CHAPTER XXVIII

ELEVENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

The evacuation of U.S. citizens from Cyprus - Collapse of Cambodia - Operation

Eagle Pull and Fall of Saigon to the North Vietnamese-Operation Frequent Wind

EXTENDED SELECTED RRESTRICTED AVAILABILTY (ERSA)

NAVAL SHIPYARD LONG BEACH, CA.

Iran History & Air Arm

(1 January 1974 to 31 December 1975)

Part 1 – (1 January 1974 to 1 July 1975)

Part 2 – (2 July to 31 December 1975)

 

 

    “On 2 July 1975, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-15 (tail code NL) embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain Thomas Stevenson Rogers, Jr., as Commanding Officer, ending her 11th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present), on her first tour in the Yellow Sea, her tenth South China Sea deployment, on her second Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruise, and tour of duty to reinforce the 7th Fleet in the Far East, with Captain Rogers, Thomas S. Jr. in command. Coral Sea made a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 11 December 1974, while soviet Bear over flights (23 and 25 December) marked the transit, which ended when Coral Sea reached the Philippines on 29 December 1974. Coral Sea made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 8 to 21 January 1975, she commenced a schedule of air wing refresher qualifications and training; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 3 to 9 February 1975; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 27 February to 4 March 1975; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 12 to 20 March 1975; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 29 March to 10 April 1975; Subic Bay, Philippines maintenance periods in February and March 1975. While the Vietnam War may have been over, the aftershocks of that conflict continued to be felt. With the collapse of Cambodia early that spring, Coral Sea operated in standby status during the evacuation of the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh 12 April 1975 in Operation Eagle Pull. Over the following two weeks, the carrier operated off the Vietnamese coast as North Vietnamese forces inexorably overran the south. The war was not over for the Vietnamese. By spring 1975, the North was advancing on the South. Operation Frequent Wind was the evacuation by helicopter of American civilians and "at-risk" Vietnamese from Saigon, South Vietnam, on 29–30 April 1975 during the last days of the Vietnam War and was carried out by U.S. 7th Fleet forces. Frequent Wind involved the evacuation of American citizens from the capital of South Vietnam under heavy attack from the invading forces of North Vietnam. The military situation around Saigon and its Tan Son Nhut airport made evacuation by helicopter the only way out. Personnel and Vietnamese were evacuated to waiting ships after the fall of Saigon to the North Vietnamese. President Gerald Ford ordered the evacuation when Viet Cong shelling forced the suspension of normal transport aircraft use at Tan Son Nhut airport. With fighter cover provided by carrier aircraft, the helicopters landed on Saigon rooftops and at Tan Son Nhut to evacuate the Americans. The airport became the main helicopter-landing Zone: Marines from the 9th Amphibious Brigade flown in for that purpose defended it. All but a handful of the 900 Americans in Saigon were evacuated. The last helicopter lifted off the roof of the United States Embassy at 7:52 p.m. carrying Marine security guards. As that country collapsed, Helicopters from Coral Sea evacuate refugees during Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon on 29 April 1975 and proceeded apace from 29 to 30 April 1975. CVW-15 aircraft covered the helo lift of the last people to leave Saigon as communist forces overran the city. In April 1975, Coral Sea aircraft furnished logistic support for the evacuation of South Vietnam.  No actual strikes were conducted during this time period. An intensive training program in all areas to improve the ship’s readiness characterized the majority of the 1974-5 cruise. Coral Sea made a port of call at from Singapore from 6 to 10 May 1975. Coral Sea seemed destined for no rest during an ostensibly peacetime deployment. As she was en route to Perth, Australia, from Singapore word reached her of the capture of SS Mayaguez by Cambodians on 12 May 1975. On 12 to 14 May 1975, Coral Sea participated with other United States Navy, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps forces in the Mayaguez incident, the recovery of the U.S. merchant ship SS Mayaguez and her 39 crew, illegally seized on 12 May in international waters by a Cambodian gunboat controlled by the Communist Khmer Rouge. Coral Sea provided both medical and air support for U. S. Marines on Koh Tang Island.  Protective air strikes were flown from Coral Sea against the Cambodian mainland naval and air installations as Air Force helicopters with 288 Marines from Battalion Landing Teams 2 and 9 were launched from Utapao, Thailand, and landed at Koh Tang Island to rescue the Mayaguez crew and secure the ship. Eighteen Marines, Airman, and Navy corpsmen were lost in the action. Steaming to the Gulf of Thailand, Coral Sea flew 63 combat sorties on the 15 May 1975 against Koh Tang Island and the Cambodian mainland, in support of Mayaguez's recovery. Wounded Marines were flown to the carrier for medical attention and transfer to Subic Bay; the ship remained in the Gulf of Thailand through 18 May 1975, at which time she began a two-day transit to Subic Bay. Coral Sea made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 20 to 24 May 1975. Finally proceeding to Perth, Australia, Coral Sea became the first American carrier since USS Saratoga, (CV-3) to visit that port from 30 May to 6 June 1975; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 13 to 16 Jun 1975 and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 26 June 1975; being reclassified CV-43 on 30 June 1975, while an intensive training program in all areas to improve the ship’s readiness characterized the majority of the 1974-5 cruise, completing more then 259,000 aircraft landings since her commission upon completion of her cruise, a record for aircraft carriers. Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines six times; Singaporee, officially the Republic of Singapore, is a Southeast Asian island city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometres (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south); Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Perth, Australia, the capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia. It is the fourth most populous city in Australia; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay; and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (Source:  CVW-15 WestPac Cruise Report for above ports of call and ref. 43 & 72). Squadrons: VF-51, F-4N; VF-111, F-4N; VA-22, A-7E; VA-94, A-7E; VA-95, A-6A/KA-6D; VFP-63 Det. 5, RF-8G; HC-1 Det. 3, SH-3G; RVAW-110 Det. 2, E-1B and VAQ-135, EKA-3B; making her first Vietnam peace coast patrol cruise during Operation Homecoming (9 March 1973 to 11 August 1973), following six Vietnam War Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972); completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). Her 11th foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Ports of call Subic Bay, Philippines;Singapore and Perth, Australia. Her 22nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947 (5 December 1974 to 2 July 1975)” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 4, 34, 35, 72, 405 & 1275W3).

 

 05/12//74 - 02/07/75

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  “WESTPAC”

 CINCPACFLT Golden Anchor Award

 1974 - For excellence in

 Counseling and retention

 11th

 Meritorious Unit Commendation

 22 to 30 April 1975 /

 15 May 1975*O

 11th

 National Defense Service Medal

 29 to 30 April 1975*N /

 15 May 1975*O

 11th

 Humanitarian Service Medal

 29 to 30 April 1975* N

 11th

The Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal*N

 

 

N - For the action in the evacuation of South Vietnam - Operation Frequent Wind

O - For the support provided by the Coral Sea in the SS Mayaguez rescue.

Reference 34 & 35 reflect Chat info.

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv43-80/004.htm

 

 

Aerial view of Naval Air Station Alameda, summer of 1974. Left to right: USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), USS Hancock (CVA-19), USS Oriskany (CVA-34), and USS Enterprise (CVAN-65). NS024346 146k. Robert M. Cieri.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024346.jpg

 

 

Left to right: USS Enterprise (CVN-65), USS Coral Sea (CV-43), USS Kansas City (AOR-3), USS Wabash (AOR-5), and USS Oriskany (CV-34) at NAS Alameda, CA, July-August 1975. Official US Navy photo from the Naval Photographic Center, Washington, D.C. NS026523 157k. Robert M. Cieri.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026523.jpg

 

    “In another first, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) received her third consecutive “Golden Anchor” Award for excellence in counseling and retention during 1973, 1974 and 1975, in the Pacific Fleet” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Vietnam Combat Cruises were from 7 December 1964 to 1 November 1965; 29 July 1966 to 23 February 1967; 26 July 1967 to 6 April 1968; 7 September 1968 to 18 April 1969; 23 September 1969 to 1 July 1970; 12 November 1971 to 17 July 1972” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(July to August 1975)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) –7th (Forward Deployed)

13th WestPac

8th SCS

CVW-5

NF

Jul 1975

Aug 1975

 

Not Deployed

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /     KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks – Marine fixed-wing squadrons

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RM) 610

RF-4B

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks – Marine fixed-wing squadrons

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(RM)

620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*VMAQ-2 Det.

Marine Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6B

*VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps – Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF)  610

RF-4B

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMCJ-1 Det. 101, RF-4B & EA-6A; HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; *VQ-l Det., EA-3B; *VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B and *VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6B.

 

    “In 1975, USS Forrestal (CV-59) was selected to be host ship for the International Naval Review in New York City on the nation's Bicentennial” (Ref. 1-Forrestal).

 

     “Captain Joseph Francis Frick assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on 18 July 1975, relieving Captain Thomas Stevenson Rogers, Jr., 27th Commanding Officer, serving from 25 January 1974 to 18 July 1975” (Ref. 35A).

 

    “The navigator's ejection seat in a KA-6D assigned to VA-115 embarked in the Western Pacific on 20 July 1975, inadvertently fires during a cat shot and the pilot follows seconds later believing that his navigator ejected because of a problem with the plane. The KA-6D crashed into the sea. The pilot is killed in the incident. He was the squadron's XO” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “In August 1975, the Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, entered the Naval Shipyard, Long Beach, Ca., for a more than $20-million seven-month Extended Selected Restricted Availability (ESRA)” (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure & 43).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 29 May to 4 October 1975, with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 29 May to 4 October 1975, with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 4 October 1975, with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer, on her ninth South China Sea deployment and sixth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her second Indian Ocean and sixth deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her ninth deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 15th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 28th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(4 October to 19 December 1975)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (6th Forward Deployed)

9th SCS        2nd IO

CVW-5

NF

4 Oct 1975

19 Dec 1975

Vietnam

Indian Ocean

Middle East

28th FWFD

77-days

6th Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise

Exercise Midlink

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /    KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VMAQ-2 Det.

Playboys - Marines Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*Not embarked for the entire deployment.

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 10 October 1975, conducting her sixth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 10 to 14 October 1975, departing to continue her sixth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “On 29 October 1975, while aboard the USS Enterprise (CVN-65) the engine of an F-14 ("NJ 453") of VF-124 started burning and destroyed the plane” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “On 25 November 1975, a plane attempting to land on USS Midway (CV-41), strikes the ramp, bolts, impacts the barricade, and strikes another plane during post-"Midlink" exercises in the Indian Ocean. Two crewmen are injured” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “After a brief stop in Subic Bay, USS Midway (CV-41) entered the Indian Ocean and operated there from mid-October until December 1973, returning to Yokosuka, Japan in time to celebrate the 1975 holiday” (Ref. 1181O).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 11 December 1975, conducting her sixth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) made a port of call Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 11 to 14 December 1975, departing to continue her sixth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea en route to her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan” (Ref. 405).

 

    “On 19 December 1975, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer, ending ninth South China Sea deployment and sixth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her second Indian Ocean and sixth deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 10 to 14 October 1975, departing to continue her sixth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea. On 25 November 1975, a plane attempting to land on Midway, strikes the ramp, bolts, impacts the barricade, and strikes another plane during post-"Midlink" exercises in the Indian Ocean. Two crewmen are injured. After a brief stop in Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 11 to 14 December 1975, Midway entered the Indian Ocean and operated there from mid-October until December 1973, returning to Yokosuka, Japan in time to celebrate the 1975 holiday. Ports of calls include: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines; Karachi, the largest city, main seaport and financial centre of Pakistan, as well as the capital of the province of Sindh, located in the south of the country, along the coastline meeting the Arabian Sea; Bandar Abbas or Bandar-e ‘Abbās, a port city and capital of Hormozgān Province on the southern coast of Iran, on the Persian Gulf (The city occupies a strategic position on the narrow Straits of Hormuz, and it is the location of the main base of the Iranian Navy) and Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; *VMCJ-1 Det. 101, RF-4B & EA-6A; VAW-115, E-2B; HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; *VQ-l Det., EA-3B; *VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B and *VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6B. *Not embarked for the entire deployment; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her ninth deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 15th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 28th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (4 October to 19 December 1975)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 84A, 72, 405 & 1181O).

 

 04/10/75 to 19/12/75

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

9th SCS

2nd IO

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The SSDR is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the SSDR, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

 

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the SSDR, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

CHAPTER XXVIII

ELEVENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

The evacuation of U.S. citizens from Cyprus - Collapse of Cambodia - Operation

Eagle Pull and Fall of Saigon to the North Vietnamese-Operation Frequent Wind

EXTENDED SELECTED RRESTRICTED AVAILABILTY (ERSA)

NAVAL SHIPYARD LONG BEACH, CA.

Iran History & Air Arm

(1 January 1974 to 31 December 1975)

Part 1 – (1 January 1974 to 1 July 1975)

Part 2 – (2 July to 31 December 1975)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXVIII

Part 2 - (2 July to 31 December 1975)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4