Thirteenth “WestPac” and first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment (Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw during the Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis (Iran History, Air Arm) and Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on the way home via Korea), operating with other Aircraft Carriers and upon completion conducted training operations and Carrier Qualifications (Iran History, Air Arm, Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis

(13 November 1979 to 30 June 1980)

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 1 – (13 to 30 November 1979)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 December 1979)

Part 3 – (1 to 31 January 1980)

Part 4 – (1 to 24 February 1980)

Part 5 – (25 February to 20 April 1980)

Part 6 – (21 to 24 April 1980)

Part 7 – (25 April to 30 June 1980)

 

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet 1979 CV and CVN Deployments and carriers from the 6th Fleet operating with the Seventh Fleet resulted in three CV’s and CVN-68 extending into 1980, operating under the direction of the Seventh Fleet in the western pacific or Far East:

 

Chapter XXXIV

Appendix I

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) – Pacific Fleet & 7th (2nd Arabian Sea, extending ops. To North  and North Western Arabian Sea)

12th WestPac

11th SCS

3rd Indian Ocean

CVW-15

NL

30 May 1979

25 Feb 1980

WestPac

Middle East

Persian Gulf

Iran Hostage Crisis

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet

En route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Kitty Hawk conducted TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase I; TRANSITEX 8-79 II; MIDPAC operations and MISSILEX Barking Sands; followed by NSSMS shoot Barking Sands and SINEX of opportunity; TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase II: two ASW TACREAD’s; TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase III: ten ASW TSCWD’s and one ASLW TACREAD exorcises tested and developed Battle Croup AAW posture, enhanced ASW teamwork, and identified and rectified communications link shortcomings; FORTRESS WARRIOR; NOTNOEX, BEAVER SNARE, MINEX ALFA in the Bananga Bay; TORPEX in the Subic OPAREA; Beaver Snare in the South China Sea; READIEX LOADEX the South China Sea; air wing/refresher operations, extended range AAWEX’s associated with Exercise COPE THUNDER 79-8 in the South China Sea and Vietnamese refugee search and assistance operations; Exercise Fortress Cale; Exercise MISSILEX Poro Pt. in the South China Sea; Exercise BUZZARDEX 3-79 in the South China Sea on 20 August 1979 (Although the modified exercise provided the ship and air wing team’s first ASU training since the transit and included a well-executed anti-missile BUZZARDEX, no close air support training was accomplished during the exercise); Exercise Fortress Cale, a large-scale amphibious exercise in the Okinawa area for which the Kitty Hawk battle Group was tasked to provide air support; USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX K4-79; operations in the East South China Sea and Philippine Sea, en route to the Philippines; MMR-1 economizer fire; MISSILEX Poro Pt.; Exercise BUSY STORM, an ASW encounter which provided valuable free play and tactical planning opportunities; MISSILEX Poro Pt.; Exercise NEWBOY 79-4 while at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; operations in the South China Sea and Philippine Sea en route to Yokosuka; CONRECEX 80-1, demonstrating the teamwork of the ship, Fleet Intelligence Support Center Western Pacific, Cubi Point, Republic of Philippines, and Fleet Air - Photo Lab, Cubi Point, operating in the Philippine Sea from 3 to 7 October, commencing AWEX80-1 in the South China Sea; BUZZAROEX 4-79 and AWEX 80-1 in the South China Sea; operations in the Philippine Sea and East China Sea; Air Wing FIFTEEN provided area surveillance support to MISSILKEX 2-80, an exercise including live missile firing by surface combatants in the Philippine Sea en route to Pusan Korea; MULTIPLEX 1-80 (The Korean contingency operations did force the cancellation of MULTIPLEX 1-80, scheduled for 27 to 31 October 1979, after only ten hours of Blue-Orange interaction. Celebrated Christmas Day, December 25, 1979 in the northern Arabian Sea as flagship, Task Force SEVEN ZERO and Task Group SEVEN ZERO PT TWO (Battle Group Bravo) joining up with USS Midway (CV-41) and ships in company comprised Task Croup SEVEN ZERO PT ONE (Battle Group ALFA) on 3 December 1979.

 

Kitty Hawk conducted cross-deck and relief operations with USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and CVW-8 on 23 January 1980. Battle Group Bravo was centered upon three carriers: Kitty Hawk, Nimitz, and USS Midway (CV-43), together with 12 escort and support ships. The next day, Kitty Hawk came about from “Camel Station,” beginning her eastward transit to the U.S.

 

Ports of call included: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Pattaya, Thailand; Hong Kong Pusan, Korea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Yokosuka, Japan; Pusan, Korea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines and Pearl Harbor.

 

Air Wing FIFTEEN was equipped with what were then the Navy's newest aircraft: the F-14 Tomcat, S-3 Viking, the A-6E version of the Intruder and the E-2C version of the Hawkeye.

Squadrons: VF-51, F-14A; VF-111, F-14A; VA-22, A-7E; VA-94, A-7E; VA-52, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-114, E-2C; VFP-63 DET.1, RF-8G; VAQ-135, EA-6B; VS-21, S-3A/US-3A; HS-8, SH-3H and VQ-1 Det., EA-3B.

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived on station with USS Midway (CV-41) in the Indian Ocean as flagship, Task Force SEVEN ZERO and Task Group SEVEN ZERO PT TWO (Battle Group Bravo), arriving on station on 3 December 1979, and with USS Midway (CV-41) and ships in company comprised Task Croup SEVEN ZERO PT ONE (Battle Group ALFA) provided the U.S. with A-6 Intruder and A-7 Corsair II attack aircraft and F-4 Phantom II and the modern F-14 Tomcat fighter aircraft, which could respond to a variety of situations if called upon during the Iranian hostage crisis. This was the first time since World War II that the U.S. Navy had two carrier task forces in the Indian Ocean in response to a crisis situation. Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty the same day” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk, 331A & 331B-1979).

*USS Nimitz

(CVN-68) - 2nd, 6th & 7th

(1st North Arabian Sea  & Gulf of Oman)

NorLant

3rd Med

Lant

SoLant

1st Cape of Good

1st IO

2nd Cape of Good

SoLant

Lant

Med

Lant

CVW-8

AJ

10 Sep 1979

26 May 1980

Europe

Middle East

North Arabian Sea

Gulf of Oman

USS California (CGN-36), USS South Carolina (CGN-37), USS Texas (CGN-39) and USS Reeves (CG-24) joined Nimitz as part of her task force with CVW-8 embarked.

USS Midway (CV-41) - 7th     (1st North Arabian Sea) (19th Forward Deployed)

24th WestPac 17th SCS

5th IO

 

CVW-5

NF

30 Sep 1979

20 Feb 1980

Western Pacific

Indian Ocean

Middle East

North Arabian Sea

144-days

Iranian Hostage Crisis in Iran, operating on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea.

 

Ports of call not reported.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) - 7th           (1st North Arabian Sea)

13th WestPac

1st IO

CVW-14

NK

13 Nov 1979

11 Jun 1980

Middle East

212-days

Iran Hostage crisis

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, to strengthen the U.S. Naval presence in the crucial Indian Ocean area as tensions heightened over Iran's taking of 52 American diplomats hostage, in what would turn out to be Operation Evening Light during Operation Eagle Claw, the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran, while operating on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea.

Cheju-Do Islands in the  Sea of Japan

 

Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Subic Bay, R.P.; Pattaya Beach, Thailand and Singapore.

 

COMCARGRU THREE, R.L. Chambers and CVW-14 Squadrons include: VMFA-323 “Death Rattlers,” F-4N; VMFA-531 “Grey Ghosts,” F-4N; VA-97 “Warhawks,” A-7E; VA-27 “Royal Maces,” A-7E; VA-196 “Main Battery,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-113 “Black Eagles,” VFP-63 DET. 2 “Eyes of the Fleet,” RF-8G and HC-1 DET. 3 “Pacific Fleet Angels,” SH-3G.

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources) - *East coast

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet Aircraft Carriers Deployments for 1980 are:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Constellation (CV-64) --7th     (2nd North Arabian Sea)

12th WestPac       3rd IO

2nd Arabian Sea.

CVW-9

NK

26 Feb 1980

15 Oct 1980

Middle East

Iranian Crisis

233-days

RIMPAC'80 and the Iranian Crisis on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea.

 

Ports of call include: Subic Bay, the Republic of the Philippines twice and Singapore Bay.

 

CVW-9 Squadrons: VF-211, F-14; VF-24; F-14; VA-146, A-7E; VA-147, A-7E; VA-165, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-116, E-2C; VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VS-38, S-3 A; HS-6, SH-3H and VQ-1 Det. EA-3B. *VFP-63 disestablished on Jun.30, 1982.

USS

Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) - 2nd, 6th & 7th (1st Arabian dep.)

SoLant

1st Cape of Good Hope

Indian Ocean

2nd Cape of Good Hope

SoLant

CVW-7

AG

15 Apr 1980

22 Dec 1980

Middle East

Iranian Crisis

252-days

In response to the Iran hostage crisis, dispatched by President Carter in support of Exercise Beacon Compass, Exercise Gonzo 4-80/MultiplEx 1-80 and Exercise Gonzo 5-80, while operating on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea.

 

Ports of call:  Singapore Bay, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines.

 

CVW-7 Squadrons include:VF-143 “Pukin' Dogs,” F-14A; VF-142 “Ghostriders,” F-14A; VA-66 ” Waldos,” A-7E; VA-12 ”Flying Ubangis,” A-7E; VA-65 “Tigers,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAQ-132 “Scorpions,” EA-6B; VAW-121 “Bluetails,” E-2C; VS-31 “Topcats,” S-3A/US-3A; HS-5 "Night Dippers,” SH-3H and VQ-2 DET. “Batmen,” EA-3B

 

USS South Carolina (CGN-37) and USS Virginia (CGN-38) joined USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) as part of her task force.

USS Midway (CV-41) - 7th (Forward Deployed)

Sea of Japan

CVW-5

NF

30 May 1980

Jun 1980

Cruise

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier

Relieved USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 30 May 1980 on standby south of the Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan following the potential of civil unrest in the Republic of Korea.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

USS Midway (CV-41) - 7th (2nd North Arabian Sea 1st Arabian / Persian Gulf) (20th Forward Deployed)

25th WestPac 18th SCS

6th IO

 

CVW-5

NF

14 Jul 1980

26 Nov 1980

Middle East

Indian Ocean

North Arabian Sea Persian Gulf

136-days

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system.

USS Ranger (CV-61) - 7th

15th WestPac    2nd IO

CVW-2

NE

10 Sep 1980

5 May 1981

Middle East

238-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

 

CVW-2 Squadrons include: VF-1 “Wolf Pack,” F-14A; VF-2 “Bounty Hunters,” F-14A; VA-113 “Stingers,” A-7E; VA-25 “Fist of the Fleet,” A-7E; VA-145 “Swordsmen,” 6E/KA-6D; VAW-117 “Wallbangers,” E-2B; VAQ-137 “Rooks,” EA-6B; VS-37 “Sawbucks,” S-3A and HS-2 “Golden Falcons,” SH-3H.

USS Independence (CV-62) - 2nd, 6th & 7th

(3rd Red Sea & Gulf of Aden and 1st North Arabian Sea deployment)

SolLant

Cape of Good Hope

2nd IO

3rd Suez Canal

15th Med

Lant

CVW-6

AE

19 Nov 1980

10 Jun 1981

Europe

Middle East

Indian Ocean

204-days

In response to the Iran hostage crisis, dispatched by President Carter and Survey Inspection (INSURV)

 

Ports of call included Perth, Australia and Port Louis, Mauritius, a city in Mauritius.

 

CVW-6 Squadrons include: VF-102 “Diamondbacks,” F-4J; VF-33 “Tarsiers,” F-4J; VA-15 “Valions,” A-7E; VA-87 “Golden Warriors,” A-7E; VA-176 “Thunderbolts,” A-6E/KA-6D

VAW-124 “Bear Aces,” E-2C; VAQ-131 “Lancers,” EA-6B; HS-15 “Red Lions,” SH-3H; VFP-63 DET.4 (*1) “Eyes of the Fleet,” RF-8G and VS-28 “Hukkers, S-3A. (*1) VFP-63 disestablished on Jun.30, 1982.

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 15 April 1980, on her first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea/Gulf (Persian Gulf) deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, steaming through the Southern Atlantic to the bottom of South Africa and through the Mazambique Channel to the Arabian Gulf.

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources) - *East Coast

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) began 1980, its nineteenth year of service to the nation, on extended duty, steaming in the northern Arabian Sea on contingency operations related to the fifty-two American hostages being held in Iran” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

    Captain Leon A. Edney, USN assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Constellation (CV-64), relieving Captain Paul F. McCarthy Jr., USN, 15th Commanding Officer, serving from June 1978 to January 1980” (Ref. 406A).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) pulled in for a port call at Naples, Italy on 1 January 1980” (Ref. 1206).

 

    “The fifth Independence (CVA-62), former CVA-62), the 62nd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 50th, commissioned at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard, New York, on 10 January 1959; reclassified to CV-62 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" 28 February 1973 commenced Overhaul, steaming up the Elizabeth River, a 6-mile-long (10 km) tidal estuary forming an arm of Hampton Roads harbor at the southern end of Chesapeake Bay in southeast Virginia in the United States, located along the southern side of the mouth of the James River, between the cities of Portsmouth and Norfolk to the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia shortly after 14 December 1979, most likely in January 1980 after leave and stand down period. Through its Southern Branch and the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, the Elizabeth River also is a gateway to points to the south for the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, an inland path from the ocean providing a more sheltered navigable waterway to Florida for commercial and recreational boating” (Ref. 1-Independence, 72, 76, 84A, 325, 1148B, 1149A, 1157 & 1158).

 

    “RADM R. E. Kirksey, Carrier Strike Force, 7th Fleet visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Berkeley (DDG-15) on 1 January and USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 2 January 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was underway in the Indian Ocean and South China Sea from 1 January to 3 February 1980, during which time a Soviet IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 2 January 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

 

USS Mullinix (DD 944)

http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/944a.htm

 

   VADM George E.R. Kinnear, II, Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic, held a high level planning conference concerning the ship’s deployment to the Indian Ocean, on board USS Nimitz (CVN-68) off Naples on 3 January 1980” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “CAPT W. P. Allen, Destroyer Squadron 13 visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) during UNREP with USS White Plains (AFS-4) twice on 4 January 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) sailed in response to the Iranian crisis

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) sailed in response to the Iranian crisis, leading a nuclear-powered battle group including guided missile cruisers USS California (CGN-36) and USS Texas (CGN-39) from the Mediterranean Sea to the Indian Ocean on 4 January 1980. The three ships stood out of separate Italian ports and rendezvoused, sailing at a speed of advance of 25 knots around Africa via the Cape of Good Hope and into the Indian Ocean to “Gonzo Station” (derisively named by sailors serving there, supposedly deriving the term from Gulf of Oman Naval Zoo Operation)” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “An F-4J assigned to VF-151 is lost after a catapult launch off USS Midway (CV-41) in the Indian Ocean on 7 January 1980. Both crewmembers eject safely” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS White Plains (AFS-4) on 6 January and USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 7 January 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

    “A Soviet IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 8 January and on 9 January 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departed Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departed Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 9 January 1980, in port from 20 December 1979 to 9 January 1980 and steamed for Pattaya Beach, Thailand. On 1 January 1980, I passed the GED Test and received a Jefferson High School diploma.  

 

    "The ship’s crew hosted singer Barbara McNair who had been performing at the clubs on base, Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines Activities” (Ref. 2).

 

   Although Subic Bay wasn’t the traditional Christmas setting, with temperatures rising into the nineties, it was still excellent liberty and many of us had an opportunity to visit Olangapo City, the closest city to Subic Bay.

 

    First weekend in port was quite, liberty was granted and I think we were on a five day duty rotation in order to ensure manning levels aboard the ship were sufficient for fast departure from port if ever the need arises.

 

   I had started smoking in Bremerton, Washington as the Ops Boss smoked heavily and the Office always smelled like coffee, cleaning floor wax and cigarettes. Our office ventilation was doable so we could breath.

 

    Amazingly I ran every day I could ten to 14 miles a day even though I smoked a half a pack a day for a year I think or longer maybe, anyway when Captain Taylor assumed command of the Operations Department, a non smoker, I quit smoking.

 

  In order to quit, I ran in a warm weather monsoon. I was used to the rain being from Oregon and had in the past run in the rain. After a ten mile run at NAS Cubi Point and through the City of Olangapo, I became very ill and for three days I was bedfast.

 

    On base, Grande Island js a featured hangout, where a sailor can relax in a tropical paradise without spending a fortune, and some excellent scuba diving besides. The base also offered a variety of recreational activities including a movie theater, bowling alley, swimming pool and a fantastic 18 hole golf course.

 

   The minute I shook off being sick, it was time to enjoy liberty. Grande Island was a beautiful inland and offered swimming, snorkeling, scuba diving, water skiing, boating and fishing, activities I became involved with.

 

   I went water skiing, hiring a skipper with a boat, accompanied with his 10-year old son, whom was his father’s eyes. As it turned out the skipper was blind. I took a test for my GED (High School Diploma) on the base, an event sponsored by the Special Service Office. Out of the many scheduled, only a few showed up for the testing.

 

   I met a couple of Philippine girls and enjoyed each other’s company on occasion. I have often wondered if I have a child through my recklessness of not using a condom. I spent most of my time in the gym or at the Enlisted Club on base when I wasn’t working or scuba diving, swimming or running.

 

   Olangapo City, the closest city to Subic Bay didn’t impress me but the way they transported the cities shit will never leave my memory. They had man size trenches that they would haul human waste into the river straddling the U.S. Naval Base. The river was known as Shit River. You would cross a walk bridge over Shit River in order to go to the city. What a mess.

 

   The United States of America’s obligation was not the city infrastructure only the U.S. Naval Base and Clark Air Force Base. Olangapo City was one big party house for U.S. Military Personnel, with an average of 30,000 women engaging in sexual activities for hire when an aircraft carrier and associated ships made Subic Bay their port of call.

 

    The United States of America, as a nation of people with morals, could have done something to improve the lives of those poor Philippines people and in many cases starving people. While roaming the streets at night, mostly drunk Sailors would routinely eat rat meet from rats the size of small dogs. Every bathroom in every bar, over one hundred bars, had rats.

 

    They were given food from large flat round pans. If they were not fed daily, the rats would have taken over the kitchens in bars and restaurants. Even the Hilton Hotel had rats in the bathrooms. I couldn’t believe America did nothing to help the city or its people develop its resources, thereby creating businesses, and employing thousands rather then thousands of girls being unemployed and reduced to sexual activity for employment.

 

   The impact of thousands of military personnel, visiting cities of other countries while on overseas deployments, should take into consideration any possible damage to foreign cultures and people. Unless of course you believe people of other countries are there to exploit.

 

   I don’t think there was a large amount of men practicing homosexuality onboard, but there were a few Americans expressing their sexual preference verbally. When I was in the Navy we didn’t point anyone out for choosing a homosexual life style.

 

   An Intelligence Specialist Seaman (ISSN) Richard Dial was assigned to the Operations Department Admin, OX Division. I was his supervisor for a little while. This guy had just completed 30 days in the brig and or 45-days extra duty and restriction. He wanted out of the U.S. Navy really bad.

 

    His attitude was negative toward the U.S. Navy and being on a ship really pissed him off. He was originally assigned to the Intelligence Division, a division of the Operations Department. This guy upon completion of his corrections chose not to conform and continued his rampage of verbal discontent of his situation. His Division had enough and he was assigned to the Ops Department or me.

 

   When we were in the Philippines, I took this guy to one of a hundred bars to find a girl in order to introduce the opposite sex to him. He got mad at me and told my Division Officer. I can’t blame this guy to much for being afraid, as the girls in the bars had a bad habit of getting under the tables and touching us sailors without notice.

 

    I was startled the first and last time a girl touched me inappropriately without my consent. I didn’t really like it, so I didn’t set at a table. I failed to warn this guy. My Division Officer told me not to concern myself with Richards’s morality. I was only trying top help this guy. This was his night that he didn’t want.

 

   This guy’s unique situation would eventually disrupt flight operations. He was a professed homosexual and continually expressed his reason for wanting out of the U.S. Navy was due to him being a homosexual. My collateral duties were extensive to say the least. Running was essential to me, and improved my job performance.

 

    I was the only one allowed to run on the hangar bay and Captain Dunleavy announced it over the 1 MC to the crew, but because of the inherent danger of moving aircraft no one else would be allowed to run on the hangar bay during flight operations.

 

    While running one evening in the hangar bay, a six feet four inch tall sailor made verbal comments about how sexy I was as I would pass him during my hangar bay laps. His eye contact wasn’t normal and his constant kissing from a distance made me mad. I informed the Master at Arms of this guys conduct and they made him go below decks. I thought that was pretty bold of this guy but after the stunt of the ISSN, I wasn’t surprised and I sure didn’t want to get involved in any type of argument with anyone for any reason.

 

    “Subic Bay is also where the crew bid farewell to Captain Stanley R. Arthur, who goes to Hawaii for duty with the Commander in Chief of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. We also welcomed our new skipper, Captain Richard M. Dunleavy, former skipper of the USS Ponchatoula. Coral Sea welcomed singer Barbara McNair for a brief while at Subic Bay, she had been performing at the clubs on base.

 

    On base, Grande Island js a featured hangout, where a sailor can relax in a tropical paradise without spending a fortune, and some excellent scuba diving besides. The base also offered a variety of recreational activities including a movie theater, bowling alley, swimming pool and a fantastic 18 hole golf course.

 

    With a longer stay in port, there was more time for exploring. The Philippines have many beautiful cities within a short drive from Subic Bay. For instance San Miguel, a Navy Communications Station, located about 30-minutes from Subic Bay, is a scenic drive through beautiful Philippine countryside combined with, miles of beach and little island paradises only a short boat ride of f shore.

 

    A little longer drive away is Clark Air Force Base which is also a good place for recreation. A little further still is the wonderful city of Baguio, here, silver is inexpensive, and the scenery, rich in beauty, Baguio is a chic resort area in the Philippines set in mountain valley close to the worlds eighth great wonder, the terraced rice fields.

 

    In three hours drive is the capital, Manila, the largest city in the country. Manila offers ah the sights and sounds one would find in America but in the special, Philippine style. Well if it sounds like fun, you’re right, it was, and Coral Sea will be ready again if we happen to sail by(Ref. The Voyager, U.S.S. CORAL SEA, January 1980, Vol. 8, No. 1– JOSA Doug Prent and SA Craig Erickson).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) crossed the equator, her “shellbacks” initiating 4,423 “pollywogs” into King Neptune’s Realm on 12 January 1980” (Ref. 372A).

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) crossed the equator

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) crossed the equator, her “shellbacks” initiating 4,423 “pollywogs” into King Neptune’s Realm on 12 January 1980” (Ref. 372A).

 

     “Jimmy Carter stands firm on embargo against the Russians 13 January 1980” (Ref. 12).

 

 

Three F-4N McDonnell-Douglas Phantom II Jet Fighters flying while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) 13th “WestPac”

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 13 January and a IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered the ship on 14 January 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

 

Indian Ocean, January 15, 1980 — Aircraft of Carrier Air Wing One Five (CVW-15) are parked in formation aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). Aircraft seen include A-6 Intruders, foreground; F-14 Tomcats and A-7 Corsair IIs, background; SH-3 Sea King helicopters, left; E-2C Hawkeyes and EA-6B Prowlers, right. US Navy photo by PHC Ken George (DVIC id # DNSN8506347). Defense Visual Information. NS026364 109k. Robert Hurst. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026364.jpg

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) recorded her 10,000th arrested landing during cruise and conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 16 January 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) arrived Pattaya Beach, Thailand

 

   USS Coral Sea (CV-43) pulled in for a port call at Pattaya Beach, Thailand on 18 January 1980, steaming from Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 9 January 1980.

 

   Pattaya Beach was charming but recreation other then the jet boat Para sailing activity resulted in tourism and night life at the bars. Most everything you buy in the market is pirated unless you want cloths.

 

   We went to shore in small canoe type boats that would come alongside the carrier, requiring us to climb down ladders. The Captain of theses canoes propelled and steered the boat by lifting the shaft from the water, placing the propeller back in the water to the starboard or port side of the stern. Speedboat Para sailing was really popular.

 

   USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Co, Captain Dunleavy, announced to the crew he did not want anyone Para sail gliding. There’s always someone who pushes things to the limit. One sailor Para sailed all around the Carrier. The Captain ordered the Master-At-Arms “Shore Patrol” to arrest him when he came ashore. Captains Mast was convened and this guy was busted.

 

    “Soviet IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and the ship conducted UNREP with USS White Plains (AF'S-4) on 18 January and USNS Mispillion (TAO-105) on 19 January 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

 

USS Paul F. Foster (DD 964)

http://www.navybuddies.com/dd/dd964.htm

 

    “A Soviet IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and the ship conducted UNREP with USS White Plains (AF'S-4) on 18 January and USNS Mispillion (TAO-105) on 19 January 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departs Pattaya Beach, Thailand

 

   USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departed at Pattaya Beach, Thailand on 20 January 1980 and headed to Singapore, in port from 18 to 20 January 1980.

 

Jimmy Carter speaks bitterly on the behavior of the Iranians

 

     “On January 21, 1981, Jimmy Carter speaks bitterly on the behavior of the Iranians in an interview before boarding a plane for Germany to meet with the hostages” (Ref. 12).

 

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) on 22 Jan 1980 shortly after arriving on Gonzo Station in the Indian Ocean. Photographed from USS California (CGN-36). NS026819 88k. Photo by Michael Boyd, STG-2(SW), USS California, 1980.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026819.jpg

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) Battle Group had some provocative maneuvers close aboard by a Soviet Navy aircraft reconnaissance AGI No. 477 from 21 to 22 January 1980” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1980).

 

    “Task Force 70 (15 ships, 3 Carrier Battle Groups) photograph on 22 January 1980 was reported but not made available to the public on the internet” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) relieved by USS Nimitz (CVN-65) and her escort ships, joining USS Midway (CV-41) and their escort ships on station in the Arabian Sea

 

   Two carrier task forces centering around USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Midway (CV-41) conducted contingency operations in the northern Arabian Sea from 27 December 1979 to 22 January 1980” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 22 January 1980, and USS San Jose (AFS-7) on 23 January 1980” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and her escort ships joined USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Midway (CV-41) and their escort ships on station in the Arabian Sea on 22 January 1980. Battle Group Bravo was centered upon three carriers: Kitty Hawk, Nimitz, and USS Midway (CV-43), together with 12 escort and support ships” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 331B-1980).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs for Subic Bay, R.P.

 

    “The following day USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed for Subic Bay, R.P., having spent 64 days in operations connected with the Iranian crisis. For their actions in the region, Kitty Hawk and CVW-15 sailors and officers were awarded the Navy Expeditionary Medal” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk).

 

Jimmy Carter's State of the Union Address

 

     “Jimmy Carter's State of the Union Address 23 January 1980, with an introduction by Tip O'Neill January 23, 1980.  Reactions and discussion to President Carter's State of the Union Address, by Richard Valeriani, John Palmer, David Brinkley, Carole Simpson, Robert Byrd, and Ted Stevens. Broadcast on NBC TV” (Ref. 12).

 

      “Reactions and discussion to President Carter's State of the Union Address, by Richard Valeriani, John Palmer, David Brinkley, Carole Simpson, Robert Byrd, and Ted Stevens January 23, 1980. Broadcast on NBC TV” (Ref. 12).

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) arrived on “Gonzo Station”

 

    “On 23 January 1980, USS Nimitz (CVN-68) arrived on “Gonzo Station” on 22 January 1980. A goodly company of ships assembled under TG 70.1 for several hours of formation steaming and station keeping, comprising: aircraft carriers Nimitz, USS Midway (CV-41) and USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63); guided missile cruisers USS Bainbridge (CGN-25), USS California (CGN-36), USS Jouett (CG-29) and USS USS Texas (CGN-39); guided missile destroyers USS Berkeley (DDG-15) and USS Parsons (DDG-33); frigates USS Knox (FF-1052) and USS Stein (FF-1065); replenishment oilers USS Roanoke (AOR-7) and USS Wabash (AOR-5); and oilers USS Mispillion (AO-105) and USS Passumpsic (AO-107). Soviet aircraft, ships and submarines regularly shadowed Nimitz while she operated at Gonzo Station; the bombers consistently forced Tomcat aircrew from VF-41 and VF-84 to intercept and escort them away from the carrier. Soviet modified Kashin class guided missile destroyer USS Sderzhanny (DDG-286) closely shadowed Nimitz during much of this period. The ship’s standard schedule called for flying five–six flights of aircraft launches–known as cycles–a day for six days, followed by a two day stand down for aircraft maintenance, a grueling experience for her crew. Most of Nimitz’s stand down days nonetheless included launching alert aircraft or conducting helo operations. In addition, the crew performed 10 “no notice drills”–exercises designed to counter missile threats to the battle group–while in the area. The carrier operated principally under Battle Group 2, commanded by RADM James R. Sanderson” (Ref. 372A).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted cross-deck and relief operations with

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and CVW-8

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted cross-deck and relief operations with USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and CVW-8 on 23 January 1980. The next day, Kitty Hawk came about from “Camel Station,” beginning her eastward transit to the U.S., having spent 64 days in operations connected with the Iranian crisis, conducting operations at “Camel Station,” in the Northwestern Arabian Sea as flagship, TF 70 and TG 70.2 (Battle Group Bravo) from 4 December 1979 to 23 January 1980. For their actions in the region, Kitty Hawk and CVW-15 sailors and officers were awarded the Navy Expeditionary conducted turnover operations with Nimitz Battle Group from 22 to 23 January 198. Also on On the 23rd, the three U.S. Navy Aircraft Carrier Battle Groups (Kitty Hawk, USS Nimitz (CVN-65) and USS Midway (CV-41), plus twelve escort/support ships) combined into a huge armada formation in a display of seapower. The aerial photographs of this formation were released to the press and the pictures were printed in newspapers and periodicals around the world. Rear Admiral Kirksey, CTF-77, hauled down his flag room Kitty Hawk and embarked on the Nimitz on 23 January 1980. Moments after is departure Kitty Hawk’s Commanding Officer, Captain Chatham, announced that the ship had taken up a course for Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines and eventually home to San Diego, California. Throughout the Iranian Hostage Crisis Kitty Hawk was under “constant surveillance” by Soviet ships and submarines, and CVW-15 aircraft “intercepted and escorted frequent” Soviet Ilyushin Il-38 Mays and Il-22 Cubs flying out of Aden, South Yemen, the Mays at three-day intervals; Iranian P-3Fs on three occasions; Omani SEPECAT Jaguars six times; an Iranian Lockheed C-130 Hercules and an Egyptian Hercules, reconnoitering the carrier. Despite strenuous efforts by logistics people in the supply chain, the exigencies of the extended deployment caused numerous problems for the crew due to shortages, especially of spare parts. Aircrew conducted small arms familiarization, and 10 leathernecks from USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) marine detachment trained as door gunners on board HS-8’s Sea Kings in preparation for “air-sea rescue missions in case of hostilities during Iranian contingencies.” In addition, following a revolution in Afghanistan beginning on 27 April 1979, and the subsequent Soviet invasion on 24 December, the U.S. decided to maintain two carrier battle groups on station in the Indian Ocean” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1980).

 

 

JMSDF P-2J flying to close while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

 

JMSDF P-2J escorted by a A-7E Vought Corsair II Jet attack aircraft flying to close  while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs northern Arabian Sea

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed northern Arabian Sea en route Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines on 24 January 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) visits Singapore

 

   Only five days out of Thailand, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) pulled into Singapore Bay for a four-day rest and relaxation liberty on 25 January 1980.

 

    “While en route to Subic Bay, Philippines, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was reconnoitered by Soviet Il-38s MAY reconnaissance on 25 January 1980” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1980).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departs Singapore

 

   USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departed Singapore Bay after a four-day rest and relaxation liberty from 25 to 29 January 1980. I met real nice people at a Seventh Day Adventist Church and was introduced to Pigeon Plato Apartment Complexes. There were pirated cassette tapes and records in the city street markets to be found and just about anything else money could buy.

 

    “CAPT W. P. Allen, Destroyer Squadron 13 visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) during UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 29 January 1980.  The Malacca Straits were transited as Kitty Hawk departed the Indian Ocean and entered the South China Sea en route to Subic Bay” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

COMCARGRU THREE / CTG 70.3 visits USS Kitty Hawk (CV-43) for Indian Ocean briefing and USS Coral Sea (CV-43) crossed deck with Kitty Hawk

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV43) was in the OPAREA just east of Singapore where the ship crossed deck with the USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) during which time RADM Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USN, Carrier Group THREE, CTG 70.3 and CAPT W. P. Allen, Destroyer Squadron 13 embarked Kitty Hawk for Indian Ocean briefing on 30 January 1980. This was a major cross decking for loading of weapons, all variety of needed supplies, and mail” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk & 331B-1980).

http://www.history.navy.mil/library/guides/rosters/african_am_flag.htm

 

The Republican response to the State of the Union Address 1980

 

      “The Republican response to the State of the Union Address 1980. With John Tower, Bill Young, Jake Garn, William Clements, Rudy Boshwitz, William Roth, and William Brock January 30, 1980. Broadcast on CBS-TV” (Ref. 12).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on track to the Indian Ocean

 

    “On 31 January 1980, USS Coral Sea (CV43) was heading through the Malacca Straits, and then on track to the Indian Ocean .Also on this same day, Coral Sea passed over the equator. The Shellback initiation was held off until the 2nd of February, due to the supplies from the cross decking on the flight deck” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk & 331B-1980).

 

Thirteenth “WestPac” and first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment (Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw during the Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis (Iran History, Air Arm) and Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on the way home via Korea), operating with other Aircraft Carriers and upon completion conducted training operations and Carrier Qualifications (Iran History, Air Arm, Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis

(13 November 1979 to 30 June 1980)

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 1 – (13 to 30 November 1979)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 December 1979)

Part 3 – (1 to 31 January 1980)

Part 4 – (1 to 24 February 1980)

Part 5 – (25 February to 20 April 1980)

Part 6 – (21 to 24 April 1980)

Part 7 – (25 April to 30 June 1980)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 3 – (1 to 31 January 1980)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4