CHAPTER XXVIII

ELEVENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

The evacuation of U.S. citizens from Cyprus - Collapse of Cambodia - Operation

Eagle Pull and Fall of Saigon to the North Vietnamese-Operation Frequent Wind

EXTENDED SELECTED RRESTRICTED AVAILABILTY (ERSA)

NAVAL SHIPYARD LONG BEACH, CA.

Iran History & Air Arm

(1 January 1974 to 31 December 1975)

Part 1 – (1 January 1974 to 1 July 1975)

Part 2 – (2 July to 31 December 1975)

 

 

Iran History & Air Arm

 

    “IIAF replaced their 28 F-5E/F Tiger IIs. With F-5E/Fs. and underwent conversion training January 1974” (Ref. 27).

 

    “Several American military men were assassinated, and in the mid-1970s, three American civilians were killed in Teheran. An unsuccessful kidnap attempt was even made on the U.S. Ambassador to Iran, Douglas MacArthur II. Bomb threats were also made against various American installations and the offices of the U.S. Information Service and the Peace Corps were actually bombed” (Ref. 4).

 

    “The Iranian Tomcat was virtually identical to the US Navy version, with only a few classified avionics items being omitted. The base site for Iranian Tomcat operations was at Isfahan’s (Khatami Air Force Base) and 1 Squadron at Shiraz Tactical Fighter Base. Imperial Iranian Air Force aircrews began to arrive in the USA for training in May of 1974, and shortly thereafter the first Grumman pilots arrived in Iran” (Ref. 27& 28).

 

    “USS Worden (CG 18) was part of USS Midway (CVA-41) battle group” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “During 1974, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) carried out a schedule of CarQuals and restricted availability, interspersed with the maintenance items that had become a driving force in her routine. The Vietnam War exacted a heavy toll on PacFlt carriers and it proved to be a difficult task to undo the neglect forced by extended cruises coupled with short turnarounds that had been so common over the previous decade” (Ref. 43).

 

    “Carrier Division 5 became Carrier Group 5 on 30 June 1973, and on 1 January 1974, still homeported at Cubi Point, was responsible for three carriers: 63 and 64 both homeported at San Diego and USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) homeported at Alameda. The group also fulfills the functions of Battle Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 70) and Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75). The strike group carries the lineage of Carrier Division 5, formed during the Second World War” (Ref. 1093).

 

     “On 1 August 1955, Carrier Division 5 comprised Essex (Bremerton), and Kearsage, and Shangri-La (both homeported in San Diego) (Ref. [3]). Until 1964 command of Task Force 77 rotated between the deployed carrier division commanders; from 1964 Carrier Group Five was permanent deployed to the Western Pacific as CTF 77, homeported at Naval Air Station Cubi Point in the Philippines (Ref. [4]). In December 1971, Commander Carrier Division 5, Rear Admiral Damon W. Cooper, led Task Force 74 aboard Enterprise to the Indian Ocean following the outbreak of the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971 (Ref [5])” (Ref. [3], [4], [5], [6] & [7] of 1093).

 

     “Captain Thomas Stevenson Rogers, Jr. assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), on 25 January 1974, relieving Captain Paul A. Peck, 26th Commanding Officer, serving from 2 November 1972 to 25 January 1974” (Ref. 34 & 35A).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 22 December 1973 to 29 January 1974” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 29 January 1974, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 10th WestPac, her fifth South China Sea deployment and second Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her second deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. She will under go her fifth deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 11th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 24th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(29 January to 6 March 1974)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) –7th (2nd Forward Deployed)

10th WestPac       5th SCS

CVW-5

NF

29 Jan 1974

6 Mar 1974

Vietnam

24th FWFD

37-days

2nd Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /    KA-6D

VFP-63 Det. 3

Eyes of the Fleet - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -     Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

600

RF-8G

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(RM) 610

EA-6A

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

010

E-2B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

003-007

SH-3G

*VQ-l Det.

World Watchers  - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -  Jet Attack - Special electronic installation

 

EA-3B

*Not embarked for the entire deployment

 

    “USS Worden (CG-18) joined up with USS Midway (CV-41) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point on 13 February 1974, conducting her second Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 13 to 15 February 1974, departing to continue her second Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Hongkong, B. C. C. on 23 February 1974, conducting her second Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Hongkong B. C. C. from 23 February to 1 March 1974, departing to continue her second Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “On 6 March 1974, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 10th WestPac, her fifth South China Sea deployment and second Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her second deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 13 to 15 February 1974, departing to the South China Sea and at Hongkong B. C. C. from 23 February to 1 March 1974, departing to the South China Sea. Ports of calls include: Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines and Hongkong, B. C. C.,  situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VMCJ-1 Det. 101, EA-6ª; VAW-115, E-2B; HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G and *VQ-l Det., EA-3B. *Not embarked for the entire deployment. USS Worden (CG-18) joined up with Midway as part of her task force. Her fifth deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 11th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 24th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (29 January to 6 March 1974)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 84A).

 

29/01/74 to 06/03/74

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

National Defense Service Medal

Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

10th WestPac

5th SCS

Ref. 1081 & 1081/C

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 6 March 1974 to 18 October 1974” (Ref. 72).

 

    “The first fighter plane- the F-14A Tomcat made its maiden landings and take-offs from USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) on 18 March 1974” (Ref. 1-Enterprise).

 

     “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 18 October 1974, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 11th WestPac, her sixth South China Sea deployment and third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her third deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. She will under go her sixth deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 12th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 25th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(18 October to 20 December 1974)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) –7th (3rd Forward Deployed)

11th WestPac       6th SCS

CVW-5

NF

18 Oct 1974

20 Dec 1974

Vietnam

25th FWFD

64-days

3rd Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /    KA-6D

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RM)   600

RF-4B

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(RM)   610

EA-6A

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

010

E-2B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

002-007

SH-3G

*VQ-l Det.

World Watchers  - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -

 Jet Attack - Special electronic installation

 

EA-3B

*Not embarked for the entire deployment

 

   “USS Worden (CG-18) joined up with USS Midway (CV-41) as part of her task force” (Reef. 84A).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 30 October 1974, departing to continue her third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 30 October to 1 November 1974, departing to continue her third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 15 November 1974, conducting her third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 15 to 25 November 1974, departing to continue her third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

 

At sea in the Western Pacific, 30 November 1974. Good overhead showing stern of Midway after her 1966-1970 overhaul: note 3 deck-edge elevators, two to starboard (forward and abaft the island) and one to port. F-4s, A-6s, A-7s, E-2s and an SH-3 are shown on the flight deck. NS024105. USN. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024105.jpg

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Hong Kong on 2 December 1974, conducting her third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Hong Kong from 2 to 9 December 1974, departing for her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan” (Ref. 405).

 

    “On 20 December 1974, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 11th WestPac, her sixth South China Sea deployment and third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her third deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 30 October to 1 November 1974, departing to continue her third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 15 to 25 November 1974, departing to continue her third Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea and Hong Kong from 2 to 9 December 1974, departing for her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan. Ports of calls include: Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines and Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VMCJ-1 Det. 101, RF-4B; VMCJ-1 Det. 101, EA-6A; VAW-115, E-2B; HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G and *VQ-l Det., EA-3B. *Not embarked for the entire deployment. USS Worden (CG-18) joined up with Midway as part of her task force. Her sixth deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 12th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 25th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (18 October to 20 December 1974)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 84A).

 

18/10/74 to 20/12/74

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

11th WestPac

6th SCS

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVW-15 (tail code NL) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 5 December 1974, with Captain Thomas Stevenson Rogers, Jr., as Commanding Officer, on her 11th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present), on her first tour in the Yellow Sea, her second Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruise, on her tenth South China Sea deployment and tour of duty to reinforce the 7th Fleet in the Far East during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh on 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull and Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 28 April 1975. Prior to her deployment conducted a schedule of CarQuals and restricted availability, interspersed with the maintenance items that had become a driving force in her routine, during which time Captain Thomas S. Rogers, Jr. arrived on 25 January 1974, becoming the new Commanding Officer (NHC Battle Order Order p 19); making her first Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruise during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972); completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She will under go her 11th foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 22nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 & 72).

 

USS CORAL SEA (CVA/CV-43) with CVW-15 (NL)

(5 December 1974 to 2 July 1975) 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CVA/CV-43)

Pacific & 7th

11th WestPac           10th SCS      2nd Vietnam Peace Keeping

CVW-15

NL

5 Dec 1974

2 Jul 1975

Vietnam Conflict

22nd FWFD

210-days

Operation Eagle Pull and Operation Frequent Wind - Evacuation of Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh 12 April 1975.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-51

Screaming Eagles -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NL100

F-4N

VF-111

Sundowners -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NL200

F-4N

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NL300

A-7E

VA-94

Mighty Shrikes -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NL300

A-7E

VA-95

Green Lizards -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NL500

A-6A / KA-6D

VFP-63 Det. 5

Eyes of the Fleet or Gators - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

NL610

RF-8G

HC-1 Det. 3

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

NL

004-006

 

SH-3G

RVAW-110    Det. 2

Firebirds - Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron Training Squadron

Grumman - Tracer

NL010

E-1B

VAQ-135

Black Ravens - Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -

et Attack Fighter -Tanker

 

EKA-3B

Some of the squadrons, such as VAQ, VAW and RVAH designated units, lose their individually assigned tail codes in the late 1960s or early 1970s and are authorized to use the tail codes of their permanently assigned Carrier Air Wing.

VFP or VF(P) - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (Light) or Light Photographic Squadron.

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 76

 

Iran History & Air Arm

 

     “The first combat use by Iran of the F-4D was in 1975 when Iran provided military assistance to the Sultan of Oman in actions against rebels. One of these F-4Ds was lost to ground fire” (Ref. 20).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 11 December 1974” (Ref. 405).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 29 December 1974 to 1 January 1975” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 20 December 1974 to 13 January 1975” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 13 January 1975, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 12th WestPac, her seventh South China Sea deployment and fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her fourth deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. She will under go her seventh deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 13th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 26th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(13 January to 18 February 1975)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) –7th (4th Forward Deployed)

12th WestPac       7th SCS

CVW-5

NF

13 Jan 1975

18 Feb 1975

Vietnam

26th FWFD

64-days

4th Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /    KA-6D

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RM)   600

RF-4B

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(RM)   610

EA-6A

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

010

E-2B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

002-007

SH-3G

*VQ-l Det.

World Watchers  - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -

 Jet Attack - Special electronic installation

 

EA-3B

*VMAQ-2 Det.

Marine Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6B

*VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps – Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF)  610

RF-4B

*Not embarked for the entire deployment

 

    “USS Worden (CG-18) joined up with USS Midway (CVA-41) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 8 to 21 January 1975” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 23 January 1975, conducting her fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 23 January to 2 February 1975, departing to continue her fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 3 to 9 February 1975” (Ref. 405).

 

    “On 18 February 1975, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 12th WestPac, her seventh South China Sea deployment and fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her fourth deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 23 January to 2 February 1975, departing to continue her fourth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea. Ports of calls include: Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; *VMCJ-1 Det. 101, RF-4B & EA-6A; VAW-115, E-2B; HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; *VQ-l Det., EA-3B; *VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B and *VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6B. *Not embarked for the entire deployment. USS Worden (CG-18) joined up with Midway as part of her task force. Her seventh deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 13th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 26th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (29 January 1974 to 18 February 1975)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 84A & 1181O).

 

 13/01/75 to 18/02/75

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

12th WestPac

7th SCS

13/01/75 to 18/02/75

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 27 February to 4 March 1975” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 12 to 20 March 1975” (Ref. 405).

 

    “Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 26 March 1975, relieving Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, 28th Commanding Officer, serving from September 7, 1973 - March 26, 1975” (Ref. 1178-G).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 29 March to 10 April 1975” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 18 February to 13 January to 31 March 1975” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) commenced a schedule of air wing refresher qualifications and training, interspersed with Subic Bay, Philippines maintenance periods in February and March 1975” (Ref. 4).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 31 March 1975, with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer, on her 13th WestPac, her eighth South China Sea deployment and fifth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her fifth deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet in support of Operation Frequent Wind was the evacuation by helicopter of American civilians and "at-risk" Vietnamese from Saigon, South Vietnam. She will under go her eighth deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 14th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 27th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(31 March to 29 May 1975)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) –7th (5th Forward Deployed)

13th WestPac

8th SCS

CVW-5

NF

31 Mar 1975

29 May 1975

Vietnam

27th FWFD

60-days

5th Vietnam Peace Patrol - Operation Frequent Wind

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /     KA-6D

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks – Marine fixed-wing squadrons

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(RM)

530

EA-6A

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks – Marine fixed-wing squadrons

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RM) 610

RF-4B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*VMAQ-2 Det.

Marine Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6B

*VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps – Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF)  610

RF-4B

*Not embarked for the entire deployment

 

     While the Vietnam War may have been over, the aftershocks of that conflict continued to be felt. With the collapse of Cambodia early that spring, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) operated in standby status during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull. Over the following two weeks, the carrier operated off the Vietnamese coast as North Vietnamese forces inexorably overran the south” (Ref. 43). 

 

    “The war was not over for the Vietnamese. By spring 1975, the North was advancing on the South” (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 15 April 1975, conducting her fifth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 15 to 18 April 1975, departing to continue her fifth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41), USS Coral Sea (CV-43), USS Hancock (CV-19), USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Okinawa (LPH-3) responded on 19 April 1975 to the waters off South Vietnam when North Vietnam overran two-thirds of South Vietnam” (Ref. 1184).

 

    “Operation Frequent Wind was the evacuation by helicopter of American civilians and "at-risk" Vietnamese from Saigon, South Vietnam, on 29–30 April 1975 during the last days of the Vietnam War and was carried out by U.S. 7th Fleet forces. During this operation, Midway had offloaded fifty percent of her regular combat air wing at NS Subic Bay, Philippines. She steamed to Thailand, whereupon eight CH-53 from 21st Special Operations Squadron and two HH-53 helicopters from 40th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron[5] were loaded for the purpose of ferrying people from Saigon out to the fleet cruising in the South China Sea. Hundreds of U.S. personnel and Vietnamese were evacuated to waiting ships after the fall of Saigon to the North Vietnamese” (Ref. 1184).

 

    “Frequent Wind involved the evacuation of American citizens from the capital of South Vietnam under heavy attack from the invading forces of North Vietnam. The military situation around Saigon and its Tan Son Nhut airport made evacuation by helicopter the only way out. Personnel and Vietnamese were evacuated to waiting ships after the fall of Saigon to the North Vietnamese” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk).

 

    “President Gerald Ford ordered the evacuation when Viet Cong shelling forced the suspension of normal transport aircraft use at Tan Son Nhut airport. With fighter cover provided by carrier aircraft, the helicopters landed on Saigon rooftops and at Tan Son Nhut to evacuate the Americans.

 

    The airport became the main helicopter-landing Zone: Marines from the 9th Amphibious Brigade flown in for that purpose defended it. All but a handful of the 900 Americans in Saigon were evacuated. The last helicopter lifted off the roof of the United States Embassy at 7:52 p.m. carrying Marine security guards. During Operation Frequent Wind, Enterprise aircraft flew 95 sorties” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & Hancock & Enterprise).

 

    “On 29 April 1975, South Vietnamese Air Force Major Buang-Ly loaded his wife and five children into a two-seat Cessna O-1 Bird Dog and took off from Con Son Island. After evading enemy ground fire Major Buang headed out to sea and spotted the USS Midway (CVA-41).

 

    The Midway's crew attempted to contact the aircraft on emergency frequencies but the pilot continued to circle overhead with his landing lights turned on. When a spotter reported that there were at least four people in the two-place aircraft, all thoughts of forcing the pilot to ditch alongside were abandoned - it was unlikely the passengers of the overloaded Bird Dog could survive the ditching and safely egress before the plane sank.

 

     After three tries, Major Buang managed to drop a note from a low pass over the deck: "Can you move the helicopter to the other side, I can land on your runway, I can fly for one hour more, we have enough time to move. Please rescue me! Major Buang, wife and 5 child." Captain Larry Chambers, the ship's commanding officer, ordered that the arresting wires be removed and that any helicopters that could not be safely and quickly be relocated should be pushed over the side.

 

    To get the job done he called for volunteers, and soon every available seaman was on deck, regardless of rank or duty, to provide the manpower to get the job done. An estimated US$10 million worth of UH-1 Huey helicopters were pushed overboard into the South China Sea. With a 500-foot ceiling, five miles visibility, light rain, and 15 knots of surface wind, Chambers ordered the ship to make 25 knots into the wind. Warnings about the dangerous downdrafts created behind a steaming carrier were transmitted blind in both Vietnamese and English.

 

    To make matters worse, five additional UH-1s landed and cluttered up the deck. Without hesitation, Chambers ordered them scuttled as well. Captain Chambers recalled in an article in the Fall 1993 issue of the national Museum of Aviation History's "Foundation" magazine that the aircraft cleared the ramp and touched down on center line at the normal touchdown point. Had he been equipped with a tailhook he could have bagged a number 3 wire.

 

    He bounced once and came stop abeam of the island, amid a wildly cheering, arms-waving flight deck crew. Major Buang was escorted to the bridge where Captain Chambers congratulated him on his outstanding airmanship and his bravery in risking everything on a gamble beyond the point of no return without knowing for certain a carrier would be where he needed it. The crew of the Midway was so impressed that they established a fund to help him and his family get settled in the United States” (Ref. [6] of 1184).

 

    “The Bird Dog that Major Buang landed is now on display at the Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola, FL.” (Ref. [7] of 1184).

 

    “As South Vietnam fell, 3,073 refugees out of Saigon were transported on to the USS Midway (CVA-41) during Operation Frequent Wind” from 29 to 30 April 1973. One South Vietnamese pilot escaped flying a Cessna 0-1 Bird Dog observation plane, with his wife and five children aboard. The Vietnamese Pilot dropped a note asking Permission to land. The angle deck was cleared, the approach was excellent, and the family landed safely with room to spare” (Ref. 1181O & 1183).

 

    “As that country collapsed, Helicopters from USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) evacuate refugees during Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 29 April 1975 and proceeded apace from 29 to 30 April 1975. CVW-15 aircraft covered the helo lift of the last people to leave Saigon as communist forces overran the city” (Ref. 34, 43 & 1184).

 

    “In April 1975, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) aircraft furnished logistic support for the evacuation of South Vietnam.  No actual strikes were conducted during this time period. An intensive training program in all areas to improve the ship’s readiness characterized the majority of the 1974-5 cruise” (Ref. 34, 43 & 1184).

 

 

VNAF Major Buang lands his Cessna O-1 Bird Dog on the deck of USS Midway (CVA-41) during Operation Frequent Wind.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/0241ap.jpg

 

    "It was April 30, 1975. Rain had soaked the deck. The men of Midway were bringing order out of chaos. An armada of helicopters, flown by and filled with Vietnamese, flocked to the floating sanctuary. At one point a tiny silhouette appeared on the horizon, heading toward the carrier. It was soon identified as a Cessna O-1 Bird Dog, used as an observation aircraft in the war." "The diminutive plane circled Midway. The Vietnamese Major at the controls tried to toss a note to the flight deck. He failed twice. But on the third attempt he succeeded. Scribled on a torn nav chart was a crude but eloquent appeal:" "Can you move these helicopter to the other side, I can land on your runway, I can fly 1 hour more, we have enough time to move.Please rescue me. Major Buang Wife and 5 child"

 

    "On the bridge, Midway's C.O., Captain L.C. Chambers didn't wait long to act. He directed the flight deck crew to clear the landing area." "Moments later the O-1 pilot turned into the groove and guided his craft, sans tail hook, toward the deck. He crossed the fantail, touched down, bounced, struck the ship again, rolled forward and stopped with plenty of room to spare." (Quoted from Naval Aviation News magazine, July 1975 issue, pages 32–33.). NS0241ap. Submitted by: Robert Hurst.

 

    “In the evacuation, one Marine CH-53 carried more than 80 men, women, and children on a flight to USS Midway (CVA-41); Marine CH-46 Sea Knights normally carried some 60 persons. Two American helicopter pilots were lost in the operation when their helicopters crashed. On 30 April 1975, North Vietnamese tanks rolled into Saigon and through the gates of the Presidential Palace, as South Vietnam fell to the Communists. Midway was the last of 17 U.S. attack carriers to participate in the conflict” (Ref. 1183).

 

    “Hundreds of U.S. personnel and Vietnamese were evacuated to waiting ships after the fall of Saigon to the North Vietnamese. One South Vietnamese pilot landed a small aircraft aboard Midway, bringing himself and his family to safety. Nearly 9,000 were evacuated: 1,373 U.S. personnel and 6,422 of other nationalities were evacuated to waiting ships after the fall of Saigon to the North Vietnamese. South Vietnam officially surrendered to the North on 30 April 1975” (Ref. 1-Midway & Enterprise).

 

    “During Operation Frequent Wind, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) aircraft flew 95 sorties” (Ref. 1-Enterprise).

 

    “Immediately following Operation Frequent Wind, USS Midway (CVA-41) steamed into the Gulf of Siam and flew abroad IOO American built aircraft, thus preventing them from falling into communist hands” (Ref. 1181O).

 

    “Upon completion of ferrying people to other ships, USS Midway (CVB-41) returned to Sattahip, Thailand on 2 May 1975, and disembarked the Air Force helicopters. The CH-53s then airlifted over 50 South Vietnamese Air Force aircraft to the ship” (Ref. 1184).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Sattahip, Thailand from 2 to 5 May 1975, loading almost 100 helicopters and aircraft of the former South Vietnamese Air Force aboard” (Ref. 405 & 1184).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Singapore from 6 to 10 May 1975” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Anchorage Guam on 11 May 1975” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Anchorage Guam from 11 to 12 May 1975, off loading 100 helicopters and aircraft of the former South Vietnamese Air Force in twenty-four hours” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) seemed destined for no rest during an ostensibly peacetime deployment. As she was en route to Perth, Australia, from Singapore word reached her of the capture of SS Mayaguez by Cambodians on 12 May 1975” (Ref. 43).

 

    “From 12 May to 14 May 1975, USS Hancock (CVA-19) was alerted, although not utilized, for the recovery of SS Mayaguez, a U.S. merchantman with 39 crew, seized in international waters on 12 May by the Communist Khmer Rouge” (Ref. 1-Hancock).

 

    “On 12 to 14 May 1975, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) participated with other United States Navy, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps forces in the Mayaguez incident, the recovery of the U.S. merchant ship SS Mayaguez and her 39 crew, illegally seized on 12 May in international waters by a Cambodian gunboat controlled by the Communist Khmer Rouge” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & 72).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) provided both medical and air support for U. S. Marines on Koh Tang Island.  Protective air strikes were flown from Coral Sea against the Cambodian mainland naval and air installations as Air Force helicopters with 288 Marines from Battalion Landing Teams 2 and 9 were launched from Utapao, Thailand, and landed at Koh Tang Island to rescue the Mayaguez crew and secure the ship. Eighteen Marines, Airman, and Navy corpsmen were lost in the action” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 72 & 1275W3).

 

    “Steaming to the Gulf of Thailand, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) flew 63 combat sorties on the 15 May 1975 against Koh Tang Island and the Cambodian mainland, in support of Mayaguez's recovery. Wounded Marines were flown to the carrier for medical attention and transfer to Subic Bay; the ship remained in the Gulf of Thailand through 18 May 1975, at which time she began a two-day transit to Subic Bay” (Ref. 43 & 72).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 20 to 24 May 1975” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 20 May 1975. On her way back to the Philippines to pick up her air wing she was rerouted to act as a floating airfield in support of special operation forces rescuing a pirated cargo ship (see Mayagüez incident). She picked up her regular air wing again a month later when she returned NAS Cubi Point, Philippines” (Ref. 405 & 1184).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 20 to 23 May 1975, conducting her fifth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea en route to her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan” (Ref. 405 & 1184).

 

    “On 29 May 1975, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 31 March 1975, with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer, ending her 13th WestPac, her eighth South China Sea deployment and fifth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her fifth deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet in support of Operation Frequent Wind was the evacuation by helicopter of American civilians and "at-risk" Vietnamese from Saigon, South Vietnam. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 15 to 18 April 1975, departing to continue her fifth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea. Midway, USS Coral Sea (CV-43), USS Hancock (CV-19), USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Okinawa (LPH-3) responded 19 April 1975 to the waters off South Vietnam when North Vietnam overran two-thirds of South Vietnam. Ten days later, Operation Frequent Wind was carried out by U.S. 7th Fleet forces. During this operation, Midway had offloaded fifty percent of her regular combat air wing at NS Subic Bay, Philippines. She steamed to Thailand, whereupon eight CH-53 from 21st Special Operations Squadron and two HH-53 helicopters from 40th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron[5] were loaded for the purpose of ferrying people from Saigon out to the fleet cruising in the South China Sea. Hundreds of U.S. personnel and Vietnamese were evacuated to waiting ships after the fall of Saigon to the North Vietnamese. Operation Frequent Wind was the evacuation by helicopter of American civilians and "at-risk" Vietnamese from Saigon, South Vietnam, on 29–30 April 1975 during the last days of the Vietnam War. More than 7,000 people were evacuated from various points in Saigon, and the airlift left a number of enduring image. On 29 April 1975, South Vietnamese Air Force Major Buang-Ly loaded his wife and five children into a two-seat Cessna O-1 Bird Dog and took off from Con Son Island. After evading enemy ground fire Major Buang headed out to sea and spotted the Midway. The Midway's crew attempted to contact the aircraft on emergency frequencies but the pilot continued to circle overhead with his landing lights turned on. When a spotter reported that there were at least four people in the two-place aircraft, all thoughts of forcing the pilot to ditch alongside were abandoned - it was unlikely the passengers of the overloaded Bird Dog could survive the ditching and safely egress before the plane sank. After three tries, Major Buang managed to drop a note from a low pass over the deck: "Can you move the helicopter to the other side, I can land on your runway, I can fly for one hour more, we have enough time to move. Please rescue me! Major Buang, wife and 5 child." Captain Larry Chambers, the ship's commanding officer, ordered that the arresting wires be removed and that any helicopters that could not be safely and quickly be relocated should be pushed over the side. To get the job done he called for volunteers, and soon every available seaman was on deck, regardless of rank or duty, to provide the manpower to get the job done. An esimated US$10 million worth of UH-1 Huey helicopters were pushed overboard into the South China Sea. With a 500-foot ceiling, five miles visibility, light rain, and 15 knots of surface wind, Chambers ordered the ship to make 25 knots into the wind. Warnings about the dangerous downdrafts created behind a steaming carrier were transmitted blind in both Vietnamese and English. To make matters worse, five additional UH-1s landed and cluttered up the deck. Without hesitation, Chambers ordered them scuttled as well. Captain Chambers recalled in an article in the Fall 1993 issue of the national Museum of Aviation History's "Foundation" magazine that the aircraft cleared the ramp and touched down on center line at the normal touchdown point. Had he been equipped with a tailhook he could have bagged a number 3 wire. He bounced once and came stop abeam of the island, amid a wildly cheering, arms-waving flight deck crew. Major Buang was escorted to the bridge where Captain Chambers congratulated him on his outstanding airmanship and his bravery in risking everything on a gamble beyond the point of no return without knowing for certain a carrier would be where he needed it. The crew of the Midway was so impressed that they established a fund to help him and his family get settled in the United States. The Bird Dog that Major Buang landed is now on display at the Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola, FL. In spring 1975, the South Vietnamese Army and Air Force, operating for the first time without American support, were overwhelmed by North Vietnamese forces carrier took aboard 3,500 Vietnamese. As South Vietnam fell, 3,073 refugees out of Saigon were transported on to the Midway during Operation Frequent Wind” from 29 to 30 April 1973. One South Vietnamese pilot escaped flying a Cessna 0-1 Bird Dog observation plane, with his wife and five children aboard. The Vietnamese Pilot dropped a note asking Permission to land. The angle deck was cleared, the approach was excellent, and the family landed safely with room to spare. In the evacuation, one Marine CH-53 carried more than 80 men, women, and children on a flight; Marine CH-46 Sea Knights normally carried some 60 persons. Two American helicopter pilots were lost in the operation when their helicopters crashed. On 30 April 1975, North Vietnamese tanks rolled into Saigon and through the gates of the Presidential Palace, as South Vietnam fell to the Communists. Midway was the last of 17 U.S. attack carriers to participate in the conflict. Immediately following Operation Frequent Wind, Midway steamed into the Gulf of Siam and flew abroad IOO American built aircraft, thus preventing them from falling into communist hands. Upon completion of ferrying people to other ships, Midway returned to Sattahip, Thailand from 2 to 5 May 1975, and disembarked the Air Force helicopters. The CH-53s then airlifted over 50 South Vietnamese Air Force aircraft to the ship, loading almost 100 helicopters and aircraft of the former South Vietnamese Air Force aboard. Midway made a port of call at Anchorage Guam from 11 to 12 May 1975, off loading 100 helicopters and aircraft of the former South Vietnamese Air Force in twenty-four hours and at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 20 to 23 May 1975, conducting her fifth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea en route to her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan. Her eighth deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 14th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Ports of calls include: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines; Sattahip, a district (amphoe) in the province Chonburi, Thailand, located at the southern tip of the province, close to the tourism center Pattaya; Guam, an organized, unincorporated territory of the United States in the western Pacific Ocean, with the island's capital is Hagåtña (formerly Agaña). Guam is the largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands and Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a second time. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VMCJ-1 Det. 101, RF-4B & EA-6A; VAW-115, E-2B; HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; *VQ-l Det., EA-3B; *VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B and *VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6B. *Not embarked for the entire deployment. Her 27th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (31 March to 29 May 1975)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 405, 1181O, 1183, [5], [6], [7] of 1184, 1185 & Military Wiki is a Fandom Lifestyle Community. Content is available under CC-BY-SA).

 

 31/03/75 to 29/05/75

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Navy Unit Commendation

Vietnam (Operation "Frequent Wind")

29 to 30 Apr 75

 

13th WestPac

8th SCS

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal

Vietnam (Operation "Frequent Wind")

29 to 30 Apr 75 (see Note 1)

 

same

Vietnam Service Medal

Operation "Frequent Wind"

Apr 1975 (see Note 1)

same

Humanitarian Service Medal

Vietnam (Operation "Frequent Wind")

Apr 1975

same

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

same

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces. The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974. When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Note 1 — Public Law 107-314 of 2 December 2002 stipulates that personnel who were awarded the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (AFEM) for their participation in Operation Frequent Wind, during the period 29 to 30 April 1975, may elect the Vietnam Service Medal (VSM) in lieu of the AFEM for such service. However, no person shall be entitled to both awards for the same service.

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “Finally proceeding to Perth, Australia, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) became the first American carrier since USS Saratoga, (CV-3) to visit that port on 30 May 1975” (Ref. 4 & 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) became the first American carrier since USS Saratoga (CV-3) to visit Perth, Australia from 30 May to 6 June 1975” (Ref. 4, 43 & 405).

 

    “On 10 June 1975, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) suffers a major flooding in its #1 machinery room while crossing to the Western Pacific, 135 miles northwest of Wake Island” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 13 to 16 June 1975” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 26 June 1975” (Ref. 405).

 

    “On 30 June 1975, all carriers with the designation CVA or CVAN that had not yet reclassified, were changed to CV or CVN to reflect the multimission capability of the carrier. This change was made to improve the accuracy of designations in modern warfare. By removing the letter A, which stood for attack, the new designation CV could serve a multipurpose air, surface, and ASW role, depending on the type of aircraft carried” (Ref. 1-Constellation, 34 & 35).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) redesignated CV-41, reclassiflying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975, with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

    “The Coral Sea (CVA-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, departed Perth, Australia and sailed for Alameda, Calif. by way of Subic, Philippines, being reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975 (hull identification symbol) “Multiple Purpose Aircraft Carrier;” major overhaul at Hunters Point, San Francisco, Calif. on 30 April 1966; underwent major overhaul at Hunters Point, San Francisco, Calif. on 22 November 1965; completed a scheduled four-month overhaul period at Hunters Point Naval Ship Yard, San Francisco, Ca. in December 1962, commencing on 8 September 1962; commenced a scheduled six-week Post-Conversion Availability at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Wa. on 7 July 1960; recommissioned on or about 25 January 1960; decommissioned on 24 April 1957 for her first modernization, SCB 110A conversion commencing on 16 April 1957 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington. The modernization included installation of three C-11-1 steam driven catapults, which were designed to accommodate the newer and heavier jet aircraft; angled deck, enclosed hurricane bow, Mk-7-Mod 2 arresting gear identical to that installed in the Forrestal-class carriers, relocation of the elevators and three new deck-edge elevators and new installed and hull blisters widened her beam to a matronly 120 feet to accommodate the increase in her displacement. Her hull was widened eight feet and her overall displacement increased to 63,600 tons. The SCB-110A upgrade took 33 months to complete and she was the last of all three Midway-class Carriers to complete SCB 110A. After the SCB-110A modernization, the Coral Sea was the first aircraft carrier with a deck edge elevator on the port quarter; was decommissioned on 24 April 1957; commenced first modernization, SCB 110A conversion on 16 April 1957 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard; completed overhaul in early 1953 at Norfolk Navy Yard, Va.; reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952, while still at sea; underwent overhaul at Norfolk Navy Ship Yard on 12 October 1952; completed overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard, Va. February 1952; entering 10 October 1951; a five-month scheduled period of repairs and alterations, including modernization of Coral Sea’s bridge and island completed, at Norfolk Naval Ship Yard, Va. on 9 February 1949; Post-Shakedown Repairs and Alterations in April 1948; reported to the Atlantic Fleet, Norfolk, Va., designated as her home port. Ship's patch insignia in color, signal flag and radio call sign issued by Navy. BIG C, CORAL MARU, AGELESS WARRIOR; launched on 2 April 1946 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company.; sponsored and christened by Mrs. Thomas C. Kincaid, a wife of RADM Thomas Kincaid, who had commanded a cruiser division under RADM Frank Jack Fletcher at Coral Sea, a Coral Sea hero. While under construction the unnamed (CV-42) was first named the Coral Sea on 10 October 1944; keel was laid down 10 July 1944 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Newport News, Va., originally classified as an aircraft carrier with hull classification symbol CV-42, reclassified as a ‘Large Aircraft Carrier’ (CVB-43) on 15 July 1943, while the contract to build her was awarded on 14 June 1943” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72 & 56).

 

CHAPTER XXVIII

ELEVENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

The evacuation of U.S. citizens from Cyprus - Collapse of Cambodia - Operation

Eagle Pull and Fall of Saigon to the North Vietnamese-Operation Frequent Wind

EXTENDED SELECTED RRESTRICTED AVAILABILTY (ERSA)

NAVAL SHIPYARD LONG BEACH, CA.

Iran History & Air Arm

(1 January 1974 to 31 December 1975)

Part 1 – (1 January 1974 to 1 July 1975)

Part 2 – (2 July to 31 December 1975)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXVIII

Part 1 - (1 January 1974 to 1 July 1975)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4