CHAPTER XXXII

TWELFTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT AND LOCALTRAINING OPERATIONS (Multi-nation combat exercises with Japan, Korea, and the Republic of China) U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac” and Indian Ocean Deployments (Indian Ocean operations keeping the peace in the Middle East (Iran History & Air Arm)

(1 January 1977 to 31 December 1977)

Part 1 – (1 January to 10 June 1977)

Part 2 – (11 June to 31 December 1977)

 

 

WEST COAST DEPLOYMENTS – Includes Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) (Multi-nation combat exercises with Japan, Korea, and the Republic of China and Indian Ocean operations off the east African coast in response to public derogatory remarks against the U.S. by the President of Uganda and his order that all Americans in Uganda meet with him, on 27 February 1977)

Chapter XXXII

Appendix I

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet 1976 Aircraft Carriers scheduling of deployments resulted in one 1 CVN deployment extending into 1977:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Enterprise (CVN-65)

8th WestPac       7th Indian Ocean voyage

CVW-14

NK

30 Jul 1976

8 Mar 1977

222-days

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet

Conducting numerous AAW, strike and ASW exercises en route Hawaiian waters, culminating in CompTuEx 1-7T, an exercise in the Hawaii area involving air intercepts, ASW, marine carrier landings and a BPDMS firing, a 4,000-mile transit to southern Australian waters for Kangaroo II, MultiPlEx 1-77 and MissilEx 1-77, ReadiEx 1-77 exercise area in the Philippine Sea and steaming to the Indian Ocean operating off the east African coast in response to public derogatory remarks against the U.S. by the President of Uganda and his order that all Americans in Uganda meet with him, on 27 February 1977, participating in Operation Exercise Merlion III and Operation Houdini.

 

CVW-14 Squadrons include: VF-1 “Wolf Pack,” F-14A; -2 “Bounty Hunters,” F-14A; VA-97 “Warhawks,” A-7E; VA-27 “Royal Maces,” A-7E; VA-196 “Main Battery,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-113 “Black Eagles,” E-2B; RVAH-1 “Tigers,” RA-5C; -134 “Garudas,” EA-6B; VS-29 “Dragonfires,” S-3A; HS-2 “Golden Falcons,” SH-3D and VQ-1 DET. “World Watchers,” EA-3B. USS Long Beach (CGN-9) and USS Truxtun (CGN-35) joined Enterprise as part of her task force.

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet Aircraft Carriers Deployments for 1977 are:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Midway (CV-41) - 7th  (11th Forward Deployed)

18th WestPac       14th SCS

CVW-5

NF

11 Jan 1977

1 Mar 1977

Western Pacific

50-days

Ports of call not reported.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G 1975.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

12th WestPac

CVW-15

NL

15 Feb 1977

5 Oct 1977

Western Pacific

233-days

Ports of call not reported.

 

CVW-15 Squadrons include: VF-191 (*1) “Satan's Kittens,” F-4J; VF-194 (*2) “Red Lightnings,” F-4J; VA-22 “Fighting Redcocks,” A-7E; VA-94“Shrikes;” A-7E; VA-95 “Green Lizards,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-114 “Hormel Hogs,” E-2B; VFP-63 DET.3 “Eyes of the Fleet,” RF-8G; HC-1 DET. 4 “Pacific Fleet Angels          ,” SH-3G and VQ-1 DET. “World Watchers,” EA-3B. (*1) disestablished on Mar.1, 1978 & (*2) disestablished on Mar.1, 1978.

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet Aircraft Carriers Deployments for 1977 are:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Constellation (CV-64)

10th WestPac

CVW-9

NK

12 Apr 1977

21 Nov 1977

Western Pacific

224-days

Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Pattaya Beach, Thailand; Singapore; Hong Kong and Yokosuka, Japan.

 

Squadrons: VF-211, F-14A; VF-24, F-14A; VA-146, A-7E; VA-147, A-7E; VA-165, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-126, E-2C; VFP-63 Det. 1 RF-8G; VAQ-132, EA-6B; VS-21, S-3A; HS-6, SH-3H and COD, US-3A.

 

Constellation battle group consisted of CVW-9 and Commander Carrier Group Five, Rear Admiral Henry P. Gindeman.

USS Midway (CV-41) - 7th (12th Forward Deployed)

19th WestPac

CVW-5

NF

19 Apr 1977

5 May 1977

Western Pacific

140-days

Ports of call not reported.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N --> F-4J; VF-151, F-4N --> F-4J; VA-93, A-7A --> A-7E; VA-56, A-7A --> A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G.

 

CVA-41 redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975.

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet Aircraft Carriers Deployments for 1977 are:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (Forward Deployed)

WestPac

CVW-5

NF

8 Aug 1977

2 Sep 1977

Western Pacific

26-days

Ports of call not reported.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N - F-4J; VF-151, F-4N - F-4J; VA-93, A-7A - A-7E; VA-56, A-7A - A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (13th Forward Deployed)

15th SCS

3rd IO

CVW-5

NF

27 Sep 1977

21 Dec 1977

Indian Ocean

86-days

Exercise Midlink, hosted by the Iranian Navy, including representatives of Pakistan, Turkey and the Royal Navy.

 

Ports of call not reported.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115 (*1), A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. (*1) changed nickname in March 1978.

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet Aircraft Carriers Deployments for 1977 are:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) – Pacific Fleet & 7th

11th WestPac

2nd Indian Ocean

CVW-11

NH

25 Oct 1977

15 May 1978

WestPac

 

TRANSITEX 2-78, a multi-encounter, advanced task group ASW training evolution conducted along the PIM to “WestPac,” en route transit to Hawaii included an opposed sortie from San Diego and the two days of cyclic air operations in the Hawaiian operating area included a MISSILEX, MINEX BRAVO, GUNEX, BOMBEX, JAMEX, and KOMAREX; TRANSITEX 2-78, a multi-encounter, advanced task group ASW training evolution conducted along the PIM to “WestPac,” Refresher carrier landing operations, USN/ROKN ASWEX K1-78, a four-phased, modular exercise designed to provide U. S. and Republic of Korea Naval Forces an opportunity to practice combined operations in AAW and ASW, USN/ROKN ASWEX K1-78, a four-phased, modular exercise designed to provide U. S. and Republic of Korea Naval Forces an opportunity to practice combined operations in AAW and ASW, READIEX BRAVO following departure from Pusan, South Korea, READIEX BRAVO on 13 December 1977 and  exercise COPE CHERRY, a test of the Japanese Air Self-defense Force, war-at-sea exercise (WASEX) by delivering the first stimulated strike against the opposing carrier conducted in the Philippine Sea (USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) bested USS Midway (CV-41)), CASEX/FAMEX 1-78A, a close air support/familiarization exercise for training TACAIR control party personnel and integration of CV aircraft into the support of amphibious operations in the vicinity of Okinawa, Japan a combined U. S. and Republic of China air defense exercise of the Eagle/Bluesky series in the Taiwan area, aircraft from Kitty Hawk participating in The ECM portion of an air defense exercise involving the Republic China, Exercise BLUESKY, the intercept/strike portion of an air defense exercise involving the Republic of China and shipboard trials for A-4Ms and F-4Ss.

 

Ports of call included: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Yokosuka, Japan; Pusan, South Korea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Hong Kong; Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines; Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines; Pattaya, Thailand; Pattaya, Singapore;Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

Air Wing ELEVEN was equipped with what were then the Navy's newest aircraft: the F-14 Tomcat, S-3 Viking, the A-6E version of the Intruder and the E-2C version of the Hawkeye.

 

Squadrons: VF-114, F- F-14A; VF-213, F-14A; VA-192, A-7E; VA-195, A-7E; VA-52, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-122, E-2C; RVAH-7, RA-5C; VAQ-131, EA-6B; VS-33, S-3A / US-3A; HS-8, SH-3H and VQ-1 Det. B, EA-3B.

 

Kitty Hawk crewmembers contributed $2,423.67 for Navy Relief during a 23-hour telethon on 5 May. Kitty Hawk arrived in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on the morning of 7 May 1978 and immediately began making preparation to serve as the plat form for the Commander in Chief United States Pacific Fleet change of command ceremony on 9 May 1978.

 

Commander Carrier Striking Force Seventh Fleet/F 77 and staff embarked in Kitty Hawk throughout the day of 13 November 1977 and Commander Carrier Group SEVEN departed. In her new role as flagship for CTF 77, Kitty Hawk sailed westward t o an operating area east of the Philippine Islands. Rear Admiral E. E. Tissot, Jr., Commander, Carrier Group Five arrived aboard Kitty Hawk on 13 November 1977. The same day, Kitty Hawk assumed the communications guard for CTF-77 and will maintain this guard until 21 April 1978.

 

Honorable W. Graham Claytor, Secretary of the Navy arrived aboard Kitty Hawk on 8 December 1977. Kitty Hawk entered 1978 moored alongside Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Republic o f the Philippines from 1 to 4 January 1978, commencing Exercise Cope Thunder 78-2 on the 2nd. Under the Opcon of Commander Seventh Fleet, she was serving as the flag ship of Commander Task Group 77.5, RADM E. E. Tissot, Jr., who was embarked with his staff. Commanded by CAPT E. J. Hogan, Jr., the carrier's officers and men reflected on the accomplishments o f the year just completed and were eager to tackle the challenges that were to be in the months ahead

 

Upon arrival in Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines on 18 April 1978, all attention turned to preparations for the return transit to the Kitty Hawk homeport of San Diego, California. RADM Tissot broke his flag ashore pending the arrival of USS Enterprise (CVN-65), Kitty Hawk's relief. CTF 77 and staff disembark from Kitty Hawk on 18 April. Rear Admiral S. T. Counts, Commander Cruiser Destroyer Group FlVE visited Kitty Hawk on 27 April 1978 before departing, and with last minute shopping and planning preparation completed, Kitty Hawk departed Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines for her home port and commenced the transit to CONUS on 27 April 1978, inport from 18 to 26 April 1978. COMCRUDESGRU FlVE and staff embark for a transit to Guam. Kitty Hawk 17th anniversary was celebrated on the Hangar Deck with an appropriate ceremony on 29 April. Kitty Hawk conducted two exercises were conducted en route Pearl Harbor from 27 April to 7 May 1978 - an ASW Encounter (29th) and a CV/CVN Encounter on 3 May.

 

On 9 May 1978, visitors aboard Kitty Hawk included: Admiral M. F. Weisner, Commander in Chief Pacific; Admiral T. B. Hayward, Commander in Chief U. S. Pacific Fleet (prospective CNO); Admiral D. C. Davis, Commander in Chief U. S. Pacific Fleet and The Honorable D. E. Mann, Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Engineering, and Systems). ADM Donald C. Davis, Director, Navy Program Planning, Kitty Hawk seventh skipper, relieved ADM

 

COMCRUDESGRU FlVE and staff disembark Kitty Hawk upon arrival at Guam on 1 May 1978. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Sacramento (AOE-1) on 2 May. Kitty Hawk chopped to COMTHIRDFLT AOR, with COMCARGRU ONE staff embarking for the transit while conducting CV/CVN Encounter on 3 May 1978, while the goals (Evolution of SSSC tactics, air strike tactics, over-the-horizon targeting, and integrated defense) were not fully achieved due to an engineering problem encountered by USS ENTERPRISE which limited aircraft interaction.

 

Thomas B. Hayward as CINCPAC, on board Kitty Hawk while she lay moored at NS Pearl Harbor during a CINCPACFLT Change of Command Ceremony on 9 May.

 

USS Goldsborough (DDG-20) was part of USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) battle group.

 

Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Sacrabmento (AOE-1); USS Sample (DD-1-48); USNS Passumpsic (TAO-102); USNS Mispillion (RAO-105); USS Wichita (AOR-1); USS Taluga (TAO-62); USS Robison (DDG-12); USS Mauna Kea (AE-22); USS Roanoke (AOR-7); USS Pyro (AE-24); USS Roanoke (AOR-7); USS Wabash (AOR-5); USCGC Rush (WHEC-723); USS Fanning (fFF-1076); USS White Plains (AFS-4) and USS Wabash (AOR-5); USNS Navasota (TAO-106) and USS San Jose (AFS-7)” (Ref. 331B-1979).

CV’s operating in the Indian Ocean (IO)

South China Sea Deployment (SCS)

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

   “The USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) entered 1977 moored alongside Pier Six at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington. The carrier was entering the final 90 days of a Complex Overhaul (COH) which had begun on 12 March 1976” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 17 December 1976 to 11 January 1977” (Ref. 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked departs on her 14th South China Sea deployment

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 11 January 1977, with Captain Donald Linn Felt, USNA '53, as Commanding Officer, on her 18th WestPac, her 14th South China Sea deployment and tenth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her 11th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 14th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 20th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 33rd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(11 January to 1 March 1977)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (11th Forward Deployed)

18th WestPac       14th SCS

CVW-5

NF

11 Jan 1977

1 Mar 1977

Western Pacific

33rd FWFD

50-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /    KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VMAQ-2 Det.

Playboys - Marines Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -       Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

 

 

    “An A-7A assigned to VA-56 taxies overboard USS Midway (CV-41) 250 miles north of Okinawa on 13 January 1977. A plane captain is lost in the accident” (Ref. 84A).

 

Jimmy Carter became President of the United States January 20, 1977” (Ref. 12).

 

Iran History & Air Arm

 

“When Jimmy Carter took office, the shah made some effort to install a more liberal government in Iran. He did so due to the increasing unrest among his people, especially among the Shiite Muslims. In addition, his doctors had informed the shah that he was suffering from possibly incurable cancer. This diagnosis made the shah more concerned about the future of the Pahlavi reign. The teenage heir apparent could not rule effectively without the full support of the Iranian people, not merely the forced acceptance of yet one more dictatorial head of a police state” (Ref. 22).

 

    ReadiEx 1-77, a training evolution emphasizing AAW and ASW, proved to be the first commitment for USS Enterprise (CVN-65) in the New Year from 16 to 21 January 1977. Three days into that period of work, on 19th, a pair of Soviet Bear Ds flew into the exercise area in the Philippine Sea, to be intercepted by Phantom IIs from USS Midway (CV-41)” (Ref. 362D).

 

     “On January 21, 1977 Jimmy Carter pardoned nearly all Vietnam War draft evaders” (Ref. 12).

 

    “Rear Admiral R. E. Kirksey, Director, Carrier Program Division, OPNAV arrived aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 25 January 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) participated in Merlion III, an exercise with the Singaporeans on 25 January 1977. Visiting the ship on that date were Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense Swee, and U.S. Ambassador to Singapore John H. Holdridge” (Ref. 362D).

 

“On January 27, 1977, Jimmy Carter talks about general lowering of thermostats and tells funny stories on himself, Billy Carter, and Walter Mondale. Broadcast on ABC-TV” (Ref. 12).

 

    Three days after Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense Swee, and U.S. Ambassador to Singapore John H. Holdridge visit USS Enterprise (CVN-65), USS Long Beach (CGN-9) and USS Truxtun (CGN-35) transited the Malacca Strait on 28 January 1977, entering the Indian Ocean, her seventh voyage since her commission, they rendezvoused with attack submarine Tautog, the first time that an all nuclear-powered task force operated in those waters since Sea Orbi” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) COMMUNITY RELATIONS AND CIVIC ACTION PROGRAM Record contribution in excess of $31,000 to the Combined Federal Campaign, United Way of Kitsap County, Washington was reported on 1 February 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

“On February 2, 1977, Jimmy Carter gives his first fireside chat. Broadcast on CBS TV” (Ref. 12).

 

    Soviet interference materialized on occasion. Kynda class raketnyy kreyser (rocket cruiser) No. 822 began trailing the task group on 8 February 1977. This movement portended more than mere observation, as the cruiser continuously jockeyed for the most advantageous position from which to attack USS Enterprise (CVN-65) in the event of hostilities” (Ref. 362D).

 

“The seventh Ranger (CVA-61), former CVA-61, the 61st aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 49th, commissioning at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 10 August 1957, Captain Charles T. Booth II in command was dry docked at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash. for a Comprehensive Overhaul on 9 February 1977” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

    “On 20 February 1977, USS Ranger (CV-61) experiences a Class Alpha fire in the anchor machinery room while dry docked at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Washington”  (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 70 Bremerton, Washington Navy Leaguers for a tour of the ship on 11 February 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    On 14 February 1977, two Soviet Ilyushin Il-38 Mays, flying from Somalia, reconnoitered USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and her consorts as they steamed east of Socotra Island, Gulf of Aden. Over a period of four hours, the Mays made three separate passes overhead, being intercepted by Tomcats” (Ref. 362D).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-15 embarked departs on “WestPac”

 

    USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-15 (tail code NL) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 15 February 1977, on her 12th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East (NHC Battle Order Order p 19). Prior to her deployment conducted local operations, preceded by months of extensive work during which time Captain Joseph F. Frick, USNA, became the new Commanding Officer, while prior to relieving Captain Rogers, Thomas S. Jr. on 18 July 1976, the ship’s crew hosted more than 200,000 people for the open house festivities at the San Francisco pier during the Bicentennial Fourth of July in 1976, conducting sea trials from 3 to 4 May 1976, returning to Alameda on 18 May, completing a complex overhaul at the Naval Shipyard, Long Beach, Calif., for a more than $20-million seven-month Extended Selected Restricted Availability (ESRA) (In August 1975 to 18 April 1976). Reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975; involved in two Vietnam peace coast patrol cruises, ending with Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 28 April 1975 during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh on 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull, while her first Vietnam peace coast patrol cruise was during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She will under go her 12th foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval ShipyardBremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB-110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 23rd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 & 72).

 

CVW-15 embarked (tail code NL)

 

    “The Green Lizards of VA-95 augment the two A-7 units with the A-6E Intruders which are characterized by their low-level, all weather capability. The Air Wing also depended on the Lizards to configure a number of the A-6’s to serve as in-flight refueling platforms. The Lizards were home-based at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington.

 

    In addition to the Air Wing, VF-191 and VF-194, based at NAS Miramar, Calif., represented the fighter contingent flying the F-4J Phantom-a supersonic interceptor designed primarily to defend against an enemy air-borne threat, and secondarily to deliver free-fall weapons.

 

    VAW-114 served as the task group’s airborne early warning system.  Their E-2B Hawkeyes not only significantly broaden the ship’s radar horizon, but also provided a means of airborne command and control.

 

    Equipped with sophisticated photographic equipment installed aboard the RF-8 Crusader, VFP-63 Detachment obtained much of the needed photoreconnaissance for use in strike planning evaluation.

 

    The air crewmen of HC-1 Detachment 4, maintained a constant airborne alert in their SH-3G Sea King helicopter, recovering downed aviators or assist in the rescue operations for a man overboard” (Ref. 2-Uss Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure).

 

USS CORAL SEA (CV-43) with CVW-15 (NL)

(15 February to 5 October 1977)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Pacific & 7th

12th WestPac

Yellow Sea

CVW-15

NL

15 Feb 1977

5 Oct 1977

23rd FWFD

233-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-191 (*1)

Satan's Kittens  -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NL100

F-4J

VF-194 (*2)

Red Lightnings  -               Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NL200

F-4J

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks - Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NL300

A-7E

VA-94

Mighty Shrikes -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NL400

A-7E

VA-95

Green Lizards -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NL500

A-6A / KA-6D

VFP-63

Det. 3

Eyes of the Fleet or Gators - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

NL610

RF-8G

VMAQ –

2 Det. A/B

Marines - Griffons/Playboy –

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

NL620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 4

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

NL000

SH-3G

VAW-114

Hormel Hogs - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

NL600

E-2B

VQ-1 Det. 13

World Watchers - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior - Jet Attack Fighter

 

PR00

EA-3B

VFP or VF(P) - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (Light) or Light Photographic Squadron.

VMAQ-2 EA-6A "electric" Intruders also made a one-time-only appearance for this cruise.

The only cruise CVW-15 operated with F-4J Phantoms embarked.

(*1) disestablished on Mar.1, 1978 & (*2) disestablished on Mar.1, 1978

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 42

 

    On 17 February 1977, TF 77 initiated Operation Houdini, aimed at evading the close surveillance of Kynda class No. 822. Before proceeding into additional operations, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) began maintaining high speed, with the objective of “putting a heavy drain on the Kynda’s fuel supply.” That the intent achieved some manner of success is that the Soviet cruiser effected a “number of refuelings” with her accompanying fleet replenishment ship Vladimir Kolyechitskiy. Under the guise of routine flight operations, Enterprise opened beyond radar range, USS Long Beach (CGN-9) remaining behind to shadow the shadower, noting the latter’s failure to relocate the carrier for three days. The keys to the operation lay in complete reliance on satellite communications and maintaining a strict EmCon posture” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “On 20 February 1977, USS Ranger (CV-61) experiences a Class Alpha fire in the anchor machinery room while dry docked at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash.”  (Ref. 84A).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) anchored at Mombasa from 19 to 22 February 1977, welcoming visiting U.S. Ambassador to Kenya Anthony D. Marshall upon her arrival. After splintering a portion of a huge camel there, one of two caissons carried and positioned alongside Enterprise for Tautog, it was “unanimously concluded the best way to support a submarine in an open road anchorage was with liberty boats while she was anchored”” (Ref. 362D).

 

    USS Coral Sea (CV-43) new CO: Captain George A. Aitcheson arrived at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 1 March 1977” (Ref. 34).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked arrived from her 14th South China Sea deployment

 

    “On 1 March 1977, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Donald Linn Felt, USNA '53, as Commanding Officer, ending her 18th WestPac, her 14th South China Sea deployment and tenth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her 11th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. An A-7A assigned to VA-56 taxies overboard Midway 250 miles north of Okinawa on 13 January 1977. A plane captain is lost in the accident. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 14th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 20th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 33rd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (11 January to 1 March 1977)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 84A).

 

 11/01/77 to 01/03/77

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

18th WestPac       14th SCS

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

 

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

   USS Enterprise (CVN-65) planned a routine transit back to the Philippines, but the worsening crisis in Uganda necessitated a change of plans. Public derogatory remarks made against the U.S. by President Idi Amin Dada of Uganda, accompanied by Amin’s directive that all Americans living in Uganda meet with him personally, caused concern for the safety of those people. The JCS ordered the task group to maintain station 300 NM east of Kenya, where the ships steamed between 25 February and 3 March 1977. Enterprise was released for normal operations after President Amin lifted travel restrictions on Americans. The Ugandan incident “provided a real sense of purpose to extended cruising of distant oceans”” (Ref. 362D).

 

     “Captain George Alfred Aitcheson, Jr. assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on 1 March 1977, relieving Captain Joseph Francis Frick, 28th Commanding Officer, serving from 18 July 1975 to 1 March 1977” (Ref. 35A).

 

    “Rear Admiral J. B. Berude, CINCPACFLT Maintenance Officer visited aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) from 1 to 2 March 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    During the return passage to the Philippines, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and her consorts briefly came under surveillance by the Soviet Kashin class guided missile destroyer Odarenny in the vicinity of the Seychelles on 4 March 1977” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted members and wives of the Military Order of World Wars for a tour of the ship on 12 March 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) culminated her Complex Overhaul (COH) in March of 1977 with a combined post-overhaul Dock Trials and Fast Cruise on 12 and 13 March 1997, following completion of a $100 million complex overhaul (COH), entering No. 6 at PSNS on 12 March 1976, shifting to Pier 6 at the latter facility on 27 September 1976, steaming to PSNS to begin a complex overhaul on 8 March 1976 from Pier Oscar-Papa, Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California. This overhaul configured Kitty Hawk to operate with the F-14 "Tomcat" and S-3A "Viking" aircraft in a total CV sea control mode. This included adding spaces for storage, ordnance handling and maintenance facilities for the two aircraft. Also included in the work package were more efficient work areas for airframes and a repair facility for ground support equipment and the addition of avionics support capability for the S-3. The ship also replaced the Terrier Surface-to-Air missile system with the NATO Sea Sparrow system, and added elevators and modified weapons magazines to provide an increased capability for handling and stowing the newer, larger air-launched weapons. Installations: Storage and maintenance facilities to accommodate Grumman F-14A Tomcats; two EA-6B DT Vans to provide avionics intermediate maintenance support for Prowlers; three octuple MK 29 (RIM-7H5 Basic Point Defense Missile System (BPDMS) NATO Sea Sparrow launchers; Tactical Support Center (CV-TSC), to accommodate Lockheed S-3A Vikings (WestPac, 21 May–15 Dec 1975: last deployment on board of Grumman S-2 Trackers); SPS-48A air search radar; AN/WLR-11 passive ECM system; AN/SMQ-10 Satellite Readout Equipment; three MK 91 fire control; upgraded HF and UHF and secure voice HF/UHF and VHF radio links; dual array of task lights on a fiberglass stub mast, providing full 360º arc of visibility.

Removals: Terrier SAM systems; ASCAC; and AN/SPS-30” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk, 84A, 331A & 311B-1977).

 

    On 13 March 1977, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) reached Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring on 13 March 1977” (Ref. 362D).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65), USS Long Beach (CGN-9) and USS Truxtun (CGN-35) got underway from NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines for their return home after several days in port, arriving on 13 March 1977, making a fast, 24-knot, passage home via a modified Great Circle Route from 13 to on or about 20 March 1977” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Admiral T. B. Hayward, Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet arrived aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 17 March 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

   “At 1700, on 24 March 1977, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) got underway for Sea Trials; arriving Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, conducting Sea Trials from 24 to 1030, 27 to March 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-14 embarked arrived from “WestPac”

 

    “On 28 March 1977, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-14 and CTF 77/COMCARGRU 5 embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain James W. Austin, relieving Rear Admiral Carol C. Smith, Jr., seventh Commanding Officer, serving from 9 April 1974 to 10 December 1976, being promoted in Cubi Point, serving in the dual role as Task Group Commander and the ship’s skipper, ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, conducting numerous AAW, strike and ASW exercises en route Hawaiian waters, culminating in CompTuEx 1-7T, an exercise in the Hawaii area involving air intercepts, ASW, marine carrier landings and a BPDMS firing, a 4,000-mile transit to southern Australian waters for Kangaroo II, MultiPlEx 1-77 and MissilEx 1-77, ReadiEx 1-77 exercise area in the Philippine Sea and steaming to the Indian Ocean on her 5th deployment and sixth voyage since her commission, operating off the east African coast in response to public derogatory remarks against the U.S. by the President of Uganda and his order that all Americans in Uganda meet with him, on 27 February 1977, participating in Operation Exercise Merlion III in the Indian Ocean voyage, followed by Operation Houdini, aimed at evading the close surveillance of Kynda class No. 822 and was directed to operate off the east African coast in response to public derogatory remarks against the U.S. by the President of Uganda and his order that all Americans in Uganda meet with him, on 27 February 1977, during which time an F-14 ("NK 213") of VF-2 misses a landing on Enterprise and its wingtip strikes two other aircraft on the flight deck before it veers out of control and crashes into the South China Sea. Reclassified CVN-65 on 30 June 1975; made maiden landings and take-offs, the first operational aircraft on 18 March 1974, since completion of an extensive refit to support a wing of the new F-14 fighters at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. (12 June 1973 by March 1974); made six South China Sea deployments and six Vietnam Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War operating with the 7th Fleet; ending her third Indian Ocean voyage on her fifth ‘WestPac;’’ arriving Alameda, California, steaming from Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, upon completion of her second refueling, steaming from the North/South Atlantic and the South & Western Pacific via Cape Horn, on her second Southern Atlantic and ninth deployment; arriving Newport News, Virginia upon conclusion of her eighth deployment and first Southern Atlantic deployment from Alameda, California; transferring to the Pacific Fleet upon conclusion of her first Vietnam Combat Cruise and second Indian Ocean voyage. Enterprise completed her First Refueling and Major Overhaul at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, and made preparation for her transfer to the Pacific Fleet to provide support to the growing war in Vietnam; returned to Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, and underwent her first refueling and overhaul in October 1964. Enterprise made one World Cruise ending on her third Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the 6th Fleet and first Indian Ocean voyage. Enterprise ended her first Caribbean Sea voyage on her first Mediterranean Sea deployment and her first Southern Atlantic deployment on her Shakedown Cruise (5 February to 5 April 1962) operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet. Her 15th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on November 25, 1961 (30 June 1976 to 8 March 1977)” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 84A, 329B-1976/1977 & 362C).   

 

    USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) Personnel manning levels as of 30 June 1976 to 8 March 1977:

 

30 June to 31 December 1976

 

Officers:

Ship's Company: 165

CVW 14: 280

CTF 77/COMCARGRU 5: 25

 

Civilians: 45

 

Enlisted:

Ship's Company: 2,800

CVW 14: 1,300

CTF 77/COMCARGRU 5: 30” (Ref. 329B-1976).

 

The pilot of an A-7A assigned to VA-93 ejects after a catapult failure off USS Midway (CV-41) in the Pacific on 30 March 1977, however, the seat/man separation of the ejection seat does not work properly and the pilot is killed on impact” (Ref. 84A).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) concludes Complex Overhaul (COH)

 

    USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) Complex Overhaul (COH) was completed on schedule (12 March 1976 to 1 April 1977) and USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed her homeport of Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington on 1 April 1977, for her new homeport of Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California; under going dock trials and a fast cruise at PSNS from 12 to 13 March 1977, following completion of a $100 million complex overhaul (COH), entering Drydock No. 6 at PSNS on 12 March 1976, shifting to Pier 6 at the latter facility on 27 September 1976, steaming to PSNS to begin a complex overhaul on 8 March 1976 from Pier Oscar-Papa, Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk, 84A, 331A & 311B-1977).

 

   “Following her departure from the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS)  Bremerton, Washington on 1 April 1977, conducting her 1976/77 Complex Overhaul (COH) from 12 March 1976 to 1 April 1977, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) began an accelerated pre-deployment build-up and training cycle which was one of the most intensive ever completed by a Pacific Fleet carrier. Kitty Hawk accomplished significant training prior to departure for San Diego that included basic CIC team training  ASMD reaction n training, combat systems training, ASW team training, and CATCC team training” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived her new homeport of Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 4 April 1977, following a twelve and one-half month complex overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard from 1 to 4 April 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

     “On April 8, 1977, Jimmy Carter gave his first address to a joint session of Congress covered on CBS TV” (Ref. 12).

 

 

San Diego, 1977. NS026441 46k. Richard Miller BMCS USNR Ret.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026441.jpg

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) with CVW-9 embarked departs on “WestPac”

 

    “USS Constellation (CV-64) (Connie) with CVW-9 and Commander Carrier Group Five, Rear Admiral Henry P. Gindeman embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California 12 April 1977, with Captain M. A. Peelle, USN, as Commanding Officer and Captain George E. “Bud” Wales, as Executive Officer, on her tenth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Fleetand tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the far east. A newly refurbished, Constellation departed Long Beach Naval Shipyard, Calif. and continued workup cycle with participation in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) multinational exercises held in and around the Hawaiian Islands, commencing upon her departure from Long Beach Naval Shipyard, Calif., where she underwent a 26-day drydocking period resulting from problems uncovered during a workup cycle after the 4th of July during 1976 celebration of America's Bicentennial by hosting a nationally-telecast TV special from her flight deck, featuring many major celebrities and guests, having prior to the 4th of July, conducted a workup cycle upon departure from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash., where she underwent one of the most extensive carrier overhauls ever undertaken (14 months), enabling her to carry the Navy's newest air supremacy fighter, the F-14A Tomcat, and the S-3A Viking, a submarine hunter; reclassified to CV-64 on 1 July 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises in Vietnamhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Fleet, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, received a Presidential Unit Citation from President Nixon in 1973. She will under go her 12th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at New York Naval Shipyard on 27 October 1961, with Captain T.J. Walker in command” (Ref. 1- Constellation, 72, 76 & 1193).

 

WestPac Cruise Book 1977 – Ref. 1128

The Cruise and Ports of Call – Ref. 1129

Command and Staff – Ref. 1130

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) with CVG-9 (NG)

(12 April to 21 November 1977)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-211

Checkmates -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NG100

F-14A

VF-24

Red Checkertails -         Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NG200

F-14A

VA-146

Blue Diamonds -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NG300

A-7E

VA-147

Argonauts -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NG400

A-7E

VA-165

Boomers -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NG500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-126

Closeouts - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

600

E-2C

VFP-63 Det. 1

Eyes of the Fleet -

Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

610

RF-8G

VAQ-132

Scorpions - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-21

Fighting Redtails - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

720

SH-3D

VQ-1 Det.

World Watchers - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior - Jet Attack Fighter

(PR) 007, 010

EA-3B

 

 

    “Senator Jake Garn, U.S. Senator, UTA arrived aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 13 April; Rear Admiral J. L. Williams, Commander, Submarine Group Five arrived aboard on 14 April; Ms. M.. M. Wertheim, Deputy Under-Secretary of the Navy arrived aboard on 16 April; Rear Admiral W. H. Rogers, Commander, Naval Base, San Diego, Ca. arrived aboard on 17 April 1977. Kitty Hawk was inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 5 to 17 April 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca., for training evolutions and independent ship's exercises in the SOCAL OPAREA

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 18 April 1977, for training evolutions and independent ship's exercises while underway in the SOCAL OPAREA in preparation for Refresher Training (REFTRA)” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 1 March to 19 April 1977” (Ref. 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked departs on a Cruise

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 19 April 1977, with Captain Donald Linn Felt, USNA '53, as Commanding Officer, on her 19th WestPac and her 12th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 15th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 21st deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 34th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(19 April to 5 May 1977)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (12th Forward Deployed)

19th WestPac

CVW-5

NF

19 Apr 1977

5 May 1977

Western Pacific

34th FWFD

140-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N --> F-4J

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N --> F-4J

VA-93

Ravens -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A --> A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A --> A-7E

VA-115

Arabs -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -     Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6E & A-6BKA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye -Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VMAQ-2 Det.

Playboys - Marines Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -       Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

 

 

    “Mr. Yashiro Usui, Kyushu Broadcasting Company, Japan arrived aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 19 April and the following day conducted one of three UNREP’S with USS Roanoke (AOR-7) on 20, 21 and 25 April 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returned to NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca., after completing training evolutions and independent ship's exercises in the SOCAL

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 25 April 1977, conducting training evolutions and independent ship's exercises while underway in the SOCAL OPAREA in preparation for Refresher Training (REFTRA). Achieved speed of 36.2 knots during high speed run, Conducting air operations for the first time in 51 weeks from 18 to 25 April 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    “General Stig Gustov Eugen Synnergren, Supreme Commander, Swedish Armed Forces arrived aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 26 April; Commander, Fleet Training Group arrived aboard to commence the Training Readiness Evolution (TRE) on 27 April 1977 and the same day Rear Admiral P. H. Peck, Commander, Carrier Group Three arrived aboard” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    Following a 30-day post deployment standdown, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with VFs-121 and 124, Marine Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron (VMFP)-3, VSs-38, 41 and 91, VAQ-129, VAW-110 and “various aircraft from CVW-11 embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 27 April 1977, for carrier qualifications in Southern California operating area” (Ref. 362D).

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 26 to 28 April 1977, conducting Training Readiness Evolution (TRE) administered by Commander, Fleet Training Group from 27 to 28 April 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted Mr. C. Johnson and 40 members of the Society of Automotive Engineers for a tour of the ship on 29 April 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca., for Individual Ship Exercises (ISE), REFTRA and CARQUALS in the SOCAL OPAREA

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) celebrated16th birthday with an appropriate ceremony on the Hangar Deck on 29 April 1977, departing Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 1 May 1977, for Individual Ship Exercises (ISE), REFTRA and CARQUALS in the SOCAL OPAREA” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

Iran History & Air Arm

 

      “In 1977 Iran placed orders for F-16 fighters and even carried this process one step further by contributing to the research and development of the new F-18 fighter, a plane not yet part of the United States military arsenal” (Ref. 22).

 

      “By May of 1977, when Iran celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Royal House, 12 had been delivered. At this time, the Soviet Foxbats were still making a nuisance of themselves by flying over Iran, and the Shaw ordered live firing tests of the Phoenix to be carried out as a warning” (Ref. 28).

 

      “The IIAA took delivery of 50 CH-47Cs from Elicotteri Meridionali during the period of 1972-1976. The serial numbers were 5-4050 through 5-4119” (Ref. 25).

 

      “In August of 1977, IIAF crews shot down a BQM-34E drone flying at 50,000 feet, and the Soviets took the hint and Foxbat over flights promptly ended” (Ref. 28).

 

      “At the time this was the latest western jet fighter, just being introduced into the US armed forces, and the value of this one sale was said to be $1850 million. This deal was vital for the survival of the Grumman Corporation. The F-14A wing-wing Tomcat fighters were equipped with Phoenix missiles, capable of locating and destroying six targets simultaneously from a range of fifty miles or more.

 

     The ultra sophisticated Phoenix AAM system was first operationally tested in Iran, when F-14 Tomcat aircraft equipped with Phoenix radar picked up Soviet-piloted MIG-25 Fox bats over flying Iranian air space at 65,000 feet and over Mach 2. The acquisition of 80 F-14A Tomcat fighters added to 165 to 186 F-5 fighters and 177 to 208/9 Phantom fighter-bombers, gave Iran a strong defensive and a potential offensive capability” (Ref. 19 & 21 & 22).

 

      “The ultra sophisticated Phoenix AAM system was first operationally tested in Iran, when F-14 Tomcat aircraft equipped with Phoenix radar picked up Soviet-piloted MIG-25 Fox bats over flying Iranian air space at 65,000 feet and over Mach 2. The acquisition of 80 F-14A Tomcat fighters added to 165 to 186 F-5 fighters and 177 to 208/9 Phantom fighter-bombers, gave Iran a strong defensive and a potential offensive capability” (Ref. 19 & 21 & 22).

 

      “The main base for the IRIAF is at Esfahan, which was purposely built for the F-14s with special facilities and hangars. Iran’s aircraft industry (SAHA) overhauls the F-14 and is capable of producing their own F-14 spares. The F-14 is also used as a mini-Awacs aircraft with its powerful AN/AWG-9 radar” (Ref. 27).

 

Iran History & Air Arm

 

      “Next to Israel, Iran was the largest overseas operator of the Phantom. The capability of the F-4 (the backbone of the Iranian Air force) and F-14A fighters had further more been enhanced by the acquisition of a squadron of Boeing 707 tankers, which extends their combat radius to 1,400 miles with in-flight refueling” (Ref. 22).

 

      “During the 1970s the Army air arm expanded greatly with the acquisition of over 300 Bell 214As and 200+ Bell AH-1J Cobras together with approximately 185 Italian build Agusta-Bell 206s, approximately 100 AB205s and 66 CH-47C Chinooks that were Agusta-Meridionali built. The fixed wing force consisted of Cessna O-2s, Cessna-185s, Cessna 310s, Dassault Falcon 20Es, Rockwell AC690 Aero Commanders and Fokker F27s and provided with a number (9?) of Harbin Y-12s(Ref. 16).

 

      “The Imperial Iranian Air Force (IIAF) was developed along the USAF lines, and relied on US threat perceptions, doctrine, strategies, tactics, purchasing, production, as well as training policies. Everything in the IIAF, its air power doctrine and capabilities, was tailored for supporting a joint US-Iranian operation against a possible Soviet invasion of Iran from the north. Even the traditions and markings of the IIAF strongly resembled those of the US Air Force (USAF). A chain of huge air bases and a widespread early warning system were erected against the USSR.

 

     Consequently, the self-sufficient structure of the IIAF was weak during the 1970s, and was planned to be developed during the 1980s. Instead, during the 1970s, Iran was turned into a huge forward base for local as well as the US forces, where huge stocks of spare parts and weapons were piled.  Partially, such a policy was also influenced by the fact that after learning about Israeli problems in 1973, the Iranians began to order additional amounts of equipment, spare parts and weapons, which could enable them to fight an intensive war for many months without any external help” (Ref. 21). 

 

      “By constantly taking part in joint exercises with the USAF, USN, RAF and the Turkish and Pakistani air forces, in addition to sending its best crews and pilots for training courses to the US and Israel, the IIAF honed the skills of its chain of command, pilots, and technical personnel to highest possible degrees. Iranian reconnaissance assets were also involved in constant monitoring operations along the Soviet borders, together with USAF/CIA personnel and equipment. The IIAF was trained to function as a member of a team with large and far-reaching objectives, and so had to keep the pace” (Ref. 25).

 

Iran History & Air Arm

 

“There were some problems, like lack of proper EW systems and gaps in radar coverage of the Iranian airspace, as well as a lack of effective anti-shipping systems, but they were recognized and measures were taken to rectify them” (Ref. 25).

 

     This ended the relaxation of government controls, begun in 1977, that had encouraged protests and that had led to the emergence of religious activists allied with extremist "Dedicated Fighter" groups, the Mujahedin; these groups were opposed to the influx of foreigners, particularly Americans, and to a westernization they saw as threatening to those traditional values subsumed under the cloak of Shi'ite Islam” (Ref.  22).

 

      “The Shah's secret police, the Savak, were notorious abusers of human rights, however. President Carter writes in his biography, Keeping the Faith, that he asked the Shah whether he could curb the human rights abuses in Iran. The Shah answered, "No, there is nothing I can do. I must enforce the Iranian laws, which are designed to combat communism” (Ref. 151- Super70s.com).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Roanoke (AOR-7) on 2 May and USS Kisa (AE-35) on 3 May 1977. Training Readiness Evolution (TRE) commenced on 27 April 1977 and the readiness report was made to the Commanding Officer on 3 May and on 6 May 1977 Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Roanoke (AOR-7) and Rear Admiral J. G. Williams, Commander, Submarine Training Group West Coast arrived aboard the same day” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked arrived from a Cruise

 

    “On 5 May 1977, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Donald Linn Felt, USNA '53, as Commanding Officer, ending her 19th WestPac and her 12th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N --> F-4J; VF-151, F-4N --> F-4J; VA-93, A-7A --> A-7E; VA-56, A-7A --> A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; CVA-41 redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 15th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 21st deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 34th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (19 April to 5 May 1977)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

 19/04/77 to 05/09/77

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Battle Efficiency Award (Navy "E" Ribbon), marking her as the outstanding carrier in the Pacific Fleet

Jan 1976 to Jun 1977

19th WestPac

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

same

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

 

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returned to NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca., after completing Individual Ship Exercises (ISE), REFTRA and CARQUALS in the SOCAL OPAREA

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 6 May 1977, conducting Individual Ship Exercises (ISE), REFTRA and CARQUALS in the SOCAL OPAREA from 29 April to 6 May 1977. Celebrating 16th birthday with an appropriate ceremony on them Hangar Deck on 29 April 1977 when Kitty Hawk departed, commencing Training Readiness Evolution (TRE) two days before departure when Commander, Fleet Training Group reported onboard on the 27th, the readiness report was made to the Commanding Officer on 3 May 1976” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 40 NJROTC cadets -and adult escorts from Pocatello, Idaho for a tour of the ship on 10 May 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) at Naval Air Station Alameda, California on 11 May 1977” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 23 students, teachers and the principal of the Yuma Lutheran School, Yuma, Arizona for a tour of the ship on 13 May, while inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 7 to 15 May 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Taluga (TAO-62) on 19 May 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returned to NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca., after completing REFTRA

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 21 May 1977, conducting intensive Refresher Training (REFTRA) operations consisting of pilot landing qualifications, general quarters, battle problems, and ACLS test in the SOCAL OPAREA from 16 to 21 May 1977. During REFTRA, Kitty Hawk conducted refresher air operations for small elements of Carrier Air Wing Eleven (CVW-11) to develop aircraft handling cap abilities on a not-to-interfere basis with extensive requirements of REFTRA” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca., for REFTRA

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 22 May, departing NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. on 23 May 1977, for Refresher Training (REFTRA) operations in the SOCAL OPAREA” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted Mr. J. J. Hunt, LCDR G. Havens, NAVCRUITCOM, and Mr. P. Morgan, Hurrah Productions, during the filming of minority naval officers performing their occupational billets from May 23 to 24 May and conducted UNREP with USNS Taluga (TAO-62) on 26 May 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returned to NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca., after completing REFTRA

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 27 May 1977, conducting Refresher Training (REFTRA) operations in the SOCAL OPAREA from 23 to 27 May 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

   “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 60 members of the Harvard Business School Alumni for a tour of the ship on 28 May 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 30 members of the Western Chapter, 10th Armored Division Veterans Association for a tour of the ship on 29 May and Rear Admiral P. H. Peck, Commander, Carrier Group Three arrived aboard on 30 May. Kitty Hawk was inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 28 to 30 May 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca., for REFTRA

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 31 May 1977, for the final week of Refresher Training (REFTRA) consisting of limited cyclic air operations and battle problems operations in the SOCAL OPAREA” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Taluga (TAO-62) on 31 May and Mr. D. W. Lindsay, Guest of the Navy visited Kitty Hawk from 3 to 4 June 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returned to NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca., after completing REFTRA

 

   USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 7 June 1977, conducting Refresher Training (REFTRA) operations consisting of limited cyclic air operations and battle problems from 1 to 7 June 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

    “Mr. Mitsuo Shinata, Director of Public Information, Japan Defense Agency arrived aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 10 June 1977” (Ref. 311B-1977).

 

CHAPTER XXXII

TWELFTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT AND LOCALTRAINING OPERATIONS (Multi-nation combat exercises with Japan, Korea, and the Republic of China) U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac” and Indian Ocean Deployments (Indian Ocean operations keeping the peace in the Middle East (Iran History & Air Arm)

(1 January 1977 to 31 December 1977)

Part 1 – (1 January to 10 June 1977)

Part 2 – (11 June to 31 December 1977)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXII

Part 1 -  (1 January to 10 June 1977)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4