FIFTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT AND SECOND VIETNAM COMBAT CRUISE - U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA - RESTRICTED AVAILABILTY AT HUNTERS POINT, SAN FRANCISCO, CA. & LOCAL TRAINING OPERATIONS

(29 July 1966 to 25 July 1967)

CHAPTER XXI

 

 

    “After further local operations off Ca., USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with Commander William G. Harris, Commander, Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) (tail code NE) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 29 July 1966, with Captain Frank Willis Ault, as Commanding Officer, on her fifth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, her fourth South China Sea deployment, her second Vietnam Combat Cruise. Prior to her deployment she underwent local operations upon completion of a major overhaul at Hunters Point, San Francisco (22 November 1965 to 30 April 1966), during which time Captain Ault, Frank W. USNA became the new Commanding Officer at Hunters Point NSY on 18 February 1966 (NHC Battle Order p 9), completing her 1st& 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She will undergo her fifth foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wa. upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will undergo her 16th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72 & 1275S7).

 

WestPac Cruise Book 1966-67 - Ref. 1275S

West Coast to Vietnam - Ref. 1275S1

Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club - Ref. 1275S2

 

USS CORAL SEA (CVA-43) with CVW-2 (NE)

(29 July 1966 to 23 February 1967) 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43)

Pacific & 7th

5th WestPac

4th SCS

2nd Vietnam Combat

CVW-2

NE

29 Jul 1966

23 Feb 1967

Vietnam Conflict/War

16th FWFD

210-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-21

Fleelancers -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NE

101-112

F-4B

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks - Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skyhawk -

Jet Attack Bomber

NE

00, 220-233

A-4C

VA-23

Black Knights -

Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skyhawk -

Jet Attack Bomber

NE   335-348

 

A-4E

VF-154

Black Knights -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell - Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NE  451-462

 

F-4B

VA-25

Fist of the Fleet -

Attack Squadron

Douglas -Skyraider -   Attack Fighter

NE  571-582

 

A-1H  /  A-1J

VAH-2 Det. A

Royal Rampants -

Heavy Attack Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior - Jet Attack Fighter - Tanker

(ZA) 691-694

 

A-3 (KA-3B)

VAW-11 Det. A (*1)

Early Elevens/Roosters/ Scouts - Carrier Airborne Early Warning

Grumman - Hawkeye -

 

(RR) 740-743

 

E-2A

VFP-63 Det. A

Eyes of the Fleet - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader - Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(PP) 986-989

 

RF-8G

HC-l Det. Delta

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Kaman - Seasprite - Transport (Utility)

UP XX

UH-2A & UH-2B / HU2K-1 (UH-2A) / HU2K-1U (UH-2B)

*VAP-61 Det.

Heavy Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior - YA3D-2P (RA-3B)

Photographic Reconnaissance/Survey

 

A3D-2P (RA-3B)

**VQ-l Det.

Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -

Photographic Reconnaissance/Survey

 

A3D-2P (RA-3B)

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVG-2 embarked (tail code NE) had two Phantom squadrons, as the F-8 had been replaced on the ‘big deck’ carriers by the F-4B. Additionally CVW-2 brought VAW-1l's Grumman E-2A/B Hawkey's aboard replacing the Willy Fudd” (Ref. 43).

VAW-13's records for 1966 do not specify the carriers they operated aboard.  However, the records indicate VAW-13 Det 1 (located at Cubi Point, P.I.) provided detachments in support of fleet strikes from the carriers on Yankee Station.

VAW-13 did not submit a Command History Report for 1967, consequently, it is not possible to verify all the squadron's detachments operating aboard carriers on Yankee Station in 1967.

*These squadron detachments were not aboard the carrier for the entire deployment.

**VQ-1's Command History Report for 1967 did not identify the detachments or carriers they operated from in support of combat operations against Vietnam.

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 and 76

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 2 to 5 August 1966” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Ranger (CVA-61) departed the Gulf of Tonkin on 6 August 1966, for Subic Bay, Philippines, thence steamed via Yokosuka, Japan for Alameda, Ca” (Ref. 1-Ranger and 72).

 

    “Steaming via Hawaii and Japan, USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) reached “Yankee Station” on 8 August 1966” (Ref. 1-Kearsarge and 72).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) proceeded on her fifth “WestPac” via Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the ship reached Yokosuka, Japan on 14 August 1966 where she relieved USS Ranger (CVA-61)” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Yokosuka, Japan from 14 to 19 August 1966” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed Yokosuka, Japan on 20 August 1966, from 14 to 19 August 1966, bound for the Philippines, but ran into heavy weather generated by Typhoon Winnie on the 21st and 22nd, suffering minor damage to her sponsons, and some exposed equipment” (Ref. 43 & 405).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Philippines on 27 August 1966, ‘Coral Maru,’ as she was often called, sailed for “Yankee Station” the following day. The transit to the war zone, however, proved abbreviated, as one blade of number four screw separated at the hub and struck a blade of number three, rendering both unserviceable for operational speeds. A brief inspection at Subic confirmed the damage, and the ship proceeded to Yokosuka for drydocking and repairs” (Ref. 43 & 405).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Yokosuka, Japan from 1 to 7 September 1966” (Ref. 405).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) ultimately returned to “Yankee Station” on 13 September 1966, launching her first strikes against lines of communication and supply facilities” (Ref. 43 & 1275U15).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) remained on “Yankee Station” until 20 October 1966- an extension brought about by USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA-42) dropping a propeller blade and requiring a dry docking for repairs” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed “Yankee Station” and headed to Subic Bay, Philippines (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Philippines on 22 October 1966” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Oriskany (CVA-34) with CVW-16 embarked underwent brief respites for replenishment in Subic Bay, Philippines. Then, back into the action that saw her launch 7,794 combat sorties” (Ref. 1-Oriskany and 72).

 

    “USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) operated off Vietnam on “Yankee Station” on 8 August

to 24 October 1966” (Ref. 1-Kearsarge and 72).

 

    “On 25 October 1966, USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) headed for the Kuala Lumpur area” (Ref. 1-Kearsarge and 72).

 

    “USS Oriskany (CVA-34) with CVW-16 embarked was on station the morning of 26 October 1966, when a fire erupted on the starboard side of the ship's forward hangar bay and raced through five decks. The resulting fire takes three hours to control, kills 44, destroys or damages six aircraft. Many who lost their lives were veteran combat pilots who had flown raids over Vietnam a few hours earlier. Oriskany had been put in danger when a magnesium parachute flare exploded in the forward flare locker of Hangar Bay 1, beneath the carrier's flight deck. Her crewmen performed fantastic feats in jettisoning heavy bombs which lay within reach of the flames. Other men wheeled planes out of danger, rescued pilots, and helped quell the blaze through three hours of prompt and daring actions. Medical assistance was rushed to the carrier from sister aircraft carriers USS Constellation (CV-64) and USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CV-42).  The fire starts when a crewman panics and throws a flare, which had accidentally ignited while being moved, into a storage locker located at the forward starboard corner of hangar bay 1” (Ref. 1-Oriskany, 72 and 84A).

 

    “USS Oriskany (CVA-34) with CVW-16 embarked steamed to Subic Bay, Philippines on 28 October 1966, where victims of the fire were transferred to waiting aircraft for transportation to the United States” (Ref. 1-Oriskany and 72).

 

    “Following repairs at Subic to USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) from 22 to 28 October 1966, aircraft elevators, sponsons, and machinery, the ship departed the Subic Bay, Philippines to return to “Yankee Station” for a second time in the deployment” (Ref. 43 & 405).

 

    “USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14) reached Yokosuka, Japan on 30 October 1966” (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga).

 

    “USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) anchored in the Strait of Malacca on 30 October 1966” (Ref. 1-Kearsarge and 72).

 

    “On 4 November 1966, A flash fire occurs in a storage compartment containing oil and hydraulic fluid four decks below the hangar deck of the USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA-42) while the ship is on station in the South China Sea, killing seven” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “Captain Harold F. Lang, assumed command of Chief of Staff, Carrier Division Seven in November 1966” (Ref. 1275T9).

 

    “USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14) remained at Yokosuka, Japan until 5 November 1966 when she headed south for an overnight stop at Subic Bay in the Philippines on the 10th and 11th  (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga).

 

    “USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) returned to “Yankee Station” via Subic Bay, Philippines on 5 November 1966” (Ref. 1-Kearsarge and 72).

 

    “On 13 November 1966, USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14) arrived in the Gulf of Tonkin and began flight operations. Ticonderoga launched combat sorties, all against enemy targets located in North Vietnam. Again, her primary targets were logistics and communications lines and transportation facilities” (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) arrived at Yokosuka, Japan on 19 November 1966 to relieve USS Constellation (CVA-64) as flagship for Rear Adm. David C. Richardson, Commander Task Force 77” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk and 72).

 

    “USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) operated on “Yankee Station” from 5 November to 23 November 1966” (Ref. 1-Kearsarge and 72).

 

    “On 23 November 1966, USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) started home via Hong Kong and Japan” (Ref. 1-Kearsarge and 72).

 

    “On 26 November 1966, USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) departed Yokosuka, Japan for “Yankee Station” via Subic Bay, Philippines” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) remained on the line at “Yankee Station” from 30 October until 4 December 1966 on her second line period and headed to Subic Bay, Philippines” (Ref. 43).

 

    “On 5 December 1966, aircraft from USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) began their around-the-clock missions over North Vietnam. About this time Kitty Hawk -- already accustomed to celebrities as guests -- entertained a number of extremely prominent visitors: William Randolph Hearst, Jr.; Bob Considine; Dr. Billy Graham; and John Steinbeck, among others” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk and 72). 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Philippines rom 6 to 17 December” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Hong Kong for rest and recreation from 20 to 25 December 1967, before returning to “Yankee Station” to closeout 1966 and usher in 1967 with round-the-clock combat operations against communist supply lines in North Vietnam. As CVW-2 aviators stepped up their efforts to interdict the supply lines, enemy gunners once more extracted their price by bringing down 16 more aircraft resulting in six aircrew KIA, three MIA and six more prisoners or war” (Ref. 43 & 405).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Philippines from 2 to 4 February 1966” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Yokosuka, Japan from 9 to 13 September 1966 and sailed for home” (Ref. 43 & 405).

 

     “Commander J. B. Linder, assumed command of Carrier Air Wing 15 in February 1967” (Ref. 1275T10).

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43)

NS024371c 132k

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024371c.jpg

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43)

NS024371b 161k

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024371b.jpg

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) as seen from USS Perkins (DD-877) in July 1966, west bound at the start of her second Vietnam War cruise (29 July 1966–23 February 1967). Carrier Air Wing was CVW-2. NS024371 118k. Michael O'Brien.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024371.jpg

 

    “On 23 February 1967, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with Commander William G. Harris (serving since 28 December 1965), Commander, Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) (tail code NL) embarked (Commander J. B. Linder, assumed command of Carrier Air Wing 15 in February 1967) arrived Hunters Point Naval Ship Yard, San Francisco, Ca., serving since 28 December 1965, with Captain Frank Willis Ault, as Commanding Officer, USNA, welcomed home with a large Banner hanging over the Golden Gate Bridge, ending her fifth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, on her fourth South China Sea deployment, her second Vietnam Combat Cruise (109 line days on 3 line periods) (NHC Battle Order p 9). Coral Sea made a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 2 to 5 August 1966, reaching Yokosuka, Japan on 14 August 1966 where she relieved USS Ranger (CVA-61), in port from 14 to 19 August 1966. Coral Sea departed Yokosuka, Japan on 20 August 1966, from 14 to 19 August 1966, bound for the Philippines, but ran into heavy weather generated by Typhoon Winnie on the 21st and 22nd, suffering minor damage to her sponsons, and some exposed equipment. Coral Sea pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Philippines on 27 August 1966, ‘Coral Maru,’ as she was often called, sailed for “Yankee Station” the following day. The transit to the war zone, however, proved abbreviated, as one blade of number four screw separated at the hub and struck a blade of number three, rendering both unserviceable for operational speeds. A brief inspection at Subic confirmed the damage, and the ship proceeded to Yokosuka for drydocking and repairs. Coral Sea made a port of call at Yokosuka, Japan from 1 to 7 September 1966. Coral Sea ultimately returned to “Yankee Station” on 13 September 1966, launching her first strikes against lines of communication and supply facilities”, remaining on “Yankee Station” until 20 October 1966- an extension brought about by USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA-42) dropping a propeller blade and requiring a dry docking for repairs. Coral Sea departed “Yankee Station” and headed to Subic Bay, Philippines, pulling in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Philippines on 22 October 1966. Following repairs at Subic to Coral Sea from 22 to 28 October 1966, aircraft elevators, sponsons, and machinery, the ship departed the Subic Bay, Philippines to return to “Yankee Station” for a second time in the deployment. Captain Harold F. Lang, assumed command of Chief of Staff, Carrier Division Seven in November 1966. Coral Sea remained on the line at “Yankee Station” from 30 October until 4 December 1966 on her second line period and headed to Subic Bay, Philippines. Coral Sea made a port of call at Subic Bay, Philippines from 6 to 17 December and made a port of call at Hong Kong for rest and recreation from 20 to 25 December 1967, before returning to “Yankee Station” to closeout 1966 and usher in 1967 with round-the-clock combat operations against communist supply lines in North Vietnam. As CVW-2 aviators stepped up their efforts to interdict the supply lines, enemy gunners once more extracted their price by bringing down 16 more aircraft resulting in six aircrew KIA, three MIA and six more prisoners or war (two Phantom squadrons, as the F-8 had been replaced on the ‘big deck’ carriers by the F-4B, while VAW-1l's Grumman E-2A/B Hawkey's aboard replacing the Willy Fudd). Coral Sea pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Philippines from 2 to 4 February 1966 and made a port of call at Yokosuka, Japan from 9 to 13 September 1966 and sailed for home. Commander J. B. Linder, assumed command of Carrier Air Wing 15 in February 1967. Ports of call include: Yokosuka, Japan; Subic Bay, Philippines; Yokosuka, Japan, a city in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, covering an area of 100.7 km² and is the 11th most populous city in Greater Tokyo, 12th in the Kantō region; Subic Bay, Philippines; Subic Bay, Philippines; H Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines and Yokosuka, Japan (Source: Coral Sea Command History Report for above ports of call and ref. 43 & 72). Squadrons: VF-21, F-4B; VA-22, A-4C; VA-23, A-4E; VF-154, F-4B; VA-25, A-1H; VAH-2 Det. A, A-3 (KA-3B); VAW-11 Det. A, E-2A; VFP-63 Det. A, RF-8G; HC-1 Det. A, UH-2A & UH-2B / HU2K-1 (UH-2A) / HU2K-1U (UH-2B); VQ-1 Det.*, EA-3B and VAP-61 Det.*, RA-3B. (*1) VAW-11 redesignated VAW-111 on Apr. 20, 1967; completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). Her fifth foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wa. upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 1 October 1952. Her 16th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947 (29 July 1966 to 23 February 1967)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 43, 405, 1275S3, 1275S4, 1275S7, 1275T10 & 1275U15).

 

West Coast to Vietnam - Ref. 1275S1

Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club - Ref. 1275S2

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Air Wing: Carrier Air Wing Fifteen (CVW)-2

 

DEPLOYMENT

 DATES

K

I

A

M

I

A

P

O

W

PLANES LOST

LINE DAYS

LINE PERIODS

WESTPAC

& Combat

Mission

CVW-2 (NE)

29/07/66 - 23/02/67

6

3

6

 16

 109

 3

 5tth / 2nd

 South China Sea

Reference 34, 35 and 43 reflect Chat info.

 

 29/07/66 - 23/02/67

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  “WESTPAC”

 Vietnam Service Medal for Combat

 Operations

 12 September - 19 October 1966,
 30 October 1966, 1 November –

 4- December 1966

 5th & 2nd

 Vietnam

 Combat

 Navy Unit Commendation

 12 August 1966 - 23 Feb 1967

 5th

 Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross

 Unit Citation

 20 - 21 November & 29

 December 1966

 5th

Reference 34 & 35 reflect Chat info.

 

Fifth “Westpac” deployment and Second Vietnam Combat Cruise

(29 July 1966 to 23 February 1967)

(2 Aviators KIA, 5 MIAs and 3 POWs)

NAME

RANK

SQUADRON

DATE of LOSS

LOSS-COUNTRY
HOW

COMMENT

Donald B. Parsons, Jr.

LT JG
U. S. Navy Reserve

VF 154
F-4B

19 Sept. 1966

North Vietnam
AM

Status in 1973: Killed in Action

Thomas H. Pilkington

LT JG
U. S. Navy Reserve

VF 154
F-4B

19 Sept. 1966

North Vietnam
SAM

Status in 1973: Killed in Action

Dunn

LT JG

VA-25
A-1H

20 Sept. 1966

Off China
MIG

Missing

James R. Bauder

LT CDR
U.S.Navy

VF 21
F-4B

21 Sept. 1966

North Vietnam
Unknown

Status in 1973: Missing in Action

James B. Mills

LT JG
U.S.Navy

VF 21
F-4B

21 Sept. 1966

North Vietnam
Unknown

Status in 1973: Missing in Action

Charles N. Tanner

LT Comdr.
U. S. Navy

VF 154
F-4B

9 Oct.
1966

North Vietnam
AAA

Status in 1973: POW/ Released

Ross R. Terry

LT
U. S. Navy

VF 154
F-4B

9 Oct.
1966

North Vietnam
AAA

Status in 1973: POW/ Released

William T. Arnold

LT JG
U. S. Navy

VA 22
A-4C

18 Nov. 1966

North Vietnam
Over Water

Status in 1973: Missing in Action

David E. Mc Rae

LT JG
U. S. Navy

VF 154
F-4B

2 Dec.
1966

North Vietnam
AAA

Status in 1973: Missing in Action

David G. Rehmann

LT JG
U. S. Navy

VF 154
F-4B

2 Dec.
1966

North Vietnam
AAA

Status in 1973: POW/ Released

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Association http://www.usscoralsea.org/ (Ref. 34)

Reference 43 reflects enemy gunners once more extracted their price by bringing down 16 more aircraft resulting in six aircrew KIA, three MIA and six more prisoners or war.

 

     “Commander J. B. Linder, assumed command of Carrier Air Wing 15 in February 1967” (Ref. 1275T10).

 

    “Two months of restricted availability followed the Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, at Hunters Point Naval Ship Yard, San Francisco, Calif. beginning after 23 February 1967” (Ref. 34 and 43).

 

     “Captain William Henley Shawcross assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), on 18 March 1967 at Hunters Point NSY, relieving Captain Frank Willis Ault, 20th Commanding Officer, serving from 18 February 1966 to 18 March 1967” (Ref. 34 & 35A).

 

    “In March 1967,USS Princeton (LPH-5) assisted in countering an enemy threat to the Marine artillery base at Gio Ling and evacuated wounded from Con Thien mountain” (Ref. 1-Princeton and 72). 

 

    “In April 1967, USS Princeton (LPH-5) participated in ‘Beacon Star’ in the Khe Sanh area, and supported search and destroy operations in conjunction with ‘Shawnee’” (Ref. 1-Princeton and 72).

 

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) at Alameda, CA, around 22 April 1967. NS024380 50k. Coral Sea had returned from her second Vietnam deployment on 23 February. David Miller. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024380.jpg

 

     “Commander “J” “D” Ward became Executive Officer, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43)  in April 1967” (Ref. 1275T5).

 

     “Seventh Fleet carrier aircraft launched their first strikes on 24 April 1967 on MiG bases in North Vietnam with an attack on Kep Airfield, 37 miles northeast of Hanoi. The attack was delivered by A-6 Intruders and A-4 Skyhawks from USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) and was followed-up by another A-6 attack the same night. While providing cover for the bombers during the first attack, Lt. Cmdr. Charles E. Southwick and Lt. Hugh Wisely, flying F-4B Phantom IIs of VF-114, each were credited with a probable MiG-17 kill in aerial combat” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk).

 

    “USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14) completed her final line period on 27 April 1967 and returned to Yokosuka, Japaan” (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga and 72).

 

    “In May 1967, USS Princeton (LPH-5) helicopters lifted Marines to the DMZ to block enemy forces withdrawing across the Ben Hai river” (Ref. 1-Princeton and 72).

 

    “USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14) departed Yokosuka, Japan on 19 May 1967, headed to San Diego Ca” (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga and 72).

 

    “Rear Admiral John P. Weinel broke his flag, relieving Rear Gerald E. Miller, Commander Carrier Division Three prior to assuming command of COMCARDIV THREE in May 1967” (Ref. 1275T6 & 1275V4).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) remained in the Far East supporting the fight for freedom in Southeast Asia until departing Subic Bay, Philippines on 28 May 1967” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk and 72). 

 

    “During subsequent CarQuals and refresher training, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) operated Grumman A-6A Intruders for the first time and landed a Vought A-7A Corsair II in June 1967 for the first time, marking the first fleet CarQuals for that aircraft” (Ref. 43).

 

    “On 16 June 1967, USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) collided with USS Platte (AO 24) during refueling west of San Francisco, Calif.” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Arlington (AGMR-2) proceeded on to Pearl Harbor, Hi., Yokosuka, and Subic Bay, whence, with USS Annapolis (AGMR-1), she rotated on station off Vietnam” (Ref. 1-Saipan and 72).

 

    “USS Oriskany (CVA-34) with CVW-16 embarked was designated flagship of Carrier Division 9 in Subic Bay on 9 July 1967” (Ref. 1-Oriskany and 72).

 

    “USS Oriskany (CVA-34) with CVW-16 embarked commenced “Yankee Station” operations on 14 July 1967” (Ref. 1-Oriskany and 72).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) was adopted by the city of San Francisco. Two ceremonies consummated the adoption. On 19 July 1967, Coral Sea was inducted into the Great Golden Fleet of San Francisco and on 24 July 1967, Mayor Shelly officiated at the formal adoption ceremony in the City Hall in a colorful ceremony in the Rotunda of City Hall.  The city extended her hospitality by making Coral Sea the first U.S. Navy carrier to serve as an official representative of a city without carrying the city’s name. Among the items presented to the ship were the battle flag of the heavy cruiser USS San Francisco (CA-38) and pieces of presentation silver given to the first San Francisco (also a cruiser) in 1889” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 43, 1275U17, 1275U18 & 1275U19).

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXI

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

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EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

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EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

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EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4