Thirteenth “WestPac” and first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment (Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw during the Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis (Iran History, Air Arm) and Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on the way home via Korea), operating with other Aircraft Carriers and upon completion conducted training operations and Carrier Qualifications (Iran History, Air Arm, Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis

(13 November 1979 to 30 June 1980)

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 1 – (13 to 30 November 1979)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 December 1979)

Part 3 – (1 to 31 January 1980)

Part 4 – (1 to 24 February 1980)

Part 5 – (25 February to 20 April 1980)

Part 6 – (21 to 24 April 1980)

Part 7 – (25 April to 30 June 1980)

 

 

 

USS Sample (FF 1048)

http://www.navybuddies.com/ff/ff1048.htm

 

Enlisted Service Members Evaluation for the period: 01/02/79 to 31/01/80

 

Rate/Rank: YNSN Bruce Wayne Henion

                                                          

Scale from 4.0 3.8; 3.6; 3.4; 3.2; 3.0; 2.8. 2.6; 2.4 and 2.2

 

Professional Performance: 3.4

 

Member’s skill and Efficiency in performance of assigned duty:

 

Highly effective and reliable. Needs only limited supervision.

 

Military Behavior: 2.8

 

How well member accepts authority and conforms to standards of military behavior.

 

Usually obeys commands and regulations. Occasionally lax.

 

Leadership and Supervisory Ability: N/A

 

Member’s ability to plan and assign work to others and effectively direct there activities:

 

Not observed.

 

Military Appearance: 3.6

 

Member’s military appearance and neatness in person and dress

 

Smart. Neat and correct in appearance.

 

Adaptability: 3.4

 

How well member gets along and works with others.

 

Gets a along very well with others. Contributes to good morale.

 

DESCRIPTION OF ASSIGNED TASKS:

 

Assigned dudes include the typing and filing of correspondence, messages, memorandums, LOIs, Green Sheets, Notices, Instructions and other duties normally associated within the Yeoman rating. Collateral dudes include: Division Supply Petty Officer and Quebec Hose Team as Unit Romeo Phonetalker. Stands Ops Duty Yeoman for Ops Department at sea and in port.

 

EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE (Includes comments on: Members performance in the area of equal opportunity; also, member’s assigned Jury to overseas or CONUS BASE; deploying units which result in inner actions with foreign nationals should be evaluated in this area.) *Comments must be justified of specifically.

 

Seaman Henion has shown marked improvement in all facets of office work during the latter part of this reporting period. He has shown good imagination and continually recommends possible improvements to office routine. His professional performance requires only limited supervision and is continuing to improve. He can be relied upon to complete assigned tasks in a minimal amount of time. Seaman Henion often puts in extra hours to ensure that the work load assigned to him is completed in a timely manner. However, he tends to get uptight when assignments given are not in his favor, and occasionally requires counseling on military behavior As Divisional Supply Petty Officer, he has kept tight control of the division’s expenditures and through attention to detail has enable it to remain within its austere budget. Seaman Henion was awarded non-judicial punishment during this marking period; however, improvement has shown to correct such discrepancies. His military appearance, both in and out of uniform is neat and clean at all times. He usually exceeds the standard of proper grooming, providing an example for others to follow. He gets along very well with his peers, and contributes to the good morale of the division. He supports the Navy’s Equal Opportunity programs. Seaman Henion has passed the September 1979 Navywide Examination for Yeoman Third Class., however this advancement is pending due to disciplinary action. He is recommended for retention in the Naval Service.

 

“I have read and understand U. S. Navy Regs., 1973, Article (I do/do desire to make a statement.”

 

Height: 61” Width: 170 lbs

Signed: Member refused to sign

Dated: 31 January 1980

 

OFF-DUTY EDUCATONAL ACHIEVEMENTS (NCFA, college courses, correspondence courses, etc. COMPLETED DURING PERIOD OF THIS REPORT.

 

Completed Psychology of Adjustment Course 200 on 11 Ju1y 1979 (3 credits).

Received General Education Dip1aia (GED)) this reporting period.

Successfully achieved Student Pilots License this reporting period.

 

J. W. TAYLOR, CAPT, USN

31 January 1980

 

Administrative Remarks regarding refusal to sign enlisted evaluation

 

USS CORAL SEA (CV 43) FPO San Francisco. CA 96601

 

1 acknowledge I reviewed my Enlisted Performance Evaluation Report for the Period 1 February 1979 to 31 January 1980 which has been referred to me because of derogatory contents. Article 1110 of Navy Regulations has been explained to me and 1 understand my rights to redress. It is my desire (to make a statement) (not to make a statement) concerning my adverse evaluation report

 

Member refused to sign subject report or make a statement.

 

BRUCE W HENION

 

WITNESS:

 

J. W. TAYLOR, CAPT, USN

Operations Officer

By direction of the Commanding Officer

                                                                                      U.S.S. CORAL SEA (CV 43)

                                                                                      CV-43:33:JWT:ti

                                                                                      1616

                                                                                      Ser 253

                                                                                      7 February 1980

 

From: Commanding Officer, USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

To: Commander, Naval Military Personnel Command (NMPC 322)

 

Subj: Enlisted Performance Evaluation Report for the Period 1 February 1979 to 31 January 1980 in the case of YNSN Bruce W. HENION, USN.

 

Re f: (a) U. S. Navy Regulations, 1973

         (b) NAVMILPERSCOMINST 1616.1

 

1. Articles 1109 and 1110 of reference (a) and Articles 1-5, 2-2 and 3—2—8 of reference (b) were fully explained to the subject member.

 

2. Service member refuses to sign enclosures (1) and (2). Seaman Henion has been informed that the signature does not indicate agreement with the report, but, that the report has been reviewed and individual rights have been explained. Additionally, Seaman Henion was counseled regarding his rights to make or not to make a statement.

 

WITNESS:

J. W. TAYLOR

By direction

 

Note: 1 and 2 enclosures are the enlisted evaluation and refusal to sign page.

 

 

    “Russian Tu-95 Bears shadowed USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 1 February 1980” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1980).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) enters Impervim Neptvini Rergis

 

   On February 2, 1980 approximately 5° north of the equator, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) entered the IMPERVIM NEPTVINI REGIS. His Royal Highness boarded the Coral Sea to carry out the traditional initiation of the land-lubbing Pollywogs, those who have not crossed the equator, into his domain. We took a day off in order for veteran sailors to initiate those of us who had never before crossed the equator. The temperature outside was in the hundreds and on the flight deck 110 degrees.

 

   Upon King Neptune’s arrival he was greeted by Captain Richard Dunleavy, and given a royal welcome to the Coral Sea. In private conversation, the King was overheard saying to a Trusty Shellback (one who has already crossed the equator into the world of King Neptune), “My mission aboard Coral Sea is to make these, the lowest of my subjects, a part of my Royal Domain, but not to do any bodily harm to them.”

 

   The initiation ceremonies were ordered to begin. With that, the Pollywogs were instructed to shift to the uniform of the day, which consisted of a reversed and inside out pair of pants and a T-shirt worn the same way.

 

   The preparation to mold each division into a respective unit was as diversified as the imagination of the Shellback in charge.

 

    Upon assembly of the Pollywogs, the procession was taken up to the flight deck by division. Since my division consisted of three we joined the Operation Specialist Division (CIC Operators).

 

   Shellbacks used a few feet of fire hose in order to spank us every time we tried to get up off the hot deck. Lying on our stomachs on the elevator until the elevator reached the flight deck seemed like forever.

 

   Once on the flight deck we were told to craw on our stomachs straddling the catapult steel runner while the Royal hose team sprayed water on us or Shellbacks dumped liquid slop on our heads.

 

   We crawled a fair distance before we entered many obstacles. The first obstacle was the Royal Baby. We were told to kiss the Royal Babies big belly, a belly with grease on it.

 

   My beard was covered with grease as the Chief grabbed my head and really rubbed my face in his grease filled belly. Another obstacle was a mid evil torture device made out of wood. I was lucky enough to skip this obstacle but others were not.

 

   They would lock your head in a forward down position and your arms were stretched out and locked down. Shellbacks would then spank you with a few feet of fire hose and throw liquid slop on you.

 

    During this initiation Shellbacks would constantly ask us “What are you”? If you didn’t say “Pollywog” Shellbacks would spank you with a few feet of fire hose and throw liquid slop on you.

 

   As we crawled our way down the flight deck once we passed through the obstacles, our last obstacle was an eight feet metal container full of liquid slop. We were told to sit in this tank while to our surprise one of the Chief Shellbacks would dunk us in this liquid slop.

 

    When we came up for air, he would ask us “What are you”? I guess I was a little slow to catch on, so I shouted out “Pollywog” Chief. The Chief dunked me again.

 

   When I came up for air again, the Chief asked me “what are you”? Louder I answered “Pollywog” Chief. Once again the Chief dunked me and when I came up for air the Chief asked me “What are you”? I answered “A pissed off sailor” and then I pulled the Chief in the tank with me. The Chief couldn’t stop laughing and told me I was supposed to say Shellback. I felt like a bumbling edit but one thing for sure, I wasn’t about to be dunked again.

 

   During the initiation Shellbacks would ask us “what are you”? If we didn’t answer “Pollywog,” Shellbacks would spank us with a few feet of fire hose and throw liquid slop on us, so I thought we were suppose to say “Pollywog” to the end. At the end of the ceremony I had to shave my beard. The Navy had announced that Petty Officer Second Class and above were allowed to have a beard so it was time to shave anyway but the grease didn’t do much for a beard.

 

We were all given a certificate and became Shellbacks. Since the days of John Paul, Jones, the Father of the U. S. Navy, the same questions have been asked, and in most cases the same answer has been ascertained. Times change, but the sailor is the same.  A special few cross that geographic line and enter the realm of King Neptune and become as well as their predecessors, “SHELLBACKS.”

 

 

 

USS Hassayampa (TAO-145)

http://www.angelwind.com/hassayampa

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived in Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived in Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 3 February 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 Air Wing and COMCARGROUP THREE embarked arrived on “Gonzo Station”

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 Air Wing and COMCARGROUP THREE embarked, was in the North Arabian Sea on Gonzo Station on 4 February 1980, having been established following the November 1979 takeover of the American Embassy in Tehran, Iran. The same day, Coral Sea cross-decked with USS Midway (CV-41) at sea off loading supplies and two E-2B aircraft were flown over. A turn over brief was also conducted between both ship’s officers (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard Brochure/March 1980-Vol 8; No. 2).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) relieves USS Midway (CV-41) in the northern part of the Arabian Sea and Midway departs

 

   “After leaving Singapore, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was at sea for 7-days at the time she relieved USS Midway (CV-41) in the northern part of the Arabian Sea, during which time Midway departed on 5 February 1980 in connection with the continuing hostage crisis in Iran” (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard Brochure/March 1980-Vol 8; No. 2, 1-Constellation & 72).

 

 

VAW-113 Black Eagles - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron flew the E-2B Grumman Hawkeye equipped with Electronics while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

Man overboard sounds on the 1 MC aboard USS Coral Sea (CV-43), this it not a drill, all hands to your muster station

 

   The ISSN, Richard Dial that I spoke of while in Subic Bay was a professed homosexual and continually expressed his reason for wanting out of the U.S. Navy was due to him being a homosexual. His constant verbal expressions of his continued desire to harass his superiors did not stop and one day the shit hit the fan. This guy had someone photograph himself and another fellow, whose head was hidden in the photo, doing sexually explicit things with each other.

 

    There were a dozen pictures, full size, with ten sets dropped off at the CO, XO, Chaplains and 7 Department Offices on the ship. It was my job to pick up the pictures. My boss, Captain Taylor, Operations Department Head, was really pissed. By the time these pictures were delivered by this guy to Departments through out the ship, we had just left Singapore, heading to the North Arabian Sea. He was confined to three days bread and water in the Master at Arms Station, directly below the Operations Department Admin Office.

 

    At around the same time a Photographers Mates Third Class, who I had a run in with while inspecting his and his shipmates berthing compartment with the Captain and others in port Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, had decided to cross deck with a Photographers Mate Third Class from an Air Squadron. I remember handling the transfer papers personally, that is once the Captain signed them.

 

   When ISSN Richard Dial’s punishment was over the Master-at-Arms escorted him to the Fantail of the ship for some air. This guy jumped overboard hand cuffed during flight operations.

 

    The SH-3H Helicopter, assigned to HC-1 Detachment 3, rescued him from the Indian Ocean soon after arriving on station in the northern part of the Arabian Sea on 5 February 1980. The Captain was really pissed off. The Ship’s man overboard alarm sounded and the ships personnel all had to muster.

 

    The Captain had a pilot fly this guy off the ship handcuffed and wet, right out of the ocean, in a plane with the CO’s name on, as he was NFO. Final destination was Clark Air Force Base, Republic of Philippines. The Captain had given this guy the maximum confinement a Ship’s Captain can legally do for his misbehavior.

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed Subic Bay, Republic of Philipines on 8 February 1980, inport from 3 to 8 February 1980, resupplied, and got underway for Pearl Harbor. Personnel enjoyed a four day picnic in Subic Bay hosted by Special Services. The presentation of a Kitty Hawk ID Card entitled personnel to all Subic Bay special services activities. In February 1980, before the ship left Subic for CONUS, S-8 Division again showed its “Can Dow attitude by receiving and sorting thousands of line items and many tons of material in a short period of time and then stowed or turned over all of these material in only three weeks. The ship’s Commmanding Officer and CAG (CVW-15) expressed appreciation for having completed this task so quickly” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

FINAL Disposition of Energy Quest and Advancement

 

   “On 9 February 1980, I went before the XO, Captain Curtain my previous boss, who I still woke up every morning, preparing his coffee, as matter of protocol. The XO dismissed the charges upon liquidation of the amount owed the government in the amount I recorded in my weekly status reports and I was allowed to advance to YN3.

 

XO Inquiry on 9 February 1980, Captain J.  M. Curtain, USN

 

    “In that HENION did, on board USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on during the period of, 18 JUNE 79 thru 8 DEC 79, wrongfully appropriate, typewriter ribbons, savin paper, bond paper envelopes. M MAC CARDS, and manila envelopes, value of a (about) $191.88, the property of the US GOVERNMENT.”

 

   Senator Hatfield responded to me by contacting Rear Admiral Killcline in Washington D.C. who in response to Senator Hatfield’s inquiry contacted the Chief of Naval Operation, Tomas B. Hayward.

 

   March 1, 1980, the CNO sent a message to Captain Dunleavy, ordering the CO to contact the Senator directly regarding the disposition of the charges against me. In the message the CNO also mentioned that the reason he didn’t send a copy of Energy Quest was because he felt there were sufficient copies onboard. The CO was on the bridge when he received the message and ordered me to come to the bridge. In the Captain’s private chamber he set me strait and told me to write a letter to the Senator for him to sign. The CO didn’t know about my research project and was upset at me for going out of the chain of command.

 

   As I reported earlier, I wrote Energy Quest after listening to President Carter’s Inaugural Address July 15, 1979 when he spoke of the Energy crisis being as if it were equivalent to a national war. I spent my off hours in a period of six months writing the book. In 1981, the Petty Officer Indoctrination Course for E-4’s was introduced by the CNO and became a course at the Naval Amphibious School’s Human Resource Management and Training Department (HRMTD) in which I was the first to take the course. Energy Quest introduction pages became this course first pages and the course accomplished what Energy Quest proposed.

 

 

Two E-2B McDonnell-Douglas Phantom II Jet Fighters flying escort for a Grumman Hawkeye while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

 

USS Krivak (FFG 693)

 

Bakhtiar went into hiding, eventually to find exile in Paris

 

      “On 12 February 1980, Bakhtiar went into hiding, eventually to find exile in Paris” (Ref. 22).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) in-chopped to COMTHIRDFLT from COMSEVENTHFLT

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 11 February and USS Pyro (AR-24) on 12 February 1980; a Soviet Russian TU-95 Bear D reconnoitered the ship on 13 February, while the following day, Kitty Hawk in-chopped to COMTHIRDFLT from COMSEVENTHFLT on 14 February. Kitty Hawk Backloaded “WestPac” ordnance allowance during UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 15 February and on 18 February 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

President Carter adopts a "Rose Garden" strategy that limited his public appearances

 

      “To the great frustration of Senator Edward Kennedy, President Carter refused to campaign in the early months of the election year, adopting a "Rose Garden" strategy that limited his public appearances so he can devote his full time to the hostage crisis February 13, 1980; he allowed the crisis to dominate American foreign policy for the remainder of his administration” (Ref. 4).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrives Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) pulled in for a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 19 February 1980, to a tumultuous welcome, yet the ship stayed only one day, just long enough to embark 499 Tiger Cruise Guests (male friends and relatives of crewmembers) for the last leg of the voyage back to the continental U.S.; en route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines 8 to 19 February 1980

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 20 February 1980, import from 19 to 20 February 1980, embarking 499 Tiger Cruise Guests. A kast minute visit by North Carolina State Senator George Marion prior to getting underway was arranged. Free Shuttle bus service was provided from Pearl Harbor to Hale Koa Hotel in Waikiki” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

 

Aircraft within a 500 mile radius while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

    “The Honorable George Marion State Senator - North Carolina visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 20 February 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

 

USS Cook (FF 1083)

http://www.navybuddies.com/ff/ff1083.htm

 

USS Midway (CV-41) arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) concluding Indian Ocean operations during the Iranian crisis

 

    “On 20 February 1980, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Eddie Inman ("Hoagy") Carmichael, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 24th WestPac, her 17th South China Sea, on her fifth Indian Ocean deployment and her 19th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her first North Arabian Sea deployment. Midway and its battle group responded to the mining threats of the Strait of Hormuz. On 18 November 1979, Midway arrived in the northern part of the Arabian Sea in connection with the continuing hostage crisis in Iran. Militant followers of the Ayatollah Khomeini, who had come to power following the overthrow of the Shah, seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran on 4 November and held 63 U.S. citizens hostage. Midway was joined on 21 November 1979 by USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). An F-4J assigned to VF-151 is lost after a catapult launch off Midway in the Indian Ocean on 7 January 1980. Both crewmembers eject safely. Both carriers, along with their escort ships, were joined by the USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and her escorts on 22 January 1980. On 4 February 1980, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) cross-decked with Midway, transferring supplies and crossing the two E-2B aircraft.  A turn over brief was also conducted between both ship’s officers. After leaving Singapore, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was at sea for 8-days at the time she relieved Midway in the northern part of the Arabian Sea on 5 February 1980 in connection with the continuing hostage crisis in Iran” (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard Brochure/March 1980-Vol 8; No. 2). Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 22nd deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 28th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 41st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (30 September 1979 to 20 February 1980)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 84A, 1082A & 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard Brochure/March 1980-Vol 8; No. 2).

 

30/09/79 to 20/02/80

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation

Indian Ocean

 

13 Nov 1979 to 8 Feb 1980

24th WestPac

17th SCS

5th IO

Middle East

1st North Arabian Sea

Navy Expeditionary Service Medal

Iran, Yemen & Indian Ocean

21 Nov 1979 to 7 Feb 1980*h

 

same

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

same

 

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location” (Ref. 1181D).

*h Iran/Indian Ocean (21 NOV 79  ~  20 OCT 81)

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Kiska (AE-35) on 21 and 22 February, Backloaded “WestPac” ordnance allowance and USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 22 February 1980.

 

    The operational status on all deck machinery and equipment was outstanding. During the January-February portion of the deployment, Deck Department conducted nineteen CONREP evolutions” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

U.S. Defeats Soviet Squad In Olympic Hockey by 4-3

 

   “Lake Placid, N.Y., Feb. 22 -- In one of the most startling and dramatic upsets in Olympic history, the underdog United States hockey team, composed in great part of collegians, defeated the defending champion Soviet squad by 4-3 tonight.

 

   The victory brought a congratulatory phone call to the dressing room from President Carter and set off fireworks over this tiny Adirondack village. The triumph also put the Americans in a commanding position to take the gold medal in the XIII Olympic Winter Games, which will end Sunday” (Ref. By Gerald Eskenazi - Special to The New York Times).

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/big/0222.html

 

    The operational status on all deck machinery and equipment was outstanding. During the January-February portion of the deployment, Deck Department conducted nineteen CONREP evolutions” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

U.S. Defeats Soviet Squad In Olympic Hockey by 4-3

 

   “Lake Placid, N.Y., Feb. 22 -- In one of the most startling and dramatic upsets in Olympic history, the underdog United States hockey team, composed in great part of collegians, defeated the defending champion Soviet squad by 4-3 tonight.

 

   The victory brought a congratulatory phone call to the dressing room from President Carter and set off fireworks over this tiny Adirondack village. The triumph also put the Americans in a commanding position to take the gold medal in the XIII Olympic Winter Games, which will end Sunday” (Ref. By Gerald Eskenazi - Special to The New York Times). http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/big/0222.html

 

   “On one particular fly over of a Russian Bear as told by Bob Doris, "an F-4 Phantom was sent up to meet and escort them out of the area. The Russian pilot was signaling with his hands to the American pilot to turn his radio to a certain frequency.

 

   The American pilot did it not knowing what could be up. The Russian pilot proceeded to congratulate the Americans on defeating the Russians in the finals of the Olympic hockey game February 22, 1980. And that's how we got the word that we had won the "miracle on ice" hockey game.

 

     Follow Up By Brad Deegan: "When we realized that the Russian Frigate(?) was coming near us, rendering us honors, by them manning the rail, like you said about 400 of us ran to the edge of the flight deck, displaying various gestures. What was wild, after the fact, was when Captain Dunleavy came over the 1 MC, and said "Aint it great to be an American". I will never forget those words!” (Ref. Bob Dorais, 1979-80 WestPac). http://www.usscoralsea.net/pages/cstories.html

 

“Do You Believe in Miracles? YES!”: 30 Years Ago Today, USA Hockey Team Beat Soviets

 

     “Thirty years ago today, on February 22, 1980, the first major event in the Reagan Revolution happened. Despite Jimmy Carter’s “malaise days” speech and his admonition to Americans that they shouldn’t expect their kids to have a better future than they had, a group of working class kids, who slept on old prison cots at Lake Placid, beat the Soviet Union’s professional hockey team in the hockey semi-finals at the Olympic Winter Games.

 

   Al Michaels’ famous, “Do You Believe in Miracles? YES!” lives on, as do chants of “USA! USA! USA!” And ultimately, the team went on to win the Olympic Gold Medal against Finland in the finals. I was a kid then, and boys at my school dressed up as the U.S. Olympic Hockey team for the Jewish holiday of Purim (on which kids wear costumes, as on Halloween).

 

   In January 1981, when Americans, held hostage in Iran at the time of the 1980 Miracle, returned home after 444 days in captivity from Islamic captors, they were shown a video of what they missed. Many of them said the highlight of that film was the scene of Americans beating the Soviets.  But it wasn’t just that we beat them. 

 

   It’s that our amateurs beat their professionals, who’d bean unbeaten for eons. Plus, it was the first major event in which Americans started to take pride in their country again, amid a horribly ineffective President, the hostages in Iran, double-digit inflation, a depressed auto industry under attack from cheap Japanese cars, and rising gas prices.

 

   Many are comparing yesterday’s U.S. Olympic hockey victory against the Canadians, yesterday, to what happened thirty years ago at Lake Placid.  PUH-LEEZE.  It doesn’t even compare. Yes, Team USA was booed by Canadians as they entered center ice, yesterday, but it’s nothing new that Canadians–who all live within 100 miles of the U.S. border and would starve, were it not for U.S. commerce and capitalism–hate us. 

 

   They booed us in 2003, when U.S.-based NHL teams (starring mostly Canadians and Europeans) played on Canadian ice against their teams. But the 1980 team, led by Captain Mike Eruzione, were not a group of spoiled professionals playing spoiled professionals. That’s strictly what yesterday’s hockey game between the U.S. and Canada was.  It had no meaning or significance, unlike the 1980 “Miracle on Ice” and the team coached by Herb Brooks to a David versus Goliath victory. 

 

   In contrast, while some went on to play in the NHL after their Olympic victory, many on the 1980 U.S. Olympic Hockey Team never made it big or had a multi-million (or even multi-thousand) dollar professional hockey contract. 

 

   Instead, they were hungry, young, mostly working class kids who lived every day lives after the fact. As I wrote in my 2004 review of the movie, “Miracle” (which I recommend to anyone who wants to learn about the 1980 Miracle on Ice), the 1980 team had spunk, sparkle, and an underdog hunger to win for the U.S. . . .

 

     “Miracle” shows the grueling conditioning Brooks put the team through. It’s doubtful today’s soft pros could withstand a lick of it. The 1980 team was tough and gritty. They had no product endorsements or part-time jobs by Home Depot and Staples. They were no billions in tax subsidies.

 

   Also the 1980 Olympians slept in converted prisons on prison cots, and organizers nearly declared bankruptcy on a $168 million budget. There were no $28 million opening ceremonies or $2 million temporary Olympic cauldrons and sculptures.

 

   But there was heavy American pride. The U.S. players included guys, like goalie Jim Craig, whose laid-off father desperately needed him to forgo the Olympics for the money an NHL career would provide.

 

   They beat the Soviets when months earlier an NHL All-Star team could not.  (Get your own custom hockey jerseys, just like members of the U.S. Olympic Hockey Team.) And the team included players like my friend, Mark Wells, who scored three goals as a member of the USA Hockey Team, but never made it big.

 

   As I’ve written on this site, he lives in the Detroit area where, for years after the Olympic victory, he slaved nights as a shift manager for Ram’s Horn 24-hour Restaurants. So to all of those who compare the Miracle on Ice that happened thirty years ago to yesterday’s piddling hockey night in Canada, please stop. The 1980 win was a victory over Communist tyranny. And there’s no hockey match-up on the horizon between us and Islamic terrorist groups.

 

    Do you believe in miracles? Yes. But the one that happened thirty years ago today isn’t likely to be repeated anytime soon . . . if ever. And that’s a tragedy, especially since we have Jimmy Carter’s re-run now occupying the White House” (Ref. February 22, 2010, - 1:51 pm - By Debbie Schlussel).

http://www.debbieschlussel.com/17883/do-you-believe-in-miracles-yes-30-years-ago-today-usa-hockey-team-beat-soviets

 

Air Wing FIFTEEN (CVW-15) aircraft flew off USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) to their respective home bases on the West Coast

 

    “On 24 February 1980, one day before arriving in San Diego, all Air Wing FIFTEEN (CVW-15) aircraft flew off USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) to their respective home bases on the West Coast. Not many of Kitty Hawk’s crew slept the evening of 24 February 1980, “Channel Fever” was rampant. The 25th of February was a beautiful sunny day and a glorious day too, at sea en route San Diego, California from 20 to 25 February 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

Thirteenth “WestPac” and first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment (Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw during the Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis (Iran History, Air Arm) and Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on the way home via Korea), operating with other Aircraft Carriers and upon completion conducted training operations and Carrier Qualifications (Iran History, Air Arm, Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis

(13 November 1979 to 30 June 1980)

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 1 – (13 to 30 November 1979)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 December 1979)

Part 3 – (1 to 31 January 1980)

Part 4 – (1 to 24 February 1980)

Part 5 – (25 February to 20 April 1980)

Part 6 – (21 to 24 April 1980)

Part 7 – (25 April to 30 June 1980)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 4 – (1 to 24 February to 1980)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

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EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

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EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4