STORIES, DEDICATION and Senior Command Personnel Photos

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STORIES, DEDICATION and Senior Command Personnel Photos

 

 

(Advertisement of your business or books is at a cost of $2.00 a year per web page with a minimum number of 10 pages and your icon will appear on the top of the web page(s) you choose)

 

    Every sailor stationed onboard Coral Sea from her commission October 1 1947, to her decommission in 1990, played a role in naval engagements and activities while in port state side or over seas. My fellow shipmates and I, along with other service members of the USS Nimitz (CVN-68), naval escort ships; Army Rangers, Air Force and Marines, all played a role in “Operation Eagle Claw” regardless of his duty. Now days I guess I would have to say his or her role.

 

      Those that purchased my first Coral Sea book or ebook are entitled to submit their two page story broke down by paragraph with dates which will be included in the authors U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment History books for free. Stories of Coral Sea sailors can be found on line at:

 

USS Coral Sea CVA-43 Association,

US Navy Officer and Enlisted Sailors Stories and

USS Coral Sea Tribute Site.

 

    If you have a story of your tour of duty aboard a ship, submarine, air wing, visit to either a ship or submarine or you are a family member that wants to share their story of a family member that served, your story will be posted on the authors web site for free.

 

      However, if you want your story included in the up coming U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment History Books, then submit your two page story by dates with as many separate paragraphs as you can and the author will publish your story provided the story is respectful, factual, mission related and or comments on your visit to a ship or submarine and or port of call for a cost of $75.00. Additional pages not to exceed four are $50.00 each, provided there are many paragraphs by separate date. If your story needs several pages to share, you story will be listed as an appendix within the authors books.

 

      Stories however are better served when they consist of many dated mission related topics as the authors work of authorship is a summarized time line compilation of U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment History that includes ship’s, submarines and air wings operating with and serving aboard aircraft carriers. If you only want to share your story at no cost to be posted on the authors web site your story is welcome. Those that elect to have their story published in the authors books that will consist of 800-page books, keep in mind that these books will have an accompanied web site with a digital foot print like the Coral Sea web site.

 

     Since books will cover 1922 to present and deployment history of U. S. Aircraft Carriers from 1946 to present, covering all conflicts and wars, state side activities, overhauls, exercises, operations and squadron and air wing onboard activities, the actual number of books will exceed 40 but may be as many as 60 with some books consisting of several years and others one to two years compiled by month, dependant in the number of story submissions. This project is the largest compilation of naval history in regards to U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment History that has ever been published and includes every FWFD carriers have ever made and by number beginning with the first in September 1945.

 

     Author has presented enough information to illustrate the brilliance of this project and the authors knowledge of the navy is so great, Yeoman's that have served in the navy should pay attention to the greatest under taking in the history of the U. S. Navy in regards to honoring those that have served aboard naval vessels. Editing, formatting, bolding and italic styles serve to highlight carriers, ships, aircraft, departments and divisions, exercises, operations, oceans, seas and port of calls. When carrier’s name precedes task force or task group and or abbreviated said same, carrier’s name is not bold. Photo descriptions rarely find carriers, ships or aircraft names either bold or italic styles.

 

     Yeoman's that would like to be a part of this project, now in it’s 14th year of research and now the task at hand is to compile paragraphs by date, consisting of an estimated 48,000 pages of history, re writing naval history in relationship to U. S. Aircraft Carrier and naval vessels deployment history, with the exception of amphibious carriers, another project, profit sharing from book and ebook sales is being offered. However, those interested have a short window to come onboard as author intends to complete this project by the end of 2018. The U. S. Navy does not care to honor those who have served other wise the CNO would release ship logs and command history reports rather then offer them to me for an estimated $130,000.00 through the Navy Judge Advocate General. The fact that a media out let would receive for free these reports, illustrates the lack of desire the American People have in regards to those who have served in the U. S. Navy.

 

DEDICATION and Senior Command Personnel Photos

 

    This story is dedicated to several men who went out of there way to help me along the way as a climbed the ladder of advancement. Among the many who took me under their wing, Chief Petty Officer McAllister, Senior Ops Yeoman; Captain J. M. Curtain, XO and former Ops Boss; Captain S. R. Author, CO; Captain R. M. Dunleavy, CO; CDR Peterson and LCDR Inverso, Ops Division Officers.

These men went out of there way to mold me into a leader with confidence and fortitude.

 

    Further acknowledgement is expressed to those who served and in particular, those who died during the Iranian Hostage Crisis Operation Eagle Claw, my brothers in arms, their honor earned, there sacrifice remembered, this book an humble attempt to bring to light the fact that Iran has been at war with the U.S. since April 4, 1980 and the loss of:

 

    Those heroes are Capt. Richard L. Bakke, 33; Capt. Harold J. Lewis, 35; Capt. Lyn D. McIntosh, 33; Capt. James T. McMillan II, 28; Tech. Sgt. Joel C. Mayo, 34; Marine Staff Sgt. Dewey L. Johnson, 31; Marine Sgt. John D. Harvey, 21; and Marine Cpl. George N. Holmes Jr., 22.

 

    In addition to the aforementioned, and in direct relationship to the history of USS Coral Sea (CVB, CVA & CV-43), Officers and enlisted that served aboard the ship share an experience few have the opportunity of experiencing, life aboard an aircraft carrier. In my day, we would say brothers in arms, but now days I think it would be united at arms or something like that as both female and male now serve aboard every naval ship and submarine I’m thinking. Its not my area of knowledge to know what young sailors serving today call each other or even if any such bond of brother/sister hood exist in regards to standing together, shoulder to shoulder at arms. I’m an old salt and my testimony and story for my navy tour of duty is presented in a different book titled:

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy

(August 1977 to February 1983)

 

 

Chief Petty Officer McAllister Senior, Ops Yeoman Retirement and Captain S.R. Author, CO

 

 

Captain S.R. Author, CO

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/005.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/006.htm

 

Stanley R. Arthur

Nickname

Bear

Born

September 27, 1935(1935-09-27) (age 82)

Place of birth

San Diego, California

Allegiance

United States

Service/branch

Seal of the United States Department of the NavyUnited States Navy

Years of service

1957–1996 (40 Years)

Rank

Admiral

Battles/wars

Vietnam War

First Gulf War

Awards

Navy Distinguished Service Medal (3)

Legion of Merit (4 with Combat "V")

Distinguished Flying Cross (11)

Meritorious Service Medal

Air Medal (47 Strike/Flight and 4 Individual with Combat "V")

Navy Commendation Medal (2 with Combat "V")

 

     “Admiral Stanley R. Arthur, USN (born September 27, 1935)[1] was the Vice Chief of Naval Operations from 1992–95, culminating more than 38 years as an officer in the United States Navy.

 

Military career

 

      Admiral Arthur was born in San Diego, California and was commissioned in U.S. Navy through the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps Program in June 1957. Following completion of flight training, he was designated as a Naval Aviator in 1958.

Arthur flew more than 500 combat missions in the A-4 Skyhawk during the Vietnam War, receiving 11 separate awards of the Distinguished Flying Cross and over 50 separate awards of the Air Medal, making him one of the most highly decorated combat aviators of that conflict. During the 1970s and 1980s, he also held command of a carrier-based attack squadron, a carrier air wing, an aircraft carrier, a carrier battle group (Carrier Group 7), and was Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Logistics) (OP-O4).

 

      In December 1990, then-Vice Admiral Arthur took command of the United States Seventh Fleet. At the time, the Seventh Fleet staff was directing U.S. Naval Forces Central Command and was forward deployed in the Persian Gulf. Thus Vice Admiral Arthur oversaw the U.S. Navy buildup for the Persian Gulf War which broke out on 17 January 1991. He directed the operations of more than 96,000 Navy and Marine Corps personnel and 130 U.S. Navy and Allied ships. This represented the largest U.S. naval armada amassed since World War II. He continued directing Naval Forces Central Command until April 1991, when he returned to Yokosuka to take up Seventh Fleet duties once more. He continued to command Seventh Fleet until July 1992.

 

      Admiral Arthur assumed duties as the Vice Chief of Naval Operations on 6 July 1992. He retired from active military service on 1 June 1995. In that job as the Navy's number two officer, he was also the Navy's most senior Naval Aviator immediately after the 1991 Tailhook Incident.[2] Admiral Arthur was nominated by President Bill Clinton to head U.S. military forces in the Pacific as the prospective Commander of United States Pacific Command, but the nomination was withdrawn after Senator Dave Durenberger (R-Minnesota), questioned Arthur's handling of sexual harassment allegations brought by one of the Senator's constituents, a female Navy student helicopter pilot named Rebecca Hansen, who was attrited from flight training.

 

      Rather than let the Pacific fleet job go unfilled during what might have been protracted hearings, Arthur elected to retire from the Navy on February 1, 1995 as a four-star admiral. Critics charged that the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Mike Boorda, sacrificed Arthur to improve the Navy's image on sexual harassment following the Tailhook Incident.[3] The volume of complaints prompted Boorda to issue an unusual public defense of Arthur and his decision not to fight for the nomination:

 

      "Stan Arthur is an officer of integrity... who chose to take this selfless action... in the interests of more rapidly filling a critical leadership position. Those who postulate other reasons for the withdrawal are simply wrong."[4]

 

Post Military

 

      Arthur joined Lockheed Martin in 1996 and was appointed President, Missiles and Fire Control – Orlando, Florida in July 1999.

 

Education

 

      Arthur is a graduate of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. He later earned a second bachelor's degree in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School and received his master's degree in administration from George Washington University.

 

Awards

 

      In 1996 Arthur received the Admiral Arleigh A. Burke Leadership Award from the Navy League. He was inducted into the Naval Aviation Hall of Honor in 2008. He also received the Gray Eagle Award. The Admiral Stan Arthur Award For Logistics Excellence is presented annually in his honor, and recognizes military and civilian logisticians who epitomize excellence in logistics planning and execution.[5][6]” (Ref. Military Wiki is a Fandom Lifestyle Community. Content is available under CC-BY-SA).

 

References

 

1. [1] Department of Defense Appropriations for ..., Part 4

https://books.google.com.mx/books?id=5pIbIxJin6oC&q=Stanley+R.+Arthur+1935&dq=Stanley+R.+Arthur+1935&hl=en&ei=MzsuTer2B4H48AbP7JH4CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&redir_esc=y

 

2. frontline: the navy blues: transcript | PBS

 

3. "Frontline : The Navy Blues : Admiral Boorda's 'In Basket'". PBS. October, 1996. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/navy/plus/inbasket.html. Retrieved 2008-05-17. 

 

4. "Admiral Once Nominated to be Pacific Forces Chief Will Resign in February; He Was Accused of Mishandling a Sexual Harassment Case". The Virginian-Pilot

http://military.wikia.com/wiki/Stan_Arthur

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/007.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/008.htm

 

Richard Dunleavy

Born

1933

Allegiance

United StatesUnited States of America

Service/branch

Flag of the United States.svg United States Navy Seal of the United States Department of the Navy

Years of service

1966-1993

Rank

Rear Admiral

Commands held

Commanding Officer, USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Philippines

Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic Fleet

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Air Warfare

 

       Admiral Richard Michael Dunleavy (born 1933) is a retired US naval officer. He retired as a two-star Rear Admiral in 1993 after being demoted from the rank of three-star Vice Admiral as a result of the Tailhook scandal.[1] Dunleavy attended Basic Naval Aviation Observer (BNAO) School at NAS Pensacola, Florida followed by advanced training at NAS Glynco, Georgia, after which he was designated as a Naval Aviation Observer (NAO). His first Fleet assignment was as a bombardier/navigator in the A-3 Skywarrior at NAS Sanford, Florida, followed by later transition to the A-5 Vigilante. He then became a reconnaissance attack navigator in the RA-5C Vigilante and was redesignated a Naval Flight Officer (NFO) with the establishment of the NFO specialty in 1966.

 

     Selected for transition to the A-6 Intruder attack aircraft, he subsequently became a bombardier/navigator in that aircraft at NAS Oceana, Virginia, later commanding an Atlantic Fleet A-6 squadron based there, Attack Squadron 176 (VA-176). This was subsequently followed by command of the Pacific Fleet's A-6 fleet replacement squadron (FRS), Attack Squadron 128 (VA-128) at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington.[2] Following command of a deep draft replenishment vessel, Dunleavy was selected as the first Naval Flight Officer (NFO) to command an aircraft carrier, serving as Commanding Officer of the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43) (as a Captain).[3] While commanding the Coral Sea he participated in the Iranian Hostage Crisis rescue attempt of April 1980 while patrolling in Gonzo Station, near Iran. Dunleavy was extremely well liked by those who served under him, and has been given much credit by his subordinates for boosting morale while commanding the Coral Sea.[4]

 

      As a Flag Officer, he also served as Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Philippines[5] and As Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic Fleet, and as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Air Warfare (OP-05).[6] In the 2008 presidential election he was among the 300 Generals and Admirals who enthusiastically endorsed John McCain for president.[7] This was in contrast to Colin Powell, who endorsed Barack Obama” (Ref. Military Wiki is a Fandom Lifestyle Community. Content is available under CC-BY-SA).

http://military.wikia.com/wiki/Richard_Dunleavy

 

References

1. http://www.nytimes.com/1993/10/16/us/tailhook-affair-brings-censure-of-3-admirals.html

2. http://www.history.navy.mil/download/va125153.pdf

3. http://www.usscoralsea.net/pages/cos.html

4. http://www.usscoralsea.org/07/?D=A

5. http://www.sterett.org/public/31shiphistory/1981.htm

6. http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-5470669_ITM

7. http://www.gwu.edu/~action/2008/chrndeb08/mccain092608pr300.html

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/072.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/065.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/011.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/012.htm

 

Lawrence (Larry) Cleveland Chambers

File:CaptainLarryChambers.jpg

Admiral Larry Chambers (then Captain) directing operations aboard the USS Midway during Operation Frequent Wind, 1975.

 

Born

(1929-06-10)June 10, 1929

Place of birth

Bedford, Virginia

Allegiance

United States

Service/branch

United States Navy

Years of service

1948–1984

Rank

Rear Admiral

Commands held

USS Midway
USS Coral Sea
Carrier Strike Group Three

Battles/wars

Vietnam War

Awards

Bronze Star
Vietnam Service Medal
Meritorious Service Medal

 

 

 

     “Lawrence (Larry) Cleveland Chambers (born June 10, 1929) was the first African American to command a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier and the first African American graduate of the Naval Academy to reach flag rank.[1] While in command of the USS Midway during Operation Frequent Wind, Chambers gave the controversial order to push overboard millions of dollars worth of UH-1 Huey helicopters so South Vietnamese Air Force Major Buang-Ly could land on the aircraft carrier in a Cessna O-1 Bird Dog with his wife and five children, thereby saving their lives.[2]

 

Early Life and Naval Academy

 

      Born in Bedford, Virginia in 1929, Chambers was the oldest of five children[3] raised by his mother, Charlotte Chambers (including his brother Andrew, who later became a major genral in the U.S. Army).[4] After Chambers' father died, his mother began working in the War Department to support the family. Chambers served in ROTC while attending Dunbar High School in (Washington, D.C. After graduating as class valedictorian, Chambers considered using the ROTC program to also pay for college.

 

     However, Wesley A. Brown, the first African American graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, encouraged him to apply there.[4] Chambers did and became the second African American to graduate from the Academy on June 6, 1952.[2][3] Chambers had mixed feelings about his time at the Naval Academy, not returning to visit for twenty years. He would later say, "While I had some good memories, I also had some tough memories."[5]

 

Naval career

 

      In 1954, after 18 months of flight training, Chambers became a naval aviator.[4] From 1968 to 1971 Chambers flew combat missions over Vietnam from the USS Ranger and the USS Oriskany.[2] In 1972 he was promoted to captain and placed in command of the USS White Plains, a combat stores ship. In January 1975, Chambers became the first African American to command an aircraft carrier, the USS Midway.[1]

 

    “On 29 May 1975, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 31 March 1975, with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer, ending her 13th WestPac, her eighth South China Sea deployment and fifth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her fifth deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet in support of Operation Frequent Wind was the evacuation by helicopter of American civilians and "at-risk" Vietnamese from Saigon, South Vietnam. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 15 to 18 April 1975, departing to continue her fifth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea. Midway, USS Coral Sea (CV-43), USS Hancock (CV-19), USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Okinawa (LPH-3) responded 19 April 1975 to the waters off South Vietnam when North Vietnam overran two-thirds of South Vietnam. Ten days later, Operation Frequent Wind was carried out by U.S. 7th Fleet forces. During this operation, Midway had offloaded fifty percent of her regular combat air wing at NS Subic Bay, Philippines. Her 27th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (31 March to 29 May 1975)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 405, 1181O, 1183, [5], [6], [7] of 1184, 1185 & Military Wiki is a Fandom Lifestyle Community. Content is available under CC-BY-SA).

 

     “RADM Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USN served as Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five from January 1975 to December 1976. After being promoted to admiral, Chambers later served as commander of Carrier Strike Group Three and the USS Coral Sea” (Ref. Military Wiki is a Fandom Lifestyle Community. Content is available under CC-BY-SA).

 

     “On 11 June 1980, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 (tail code NK), Captain David N. Rogers; RADM Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USN, Commander, Carrier Group THREE, CTG 70.3 and Captain Ming E.  Chang, Chief of Staff, Carrier Group THREE and Commodore Gelke, DESRON Five was with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) until late May 1980, relieving Commodore Treiber, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) Twenty Three in March 1980 embarked arrived Alameda, California with Captain Richard Michael Dunleavy, as Commanding Officer, relieving Captain Stanley Roger Arthur, 30th Commanding Officer, serving from 3 June 1978 to 22 December 1979 at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, while Commodore Gelke, DESRON Five was with the ship until late May 1980, relieving Commodore Treiber, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) Twenty Three in March 1980 (NHC Battle Order p _), ending her her 13th WestPac deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, on her first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment during the Iranian Revolution & Iran Hostage Crisis to strengthen the U.S. Naval presence in the crucial Indian Ocean area as tensions heightened over Iran's taking of 52 American diplomats’ hostage, in what would turn out to be Operation Evening Light during Operation Eagle Claw, the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran. . Her 24th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 1 October 1947 (13 November 1979 to 11 June 1980)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72, 1275W9 & 1275W10).

 

     “RADM Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USN finished his career in charge of the Naval Air Systems Command. In April 1975, while in command of the aircraft carrier USS Midway, Chambers was ordered to "make best speed" to the waters off South Vietnam as North Vietnam overran the country to take part in Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of U.S. and South Vietnamese personnel. At the time the carrier was in Subic Bay Naval Base with the engineering plant partially torn apart. Chambers has stated that he received no official order to start the operation, which began on April 29. Instead, when Nguyễn Cao Kỳ, the Vice President of Vietnam, landed on the flight deck, Chambers figured the operation was going on.[6] Soon the carrier's flight deck was full of helicopters carrying refugees from the fall of South Vietnam. On that same day, South Vietnamese Air Force Major Buang-Ly loaded his wife and five children into a two-seat Cessna O-1 Bird Dog and took off from Con Son Island. After evading enemy ground fire Major Buang headed out to sea and spotted the Midway.

 

      The Midway's crew attempted to contact the aircraft on emergency frequencies but the pilot continued to circle overhead with his landing lights turned on. When a spotter reported that there were at least four people in the two-place aircraft, all thoughts of forcing the pilot to ditch alongside were abandoned - it was unlikely the passengers of the overloaded Bird Dog could survive the ditching and safely egress before the plane sank. After three tries, Major Buang managed to drop a note from a low pass over the deck: "Can you move the helicopter to the other side, I can land on your runway, I can fly for one hour more, we have enough time to move. Please rescue me! Major Buang, wife and 5 child."

 

      Even though an admiral currently on board the USS Midway said the plane should be ordered to ditch in the ocean, Chambers knew that doing so would likely kill most of the people on it.[6] Instead, he ordered that the arresting wires be removed and that any helicopters that could not be safely and quickly be relocated should be pushed over the side. To get the job done he called for volunteers, and soon every available seaman was on deck, regardless of rank or duty, to provide the manpower to get the job done. An estimated US$10 million worth of UH-1 Huey helicopters were pushed overboard into the South China Sea. With a 500-foot ceiling, five miles visibility, light rain, and 15 knots of surface wind, Chambers ordered the ship to make 25 knots into the wind. Warnings about the dangerous downdrafts created behind a steaming carrier were transmitted blind in both Vietnamese and English. To make matters worse, five additional UH-1s landed and cluttered up the deck. Without hesitation, Chambers ordered them scuttled as well. Captain Chambers recalled in an article in the Fall 1993 issue of the national Museum of Aviation History's "Foundation" magazine that the aircraft cleared the ramp and touched down on center line at the normal touchdown point. Had he been equipped with a tailhook he could have bagged a number 3 wire. He bounced once and came stop abeam of the island, amid a wildly cheering, arms-waving flight deck crew.

 

      Major Buang was escorted to the bridge where Captain Chambers congratulated him on his outstanding airmanship and his bravery in risking everything on a gamble beyond the point of no return without knowing for certain a carrier would be where he needed it. The crew of the Midway was so impressed that they established a fund to help him and his family get settled in the United States.[7] The Bird Dog that Major Buang landed is now on display at the Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola, FL.[8] At the time, Chambers had only been in command of the USS Midway for four or five weeks and believed that his order would get him court martialed.[6] He also called Major Buang-Ly the "bravest man I have ever met in my life"[6] and said of his decision to allow Lee to land that "When a man has the courage to put his family in a plane and make a daring escape like that, you have to have the heart to let him in."[9]

 

Later life

 

      After retiring from the Navy, Chambers became director of program development at System Development Corporation.[10] In 2010, Chambers took part in commemorations honoring Operation Frequent Wind.[9]” (Ref. Military Wiki is a Fandom Lifestyle Community. Content is available under CC-BY-SA).

 

References

 

1. African American Flag Officers in the US Navy, Naval History and Heritage Command, accessed March 16, 2013.

Catherine Reef (1 January 2004).

 

2. African Americans in the Military. Infobase Publishing. pp. 57. ISBN 978-1-4381-0775-2. http://books.google.com/books?id=QF9grMa_84YC&pg=PA56. Retrieved 16 March 2013. 

 

3. D.C. grad ranks high at U.S. Naval Academy, The Afro American, Jun 7, 1952.

 

4. Johnson Publishing Company (November 1981). Ebony. Johnson Publishing Company. pp. 118ISSN 00129011. http://books.google.com/books?id=nJ3TyeTf6tIC&pg=PA118. Retrieved 16 March 2013. 

 

5. Robert J. Schneller (19 December 2007). Blue & Gold and Black: Racial Integration of the U.S. Naval Academy. Texas A&M University Press. pp. 99–. ISBN 978-1-60344-000-4. http://books.google.com/books?id=OiJFC4P52f8C&pg=PA99. Retrieved 16 March 2013. 

 

6. USS Midway Veterans Recall Fall of Saigon by Maureen Cavanaugh and Natalie Walsh, KPBS, April 29, 2010.

 

7. Shiel, Walt (1995). Cessna Warbirds, pp 119-120. Jones Publishing. ISBN 1-879825-25-2.

 

8. Watter, Steve. "Clear the Decks." Focus on the Family, 2004. Retrieved 9 July 2008.

 

9. "Refugees 'come home' to the Midway after 35 years" by Deepa Bharath, The Orange County Register, April 30, 2010.

 

10. Earl G. Graves, Ltd. (August 1985). Black Enterprise. Earl G. Graves, Ltd.. pp. 42–ISSN 00064165. http://books.google.com/books?id=kV8EAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA42. Retrieved 16 March 2013.  http://military.wikia.com/wiki/Lawrence_Chambers

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/013.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/014.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/076.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/077.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/071.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/069.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/070.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/200.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/201.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/204.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/205.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/097.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/098.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/099.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/100.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/337.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/336.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/101.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/102.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/170.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/171.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/103.htm

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/104.htm

 

 

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-82/169.htm