SIX FLEET AND ATLANTIC FLEET CV AND CVB DEPLOYMENTS

(1 January 1946 to 30 September 1947)

CHAPTER II

 

 

U.S. Atlantic Fleet

 

    “The Atlantic Fleet of the U.S. Navy is the part of the navy responsible for operations in and around the Atlantic Ocean” (Ref. 313B).

 

    “As of 1946, the HQ of the Atlantic Fleet remains onboard a rather odd assortment of ships: the Augusta (CA-31), the old wooden ship Constellation, Vixen (PG-35), and Pocono (AGC-16). The Atlantic Fleet reappeared 1 February 1941, along with the Pacific Fleet and the new Asiatic Fleet. This time each fleet was to be under the command of a full Admiral, which jumped the fleet’s commander Ernest J. King from a two-star to a four-star flag flying over his flagship Texas (BB-35).  The Atlantic Fleet was reorganized into the Scouting Force in 1923 until 1941.  The Atlantic Fleet originally came into existence in 1906 (along with the Pacific Fleet), established by President Theodore Roosevelt as protection for new bases in the Caribbean acquired as a result of the Spanish-American War.  In 1907, the first commander of the Atlantic Fleet was Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans, who hoisted his flag in the battleship Maine (BB-10) on 1 January 1906, took his 16 battleships, now dubbed the Great White Fleet, on a round-the-world goodwill cruise that served the purpose of advertising the United States’ naval strength and reach to all other nations of the globe from 1907 to 1909” (Ref. 313B).

 

Mediterranean

 

    “In 1946, President Truman dispatched battleship Missouri to the eastern Mediterranean to counter Soviet threats to Turkey and Iran. The United States has maintained a naval presence in the Mediterranean since the early 19 th century, when U.S. naval forces first engaged the Barbary Pirates to prevent them from interfering with commercial shipping. ‘Millions for defense, but not a penny for tribute!’” (Ref. 313E).

 

U.S. Eighth Fleet

 

    “The U.S. Eighth Fleet traces its origin to the reorganization of the navy after World War II in December 1945 and is responsible in peacetime for training the Atlantic battle fleet in war-fighting skills, developing and evaluating new naval tactics, and maintaining theater battle group readiness. The Eighth Fleet operates primarily in the Atlantic Ocean, from the North Pole to the South Pole, and from the shores of the United States to the west coast of Europe. It also operates along both coasts of South America and part of the west coast of Central America. In all, it covers more than 38 million square miles (98 million km).  The force consists of a balanced mix of capabilities, including aircraft carriers, surface combatants, submarines, surveillance assets, amphibious forces, marine landing and mobile logistic units” (Ref. 313C).

 

1946 EAST COAST DEPLOYMENTS - Includes Florida

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Eighth and Sixth Fleet) 1945 Aircraft Carriers (CV & CVB) scheduling of deployments resulted in one CVB deployment extending into 1946.

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS Randolph (CV-15)

Carib Panama Canal x 2

 

 

Dec 1944

15 Oct 1945

WW II

 

USS Midway (CVB-41)

Carib Shakedown

CVBG-75

 

7 Nov 1945

 2 Jan 1946

57-days

 

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

    “USS Midway (CVB-41) with CVBG-74 embarked departed Norfolk Va. 7 November 1945, with Joseph Francis Bolger, USNA ’21, as Commanding Officer, on her Shakedown Cruise, operating with the Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet (CinCLant) under under operational control of ComAirLant in the Southern Atlantic and Caribbean Sea. She will under go her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

 

USS Midway (CVB-41) with CVBG-74

(7 November to 2 January 1945)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVB-41)

CinCLant & ComAirLant

SoLant

Caribean Sea

CVBG-75

 

7 Nov 1945

2 Jan 1946

South America

Training

57-days

Shakedown Cruise

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-74

Fighting Plane Squadron or Fighting Squadron

Vought - Corsair -

Fighter
Grumman - Hellcat -

Fighter

 

F4U-4

F6F-5N

VBF-74

Cavaliers - Bombing Fighting Squadron

Vought - Corsair -

Fighter

 

F4U-4

VB-74

Bomb-a-Toms –

Bombing Squadron or
Light Bombing Plane Squadron

Curtiss - Helldiver -

Scout Bomber - Special electronic installation

 

SB2C-4E
SB2C-5

VT-74

Beasts - Torpedo Squadron

C.C.& F. - Helldiver -Scout Bomber - Special electronic installation - Curtiss - Helldiver

 

SBW-4E
SB2C-4E

 

    “Captain Herbert Spencer Duckworth, USNA ‘22, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 12 January 1946, relieving Joseph Francis Bolger, USNA ’21, 1st Commanding Officer, serving from September 10, 1945 - January 12, 1946” (Ref. 1178-G).

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Eighth and Sixth Fleet) 1946 (CV’s & CVB’s) deployments commenced, deploying in the Mediterranean Sea, southern Atlantic, Caribbean, east coast of South America and South Western Pacific, with the exception that one CVB deployed twice:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42)

Carib   SoLant Shakedown

CVBG-75

FF

8 Jan 1946

19 Mar 1946

71-days

Shakedown Cruise

USS Tarawa (CV-40)

Carib   Shakedown

 

 

15 Feb 1946

16 Apr 1946

30-days

 

USS Tarawa (CV-40)

SoLant

Panama Canal    South Western Pacific

CVG-81 CVAG-13

P

28 Jun 1946

15 Jul 1946

18-days

Home port transfer to the West Coast

USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42)

1st Med

CVBG-75

CVBG-3

FF

F

8 Aug 1946

4 Oct 1946

58-days

 

USS Philippine Sea (CV-47)

Carib   Shakedown

Air Group 20

 

Sep 1946

Nov 1946

90-est. days

 

USS Leyte (CV-32)

Carib

East Coast of South America

CVG-18 CVAG-7

L

16 Sep 1946

12 Dec 1946

88-days

 

USS Randolph (CV-15)

1st Med

CVG-82 CVAG-17

R

22 Oct 1946

21 Dec 1946

62-days

 

CVBG-75 redesignated CVBG-3 on 15 November 1946

CVG-81 redesignated CVAG-13 on 15 November 1946

CVG-18 redesignated CVAG-7 on 15 November 1946

CVG-82 redesignated CVAG-17 on 15 November 1946

CVBG-74 redesignated CVBG-1 on 15 November 1946

*On 28 June 1946, USS Tarawa (CV-40) exited Hampton Roads bound for the west coast operating with the Pacific Fleet. Tarawa transited the Panama Canal early in July and reached San Diego on 15 July 1946.

(Ref. U.S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

    “On 2 January 1946, USS Midway (CVB-41) with CVBG-74 embarked arrived Norfolk Va., with Captain Herbert Spencer Duckworth, USNA ’22, relieving Captain Herbert Spencer Duckworth, USNA ’22, as Commanding Officer, ending her Shakedown Cruise, operating with the Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet (CinCLant) under under operational control of ComAirLant in the Southern Atlantic and Caribbean Sea. Captain Herbert Spencer Duckworth, USNA ‘22, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Midway on 12 January 1946, relieving Joseph Francis Bolger, USNA ’21, 1st Commanding Officer, serving from September 10, 1945 - January 12, 1946. Her Caribbean shakedown cruise lived up to all expectations, the only negative being a pronounced proclivity to drench the flight deck and the bow 40mm quad mount with green water in moderately heavy seas. Seriously overweight, Midway tended to plunge through, rather than ride over, heavy seas. The result of wartime demands that had continually added more tonnage, Midway quickly earned a reputation as a "wet" ship with her forward flight deck, gun galleries and hangar spaces frequently awash. In her final years, crewmembers described this plunging as "Rock & Roll." Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-74, F4U-4; VBF-74, F6F-5N; VB-74, F4U-4 and VT-74, SB2C-4E, SB2C-5, SBW-4E and SB2C-4E. Her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (7 November 1945 to 2 January 1946)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 1082).

 

07/1145 to 02/01/46

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

World War II Victory Medal

Sep 1945 to Dec 1946

Shakedown Cruise South America

Training

American Campaign Medal

Nov 1945 to Mar 1946

same

Ref. 1081 & 1081/C

 

    “USS Midway (CVB-41) was designated flagship for CarDiv 1, beginning 20 February 1946” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 1082).

 

    “With the reorganization of the Navy after World War II in December 1945, Eighth Fleet was reactivated on 1 March 1946 under the command of Admiral Marc A. Mitscher. Under the overall command of Commander, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, Eighth Fleet was the heavy striking arm of the Atlantic Fleet. It consisted of the preponderance of Atlantic Fleet aircraft carrier assets, initially including the new fast carriers Midway and Franklin D. Roosevelt, their escorts and support ships. These latter did not include the fast Battleship Division (Battleship Division Two?) made up of USS Wisconsin and Missouri, retained under direct command of Atlantic Fleet. In January 1947, the US Eighth Fleet was redesignated as the Second Task Fleet, a part of the Atlantic Fleet” (Ref. 313CH).

 

    “USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) with CVBG-75 embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. 8 January 1946, on her Shakedown Cruise to the Caribbean Sea, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet. She will undergo her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) (renamed Franklin D. Roosevelt 8 May 1945, following the death of the President) since her commission on 27 October 1945” (Ref. 1-Roosevelt and 72).

 

USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) with CVBG-75

(8 January to 9 March 1946)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-75

Fighting Plane Squadron or Fighting Squadron

Vought - Corsair -

Fighter

FF

F4U-4

VBF-75

Green Pawns -      Bombing Fighting Squadron

Vought - Corsair -

Fighter

FF

F4U-4

VB-75

Bombing Squadron or
Light Bombing Plane Squadron

Curtiss - Helldiver - Scout Bomber - Special electronic installation

FF

SB2C-4E

VT-75

Fish Hawks -

Torpedo Squadron

Curtiss - Helldiver - Scout Bomber - Special electronic installation

FF

SB2C-4E

United States after the war” (Ref. 180A).

 

     “In 1946, Lockheed YP-80A Shooting Stars were delivered to the 38 th Squadron of the 55 th Fighter Group and the 27 th, 71st, and 94 th of the 1st Group stationed in the United States, the 31st Group (307 th, 308 th, and 309 th Squadrons) based in Germany, and the 18 th Fighter Bomber Wing (12 th, 44 th, and 67 th Squadron) based on Okinawa. In early 1946, 30 P-80s were sent to the 414 th Fighter Group at Florida Blanca Airbase on Luzon in the Philippine Islands” (Ref. 41 and 180A).  In spite of its high accident rate, the USAAF was anxious to show off its new jet fighter to the public.

 

     “On 26 January 1946, three Lockheed P-80A-1-LOs Shooting Stars were equipped with auxiliary fuel tanks in place of the guns and ammunition broke the transcontinental speed record between Long Beach, Calif, and LaGuardia Airport, New York City, N.Y. Carrying standard 165-U.S. gallon wingtip tanks, Capt. Martin Smith's 44-85113 and Capt. John Babel’s 44-85131 completed the trip, respectively, in 4 hours 33 minutes 25 seconds, and 4 hours 23 minutes 54 seconds, which included a refueling stop in Topeka, Ks. The fastest time—4 hours 13 minutes 26 seconds for an average speed of 580.93 mph over 2453.8 miles—was obtained by Col. William Council, who was able to fly nonstop since his aircraft (44-85123) was fitted with special 310-gallon drop tanks” (Ref. 41 and 180A).

 

    “During USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) Shakedown Cruise, she visited Rio de Janeiro on 1 February 1946 to represent the United States at the inauguration of the Brazilian president, Eurico G. Dutra, who came aboard for a short cruise” (Ref. 1-Roosevelt).

 

    “USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) departed Rio de Janeiro on 11 February 1946” (Ref. 1-Roosevelt).

 

    “USS Tarawa (CV-40) sailed from Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. 15 February 1946, on her Shakedown Cruise, in the vicinity off Guantanamo Bay, Cuba steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet. She will under go her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 8 December 1945” (Ref. 1-Tarawa & 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CVB-41) was desginated flagship for CarDiv 1, beginning 20 February 1946” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 1082).

 

    “USS Midway (CVB-41) training continued off the East coast operating with the Atlantic under the direction of the 8th Fleet in the Atlantic beginning on 20 February through December 1946” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

      “The Republic F-84 Thunderjet, the USAF’s first post-war fighter, made its initial flight on 26 February 1946” (Ref. 41 and 192).

 

       “The production version of the Thunderjet the USAF equipped there Fighter Escort Group in the fighter-bomber role was the F-84E Thunderjet” (Ref. 41 and 182).

 

    “USS Midway (CVB-41) with CarDiv 1, CVBG-74 and Coast Guard helicopter and crew, which signified the first use of a helicopter for plane guard duty embarked departed Norfolk Va. 1 March 1946, with Captain Herbert Spencer Duckworth, USNA ’22, as Commanding Officer, on her first North Atlantic deployment, operating with the Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet (CinCLant), operational control extending to the Eighth Fleet and ComAirLant, steaming in the Davis Straits, this time crossing the Arctic Circle with three destroyers and a fleet oilier testing equipment and techniques for cold weather operations in the North Atlantic, conducting a cold weather evaluation of aircraft, personnel and ships. She will under go her second Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 1082).

 

USS Midway (CVB-41) with CVBG-74

(1 to 28 March 1946)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVB-41) CinCLant,  Eighth Fleet & ComAirLant

1st  NorLant

North Sea

CVBG-74 (*1)

 

1 Mar 1946

28 Mar 1946

Arctic Circle

Training

28-days

Operation "FROSTBITE"
(coast of Labrador and Arctic Circle)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-74 (*2)

Fighting Plane Squadron or Fighting Squadron

Vought - Corsair -

Fighter
Grumman - Hellcat -

Fighter

 

F4U-4

F6F-5N

VBF-74 (*3)

Cavaliers - Bombing Fighting Squadron

Vought - Corsair -

Fighter

 

F4U-4

VB-74 (*4)

Bomb-a-Toms - Bombing Squadron or
Light Bombing Plane Squadron

Curtiss - Helldiver -

Scout Bomber - Special electronic installation

 

SB2C-4E
SB2C-5

VT-74 (*5)

Beasts - Torpedo Squadron

C.C.& F. - Helldiver -Scout Bomber - Special electronic installation - Curtiss - Helldiver

 

SBW-4E
SB2C-4E

NATC

 

Grumman - Bearcat  -

Fighter

Ryan - Fireball - Fighter

Sikorsky - Hoverfly

 

F8F-1
FR-1 / FR-1
HNS-1

(*1) CVBG-74 redesignated CVBG-1 on 15 November 1946

(*2) Redesignated VF-1B on 15 November 1946

(*3) Redesignated VF-2B on 15 November 1946

(*4) Redesignated VA-1B on 15 November 1946

(*5) Redesignated VA-2B on 15 November 1946

 

    “Operation FROSTBITE - March 1946, a naval exercise involving U.S. Navy Task Group 21.11 led by the aircraft carrier USS Midway (CVB-41) that operated in the Davis Straits between Labrador and Greenland” (Ref. 1088 & [2] - Midway History and Events: Shake Down and Operation Frostbite of 1088A).

 

    “On 19 March 1946, USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) with CVBG-75 embarked  arrived Naval Station, Norfolk, Va., ending her Shakedown Cruise to the Caribbean Sea, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet, visited Rio de Janeiro on 1 February 1946 to represent the United States at the inauguration of the Brazilian president, Eurico G. Dutra, who came aboard for a short cruise, departing Rio de Janeiro on 11 February 1946. Her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) (8 January 1946 to 19 March 1946), (renamed Franklin D. Roosevelt 8 May 1945, following the death of the President) since her commission on 27 October 1945” (Ref. Roosevelt and 72).

 

    “On 28 March 1946, USS Midway (CVB-41) with CarDiv 1, CVBG-74 and Coast Guard helicopter and crew, which signified the first use of a helicopter for plane guard duty embarked arrived Norfolk Va., with Captain Herbert Spencer Duckworth, USNA ’22, as Commanding Officer, on her first North Atlantic deployment, operating with the Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet (CinCLant), operational control extending to the Eighth Fleet and ComAirLant, steaming in the Davis Straits for 23 days, crossing the Arctic Circle with three destroyers and a fleet oilier testing equipment and techniques for cold weather operations in the North Atlantic, conducting a cold weather evaluation of aircraft, personnel and ships. Helicopter and crew, which signified the first use of a helicopter for plane guard duty. Helicopter air-sea rescue techniques were refined and the infamous "poopy suit" was evaluated. Midway conducted flight and refueling operations during these tests despite heavy weather damage to elevator hangar doors and having two to four inches of snow on the flight deck at various times. Operation FROSTBITE - March 1946. Operation Frostbite (pictured), a 1946 naval exercise involving U.S. Navy Task Group 21.11 led by the aircraft carrier USS Midway (CVB-41) that operated in the Davis Straits between Labrador and Greenland. Ports of call include: Argentia, Newfoundland, a community on the island of Newfoundland in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. CVBG-74 redesignated CVBG-1 on 15 November 1946. Squadrons: VF-74 (*2), F4U-4, F6F-5N; VBF-74 (*3), F4U-4; VB-74 (*4), SB2C-4E, SB2C-5; VT-74 (*5), SBW-4E, SB2C-4E and NATC, F8F-1, FR-1 and HNS-1. (*2) Redesignated VF-1B on 15 November 1946; (*3) Redesignated VF-2B on 15 November 1946; (*4) Redesignated VA-1B on 15 November 1946 and (*5) Redesignated VA-2B on 15 November 1946. Her second Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 1082, 1088 & [2] of 1088A).

 

    “USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) underwent fleet maneuvers and other training and intensive operations off the Virginia capes upon arrival from her Shakedown Cruise to the Caribbean Sea, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet” (Ref. Roosevelt and 72).

 

    “In April 1946, Col. Council flew a Lockheed YP-80A Shooting Star from New York to Washington, D.C. in 20 minutes 15 seconds” (Ref. 41 and 180A). 

 

    “Grumman Aircraft Corporation of Bethpage, Long Island’s competing proposals for a two-seat, radar-equipped, jet-powered carrier-based night fighter for the U.S. Navy were Curtiss, Douglas, and Fleetwings, who also submitted proposals to the navy in response to the RFP. On 3 April 1946, the navy deemed the Douglas proposal as being the best of the lot, and ordered three prototypes under the designation XF3D-1. However, on 11 April, a navy contract was issued for the construction of two G-75 prototypes under the designation XF9F-1 as a backup just in case the Douglas design did not live up to expectations” (Ref. 41, 155D1).

 

    “USS Kearsarge (CV-33) arrived at her homeport on 21 April 1946” (Ref. 1-Kearsarge & 72).

 

    “USS Tarawa (CV-40) arrived Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. 16 April 1946, ending her Shakedown training cruise in the vicinity off Guantanamo Bay, Cuba steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet. Her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 8 December 1945 (15 February to 16 April 1946)” (Ref. 1-Tarawa & 72).

 

    “USS Tarawa (CV-40) visited New York in the latter part of April 1946” (Ref. 1-Tarawa & 72).

 

    “USS Tarawa (CV-40) departed New York, arriving at Norfolk, Va. on 30 April 1946, commencing Post-Shakedown Overhaul the same day” (Ref. 1-Tarawa & 72).

 

    “USS Tarawa (CV-40) underwent Post-Shakedown Overhaul from 30 April to late June 1946” (Ref. 1-Tarawa & 72).

    “In June 1946, Lt. Henry Johnson set a 1000-km speed record of 426.97 mph in a Lockheed YP-80A Shooting Star” (Ref. 41 and 180A). 

    “In June 1946, USS Philippine Sea (CV-47) departed Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Mass. and sailed to Quonset Point, R.I. for initial training of the crew” (Ref. 1-Philippine Sea & 72).

    “USS Tarawa (CV-40) with CVG-4 embarked departed Hampton Roads 28 June 1946, on her home port transfer to San Diego, Ca., her second Caribbean Sea voyage operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet, on her first Panama Canal transit bound for the West coast” (Ref. 1-Tarawa and 72). 

 

USS Tarawa (CV-40) with CVG-4

(28 June to 15 July 1946)

(Home port change: Norfolk to San Diego via the Panama Canal)

                                           SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-4

Red Rippers -                 Fighting Plane Squadron or Fighting Squadron

Vought - Corsair - Fighter

T100

F4U-4

VBF-4

Flying Ubangis -           Bombing Fighting Squadron

Vought - Corsair - Fighter

T200

F4U-4

VB-4

Tophatters -             Bombing Squadron or
Light Bombing Plane Squadron

Curtiss - Helldiver - Scout Bomber

T300

SB2C-5

VT-4

Valions -                     Torpedo Squadron

Eastern (GM) - Avenger- Torpedo Bomber - Special electronic installation & Electronic countermeasures

T400

TBM-3E / TBM-3Q

 

 

    “USS Tarawa (CV-40) transited the Panama Canal in July 1946, en route to San Diego, Ca., departing Hampton Roads on 28 June 1946” (Ref. 1-Tarawa and 72). 

 

    “On 15 July 1946, USS Tarawa (CV-40) with CVG-4 embarked arrived San Diego, Ca., ending her home port transfer and second Caribbean Sea voyage operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet, transiting the Panama Canal in July 1946 on her first canal transit steaming from Hampton Roads (28 June to 15 July 1946)” (Ref. 1-Tarawa and 72).

 

    “USS Tarawa (CV-40) commenced training and upkeep upon arrival to San Diego, California on 15 July 1946” (Ref. 1-Tarawa & 72).  

 

    “The Grumman XF9F-1 was appreciably larger and heavier than the XF3D-1. In the summer of 1946, further design studies indicated that the Grumman design was considerably less promising than the Douglas design, and the navy considered canceling the XF9F-1 contract altogether. Ordinarily, this would have been the end of the line, but Grumman had been fortuitously working on another unrelated project under the company designation of G-79, which had been initiated only a month before the two XF9F-1 night fighter prototypes had been ordered. As originally conceived, the G-79 was a much smaller single-seat fighter, powered either by a single centrifugal-flow turbojet fed by wing root intakes and exhausting underneath the rear fuselage, by two wing-mounted Westinghouse J34 axial-flow turbojets, or by two Rolls-Royce Derwent centrifugal-flow turbojets mounted in the wing roots. Alternatively, during the early summer of 1946, Grumman proposed the use of a single 5000 lb.s.t., Rolls-Royce Nene centrifugal-flow turbojet, which would be built under license in the United States as the J42. In case the J42 ran into unexpected difficulties, the 4600 lb.s.t., Allison J33 was considered as a possible alternative since it was about the same size as the Nene but was somewhat less powerful” (Ref. 155D1).

 

    “The 412 th Fighter Group was inactivated in July 1946 after completing the operational evaluation of the first two USAAF jet fighters, the XP-59A (P-59A) (Bell XP-59A Airacomet) (Bell P-59 Airacomet) and the Lockheed YP-80A Shooting Stars” (Ref. 41 and 180A).

 

    “The 412 th Fighter Group was inactivated in July 1946 after completing the operational evaluation of the first two USAAF jet fighters, the XP-59A (P-59A) (Bell XP-59A Airacomet) (Bell P-59 Airacomet) and the Lockheed YP-80A Shooting Stars” (Ref. 41 and 180A).

 

 “The 363rd Reconnaissance Group was activated at Brooks Field, Tx., in July 1946, and received Lockheed YP-80A Shooting Stars” (Ref. 41 and 180A). 

 

    “On 21 July 1946, Lt. Cmdr. James Davidson, flying the McDonnell XFD-1 Phantom, made a series of successful landings and take-offs aboard USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) in the first U.S. test of the adaptability of jet aircraft to shipboard operations” (Ref. 1-Roosevelt).

 

“In the first postwar National Air Races held in Cleveland, Oh., in August 1946, Shooting Stars won three trophies: the Bendix Trophy, awarded to Col Leon Gray for flying an Lockheed FP-80A (RF-80A) Shooting Star from Van Nuys, Ca. to Cleveland, Oh. in 4 hours 8 minutes; the Thompson Trophy, a 180-km closed circuit race, won by Colonel Gustav Lundquist in a P-80A (XP-80A); and the Weatherhead Jet Speed Dash Trophy, won by Lieut W. Reilly at a speed of 576.4 mph in a P-80A” (Ref. 41 and 180A).

 

    “USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) with CVBG-75 embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. 8 August 1946, on her first Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. Prior to her deployment she underwent fleet maneuvers and other training and intensive operations off the Virginia capes. Upon arrival from her Shakedown Cruise to the Caribbean Sea operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet, during which time, Lt. Cmdr. James Davidson, flying the McDonnell XFD-1 Phantom, made a series of successful landings and take-offs aboard Franklin D. Roosevelt in the first U.S. test of the adaptability of jet aircraft to shipboard operations on 21 July 1946. She will undergo her second Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) (renamed Franklin D. Roosevelt on 8 May 1945, following the death of the President) since her commission 27 October 1945” (Ref. 1-Roosevelt and 72).

 

USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) with CVBG-75

(8 August to 4 October 1946)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-75 (*3) (*4)

Fighting Plane Squadron or Fighting Squadron

Vought Corsair - Fighter

FF

F4U-4

VBF-75 (*5) (*6)

Green Pawns -Bombing Fighting Squadron

Vought Corsair - Fighter

FF

F4U-4

VB-75 (*7) (*8)

Bombing Squadron or
Light Bombing Plane Squadron

Curtiss - Helldiver - Scout Bomber

FF

SB2C-5

VT-75 (*9) (*10)

Fish Hawks - Torpedo Squadron

Curtiss - Helldiver - Scout Bomber

FF

SB2C-5

 (*1) CVBG-75 was redesignated CVBG-3 on 15 November 1946

(*2) CVBG-75 was redesignated CVG-4 on 1 September 1948

(*3) Redesignated VF-3B on 15 November 1946

(*4) Redesignated VF-41 on 1 September 1948

(*5) Redesignated VF-4B on 15 November 1946

(*6) Redesignated VF-42 on 1 September 1948

(*7) Redesignated VA-3B on 15 November 1946

(*8) Redesignated VA-44 on 1 September 1948

(*9) Redesignated VA-4B on 15 November, 1946

(*10) Redesignated VA-45 on 1 September 1948

 

   “USS Philippine Sea (CV-47) with Air Group 20 embarked departed Quonset Point, R.I. September 1946, on her Shakedown Cruise in the Caribbean Sea, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet. She will under go her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 11 May 1946, with Capt. D.S. Cornwell in command” (Ref. 1-Philippine Sea & 72).

 

    “Because of its outstanding war record, the Fourth Fighter Group was re-activated less than a year later, in September 1946, at Selfridge AFB, Mich, and shortly after became the Fourth Fighter Interceptor Group” (Ref. 231 & 232).

 

    “4th Fighter Wing [4th FW] 4th Air Expeditionary Wing (Base Code: SJ)” (Ref. 232).

 

    “USS Leyte (CV-32) with CVG-18 embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. 16 September 1946, on her southern Atlantic and Caribbean Sea deployment, joining up with USS Wisconsin (BB-64) on a good will cruise down the western seaboard of South America, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet. She will undergo her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 11 April 1946” (Ref. 1-Leyte and 72).

 

USS Leyte (CV-43) with CVG-18

(16 September to 12 December 1946)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-18 (*2)

Fighting Plane Squadron or Fighting Squadron

Grumman - Hellcat - Fighter

xxx

F6F-5

VBF-18 (*3)

Bearcats - Bombing Fighting Squadron

Grumman - Bearcat

xxx

F8F-1

VB-18 (*4)

Sunday Punchers -  Light Bombing Plane Squadron

Curtiss - Helldiver - Scout Bomber

xxx

SB2C-5

VT-18 (*5)

Carrier Clowns -            Training Squadron

Eastern (GM) - Avenger- Torpedo Bomber - Special electronic installation & Electronic countermeasures

xxx

TBM-3E / TBM-3Q

 (*1) redesignated CVAG-7 on 15 November 1946

(*2) redesignated VF-7A on 15 November 1946

(*3) redesignated VF-8A on 15 November 1946

(*4) redesignated VA-7A on 15 November 1946

(*5) redesignated VA-8A on 15 November 1946

 

    “On 4 October 1946, USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) with CVBG-75 embarked arrived Naval Station, Norfolk, Va., ending her first Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. Franklin D. Roosevelt was part of a U.S. Navy force, which visited Athens to bolster the government of Greece during its successful fight against the Communist, she received thousands of visitors during her calls to many Mediterranean ports, giving Europeans an opportunity to view this impressive addition to America’s sea power for peace. Her second Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) (renamed Franklin D. Roosevelt on 8 May 1945, following the death of the President) since her commission 27 October 1945 (8 August to 4 October 1946)” (Ref. Roosevelt and 72).

 

    “USS Randolph (CV-15) with CVG-82 embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. 22 October 1946, on her first Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the U U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. She will undergo her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since the beginning of 1946, rigged for the “Magic Carpet” service 15 October 1945 after World War II, and actively involved in the latter part of World War II, earning three battle stars for World War II service, and entered service upon commission 9 October 1944” (Ref. 1-Randolph and 72).

 

USS Randolph (CV-15) with CVG-82

(22 October to 21 December 1946)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-82 (*2)

Fighting Plane Squadron or Fighting Squadron

Grumman - Hellcat - Fighter

R100

*F6F-5

VBF-82 (*3)

Checkmates - Bombing Fighting Squadron

Vought - Corsair - Fighter

R200

F4U-4

VB-82 (*4)

Battering Rams -

Bombing Squadron or
Light Bombing Plane Squadron

Curtiss - Helldiver - Scout Bomber

R300

SB2C-5

VT-82 (*5)

Devil's Diplomats - Torpedo Squadron

Eastern (GM) - Avenger- Torpedo Bomber - Special electronic installation & Electronic countermeasures

R400

TBM-3E / TBM-3Q

(*1) CVG-82 redesignated CVAG-17 on 15 November 1946

(*2) redesignated VF-17A on 15 November 1946

(*3) redesignated VF-18A on 15 November 1946

(*4) redesignated VA-17A on 15 November 1946

(*5) redesignated VA-18A on 15 November 1946

 

      “Enough interest was generated in this list of projects that the navy was persuaded to amend the Grumman XF9F-1 contract rather than cancel it outright. On 9 October 1946, the XF9F-1 contract was amended to provide for the construction of three single-seat prototypes (BuNos 122475/122477), a static test airframe, plus design data for a swept-wing version” (Ref. 41 and 155D1).

 

    “The first opportunity for general visiting by the American public onboard USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) came at New York City during Navy Day celebrations on 27 October 1946” (Ref. 1-Roosevelt & 72).

 

    “By November the navy had narrowed its choice of powerplant options and specified that two of the G-79 prototypes should be completed as XF9F-2, powered by Rolls Royce Nene turbojets and that the third should be powered by an Allison J33 turbojet and be designated XF9F-3. The Rolls-Royce Nene jet engine was to be built under license in the USA by the Taylor Turbine Corporation as the J42-TT-2. Just in case the adaptation of the Nene to production in the United States turned out to be more difficult than expected, Grumman developed a parallel version of the Panther to be powered by the Allison J33 turbojet. The J33 engine was somewhat less powerful than the J42, but it was considered to be a safer risk. The J33-powered version was to be designated F9F-3 and was to be manufactured in parallel with the J42-powered F9F-2. Since the J42 was not going to be ready in time to be installed in the XF9F-2, Taylor Turbine Corporation supplied six imported Rolls-Royce Nene turbojets to Grumman” (Ref. 41 and 155D1).

 

    “In November 1946, Lt. Col. Marion E. Carl, USMC, flying a jet propelled P-80A made two catapult launches, four free take-offs, and five arrested landings aboard USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) as part of continuing tests into the carrier suitability of the aircraft” (Ref. 1-Roosevelt).

 

    “In November 1946, USS Philippine Sea (CV-47) with Air Group 20 embarked arrived Quonset Point, R.I., ending her Shakedown Cruise in the Caribbean Sea, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet. Her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 11 May 1946, with Capt. D.S. Cornwell in command (September to November 1946)” (Ref. 1-Philippine Sea & 72).

 

    “Upon returning from shakedown exercises, USS Philippine Sea (CV-47) was ordered back to Boston, Mass. to prepare for the Navy's Antarctic Expedition, Operation Highjump” (Ref. 1-Philippine Sea & 72).

 

    “On 12 December 1946, USS Leyte (CV-32) with CVG-18 embarked arrived Naval Station, Norfolk, Va., ending her Southern Atlantic and Caribbean Sea deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet. She made a good will cruise down the western seaboard of South America with Wisconsin (BB-64), returning to the Caribbean Sea on 18 November 1946 to resume shakedown operations. Her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 11 April 1946 (16 September to 12 December 1946)” (Ref. 1-Leyte and 72).

            

    “On 21 December 1946, USS Randolph (CV-15) with CVG-82 embarked Naval Station, Norfolk, Va., ending her first Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea. Her first Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since the beginning of 1946 (22 October 1946 to 21 December 1946), rigged for the “Magic Carpet” service 15 October 1945 after World War II, actively involved in the latter part of World War II, earned three battle stars for World War II service, entering service upon commission on 9 October 1944” (Ref. 1-Randolph and 72).

 

    “From April to 31 December 1946, USS Kearsarge (CV-33) engaged in training operations along the East Coast and Atlantic” (Ref. 1-Kearsarge & 72).

 

    “USS Saipan (CVL-48) trained student pilots out of Pensacola, Florida from September 1946 to 31 December 1946” (Ref. 1-Saipan & 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CVB-41) training continued off the East coast operating with the Atlantic under the direction of the 8th Fleet in the Atlantic beginning 20 February 1946 through December 1946” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72)

 

1947 EAST COAST DEPLOYMENTS - Includes Florida

 

The US Navy's Atlantic Fleet (Eighth and Sixth Fleet) 1947 northern/eastern Atlantic, Mediterranean and Caribbean Deployments (CVs & CVBs), with the exception that two CVs deployed twice:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at Sea

USS Philippine Sea (CV-47)

South Pacific Antarctic

 

 

Jan 1947

 

 

Shakedown Cruise

USS Valley Forge (CV-45)

SoLant  Shakedown

CVBG-5

C

24 Jan 1947

18 Mar 1947

54-days

 

USS Randolph (CV-15)

Eastern Lant

CVAG-17

R

2 Feb 1947

19 Mar 1947

46-days

 

USS Leyte (CV-32)

1st Med

CVAG-7

L

3 Apr 1947

9 Jun 1947

68-days

 

USS Randolph (CV-15)

1st NorLant

Carib

CVAG-17

R

20 May 1947

11 Aug 1947

84-days

 

USS Kearsarge (CV-33)

1st NorLant

Carib

CVAG-3

K

7 Jun 1947

11 Aug 1947

66-days

 

*USS Valley Forge (CV-45) (Home Port transfer to the West Coast)

SoLant & Carib Panama Canal

CVAG-11

V

14 Jul 1947

14 Aug 1947

32-days

 

USS Leyte (CV-32)

2nd Med

CVAG-7

L

30 Jul 1947

19 Nov 1947

113-days

 

USS Valley Forge (CV-45)

1st Persian Gulf & Suez Canal

 

1st WestPac

1st SCS

Tasman

1st Indian Ocean

CVAG-11

V

9 Oct 1947

11 Jun 1948

World Cruise

Middle

East

 

USS Midway (CVB-41)

1st Med

CVBG-1

M

29 Oct 1947

11 Mar 1948

104-days

 

CVBG-5 redesignated CVG-6 on 27 July 1948

CVAG-7 redesignated CVG-7 on 1 September 1948

CVAG-17 redesignated CVG-17 on 1 September 1948

CVAG-3 redesignated CVG-3 on 1 September 1948

CVAG-7 redesignated CVG-7 on 1 September 1948

CVAG-11 redesignated CVG-11 on 1 September 1948

CVBG-1 redesignated CVG-2 on 1 September 1948

USS Valley Forge (CV-45) left Philadelphia headed south, and transited the Panama Canal on 5 August 1947. She arrived at her homeport, San Diego, Ca., on the 14th and joined the Pacific Fleet.

(Ref. U.S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

    “In January 1947, the U.S. Eighth Fleet was redesignated as the Second Task Fleet, a part of the Atlantic Fleet” (Ref. . 313CH & [4] - Lt Col Ronald H. Spector, U.S. Marines in Grenada 1983, History and Museums Division, HQ USMC, 1987, 1.of 313U1).

 

    “In early 1947, the first “Dirigible” lands aboard USS Midway (CVB-41)” (Ref. 1081M).

 

    “Early in 1947, operating off the East Coast with her recently redesignated battle group, CVBG-1, USS Midway (CVB-41) operated F4U-4B Corsairs and SB2-C-5 Helldivers” (Ref. 1082).

 

    “In June 1947, USS Midway (CVB-42) crew began extensive preparations for the launching of V-2 from the flight deck” (Ref. 1175G).

 

    “USS Midway (CVB-41) with CVBG-1 embarked air group continued training off the East coast and in the Caribbean in foreign waters, operating with the Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet (CinCLant) under operational control of Second Task Fleet and ComAirLant” (Ref. .[4] - Lt Col Ronald H. Spector, U.S. Marines in Grenada 1983, History and Museums Division, HQ USMC, 1987, 1.of 313U1). 

 

    “Captain John Perry Whitney, USNA ‘22, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 18 July 1946, relieving Captain Herbert Spencer Duckworth, USNA ‘22, 2nd Commanding Officer, serving from January 12, 1946 - July 18, 1946” (Ref. 1178-G). 

 

    “Captain Albert Kellogg Morehouse, USNA ‘22, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 11 August 1947, relieving Captain John Perry Whitney, USNA ‘22, 3rd Commanding Officer, serving from September 10, 1945 - January 12, 1946” (Ref. 1178-G). 

 

    “USS Midway (CVB-42) conducted three training cruises in the Caribbean Sea before sailing from her homeport at Norfolk, Virginia, on another experimental mission” (Ref. 1082).

 

    “By the second of September 1947 all was ready for the test and a host of scientific and military observers with tons of equipment embarked aboard USS Midway (CVB-42). After a brief stop in Bermuda, the Midway departed for the launching area and successfully launched the first V-2 rocket ever fired from the deck of a ship” (Ref. 1175G).

 

    “On 6 September 1947, while operating as flagship of Commander Task Force 81, with CVBG-1 and Task Force 81 embarked, USS Midway (CVB-42) added another first to her impressive record-that of being the first ship to launch a captured Germa V-2 Rocket from its flight deck in Operation Sandy, first such launching from a moving platform to see if a large rocket could be launched from the deck of an aircraft carrier with little to no modifications. With the launching of the V-2 from the after end of the flight deck, the feasibility of launching such missiles from shipboard was proved. The actual ship launch test was only conducted once. There were prior tests carried out at White Sands on a simulated aircraft carrier deck to see what effects the rocket would have if it were to explode on the deck. This test marked the first time such a weapon was fired from a ship at sea or a moving platform. It decisively demonstrated the potential of large rocket fire from surface ships” (Ref. 1175B, 1081K & 1082).

    “Rear Admiral John Jennings Ballentine, U.S.N., Commander Carrier Division One exercises command of the administration and operating functions of the ships and units of Carrier Division One, which consists of his flag ship USS Midway (CVB-41), the USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) and the Air Groups and Aircraft Squadrons of each of these ships” (Ref. 1175A & 1175F)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER II

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4