the South China Sea while en route from 1 to 10 August. Kitty Hawk raised anchor and departed Hong Kong on 10 August 1979, in port from 10 to 15 August 1979. American Consul General, Hong Kong visited on the 14th. The 14th ended with sadness with the loss of CWO2 Neil Peters as a result of cardiac arrest. Kitty Hawk hosted 25 Hong Kong businessmen and public officials from 10 to 15 August 1979 and commenced exercise Fortress Cale upon departure. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 16 August and Exercise MISSILEX Poro Pt. in the South China Sea on 17 August 1979, conducting three days later an UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 20 August. Kitty Hawk conducted Exercise BUZZARDEX 3-79 in the South China Sea the same day. Although the modified exercise provided the ship and air wing team’s first ASU training since the transit and included a well-executed anti-missile BUZZARDEX, no close air support training was accomplished during the exercise. Kitty Hawk commenced Exercise Fortress Cale, a large-scale amphibious exercise in the Okinawa area for which the Kitty Hawk battle Group was tasked to provide air support commencing on 23 August. Admiral Davis (CINCPACFLT) and Vice Admiral Foley (COMSEVENTHFLT) were aboard to present the coveted NEY Award to Kitty Hawk on 23 August 1979. This award was won for having the best food services among all aircraft carriers in the Pacific Fleet. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 26 August and held CTG SEVEN SEVEN/COMCARGRU FIVE Change of Command ceremony aboard on 27 August 1979. Evasion of Super-Typhoon Judy disrupted the first half of exercise Fortress Cale, a large-scale amphibious exercise in the Okinawa area for which the Kitty Hawk battle Group was tasked to provide air support from 23 to 29 August 1979. The Marine Detachment provided color guard during Commander Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet Change of Command ceremony on 27 August. On 28 and 29 August 1979, Kitty Hawk and Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN participated in USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX K4-79 before commencing a five day Pusan, Korea import periods. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 29 August, pulling in for a port call at Pusan, Korea, dropping anchor on 30 August. Kitty Hawk raised anchor and departed Pusan, Korea on 4 September 1979, in port from 30 August to 4 September 1979, Kitty Hawk will conduct operations in the East South China Sea and Philippine Sea, en route to the Philippines, conducted MMR-1 economizer fire on 4 September and MISSILEX Poro Pt. on 8 September 1979; encountering a transiting Soviet task group led by a Sverdlov-class cruiser from 4 to 8 September 1979. Old Nick 203 (NL-203), an F-14A Tomcat Jet Fighter (BuNo 160672), LT Lloyd A. Vermillion, and LT(JG) Richard W. Cummings, VF-111 attached to CVW-15, launched at 1933, 8 September 1979 for a night carrier qualifications, while Kitty Hawk steamed in the South China Sea. About 27 seconds into the flight, the “classic thump bang” and a series of flashes on the starboard side of the Tomcat indicated an engine fire. Unable to regain control, both men ejected, being recovered by a SAR helo. En route to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, Kitty Hawk conducted operations in the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea during the 4 to 8 September transit to Subic Bay included MMR-1 economizer fire on 4 September, tactical air support to U.S. Air Force B-52 mining operations during exercise BUSY STORM from 5 to 9 September 1979 and an ASW encounter which provided valuable free play and tactical planning opportunities. Ocean surveillance operations during this period obtained high-quality photography of a transiting Soviet Navy SVERDLOV cruiser Task Group. Kitty Hawk conducted MISSILEX Poro Pt. and VF-111 lost an F-14 203 at sea, while the crew was rescued on 8 September 1979; encountering a transiting Soviet task group led by a Sverdlov-class cruiser from 4 to 8 September 1979; arriving Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on the 9th. Kitty Hawk Marine Detachment provided color guard during an official visit of the American Ambassador to the Republic of the Philippines on 15 September 1979. Kitty Hawk DACT Det. 3 TFW Clark AFB from 11 to 22 September and Marine Detachment provided color guard during Fighter Squadron One Hundred Eleven and Attack Squadron Twenty-Two Change of Command ceremony on 25 September and Kitty Hawk conducted Exercise NEWBOY 79-4 while at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 26 September 1979. COMASWWINGPAC and COMFITAEWINGPAC visited Kitty Hawk while at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on from 26 to 27 September 1979. Kitty Hawk commenced CONRECEX 80-1 on 3 October 1979. Following an almost month long mid-deployment upkeep period in Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, in port from 9 September to 4 October 1979, the ship departed on 4 October bound for Yokosuka, Japan for operations in the South China Sea and Philippine Sea en route to Yokosuka, conducting UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 7 October and CONRECEX 80-1, demonstrated the teamwork of the ship, Fleet Intelligence Support Center Western Pacific, Cubi Point, Republic of Philippines, and Fleet Air - Photo Lab, Cubi Point, operating in the Philippine Sea from 3 to 7 October, commencing AWEX80-1 in the South China Sea on 8 October and conducted BUZZAROEX 4-79 on 9 October and AWEX 80-1 in the South China Sea from 8 to 10 October 1979. During operations on 11 October 1979, an engineering casualty forced the temporary diversion of airborne Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN aircraft to MCAS lwakuni, Japan. Kitty Hawk engineering casualty forced aircraft aloft to divert to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan on 11 October, pulling in for a port call at Yokosuka, Japan on 12 October 1979. Super Typhoon Tip slammed across the Northern Pacific, passing within 90 nautical miles of Yokosuka, Japan on 13 October 1979. At one point, Kitty Hawk endured winds as high as 45 knots (gusting to 65) belying earlier criticism of her construction by suffering no damage. The crew estimated that she could experience 20–25% higher winds with “no appreciable difficulties. The ship remained in port and no damage was suffered, so the crew dressed the ship up and welcomed more than 32,090 visitors during Japanese-U. S. “Friendship Day” while in port Yokosuka, Japan on 14 October 1979. Kitty Hawk Marine Detachment helped the Kitty Hawk host over 35,000 Japanese visitors on Naval Station Yokosuka, Japan Annual Friendship Day on 14 October 1979. Commander Naval Air Pacific (COMNAVAIRPAC), Vice Admiral Coogan visited Kitty Hawk to present the ship the “Blue H” on 19 October 1979. This award recognized the aircraft carrier made the greatest improvements in overhaul ship habitability during the competitive cycle. Kitty Hawk departed Yokosuka, Japan on 22 October 1979, in port from 12 to 22 October 1979, for operations in the Philippine Sea and East China Sea en route to Pusan Korea. Kitty Hawk hosted 50 officers, Japanese Self-Defense Forces. 30,003 Japanese and Americans visited the ship for "Friendship Day;" 30 members of the Japanese media and 25 members of Japanese basketball team 12 to 22 October 1979. Departing Yokosuka, Japan on 22 October 1979, Kitty Hawk Air Wing FIFTEEN provided area surveillance support to MISSILKEX 2-80, an exercise including live missile firing by surface combatants in the Philippine Sea en route to Pusan Korea. Kitty Hawk commenced MULTIPLEX 1-80 on 27 October 1979. The Korean contingency operations did force the cancellation of MULTIPLEX 1-80, scheduled for 27 to 31 October 1979, after only ten hours of Blue-Orange interaction. Before cancellation, however, significant long range AAW training was accomplished. The scheduled exercise events in the Philippine Sea were cut short the same day, because of the assassination of Republic of Korea President Park Chung Hee. Kitty Hawk was immediately directed to come about and steam at best speed to a contingency support station in the East China Sea off Cheju Do, southwest coast of the Korean Peninsula on 26 October 1979. During contingency operations in the wake of the assassination of South Korean President Park C. Lee, Kitty Hawk cancelled her participation of MultiPleEx 1-80 barely 10 hours into the exercise, coming about and steamed to a position in the East China Sea off Cheju Do, southwest coast of the Korean on 27 October. On 28 October 1979, Kitty Hawk and her escort ships began operations in the East China Sea off Cheju Do, southwest coast of the Korean in response to the assassination of South Korean President Park Chung Hee on 26 October. Upon arrival, Air Wing Fifteen aircraft initiated cyclic flight operations within the detection envelope of North Korean early warning radars, demonstrating to Pyŏngyang U.S. resolve to support the South Koreans, and helping to ease the crisis. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Passuipisic (TAO-107) on 28 October and USS Shasta (AE-33) and USS White Plains (AFS-4) on 29 October 1979. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 31 October, CASEX (Okinawa) on 1 November and USN/ROKIN MINEX “B”/EODEX K1-80 on 2 November 1979. Kitty Hawk remained in a contingency support station off the southwest coast of the Korean Peninsula from 27 October to 4 November 1979. This activity was designed to demonstrate U. S. resolve at insuring the territorial integrity of South Korea. It apparently worked. Upon arrival, Air Wing Fifteen aircraft initiated cyclic flight operations within the detection envelope of North Korean early warning radars. U. S. officials who visited the ship during these operations stated that in their opinion and the opinion of many South Koreans, the presence of the Kitty Hawk Battle Group was the single most important factor in thwarting North Korean military intervention in South Korea, an opportunity for which the North Koreans had been planning and awaiting for several decades. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 4 November 1979. AS the situation stabilized, Kitty Hawk was released from contingency station and commenced participation in a USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX KI-80 before making a second port visit to Pusan on 5 November 1979. The Korean contingency operations did force the cancellation of MULTIPLEX 1-80, scheduled for 27 to 31 October 1979, after only ten hours of Blue-Orange interaction. Before cancellation, however, significant long range AAW training was accomplished. After Kitty Hawk was released from contingency support station off the southwest coast of the Korean Peninsula– MODLOC off Korea (27 October to 4 November 1979), Kitty Hawk commenced participation in a USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX KI-80 before making a second port visit to Pusan, Korea, dropping anchor on 5 November 1979. Hawk hosted 40 Korean Amy officers, 2 ROKN Captains; 106 Sixth Graders and Mr. Bon Yonan; 12 Pusan Businessmen and Commodore Jeong (KOKN); 75 members of Korean Broadcasting Company; 15 Brigadier Generals (ROK Aroy); Bishop of Pusan and 8 priests; Mayor of Pusan and 8 other officials and 8 U.S. officers from UNC-Seoul from 5 to 7 November 1979. Kitty Hawk Marine Detachment provided color guard during Attack Squadron Fifty-Two Change of Command ceremony on 8 November 1979. Kitty Hawk raised anchor and departed Pusan, Korea on 10 November 1979, in port from 5 to 10 November 1979, en route to the Philippines. The Marine Detachment celebrated the Marine Corps Birthday, while at sea, with a formal dinner and traditional cake cutting ceremony on 10 November. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS White Plains (AFS-4) and USS Wabash (AOR-5) on the 10th as well. Kitty Hawk pulled in for a port call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 15 November 1979, conducting READIEX ALFA (Power Projection) UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) while en route on 14 November 1979. Kitty Hawk departed Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 21 November 1979, inport from 15 to 21 November 1979, for the northern Arabian Sea via the Diego Garcia vicinity, in response to Iranian Crisis, which would lengthen the ship’s scheduled deployment beyond Christmas and the New Year. Initially preparing for a 28 November departure for Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California, Kitty Hawk was ordered to the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea in response to the Ayatollah R. Khomeini tacit approval given to the extremists who continued to hold 52 Americans hostage at the U.S. Embassy in Teheran, beginning on 4 November 1979 when one of the more radical groups, “Students Following the Imam’s Line,” blamed the U.S. for the discord, and sought to mobilize support for their policies by seizing the U.S. Embassy in Teheran. Kitty Hawk and her escort ships was underway within 12 hours of receiving orders on the 21st to sail to the Indian Ocean to join USS Midway (CV-41) and her escort ships which were operating in the northern Arabian Sea. En route to station via Diego Garcia, the ship and air wing “Pollywogs” were initiated by Neptune Rex and his court into the ranks of “Shellbacks” as Kitty Hawk crossed the equator on 27 November 1979. The Marine Detachment has 58 shellbacks initiated in the Solem Order of the Deep as Kitty Hawk crossed the equator near Diego Garcia. During an exercise with the Pakistanis, an HS-8 assigned to SH-3H detected an “unidentified contact in international waters,” and prosecuted the contact to protect Kitty Hawk on 28 November 1979. The submarine surfaced, revealing a Pakistani Agosta-class boat. During the same evolution, a Daphne-class sub also tracked the carrier, but was herself tracked by HS-8. Also on the 28th, a EA-6B (NL 626) (BuNo 158541), piloted by CDR Peter T. Rodrick, squadron CO, LCDR William J. Coffey, LT James B. Bradley, Jr., and LT(JG) John R. Chorey, VAQ-135 attached to CVW-15, launched for a scheduled electronic support measures (ESM) mission, at 1324, on 28 November 1979 at 07º33’S, 073º19’E. Kitty Hawk was under EMCON A conditions, which prohibited electronic emissions from either the ship or the Prowler. Within two minutes the Prowler passed close abeam of guided missile cruiser Jouett (CG-29), about eight nautical miles ahead of the carrier. The EA-6B suddenly executed a “near vertical climbing turn,” partial cloud cover obscuring further observation of the aircraft, though it is surmised that the crew was practicing a “low level ingress tactic.” Though not verified, it is believed the Prowler impacted the water at approximately 13 miles off the port beam of Kitty Hawk, 63 nautical miles from Diego Garcia, at 1505. Despite determined efforts by two SH-3Hs from the carrier and a Lockheed P-3 Orion from Diego Garcia, none of the men were recovered. Kitty Hawk arrived in the vicinity of Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Territory to load special equipment and supplies on 28 November 1979. A KA-6D (NL 521) (BuNo 152632), piloted by CDR Walter D. Williams, Jr., and LCDR Bruce L. Miller, VA-52 attached to CVW-15, launched from No. 2 catapult on a scheduled tanker sortie, at 1415, 29 November 1979. Almost immediately, NL 521 settled off the bow of Kitty Hawk due probably to low airspeed resulting from catapult errors (129 knots was the required airspeed; the KA-6D had attained only 92). A plane guard helo (HS-8) ¼ mile aft of the ship, immediately initiated a SAR, supported by a helo from HC-1 Det 2, embarked in Midway, and by destroyer USS David R. Ray (DD-971). Those concerted efforts proved fruitless: neither of the men survived. Kitty Hawk Marine Detachment participated in a memorial service for four aviators lost at sea by providing a gun salute, color guard and bugler and Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 30 November 1979. Kitty Hawk deployment was extended two-and-a-half months to support contingency operations in the northern Arabian Sea as flagship, Task Force SEVEN ZERO and Task Group SEVEN ZERO PT TWO (Battle Group Bravo), arriving on station on 3 December 1979, and with Midway and ships in company comprised Task Croup SEVEN ZERO PT ONE (Battle Group ALFA) provided the U.S. with A-6 Intruder and A-7 Corsair II attack aircraft and F-4 Phantom II and the modern F-14 Tomcat fighter aircraft, which could respond to a variety of situations if called upon during the Iranian hostage crisis. This was the first time since World War II that the U.S. Navy had two carrier task forces in the Indian Ocean in response to a crisis situation. Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty the same day. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 3 December and USS Wabash (AOR-5) and an Iranian P3F and Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered the ship on 4 December 1979. A Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY, Iranian P3F, and Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 5 December and conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 6 December. Also on the same day Aircraft No. 505, an A-6A (BuNo 157011), LT (JG) Mark S. Gontkovic and LT(JG) Anthony J.R. Bilotti (VA-35) attached to CVW-8, crashed off Avgo Nisi, a small deserted Greek island north of Crete utilized as a bombing range on 6 December 1979. The third aircraft in a bombing run, 505 rolled in for its strike but suffered what appeared to be a “catastrophic wing failure,” possibly due to being struck accidentally by weapons released by the number two Intruder, impacting the water during its dive and killing both men. A Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY, Iranian P3F, and Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 5 December and conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 6 December. Also on the same day Aircraft No. 505, an A-6A (BuNo 157011), LT (JG) Mark S. Gontkovic and LT(JG) Anthony J.R. Bilotti (VA-35) attached to CVW-8, crashed off Avgo Nisi, a small deserted Greek island north of Crete utilized as a bombing range on 6 December 1979. The third aircraft in a bombing run, 505 rolled in for its strike but suffered what appeared to be a “catastrophic wing failure,” possibly due to being struck accidentally by weapons released by the number two Intruder, impacting the water during its dive and killing both men. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS San Jose (AFS-7) on 8 December and an Iranian P3F and a Omaai JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 9 December, conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) and USS Passuipisic (TAO-107) and an Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 10 December, conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 12 December and a Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 13 December. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5); a Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 15 December and a Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered the ship on 16 December 1979. A Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 17 December and Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 18 December and a Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 20 December. On 21 December 1979, the Defense Department announced a three-ship nuclear-powered carrier battle group from the Sixth Fleet would deploy to the Indian Ocean to relieve the Seventh Fleet carrier battle group led by Kitty Hawk and the ship conducted UNREP with USS San Jose (AFS-7) the same day. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 22 December and a Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered the ship the same day on 23 December 1979. A Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 24 December and the crew celebrated Christmas Day, December 25, 1979 in the northern Arabian Sea as flagship, Task Force SEVEN ZERO and Task Group SEVEN ZERO PT TWO (Battle Group Bravo) joining up with Midway and ships in company comprised Task Croup SEVEN ZERO PT ONE (Battle Group ALFA) on 3 December 1979. Continuous Soviet and other foreign surface surveillance; frequent Soviet and other foreign air surveillance. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 26 December and USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 27 December 1979 and the same day, a Soviet-backed coup installed a new president in Afghanistan. Two carrier task forces centering around Kitty Hawk and Midway continued contingency operations in the Northern Arabian Sea. A Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk the same day. On 29 December 1979, a VA-52 KA-6E 521 and its crew of CDR Walter D. Williams and LCDR Bruce L. Miller were lost at sea when the KA6E was launched off the ships forward port catapult number 2. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 30 December 1979. From 3 December 1979 until the end of the year Kitty Hawk and Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN stood ready to carry out U.S. policy in the Northern Arabian Sea vis-a-vis Iran. Throughout this period, the ship and air wing were under the constant surveillance of Soviet Navy units. Kitty Hawk, air wing aircraft also intercepted and escorted frequent Soviet, Iranian and Omani aircraft reconnoitering the Battle Group. The year ended with the American hostages remaining captive and the Kitty Hawk Battle Group on station. 140 shots had been fired and no bombs dropped in combat. No one knew what the New Year would bring, but every one knew the New Year would bring, but everyone knew the best aircraft carrier was on the scene ready to do whatever was necessary. Kitty Hawk’s Marine Detachment gave a total of 4,620.00 during the annual Combined Federal Campaign, an average of 75.00 per Marine a year” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

     “The following major accomplishments highlight Kitty Hawk’s performance on “WestPac” and CY 1979:

 

     En route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Kitty Hawk conducted TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase I; TRANSITEX 8-79 II; MIDPAC operations and MISSILEX Barking Sands; followed by NSSMS shoot Barking Sands and SINEX of opportunity; TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase II: two ASW TACREAD’s; TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase III: ten ASW TSCWD’s and one ASLW TACREAD exorcises tested and developed Battle Croup AAW posture, enhanced ASW teamwork, and identified and rectified communications link shortcomings; FORTRESS WARRIOR; NOTNOEX, BEAVER SNARE, MINEX ALFA in the Bananga Bay; TORPEX in the Subic OPAREA; Beaver Snare in the South China Sea; READIEX LOADEX the South China Sea; air wing/refresher operations, extended range AAWEX’s associated with Exercise COPE THUNDER 79-8 in the South China Sea and Vietnamese refugee search and assistance operations; Exercise Fortress Cale; Exercise MISSILEX Poro Pt. in the South China Sea; Exercise BUZZARDEX 3-79 in the South China Sea on 20 August 1979 (Although the modified exercise provided the ship and air wing team’s first ASU training since the transit and included a well-executed anti-missile BUZZARDEX, no close air support training was accomplished during the exercise); Exercise Fortress Cale, a large-scale amphibious exercise in the Okinawa area for which the Kitty Hawk battle Group was tasked to provide air support; USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX K4-79; operations in the East South China Sea and Philippine Sea, en route to the Philippines; MMR-1 economizer fire; MISSILEX Poro Pt.; Exercise BUSY STORM, an ASW encounter which provided valuable free play and tactical planning opportunities; MISSILEX Poro Pt.; Exercise NEWBOY 79-4 while at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; operations in the South China Sea and Philippine Sea en route to Yokosuka; CONRECEX 80-1, demonstrating the teamwork of the ship, Fleet Intelligence Support Center Western Pacific, Cubi Point, Republic of Philippines, and Fleet Air - Photo Lab, Cubi Point, operating in the Philippine Sea from 3 to 7 October, commencing AWEX80-1 in the South China Sea; BUZZAROEX 4-79 and AWEX 80-1 in the South China Sea; operations in the Philippine Sea and East China Sea; Air Wing FIFTEEN provided area surveillance support to MISSILKEX 2-80, an exercise including live missile firing by surface combatants in the Philippine Sea en route to Pusan Korea; MULTIPLEX 1-80 (The Korean contingency operations did force the cancellation of MULTIPLEX 1-80, scheduled for 27 to 31 October 1979, after only ten hours of Blue-Orange interaction. Before cancellation, however, significant long range AAW training was accomplished), canceling her participation of MultiPleEx 1-80 barely 10 hours into the exercise, coming about and steamed to a position in the East China Sea off Cheju Do, southwest coast of the Korean in response to the assassination of South Korean President Park Chung Hee; CASEX (Okinawa) and USN/ROKIN MINEX “B”/EODEX K1-80; released from contingency station and commenced participation in a USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX KI-80; READIEX ALFA (Power Projection) ; celebrated Christmas Day, December 25, 1979 in the northern Arabian Sea as flagship, Task Force SEVEN ZERO and Task Group SEVEN ZERO PT TWO (Battle Group Bravo) joining up with USS Midway (CV-41) and ships in company comprised Task Croup SEVEN ZERO PT ONE (Battle Group ALFA) on 3 December 1979” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) 1980

THOUSANDTH CARRIER LANDINGS

DATES

TRAPS

WIRE

TIME

A/C

SIDE

PILOT

SQUAD/WING

02/02/79

175,000

3

1,658

A-7

416

Ltjg Dilugos

VA-122

14/02/79

176,000

4

1,444

F-4

147

Ltjg Bryant

VMFA-232

19/02/79

177,000

4

1,947

E-2

337

Ltjg Woumb

VAW-110

13/03/79

178,000

3

1,428

A-7

301

Cdr Palmer

VA-22

25/04/79

179,000

3

1,226

A-7

412

Ltjg Williams

VA-94

WESTPAC

08/06/79

180,000

3

2,040

E-2

603

Lcdr Weber

VAW-114

03/07/79

181,000

2

1,216

F-14

203

Ltjg Schilnker

VF-111

23/07/79

182,000

4

1,620

F-14

107

Lcdr Perkins

VF-51

21/08/79

183,000

3

1,622

A-7

314

Lcdr Harrell

VA-22

08/09/79

184,000

4

2,100

A-7

303

Ltjg Sanders

VA-22

24/10/79

185,000

3

1,414

A-7

412

Lt Hoewing

VA-94

04/11/79

186,000

3

1,315

F-14

105

Ltjg Oconner

VF-51

06/12/79

187,000

3

1,943

A-7

403

Lcdr Webster

VA-94

23/12/79

188,000

4

1,059

A-6

523

Lcdr Sledge

CVW-15

No combat or combat support sorties were flown from USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) during 1979.

 

     “The flying tempo was high throughout the entire year. V-4 Division pumped a total of 20,364,938 gallons of JP-5. Catapult and arresting gear statistics demonstrated the emphasis on flying” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

CATAPULT STATISTICS

CAT NO.

1979

SHIPS/TOTAL

1979

SHIPS/TOTAL

1

4,135

66,709

728

28,035

2

1,609

57,091

2,944

58,141

3

2,974

44,287

4,241

65,412

4

1,675

37,377

0

0

Total

10,393

205,464

10,420

189,610

 

     Referee to Kitty Hawk Command History Report for additional ship board equipment history.

 

     “Kitty Hawk began 1980, its nineteenth year of service to the nation, on extended duty, steaming in the northern Arabian Sea on contingency operations related to the fifty-two American hostages being held in Iran. RADM R. E. Kirksey, Carrier Strike Force, 7th Fleet visited Kitty Hawk and Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Berkeley (DDG-15) on 1 January and USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 2 January 1980. Kitty Hawk was underway in the Indian Ocean and South China Sea from 1 January to 3 February 1980, during which time a Soviet IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 2 January 1980. CAPT W. P. Allen, Destroyer Squadron 13 visited Kitty Hawk during  UNREP with USS White Plains (AFS-4) twice on 4 January, UNREP with USS White Plains (AFS-4) on 6 January and USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 7 January 1980. A Soviet IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 8 January and on 9 January, conducting UNREP with USNS Passumpsic (TAO-107) on 10 January, USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 11 January, USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 13 January and a IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered the ship on 14 January 1980. Kitty Hawk recorded her 10,000th arrested landing during cruise and conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 16 January 1980. A Soviet IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk and the ship conducted UNREP with USS White Plains (AF'S-4) on 18 January and USNS Mispillion (TAO-105) on 19 January 1980. Kitty Hawk Battle Group had some provocative maneuvers close aboard by a Soviet Navy aircraft reconnaissance AGI No. 477 from 21 to 22 January 1980. Task Force 70 (15 ships, 3 Carrier Battle Groups) photograph on 22 January 1980 was reported but not made available to the public. USS Nimitz (CVN-65) and her escort ships joined Kitty Hawk and USS Midway (CV-41) and their escort ships on station in the Arabian Sea on 22 January 1980. Battle Group Bravo was centered upon three carriers: Kitty Hawk, Nimitz, and USS Midway (CV-43), together with 12 escort and support ships. Kitty Hawk conducted cross-deck and relief operations with USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and CVW-8 on 23 January 1980. The next day, Kitty Hawk came about from “Camel Station,” beginning her eastward transit to the U.S., having spent 64 days in operations connected with the Iranian crisis, conducting operations at “Camel Station,” in the Northwestern Arabian Sea as flagship, TF 70 and TG 70.2 (Battle Group Bravo) from 4 December 1979 to 23 January 1980. For their actions in the region, Kitty Hawk and CVW-15 sailors and officers were awarded the Navy Expeditionary conducted turnover operations with USS Nimitz (CVN-68) Battle Group from 22 to 23 January 198. Also on On the 23rd, the three U.S. Navy Aircraft Carrier Battle Groups (Kitty Hawk, Nimitz and USS Midway (CV-41), plus twelve escort/support ships) combined into a huge armada formation in a display of seapower. The aerial photographs of this formation were released to the press and the pictures were printed in newspapers and periodicals around the world. Rear Admiral Kirksey, CTF-77, hauled down his flag room Kitty Hawk and embarked on the Nimitz on 23 January 1980. Moments after is departure Kitty Hawk’s Commanding Officer, Captain Chatham, announced that the ship had taken up a course for Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines and eventually home to San Diego, California. Throughout the Iranian Hostage Crisis Kitty Hawk was under “constant surveillance” by Soviet ships and submarines, and CVW-15 aircraft “intercepted and escorted frequent” Soviet Ilyushin Il-38 Mays and Il-22 Cubs flying out of Aden, South Yemen, the Mays at three-day intervals; Iranian P-3Fs on three occasions; Omani SEPECAT Jaguars six times; an Iranian Lockheed C-130 Hercules and an Egyptian Hercules, reconnoitering the carrier. Despite strenuous efforts by logistics people in the supply chain, the exigencies of the extended deployment caused numerous problems for the crew due to shortages, especially of spare parts. Aircrew conducted small arms familiarization, and 10 leathernecks from Kitty Hawk marine detachment trained as door gunners on board HS-8’s Sea Kings in preparation for “air-sea rescue missions in case of hostilities during Iranian contingencies.” In addition, following a revolution in Afghanistan beginning on 27 April 1979, and the subsequent Soviet invasion on 24 December, the U.S. decided to maintain two carrier battle groups on station in the Indian Ocean. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 22 January 1980, and USS San Jose (AFS-7) on 23 January 1980, departing northern Arabian Sea en route Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines on 24 January and the following day, Kitty Hawk was reconnoitered by Soviet Il-38s MAY reconnaissance on 25 January, conducting UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) and USS San Jose (AFS-7) on 26 January 1980. CAPT W. P. Allen, Destroyer Squadron 13 visited Kitty Hawk during UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 29 January 1980. The Malacca Straits were transited as Kitty Hawk departed the Indian Ocean and entered the South China Sea en route to Subic Bay. USS Coral Sea (CV43) was in the OPAREA just east of Singapore where the ship crossed deck with the Kitty Hawk during which time RADM L. C. Chambers, Carrier Group THREE, CTG 70.3 and CAPT W. P. Allen, Destroyer Squadron 13 visited Kitty Hawk for Indian Ocean operations briefing on 30 January 1980. This was a major cross decking for loading of weapons, all variety of needed supplies, and mail.  Also on this same day, Coral Sea passed over the equator. The Shellback initiation was held off until the 2nd of February, due to the supplies from the cross decking on the flight deck. On January 31st, Coral Sea was heading through the Malacca Straits, and then on track to the Indian Ocean.  A Russian Tu-95 Bears shadowed Kitty Hawk on 1 February 1980, arriving in Subic Bay, Republic of Philipines on 3 February 1980, inport from 3 to 8 February 1980, resupplied, and got underway for Pearl Harbor. Personnel enjoyed a four day picnic in Subic Bay hosted by Special Services. The presentation of a Kitty Hawk ID Card entitled personnel to all Subic Bay special services activities. In February 1980, before the ship left Subic for CONUS, S-8 Division again showed its “Can Dow attitude by receiving and sorting thousands of line items and many tons of material in a short period of time and then stowed or turned over all of these material in only three weeks. The ship’s Commanding Officer and CAG (CVW-15) expressed appreciation for having completed this task so quickly. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 11 February and USS Pyro (AR-24) on 12 February and a Soviet Russian TU-95 Bear D reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 13 February 1980. Kitty Hawk in-chopped to COMTHIRDFLT from COMSEVENTHFLT on 14 February and Backloaded “WestPac” ordnance allowance during UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 15 February and 16 February, conducting UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 18 February 1980. Kitty Hawk pulled in for a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 19 February 1980, to a tumultuous welcome, yet the ship stayed only one day, just long enough to embark 499 Tiger Cruise Guests (male friends and relatives of crewmembers) for the last leg of the voyage back to the continental U.S.; en route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines 8 to 19 February 1980. Kitty Hawk departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 20 February 1980, import from 19 to 20 February 1980, embarking 499 Tiger Cruise Guests. A last minute visit by North Carolina State Senator George Marion prior to getting underway was arranged. Free Shuttle bus service was provided from Pearl Harbor to Hale Koa Hotel in Waikiki. The Honorable George Marion State Senator - North Carolina on 20 February 1980. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Kiska (AE-35) on 21 and 22 February, Backloaded “WestPac” ordnance allowance and USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 22 February 1980. The operational status on all deck machinery and equipment was outstanding. During the January-February portion of the deployment, Deck Department conducted nineteen CONREP evolutions on 24 February 1980, one day before arriving in San Diego, all Air Wing FIFTEEN (CVW-15) aircraft flew off Kitty Hawk to their respective home bases on the West Coast. Not many of Kitty Hawk’s crew slept the evening of 24 February 1980, "Channel Fever was rampant. The 25th of February was a beautiful sunny day and a glorious day too, at sea en route San Diego, California from 20 to 25 February 1980.

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) 1980

THOUSANDTH CARRIER LANDINGS

DATES

TRAPS

WIRE

TIME

A/C

SIDE

PILOT

SQUAD/WING

13/01/80

189,000

-

1745

A-7

401

Lt Whitford

VA-94

02/02/80

190,000

-

17-04

F-14

106

Lt Doerr

VF-51

No combat or combat support sorties were flown from USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) during 1980.

 

     While on extended deployment in the Indian Ocean, the Kitty Hawk /CVW-15 team conducted the intercept and escort of fourteen Soviet aircraft (CUBS/MAYS). The flying tempo was high throughout the extension and 2,246 launches were logged in the Indian Ocean and transit to the United States. Catapult and arresting gear statistics demonstrate the emphasis on flying.

 

CATAPULT STATISTICS

CAT NO.

CRUISE

WORK - UPS

TOTAL

SHIPS/TOTAL

1

947

4,189

5.136

71,421

2

389

2,130

2,519

59,557

3

575

843

1,407

45,392

4

335

724

1,059

38,362

 

ARRESTING GEAR STATISTICS

CAT NO.

CRUISE

WORK - UPS

TOTAL

SHIPS/TOTAL

1

95

467

562

28,571

2

433

1,933

2,366

60,216

3

1,050

3,064

4,115

68,966

4

480

1,732

2,218

39,951

To accomplish the statistics above Kitty Hawk received 12,295,270 gallons of JP-5

and issued 10,436,061 to the embarked airplanes along with 18,000 gallons of lube

oil for catapults.

 

During deployed operations in the Indian Ocean, AIMD monthly items processed peaked at 3500 items - an indicator of the level of effort required to support air wing Indian Ocean operations. The Communications Department supported the communications requirements of the ship, CVW-15 and CTE’ 77 while deployed to the Indian Ocean. Arrival in San Diego marked the end of the most successful Kitty Hawk deployment in recent memory wherein Kitty Hawk Communications handled over 295,000 incoming and outgoing General Service (GENSW) messages with a total distribution of over 8 million copies. Kitty Hawk steamed a total of 73,435 nautical miles, logging 11,276 catapult launches and 11,242 recoveries (8,115-day / 3,127-night). Port visits included: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Pattaya, Thailand; Hong Kong Pusan, Korea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Yokosuka, Japan; Pusan, Korea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Subic Bay, Republic of Philipines and Pearl Harbor. Reclassified a CV-63 “Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier” on 29 April 1973, inaugurated her new role as CV on 1 July 1975. Her 13th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 29 April 1961 at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, with Captain William F. Bringle in command and was the first of the Kitty Hawk class (the only other two being the USS Constellation (CVA-64) and USS America (CVA-66) (30 May 1979 to 25 February 1980)” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk, 72, 331A & 331B-1979/1980).

 

    “Upon arrival in San Diego, 5-8 Division personnel enjoyed only three days off as there were too many materials aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) to be off loaded and onloaded. Never-out-items had to be onloaded and retrograde and AVCAL materials had to be offloaded, just to mention a few of the high priority jobs to be accomplished upon arrival” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1980).

 

Thirteenth “WestPac” and first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment (Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw during the Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis (Iran History, Air Arm) and Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on the way home via Korea), operating with other Aircraft Carriers and upon completion conducted training operations and Carrier Qualifications (Iran History, Air Arm, Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis

(13 November 1979 to 30 June 1980)

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 1 – (13 to 30 November 1979)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 December 1979)

Part 3 – (1 to 31 January 1980)

Part 4 – (1 to 24 February 1980)

Part 5 – (25 February to 20 April 1980)

Part 6 – (21 to 24 April 1980)

Part 7 – (25 April to 30 June 1980)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 5 – (25 February to 20 April 1980)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4