CHAPTER XXXIII

U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (Indian Ocean operations keeping the peace in the Middle East during which time riots against the shah's regime took place in several Iranian cities, resulting in the Iranian revolution with control of Iran shifting to Ayatollah Khomeini; followed by the Shah of Iran’s admission into the U. S. (22 October 1979) for medical treatment which touched off a huge demonstration in Tehran demanding his extradition and on the morning of 4 November 1979, exactly one year before the United States Presidential election, a mob of around 3,000 students stormed the U.S. embassy gate in Tehran, overran the guards, and took the sixty-six people inside hostage, in the name of Ayatollah Khomeini) - $80,000,000 11 month overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Washington and sailed for Alameda, Ca. 8 February 1979, arriving the next day; underwent overhaul on 6 March 1978, during which the last of her 5-inch battery and all gun directors were removed, followed by Refresher Training and CarQuals with Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN (CVW-14) embarked, visits at North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, Ca.

Iran History & Air Arm

 (1 January 1978 to 12 November 1979)

Part 1 – (1 January to 14 May 1978)

Part 2 – (15 May to 31 November 1978)

Part 3 – (1 December 1978 to 8 March 1979)

Part 4 – (9 March to 25 October 1979)

Part 5 – (26 October to 12 November 1979)

 

Former Shah of Iran’s admission into the U. S.  (22 October 1979)

 

     “Several influential political leaders were able to persuade President Carter to allow the shah to enter the country -- for humanitarian reasons -- to be treated for his cancer. It had been argued that it was disgraceful that the United States had turned its back on one of her oldest and closest friends. Carter's primary concern was the safety of the American embassy. Fearing another assault, Carter decided to permit the shah entry after the Tehran government indicated it would take no retaliatory action if he came only for medical treatment. The shah entered the United States on October 22 1979, and survived the gall bladder surgery on October 26 1979” (Ref. 4).

 

     “Anti-American sentiment was strong, and the Shah's admission to the United States for medical treatment touched off a huge demonstration in Tehran demanding his extradition” (Ref. 22).

 

 

NS024131 69k USS Midway (CV-41) operating with US and Australian ships in a joint exercise in the Indian Ocean, October 1979. US Navy photo [# 1176316]. USN http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024131.jpg

 

    “During contingency operations in the wake of the assassination of South Korean President Park C. Lee, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) cancelled her participation of MultiPleEx 1-80 barely 10 hours into the exercise, coming about and steaming to a position in the East China Sea off Cheju Do on 26 October 1979” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) pulled in for a port call at Naples, Italy on 26 October 1979” (Ref. 1206).

 

The first female sailor to re-enlist on board USS Nimitz (CVN-68)

 

     “AZ2 Kathy Hughes, Naval Air Facility (NAF) Mildenhall, U.K., re-enlisted in VA-35’s Ready Room, the first female sailor to re-enlist on board USS Nimitz (CVN-68) on 27 October 1979. Hughes flew to Naples, Italy, for the ceremony while the ship visited that port” (Ref. 372A).

 

     “During contingency operations in the wake of the assassination of South Korean President Park C. Lee, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) cancelled her participation of MultiPleEx 1-80 barely 10 hours into the exercise, coming about and steamed to a position in the East China Sea off Cheju Do, southwest coast of the Korean on 27 October 1979” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and her escort ships began operations in the East China Sea off Cheju Do, southwest coast of the Korean in response to the assassination of South Korean President Park Chung

 

     “On 28 October 1979, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and her escort ships began operations in the East China Sea off Cheju Do, southwest coast of the Korean in response to the assassination of South Korean President Park Chung Hee on 26 October. Upon arrival, Air Wing Fifteen aircraft initiated cyclic flight operations within the detection envelope of North Korean early warning radars, demonstrating to Pyŏngyang U.S. resolve to support the South Koreans, and helping to ease the crisis. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Passuipisic (TAO-107) on 28 October and USS Shasta (AE-33) and USS White Plains (AFS-4) on 29 October 1979” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk, 331A & 331B-1979).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) made a port call at Naples, Italy from 26 to 30 October 1979” (Ref. 1206).

 

 

USS Independence (CV-62) at anchor in Genoa, Italy, 30 October 1979. This was Indy's 14th Mediterranean deployment, the first with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 6. NS026261. Carlo Martinelli. A stern view of the aircraft carrier USS Independence (CV-62) underway. Photo is dated 12 November 1979, but this might be incorrect. US Navy photo by PH1 R.J. Lincoln (DVIC id: DNSC8200353). NS026233. Defense Visual Information Center.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026261.jpg

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) commenced MULTIPLEX 1-80 on 27 October 1979. The Korean contingency operations did force the cancellation of MULTIPLEX 1-80, scheduled for 27 to 31 October 1979, after only ten hours of Blue-Orange interaction. Before cancellation, however, significant long range AAW training was accomplished. The scheduled exercise events in the Philippine Sea were cut short the same day, because of the assassination of Republic of Korea President Park Chung Hee. Kitty Hawk was immediately directed to come about and steam at best speed to a contingency support station in the East China Sea off Cheju Do, southwest coast of the Korean Peninsula on 26 October 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 31 October 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) played a key role in CrisEx-79 commencing on 31 October 1979, a joint naval amphibious exercise with the Spaniards that envisioned a scenario to repel invaders from gaining a foothold along the Spanish Mediterranean Sea coast; the evolution involving more than two dozen ships and submarines and 35,000 troops, operating closely with Spanish destroyer SPS Mendez Nuńez (D-63), which she integrated into her screen” (Ref. 372A).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted CASEX (Okinawa) on 1 November and USN/ROKIN MINEX “B”/EODEX K1-80 on 2 November 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

    “On 3 November 1979 during Fast Eagle 111, an F-14A (BuNo 160383), CDR David J. Formo, squadron CO, and LCDR Nicholas J. DeLello (VF-41) attached to CVW-8, failed to recover from a high speed, low level (80º–90º) practice combat air patrol interception vs. USAF General Dynamics (Grumman) F-111 Aardvarks off the eastern Spanish coast, and flew into the water “nose low,” killing both men” (Ref. 372A).

 

    LCDR John M. Luecke and LT(JG) Frederick Eliot (VA-35) completed the 50,000th landing on board USS Nimitz (CVN-68), in an A-6E attached to CVW-8 in November 1979” (Ref. 372A).

 

Iran History, Iranian Revolution & Iran hostage crisis

 

    Iranian students poured into the streets to protest, demanding that the United States return the shah and his multimillion dollar fortune to Iran. At first these protests seemed to be no more than what had been going on since Khomeini's return, but on the morning of 4 November 1979, exactly one year before the United States Presidential election, a mob of around 3,000 students stormed the U.S. embassy gate in Tehran, overrun the guards, and took the sixty-six people inside hostage, in the name of Ayatollah Khomeini” (Ref. 4 & 72).

 

    These Muslim "students," adherents of the Ayatollah Khomeini's fundamentalist revolution, having stormed the U.S. Embassy in Teheran and seized the Americans in the compound, including 14 Marine guards, the students announce that they will release their hostages if the United States will extradite the deposed Shah, who is undergoing medical treatment in New York, for trial by a revolutionary tribunal. President Jimmy Carter refuses to concede to the Iranians' demands” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

    Do to the U. S. seizure from Iran, of spare parts delivery 4 November 1979, the operational status of the western equipment deteriorated quickly in the IIAF” (Ref. 16 & 72).

 

    The civilian government responded to President Carter's immediate protest by assuring him that they would do everything in their power to secure the release of the hostages unharmed. But the fact was that they had no power beyond that which Khomeini allowed them to exercise, and he was quick to support the students, who had become overnight heroes in Iran” (Ref. 4).

 

    “In November 1979, the republic's first prime minister, Mehdi Bazargan, resigned. The republic's first president, Abolhassan Bani-Sadr, opposed the holding of the U.S. embassy in Tehran. He was impeached by the Majles and forced to flee to France, together with opposition leader Massoud Rajavi of the outlawed Mujahedin-e Khalq (Fighters for the People) faction, with whom he formed the National Council of Resistance for the overthrow of the Khomeini regime. The Mujahedin stepped up a campaign of sporadic and highly demoralizing bombing throughout the country that killed many clerics and government leaders” (Ref. 22 & 72).

 

    President Carter made it clear to the Iranians and the world that the lives of the hostages were his first priority.  He ordered the fifty thousand Iranian students in the United States to report to the nearest immigration office. President Cater also suspended arms sales to Iran, froze Iranian assets in American banks, and announced an embargo on Iranian oil, which obviously did not help the Energy Crisis.  More important than his actions, were Carter's public statements which had the effect of enormously enhancing the value of the hostages to the Iranians.

 

    News of the embassy takeover caused an instant sensation in the United States.

Television newscasts were filled with on-the-scene pictures of the dramatic event, which was virtually unprecedented in American history. The media, by giving the crisis an extremely high level of coverage, including nightly TV "specials" on the situation, added to the emotional response of the American people, and showed huge mobs of crazed Iranians in Tehran chanting "Death to America, Death to Carter, Death to the shah."

 

    Representations of Uncle Sam and Carter were burned and numerous American flags were spat upon trampled, and burned in the street. More importantly, American television audiences were shocked to see blindfolded members of the United States Marines embassy guard, with their hands tied behind their backs, as they were paraded before TV cameras. Everywhere the American public demanded that the government take some sort of retaliatory action. The only concession the demonstrators made was to release all of the non-American hostages as well as all the blacks and most of the women. The blacks were released, the Muslims said, because they were victims of American oppressors. The women were freed because the Muslims did not wage war against women. During this period of early confusion, six Americans -- four men and two women -- escaped from the embassy by simply walking out and making their way to the Canadian embassy. The number of hostages was down to 52, but these people will be held, their captors claimed, until all their demands were met” (Ref. 4).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained in a contingency support station off the southwest coast of the Korean Peninsula

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained in a contingency support station off the southwest coast of the Korean Peninsula from 27 October to 4 November 1979. This activity was designed to demonstrate U. S. resolve at insuring the territorial integrity of South Korea. It apparently worked. Upon arrival, Air Wing Fifteen aircraft initiated cyclic flight operations within the detection envelope of North Korean early warning radars. U. S. officials who visited the ship during these operations stated that in their opinion and the opinion of many South Koreans, the presence of the Kitty Hawk Battle Group was the single most important factor in thwarting North Korean military intervention in South Korea, an opportunity for which the North Koreans had been planning and awaiting for several decades. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 4 November 1979. AS the situation stabilized, Kitty Hawk was released from contingency station and commenced participation in a USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX KI-80 before making a second port visit to Pusan on 5 November 1979. The Korean contingency operations did force the cancellation of MULTIPLEX 1-80, scheduled for 27 to 31 October 1979, after only ten hours of Blue-Orange interaction. Before cancellation, however, significant long range AAW training was accomplished. After Kitty Hawk was released from contingency support station off the southwest coast of the Korean Peninsula– MODLOC off Korea (27 October to 4 November 1979)” (Ref. 372A).

 

    LCDR John M. Luecke and LT(JG) Frederick Eliot (VA-35) completed the 50,000th landing on board USS Nimitz (CVN-68), in an A-6E attached to CVW-8 in November 1979” (Ref. 372A).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrives Pusan, Korea

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) commenced participation in a USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX KI-80 before making a second port visit to Pusan, Korea, dropping anchor on 5 November 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 40 Korean Amy officers, 2 ROKN Captains; 106 Sixth Graders and Mr. Bon Yonan; 12 Pusan Businessmen and Commodore Jeong (KOKN); 75 members of Korean Broadcasting Company; 15 Brigadier Generals (ROK Aroy); Bishop of Pusan and 8 priests; Mayor of Pusan and 8 other officials and 8 U.S. officers from UNC-eoul from 5 to 7 November 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

 

An aerial starboard view of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN-68) underway in the Mediterranean Sea, November 1979, with two A-7E Corsair II aircraft from Light Attack Squadron 82 (VA-82, "Marauders") in flight above the ship. US Navy photo by PH2 Inks. NS026837 53k. Alex Tatchin.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026837.jpg

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) Marine Detachment provided color guard during Attack Squadron Fifty-Two Change of Command ceremony on 8 November 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) raised anchor and departed Pusan, Korea

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) raised anchor and departed Pusan, Korea on 10 November 1979, inport from 5 to 10 November 1979, en route to the Philippines. The Marine Detachment celebrated the Marine Corps Birthday, while at sea, with a formal dinner and traditional cake cutting ceremony on 10 November. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS White Plains (AFS-4) and USS Wabash (AOR-5) on the 10th as well” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) played a key role in CrisEx-79 from 31 October to 12 November 1979, a joint naval amphibious exercise with the Spaniards that envisioned a scenario to repel invaders from gaining a foothold along the Spanish Mediterranean Sea coast; the evolution involved more than two dozen ships and submarines and 35,000 troops. Nimitz operated closely with Spanish destroyer SPS Mendez Nuńez (D-63), which she integrated into her screen” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) made a port call at Tunis, Tunisia on 12 November 1979” (Ref. 1206).

 

    USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN (CVW-14) embarked, conducted an intensive workup cycle, Refresher Training and Carrier Qualifications (CarQuals), to include many visits at North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, Ca. February to November 1979 and was the ready carrier off the coast of California for about four months going from off the coast of Mexico, up to the Aleutians, and back.

 

 

A stern view of the aircraft carrier USS Independence (CV-62) underway. Photo is dated 12 November 1979, but this might be incorrect. US Navy photo by PH1 R.J. Lincoln (DVIC id: DNSC8200353). NS026233 142k. Defense Visual Information Center. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026233.jpg

 

CHAPTER XXXIII

U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (Indian Ocean operations keeping the peace in the Middle East during which time riots against the shah's regime took place in several Iranian cities, resulting in the Iranian revolution with control of Iran shifting to Ayatollah Khomeini; followed by the Shah of Iran’s admission into the U. S. (22 October 1979) for medical treatment which touched off a huge demonstration in Tehran demanding his extradition and on the morning of 4 November 1979, exactly one year before the United States Presidential election, a mob of around 3,000 students stormed the U.S. embassy gate in Tehran, overran the guards, and took the sixty-six people inside hostage, in the name of Ayatollah Khomeini) - $80,000,000 11 month overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Washington and sailed for Alameda, Ca. 8 February 1979, arriving the next day; underwent overhaul on 6 March 1978, during which the last of her 5-inch battery and all gun directors were removed, followed by Refresher Training and CarQuals with Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN (CVW-14) embarked, visits at North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, Ca.

Iran History & Air Arm

 (1 January 1978 to 12 November 1979)

Part 1 – (1 January to 14 May 1978)

Part 2 – (15 May to 31 November 1978)

Part 3 – (1 December 1978 to 8 March 1979)

Part 4 – (9 March to 25 October 1979)

Part 5 – (26 October to 12 November 1979)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXIII

Part 5 - (26 October to 12 November 1979)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4