TENTH “WESTPAC” DEPLOYMENT AND

FRIST VIETNAM PEACE KEEPING CRUISE

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA

CARQUALS AND RRESTRICTED AVAILABILTY

Iran History & Air Arm

Operation Homecoming, the repatriation of U.S. POWs

(28 December 1972 to 31 December 1973)

CHAPTER XXVII

 

 

    “On 28 December 1972, USS America (CVA-66) anchored in Hong Kong harbor, and remained there until 4 January 1973, when she stood out for the Philippines and the period of rest and repairs at Subic Bay, Philippines that would precede the ship's return to the line. All hands avidly followed the progress of the peace talks as America returned to "Yankee Station,” and resumed operations. After two weeks on the line, the ship learned that peace had been secured and that an agreement was to be signed in Paris” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “On 28 December 1972, an F-4J Phantom II from VF-142 on board USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65), downed a MiG-21, the 24th downed by Navy and Marine Corps pilots during the Vietnam War” (Ref. 1-Enterprise).

 

    “USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14) upon return from her 12th “WestPac” operated out of San Diego until preparations were made for inactivation” (Ref. 1-Ticonderoga).

 

    “The Linebacker II operations ended on 29 December 1972 when the North Vietnamese returned to the peace table. These operations involved the resumed bombing of North Vietnam above the 20th parallel and were an intensified version of Linebacker I. The reseeding of the mine fields was resumed and concentrated strikes were carried out against surface-to-air missile and antiaircraft artillery sites, enemy army barracks, petroleum storage areas, Haiphong naval and shipyard areas, and railroad and truck stations” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

    “The following carriers participated in Linebacker II operations: USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65), USS Saratoga (CVA 60), USS Oriskany (CVA-34), USS America (CVA 66) and USS Ranger (CVA-61)” (Ref. 1-Enterprise & 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Singapore from 23 to 29 December 1972, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her tenth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Saratoga (CVA-60) was on "Yankee Station" in the Tonkin Gulf on her seventh line period (18 December to 31 December 1972)” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 2 January 1973, ending her tenth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 2 to 3 January 1973, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her 11th line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Saratoga (CVA-60) departed "Yankee Station" in the Tonkin Gulf for Subic Bay on 7 January 1973, having made a total of seven line periods by the end of 1972: 18 May to 21 June; 1 July to 16 July; 28 July to 22 August; 2 September to 19 September, 29 September to 21 October; 5 November to 8 December; and 18 December to 31 December” (Ref. 1-Saratoga & 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) made her presence felt. In one week there were five MIG kills. Finally on 12 January 1973, a Midway F-4J, flown by Lt. Vic Kovaleska and R.I.O. Lt. Jim Wise, shot down the last MIG and the last aerial kill of the Vietnam War, when a Sidewinder missile brought down a North Vietnamese MiG-17. Navy and Marine Corps fighter and attack pilots bagged a total of 58 MiG-series fighters plus two An-2 biplane transports” (Ref. 1181O & 1183).

 

    “After the signing of the cease fire on 15 January 1973, USS Midway (CVA-41) returned home and was awarded The Presidential Unit Citation by President Richard Nixon for outstanding performance on her eleven month deployment” (Ref. 1181O).

 

    “The Vietnam cease-fire, announced on 23 January 1972 went into effect on the 27th. Aircraft from USS Constellation (CVA-64) and USS Oriskany (CVA-34) operating on "Yankee Station," the location of which was changed to a position off the coast of the northern part of South Vietnam, flew strikes against targets in southern Laos. Combat sorties from carriers on "Yankee Station" against targets in Laos had continued since the cease-fire in Vietnam. These combat support sorties were flown in support of the Laotian government which had requested this assistance and it had no relationship with the cease-fire” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point on 25 January 1973, ending her 11th line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 405).

 

    “The Paris Peace Accords, ending hostilities in Vietnam, were signed on 27 January 1973, ending four years of talks” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).  

 

    “Operation Homecoming, the repatriation of U.S. POWs commenced 27 January 1973 and North Vietnam and the Viet Cong began releasing” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

    “On 27 January 1973, when the Vietnam cease-fire, announced four days earlier, came into effect, USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65), USS Oriskany (CVA-34), USS America (CVA 66) and USS Ranger (CVA-61) was on “Yankee Station,” canceling all combat sorties into North and South Vietnam. However, on 28 January, aircraft from Enterprise and Ranger flew 81 combat sorties against lines-of-communication targets in Laos. The corridor for overflights was between Hue and Da Nang in South Vietnam. These combat support sorties were flown in support of the Laotian government which had requested this assistance and it had no relationship with the cease-fire in Vietnam” (Ref. 1-Enterprise).

 

    “At 0800, 28 January 1973, the Vietnam War-at least that stage of it-was at an end. Rumors swept the ship that her deployment would be shortened because of the cessation of hostilities, and hope ran high as USS America (CVA-66) moored at Subic Bay, Philippines on 3 February” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “During the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam conflict (starting in 1961 and ending on 28 January 1973) the Navy lost 726 fixed-wing aircraft and 13 helicopters to hostile action. The Marine Corps lost 193 fixed-wing aircraft and 270 helicopters to enemy action during the same period” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 25 January to 2 February 1973, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her 12th line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point on 10 February 1973, ending her 12th line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 10 to 15 February 1973, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her 13th line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin and or headed to the West Coast, possibly conducting combat missions en route” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS America (CVA-66) did return to "Yankee Station" one last time, but her time on station proved short, as she returned to Subic Bay, Philippines on 17 February 1973” (Ref. 1- America & 72).

 

    “USS America (CVA-66) departed Subic Bay, Philippines and sailed for the United States on 20 February 1973” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

    “On 8 March 1973, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Rear Admiral W. R. Flanagan, relieving Rear Admiral J. L. Butts, Commander and Captain K. L. Shugart, as Chief of Staff, Carrier Division One and Captain C. E. Myers, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 5 (CVW-5) embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain S, R. Foley, Jr. USNA '50, relieved Captain W. L. Harris, Jr., , USNA ’37, as Commanding Officer, ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, her third South China Sea deployment, ending her third Vietnam Combat Cruise on “Yankee Station” in the Far East, returning to the war zone seven weeks earlier than her scheduled deployment date. Midway arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 22 April 1972, ending her first line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin and or other operations. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 22 to 23 April 1972, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her second line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin. On 11 May 1972, aircraft from Midway along with those from USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63), and USS Constellation (CVA-64) continued laying minefields in ports of signicance to the North Vietnamese — Thanh Hoa, Dong Hoi, Vinh, Hon Gai, Quang Khe and Cam Pha as well as other approaches to Haiphong. Ships that were in port in Haiphong had been advised that the mining would take place and that the mines would be armed 72 hours later. Midway arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 2 June 1972, ending possibly her second line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin, inport from 2 to 9 June 1972, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her third line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 9 to 15 July 1972, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her fourth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin. Captain Sylvester Robert Foley, Jr., USNA '50, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Midway on 31 July 1972, relieving Captain Leroy Eugene Harris, USNA ‘37, 26th Commanding Officer, serving from July 10, 1971 - July 31, 1972. On 7 August 1972, an HC-7 Det 110 helicopter, flying from Midway, and aided by planes from the carrier and from USS Saratoga (CV-60), conducted a search and rescue mission for a downed aviator in North Vietnam. The pilot of an A-7 aircraft from Saratoga had been downed by a surface-to-air missile about 20 miles inland, northwest of Vinh, on 6 August. The HC-7 helo flew over mountainous terran to rescue the pilot. The rescue helicopter used its search light to assist in locating the downed aviator and, despite receiving heavy ground fire, was successful in retrieving him and returning to an LPD off the coast. This was the deepest penetration of a rescue helicopter into North Vietnam since 1968. HC-7 Det 110 continued its rescue missions and by the end of 1972 had successfully accomplished 48 rescues, 35 of which were under combat conditions. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 14 to 15 August 1972, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her fifth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin; Hongkong B. C. C. from 17 to 22 August 1972, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her sixth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 12 to 17 September 1972, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her seventh line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin and Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 14 to 21 October 1972, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her eight line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin. While in the Pacific on 29 October 1972, a plane crash landed onboard Midway. The aircraft run into a group of parked aircraft and destroyed eight of them, killed 5 crewmen and injured 23 others. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 25 to 30 November 1972, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her ninth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin. Fire aboard Midway while in port in November 1972 was reported. One crewman died (Long Beach, Calif. was reported as the port, so either the year or port is wrong). Midway made a prt call, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her tenth line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin and Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 2 to 3 January 1973, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her 11th line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin. Midway made her presence felt. In one week there were five MIG kills. Finally on 12 January 1973, a Midway F-4J, flown by Lt. Vic Kovaleska and R.I.O. Lt. Jim Wise, shot down the last MIG and the last aerial kill of the Vietnam War, when a Sidewinder missile brought down a North Vietnamese MiG-17. Navy and Marine Corps fighter and attack pilots bagged a total of 58 MiG-series fighters plus two An-2 biplane transports. After the signing of the cease fire on 15 January 1973, Midway returned home and was awarded The Presidential Unit Citation by President Richard Nixon for outstanding performance on her eleven month deployment. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 25 January to 2 February 1973, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her 12th line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin and from 10 to 15 February 1973, departing to conduct combat missions on possibly her 13th line period in the South China Sea in the Gulf of Tonkin and or headed to the West Coast, possibly conducting combat missions en route. Ports of calls include: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a second time; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a third time; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a fourth time; Hongkong, B. C. C., situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a fifth time; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a sixth time; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a seventh time; Singapore, is a Southeast Asian island city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometres (85 mi) north of the equator (An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia's Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south); Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines a eight time; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point a ninth time and Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point a tenth time. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4B; VF-151, F-4B; VA-93, A-7B; VA-56, A-7B; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-130 Det. 2, EKA-3B; HC-1 Det. 8, SH-3G and HC-7 Det. 110, HH-3A. *These squadron detachments were not aboard the carrier for the entire deployment. USS Worden (CG-18) and USS Towers (DDG-9) joined up with Midway as part of her task force. Her second deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her eighth deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 21st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (10 April 1972 to 8 March 1973)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 1181, 1181A, 1181B, 10181C, 1181D, 1181E, 1181E1, 1181F, 1181G, 1181H, 1181I1181J & 1181N).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) Air Wing: Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW)-5 - Ref. 406A

 

DEPLOY.

DATES

K

I

A

M

I

A

P

O

W

PLANES LOST

LINE DAYS

LINE PERIODS

WESTPAC

 

CVW-5 (NF)

10/04/72 to 08/03/73

 

 

 

 

 

*13

8th WestPac       3rd SCS

Air Combat Victories (?) – Ref. – 406A

Combat Losses (?)

Operational Losses (?)

In-chop/out-chop:

EQNEEDF note: Best Guess based on port of calls and distance and steaming periods between port periods.

Ref. -

 

 10/04/72 to 08/03/73

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

Presidential Unit Citation – Vietnam

30 Apr 1972 to 9 Feb 1973

8th WestPac

3rd SCS

Vietnam Service Medal with 1 Silver Star (see Note 2) Vietnamese Ceasefire Campaign

May 1972 to Jan 1973

same

Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation (Gallantry Cross Medal with Palm)

 

same

Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

 

same

National Defense Service Medal

Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

same

Service outside the geographical limits of South Vietnam and direct combat support to the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces for more than six months.

Note 2 — 1 Silver Star = 5 Bronze Stars

The Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation (Gallantry Cross Medal), with Palm, was awarded to a unit cited at the Armed Forces level.

Service outside the geographical limits of South Vietnam and direct combat support to the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces for more than six months.

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

Eight “Westpac” deployment and Third Vietnam Combat Cruise

(10 April 1972 to 8 March 1973)

(KIAs, killed due to operational loss and POWs)

KIA/MIAs/POWs

NAME

RANK

SQUADRON

DATE of LOSS

LOSS-COUNTRY
HOW

COMMENT

 

 

 

 

 

Status in 1966:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Midway (CV-41) Air Wing: Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW)-2 & 5 - Ref. 406A

 

DEPLOY.

DATES

K

I

A

M

I

A

P

O

W

PLANES LOST

LINE DAYS

LINE PERIODS

WESTPAC

 

CVW-2 (NE)

06/03/65 to 23/11/65

 

 

 

 

 

*7

6th WestPac

1st SCS

CVW-5 (NF)

16/04/71 to 06/11/71

 

 

 

 

 

*7

7th WestPac

2nd SCS

CVW-5 (NF)

10/04/72 to 08/03/73

 

 

 

 

 

*13

8th WestPac       3rd SCS

Air Combat Victories (?)

Combat Losses (?)

Operational Losses (?)

In-chop/out-chop:

EQNEEDF note: Best Guess based on port of calls and distance and steaming periods between port periods.

Ref. – 406A

 

06/03/65 to 08/03/73

AWARD OR CITATION

AIR WING

TAIL

CODE

 “WESTPAC”

Navy Unit Commendation – Vietnam

16 Apr to 4 Nov 1965

7 May to 28 Oct 1971

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

6th, 7th & 8th

 

 

 

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal – Vietnam

09 Apr to 11 May 65 *b

20 May to 28 Jun 65 *b

17 to 19 Oct 71 *c

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

6th, 7th & 8th

 

 

 

Vietnam Service Medal with 1 Silver Star (see Note 2) - Vietnam Defense Campaign

(Vietnamese Counteroffensive Phase VII – 7th)

Jul to Nov 1965

May to Jun 1971

Jul to Oct 1971

May 1972 to Jan 1973

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

6th, 7th & 8th

 

 

 

Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation (Gallantry Cross Medal with Palm)

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

6th, 7th & 8th

 

 

 

Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

 

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

6th, 7th & 8th

 

 

 

Battle Efficiency Award (Navy "E" Ribbon), marking her as the outstanding carrier in the Pacific Fleet – Ref. 1180B

CVW-2

 

6th

National Defense Service Medal – Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

CVW-2, 5 & 5

 

6th, 7th & 8th

 

 

 

Presidential Unit Citation – Vietnam

30 Apr 1972 to 9 Feb 1973

CVW-5

 

8th

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal - Service outside the geographical limits of South Vietnam and direct combat support to the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces for more than six months.

Note 2 - 1 Silver Star = 5 Bronze Stars

*b = Vietnam (01 JUL 58  to  03 JUL 65)

*c = Korea (01 OCT 66  to  03 JUN 74)

The Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation (Gallantry Cross Medal), with Palm, was awarded to a unit cited at the Armed Forces level.

Service outside the geographical limits of South Vietnam and direct combat support to the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces for more than six months.

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

Sixth to Eighth “Westpac” deployment and First to Third Vietnam Combat Cruise

(6 March 1965 to to 8 March 1973)

(KIAs, killed due to operational loss and POWs)

KIA/MIAs/POWs

NAME

RANK

SQUADRON

DATE of LOSS

LOSS-COUNTRY
HOW

COMMENT

 

 

 

 

 

Status in 1966:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) was the first carrier to deploy after the negotiation of the Vietnam Cease Fire agreement of 27 January-nearly a month later than scheduled” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVW-15 (tail code NL) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 9 March 1973, with Captain Paul A. Peck, as Commanding Officer, on her tenth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, her ninth South China Sea deployment, on her first Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruise (Operation Homecoming) and the first carrier to deploy after the negotiation of the Vietnam Cease Fire agreement of 27 January-nearly a month later than scheduled. Prior to her deployment she conducted ReTra and air wing operations upon completion of overhaul at Hunter's Point into late October, during which time Captain Peck, Paul A. arrived on 2 November 1972, becoming the new Commanding Officer (NHC Battle Order p 18), involved in six Vietnam War Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). She will under go her tenth foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 21st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 & 72).

 

USS CORAL SEA (CVA-43) with CVW-15 (NL)

(9 March to 8 November 1973) 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43)

Pacific & 7th

10th WestPac        9th SCS

1st Vietnam Peace Keeping

CVW-15

NL

9 Mar 1973

8 Nov 1973

Vietnam Conflict

21st FWFD

245-days

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-51

Screaming Eagles -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NL100

F-4B

VF-111

Sundowners -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NL200

F-4B

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NL300

A-7E

VA-94

Mighty Shrikes -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NL400

A-7E

VA-95

Green Lizards

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber -Tanker

NL500

A-6A / A-6B / KA-6D

VFP-63 Det. 5

Eyes of the Fleet or Gators - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

NL600

RF-8G

VAQ-135 Det. 3 (*1)

Black Ravens - Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron or Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior - Jet Attack Fighter -

NL610

EKA-3B

VAQ-130 Det. 2 (*1)

Zappers -Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron or Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior - Jet Attack - Special electronic installation

NL610

EKA-3B

HC-1 Det. 6

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

NL

 004-006

 

SH-3D

VAW-111 Det. 4

Gray Berets - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Tracer

NL010

E-1B

HC-7 Det. 110

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Search and Rescue

 

 

HH-3A

“Significant changes for CVW-15 for this cruise were the A-7Es of VA-22 and -94 and 4 HC-l Det 6's SH-3G Sikorsky Sea Kings” (Ref. 43).

VAQ-135 Detachments 3 and 5 were transferred on 25 August 1973 to VAQ-130.  VAQ-135 Det. 3 became VAQ-130 Det. 2 and VAQ-135 Det. 5 became VAQ-130 Det. 5.

VFP or VF(P) - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron or Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (Light) or Light Photographic Squadron.

HC-7 Det. 110 was not aboard the carrier for the entire deployment.

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 76

 

     “USS America (CVA-66) arrived at Mayport Fla., disembarking men from CVW-8 and embarking the teenaged sons of some of the ship's company officers and men, thus allowing them to ride the ship back to Norfolk with their fathers, something thoroughly enjoyed by all who took part” (Ref. 1-America & 72).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 14 March 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

    “Proceeding via Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) reached Subic Bay, Philippines on 26 March 1973” (Ref. 43).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 26 to 30 March 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

    “Upon arrival in the South China Sea, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) joined USS Oriskany (CVA-34), USS Constellation (CVA-64) and USS Ranger (CVA-61) involved in Operation Homecoming, the repatriation of U.S. POWs at “Yankee Station”, one of six carriers operating in 1973 in the far east during her first Vietnam peace coast patrol cruise, USS Coral Sea (CV-43), USS Constellation (CVA-64) and USS Oriskany (CVA-34) conducted combat sorties against targets in Laos which had continued since the cease-fire in Vietnam. These combat support sorties were flown in support of the Laotian government, which had requested this assistance, and it had no relationship with the cease-fire” (Ref. 1-Ranger & Enterprise).

 

    “Operation Homecoming, the repatriation of U.S. POWs ended 1 April 1973 (27 January and 1 April 1973).  Of the 591 POWs released during Operation Homecoming, 145 were Navy personnel, all but one of whom were Naval Aviation personnel” (Ref. 1-Ranger & Enterprise).

 

    “Within four months following the cease-fire in Vietnam, 27 January 1973, USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) proceeded to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash., where Big E was altered and refitted to support the Navy's newest fighter aircraft —- the F-14A Tomcat” (Ref. 1-Enterprise).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 24 to 29 April 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Manila, Republic of Philippines from 30 April to 4 May 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 21 May 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Sasebo, Japan from 26 May to 1 June 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

    “By June 1973 only three carriers were on station in the South China Sea” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 6 to 9 June 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 26 June to 9 July 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 29 July 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

    “Carrier Division 5 became Carrier Group 5 on 30 June 1973” (Ref. 1093).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Hong Kong from 1 to 7 August 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

    “The last U.S. combat troops departed Vietnam on 11 August 1973” (Ref. 1-Coral Sea & 72).

 

Operation Arc Light

(18 June 1965 to 15 August  1973) - Ref. 102E

 

Iran History & Air Arm

 

      “In August of 1973, the Shah selected the F-14 Tomcat, and the sale was approved by the US government in November of 1973.  The initial order signed in January of 1974 covered 30 Tomcats, but in June 50 more were added to the contract. At the same time, the Iranian government-owned Melli Bank agreed to loan Grumman $75 million to partially make up for a US government loan of $200 to Grumman, which had just been cancelled. This loan enabled Grumman to secure a further loan of $125 from a consortium of American banks, ensuring at least for the moment that the F-14 program would continue” (Ref. 27 & 28).

     

“Throughout the 1970s, Iran purchased sophisticated aircraft for its air force.  The most spectacular acquisitions of IIAF were the F-14A (Tomcats)” (Ref. 27).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) underwent repairs and alterations prior to being assigned with CVW-5 permanently assigned to Yokosuka, Japan” (Ref. 1181O).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 10 to 28 August 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 5 to 6 September 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

    “Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 7 September 1973, relieving Captain Sylvester Robert Foley, Jr., USNA '50, 27th Commanding Officer, serving from July 31, 1972 - September 7, 1973” (Ref. 1178-G). 

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Manila, Republic of Philippines from 7 to 11 September 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 11 September 1973, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, on her home port transfer to Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), marking the first forward-deployment of a complete carrier task group in a Japanese port (dependents housed along with the crew in a foreign port), the result of an accord arrived at on 31 August 1972 between the U.S. and Japan, while the move had strategic significance because it facilitated continuous positioning of three carriers in the Far East at a time when the economic situation demanded the reduction of carriers in the fleet. She will under go her third deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her ninth deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 22nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(11 September 1973 to 5 October 1973)

(West Coast to Japan Transfer)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) – 3rd & 7th

WestPac

Sea of Japaan

CVW-5

NF

11 Sep 1973

5 Oct 1973

West Coast to Japan Transfer

22nd FWFD

25-days

West Coast to Yokosuka, Japan Transfer

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-56

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-93

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /    KA-6D

VFP-63 Det. 3

Eyes of the Fleet -

Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader  -       Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

600

RF-8G

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

010

E-2B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

003-007

SH-3G

 

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 12 September 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 26 September 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 3 to 6 October 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

    “On 5 October 1973, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, operating with the Pacific Fleet and the 7th Fleet, endinng her home port transfer from Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, marking the first forward-deployment of a complete carrier task group in a Japanese port (dependents housed along with the crew in a foreign port), the result of an accord arrived at on 31 August 1972 between the U.S. and Japan, while the move had strategic significance because it facilitated continuous positioning of three carriers in the Far East at a time when the economic situation demanded the reduction of carriers in the fleet. Her third deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VAW-115, E-2B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. Her ninth deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 22nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (11 September to 5 October 1973)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

11/09/73 to 05/10/73

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

National Defense Service Medal

Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

WestPac

Sea of Japaan

West Coast to Japan Transfer

Ref. 1081 & 1081/C

 

    “An SH-3G helicopter assigned to HC-1 crashes off USS Midway (CVA-41)  bow on take-off for an SAR mission in the western Pacific on 22 October 1973. All three crew on board are killed. The helicopter was supposed to get underway to the crash site of two other Midway aircraft that had a mid-air collision. Involved in the mid-air collision were an A-7A (VA-56) and an EA-6A (VMCJ-1). This collision killed all three crew of the aircraft involved” (Ref. 84A).


     “
USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 22 to 23 October 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) pulled in for a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 3 November 1973” (Ref. 405).

 

    “On 8 November 1973, USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) with CVW-15 (tail code NL) embarked arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain Paul A. Peck, as Commanding Officer, ending her tenth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet (25 January 1960 to Present) and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, on her ninth South China Sea deployment, her first Vietnam Peace Coast Patrol Cruise (Operation Homecoming), with Captain Peck, Paul A. in command, becoming the first carrier to deploy after the negotiation of the Vietnam Cease Fire agreement of on 27 January-nearly a month later than scheduled (NHC Battle Order p 18), proceeding via Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 14 March 1973, while significant changes for CVW-15 for this cruise were the A-7Es of VA-22 and -94 and 4 HC-l Det 6's SH-3G Sikorsky Sea Kings. Coral Sea reached Subic Bay, Philippines on 26 March 1973, in port from 26 to 30 March 1973. Upon arrival in the South China Sea, Coral Sea joined USS Oriskany (CVA-34), USS Constellation (CVA-64) and USS Ranger (CVA-61) involved in Operation Homecoming, the repatriation of U.S. POWs at “Yankee Station”, one of six carriers operating in 1973 in the far east during her first Vietnam peace coast patrol cruise, USS Coral Sea, Constellation and Oriskany conducted combat sorties against targets in Laos which had continued since the cease-fire in Vietnam. These combat support sorties were flown in support of the Laotian government, which had requested this assistance, and it had no relationship with the cease-fire. Operation Homecoming, the repatriation of U.S. POWs ended 1 April 1973 (27 January and 1 April 1973).  Of the 591 POWs released during Operation Homecoming, 145 were Navy personnel, all but one of whom was Naval Aviation personnel. Coral Sea made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 24 to 29 April 1973; Manila, Republic of Philippines from 30 April to 4 May 1973; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 21 May 1973; Sasebo, Japan from 26 May to 1 June 1973. By June 1973 only three carriers were on station in the South China Sea. Coral Sea made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 6 to 9 June 1973; from 26 June to 9 July 1973 and from 29 July 1973. Carrier Division 5 became Carrier Group 5 on 30 June 1973. Coral Sea made a port of call at Hong Kong from 1 to 7 August 1973. The last U.S. combat troops departed Vietnam on 11 August 1973 (Operation Arc Light - 18 June 1965 to 15 August 1973). Coral Sea made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines from 10 to 28 August 1973 and from 5 to 6 September 1973. Coral Sea made a port of call at Manila, Republic of Philippines from 7 to 11 September 1973. Coral Sea pulled in for a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 12 September 1973; on 26 September 1973; from 3 to 6 October 1973 and from 22 to 23 October 1973. Coral Sea pulled in for a port of call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 3 November 1973 and then headed home. Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay twice; Manila, Republic of Philippines, the capital city of the Philippines; Sasebo, a city in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines three times; Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Manila, Republic of Philippines, the capital city of the Philippines, is one of the sixteen cities (along with the municipality of Pateros) that comprise the national capital region called Metro Manila, located on the eastern shore of Manila Bay and is bordered by the cities of Navotas and Caloocan to the north; Quezon City to the northeast; San Juan and Mandaluyong to the east and Makati to the southeast, and Pasay to the south; U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines four times; Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (Source: CVW-15 History Report for above ports of call and ref. 43 & 72). Squadrons: VF-51, F-4B; VF-111, F-4B; VA-22, A-7E; VA-94, A-7E; VA-95, A-6A / A-6B / KA-6D; VFP-63 Det. 5, RF-8G; VAQ-135 Det. 3, EKA-3B; VAQ-130 Det. 2, EKA-3B; HC-1 Det. 6, SH-3D; VAW-111 Det. 4, E-1B; and HC-7 Det. 110*, HH-3A.

(*1) VAQ-135 Det. 3 redesignated VAQ-130 Det. 2 on Aug. 25, 1973. USS Sterett (CG-31); USS Waddell (DDG-24); USS Reasoner (FF-1063) and USS Camden (AOE-2) joined USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) as part of her task force.; involved in six Vietnam War Combat cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War (1 November 1965 to 17 July 1972), completing her 1st & 2nd Vietnam Expeditionary Force (VEF) deployments during her 1st & 2nd “WestPac,” (first CVA in the Bering Sea during 12 December 1961 to 17 July 1962 deployment). Her tenth foreign water deployment since her visit to Vancouver, B.C. (18 to 22 March 1960) when she deployed from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey evaluation, commencing once recommissioned, following SCB 110A conversion (16 April 1957 to 25 January 1960), decommissioned on 24 April 1957, completing nine tours of duty in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet (7 June 1948 to 13 August 1956); reclassified hull classification symbol CVA-43 on 1 October 1952. Her 21st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 1 October 1947 (9 March to 8 November 1973)”  (Ref. 1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35, 72 & 405).

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Air Wing: Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW)-15

 

DEPLOY

 DATES

K

I

A

M

I

A

P

O

W

PLANES LOST

LINE DAYS

LINE PERIODS

WESTPAC

 

CVW-15 (NL)

09/03/73-08/11/73

Operation Homecoming

N/A

N/A

N/A

14

 84

6+

10th - First Vietnam

peace coast patrol cruise in the South China Sea

Reference 34, 35 & 43 reflect Chat info.

 

09/03/73 - 08/11/73

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  “WESTPAC”

 Vietnam Service Medal for Combat

 Operations

 8 November 1973

 10th & 1st

 Vietnam coast

 Peace Patrol –

 Combat

 Excellent Deck Efficiency Admiral Flatley

 1973 - Aviation Safety

 10th

 CINCPACFLT Golden Anchor Award

 1973 - For excellence in

 Counseling and retention

 10th

Reference 34 & 35 reflect Chat info.

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 26 November 1973, with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her ninth WestPac, her fourth South China Sea deployment and first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her and first deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. She will under go her fourth deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her tenth deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 23rd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(26 November to 22 December 1973)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CVA-41) –7th (1st Forward Deployed)

9th WestPac       4th SCS

CVW-5

NF

26 Nov 1973

22 Dec 1973

Vietnam

23rd FWFD

27-days

1st Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /    KA-6D

VFP-63 Det. 3

Eyes of the Fleet - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -     Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

600

RF-8G

VMCJ-1 Det. 101

Golden Hawks - Marine fixed-wing squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(RM) 610

EA-6A

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

010

E-2B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

003-007

SH-3G

 

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) arrived Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point on 10 December 1973, conducting her first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise in the South China Sea” (Ref. 405).

 

    “On 11 December 1973, seven crewmen on board USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) were killed in a boiler-room blaze 700 nautical miles eastern of the Philippines. The fire could be extinguished by the crew, and Kitty Hawk was towed to Subic Bay, Philippines, for repairs” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Midway (CVB-41) made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 10 to 12 December 1973, departing for her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan” (Ref. 405).

 

    “On 22 December 1973, USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Richard Joseph Schulte, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her ninth WestPac, her fourth South China Sea deployment and first Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her first deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Midway made a port of call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, mooring at Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point from 10 to 12 December 1973, departing for her forward deployed port of Yokosuka, Japan. Ports of calls include: Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D, VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VMCJ-1 Det. 101, EA-6ª; VAW-115, E-2B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. Her fourth deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her tenth deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her  23rd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (26 November to 22 December 1973)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

26/11/73 to 22/12/73

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

National Defense Service Medal

Vietnam

Jan 1961 to Aug 1974

9th WestPac

4th SCS

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXVII

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4