Thirteenth “WestPac” and first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment (Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw during the Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis (Iran History, Air Arm) and Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on the way home via Korea), operating with other Aircraft Carriers and upon completion conducted training operations and Carrier Qualifications (Iran History, Air Arm, Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis

(13 November 1979 to 30 June 1980)

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 1 – (13 to 30 November 1979)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 December 1979)

Part 3 – (1 to 31 January 1980)

Part 4 – (1 to 24 February 1980)

Part 5 – (25 February to 20 April 1980)

Part 6 – (21 to 24 April 1980)

Part 7 – (25 April to 30 June 1980)

 

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived on station with USS Midway (CV-41) in the Indian Ocean in response to a crisis situation

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrived on station with USS Midway (CV-41) in the Indian Ocean as flagship, Task Force SEVEN ZERO and Task Group SEVEN ZERO PT TWO (Battle Group Bravo), arriving on station on 3 December 1979, and with USS Midway (CV-41) and ships in company comprised Task Croup SEVEN ZERO PT ONE (Battle Group ALFA) provided the U.S. with A-6 Intruder and A-7 Corsair II attack aircraft and F-4 Phantom II and the modern F-14 Tomcat fighter aircraft, which could respond to a variety of situations if called upon during the Iranian hostage crisis. This was the first time since World War II that the U.S. Navy had two carrier task forces in the Indian Ocean in response to a crisis situation. Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty the same day” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk, 331A & 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 3 December and USS Wabash (AOR-5) and an Iranian P3F and Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered the ship on 4 December 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

The wife of the senior foreign officer being held hostage, Penelope Laingen, tied a yellow ribbon around a tree on the lawn of her Maryland home

 

      “In December 1979, the wife of the senior foreign officer being held hostage, Penelope Laingen, tied a yellow ribbon around a tree on the lawn of her Maryland home. Yellow ribbons sprouted all over the country, and the song "Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree" was revived with a new meaning that helped unite the country against Khomeini”  (Ref. 5 CNN Interactive).

 

Defense Visual Information Center

Bow view of USS Constellation (CV-64) underway, December 1979. US Navy photo (DVIC id: DNST8511032). NS026444.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026444.jpg

 

Two carrier task forces in combined operations in the Mediterranean Sea

 

   USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and USS Forrestal (CV-59) participated in MultiPlEx, an exercise incorporating two carrier task forces in combined operations in the Mediterranean Sea in December 1979. During the evolution the two carriers operated as adversaries and sent mock air strikes against each other, as well as hunted submarines USS Shark (SSN-591) and Italian NMM Gianfranco Gazzana Priaroggia (S-502). Nimitz’s screen comprised guided missile cruiser USS Texas (CGN-39), guided missile destroyer USS Semmes (DDG-18) and frigate Bowen (FF-1079). CAPT John R. Batzler praised the crews of the three ships as performing “in an outstanding manner”” (Ref. 372A).

 

Aircraft loss for CVW-8 suffering the loss of two pilots

 

     “A Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY, Iranian P3F, and Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 5 December and conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 6 December. Also on the same day Aircraft No. 505, an A-6A (BuNo 157011), LT (JG) Mark S. Gontkovic and LT(JG) Anthony J.R. Bilotti (VA-35) attached to CVW-8, crashed off Avgo Nisi, a small deserted Greek island north of Crete utilized as a bombing range on 6 December 1979. The third aircraft in a bombing run, 505 rolled in for its strike but suffered what appeared to be a “catastrophic wing failure,” possibly due to being struck accidentally by weapons released by the number two Intruder, impacting the water during its dive and killing both men” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “In early December 1979, a blue water turnover was conducted with USS Forrestal (CV-59) and USS Independence (CV-62) headed for Norfolk” (Ref. 1148B).

 

    “Aircraft No. 505, an A-6A (BuNo 157011), LT (JG) Mark S. Gontkovic and LT(JG) Anthony J.R. Bilotti (VA-35) attached to CVW-8, crashed off Avgo Nisi, a small deserted Greek island north of Crete utilized as a bombing range on 6 December 1979. The third aircraft in a bombing run, 505 rolled in for its strike but suffered what appeared to be a “catastrophic wing failure,” possibly due to being struck accidentally by weapons released by the number two Intruder, impacting the water during its dive and killing both men” (Ref. 372A).

 

 

A-7E Vought Corsair II Jet attack aircraft flying while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

 

Two A-7E Vought Corsair II Jet attack aircraft flying while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

 

Six A6-E/KA-6D Grumman Intruder Jet Attack Bombers flying while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

 

A6-E/KA-6D Grumman Intruder Jet Attack Bomber flying while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) pulled in for a port call at Athens, Greece on 8 December 1979” (Ref. 1206).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS San Jose (AFS-7) on 8 December and an Iranian P3F and a Omaai JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 9 December 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

Disposition of Energy Quest

 

   The Ship’s Sectary I don’t think liked me and not because I did something that may of upset him, but because the Captain of Coral Sea ordered the Operations Department to type all Senior Officer FITREP’s

 

   The Ship’s Sectary found Energy Quest books in the ship’s print shop and acquisitions began flying. The Ship’s Sectary was convinced that the Print Shop under the direction of the Ship’s Sectary printed my books.

 

    He ceased my books December 9, 1979, and I was charged with Miss Appropriation of Government Property, i.e. paper, typewriter ribbons and IBM II Mag Cards.

 

    Since the beginning of my research project, I had kept a Weekly Status Report on the research project listing hours involved, supplies and their cost. Of course he didn’t know anything about that or my mission.

 

   Everyone in my office of COMCARGRUP THREE, Rear Admiral L. M. Chambers knew of my project, to include the newly assigned XO, my previous Boss, Commander James T. Curtain, Operations Department Head, himself recently frocked to Captain.

 

   When the Ship’s Sectary confiscated my books I knew he would be at my office, so I immediately sent original Energy Quest manuscripts to news agencies and Senator Hatfield, an Oregon Senator, telling him the details.

 

   Sure enough, the Master-At-Arms impounded my original manuscript, 73 Scotch Brand MC/ST 536 Magnetic Cards and a letter from my Division Officer addressed to the Assistant Supply Officer regarding my desire to purchase the 73-Mag Cards, a cost of $87.36, November 16, 1979:

 

   “SN Henion has utilized $87.36 worth of Mag Cards in the preparation of a personal research project concerning the energy crisis in America. As he desires to retain these cards for his own use, request he be allowed to reimburse the government for the cost.”

 

   USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) turned over with USS Independence (CV-62) at sea from 8 to 9 December 1980 and departed the 7th Fleet AOR and returned to the Atlantic Fleet, steaming from the Indian Ocean through the Mazambique Channel to the bottom of South Africa, traveling around Cape of Good Hope through the South Atlantic” (Ref. 383B).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) and USS Passuipisic (TAO-107) and an Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 10 December 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) arrives Pusan, Korea

 

   USS Coral Sea (CV-43) pulled in for a port call at Pusan, Korea on 10 December 1979. The crew was given liberty while the ship was anchored in Pusan, Korea Harbor, and we went to shore aboard an Amphibious Landing Craft.

 

   Several months earlier, my Uncle, Loyd Henion, had visited Soul Korea on official business. As the Economic Financial Planner and Manager for the Oregon Department of Transportation, he was there to assist the Korean Transportation Department with their interstate highway development. We only spent a couple of days in Pusan, Korea.

 

 

Atlantic Ocean, 12 December 1979 Aerial view of the USS Independence (CV-62) battle group as it heads home from deployment in the Mediterranean Sea. The ships are, clockwise from top, USS Farragut (DDG-37), USS McCandless (FF-1084), Independence, USS Detroit (AOE-4), USS Garcia (FF-1040), USS Mahan (DDG-42), USS Caron (DD-970) and USS Peterson (DD-969). US Navy photo by PHC C. Pedrick (DVIC id: DNSC8200297). NS026235. Defense Visual Information Center.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026235.jpg

 

 

NS026234 83k An overhead view of the aircraft carrier USS Independence (CV-62) underway in the Atlantic Ocean as crewmen form the word "Indy" on the flight deck, 12 December 1979. The carrier was heading home from her 14th deployment in the Mediterranean Sea. US Navy photo by PHC C. Pedrick (DVIC id: DNSC8200286). NS026234 83k. NS026234 83k. Defense Visual Information Center. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026234.jpg

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departs Pusan, Korea

 

    “USS Coral (CV-43) departed Pusan. Korea on 12 December 1979, in port from 10 to 12 December 1979, fun filled port that was excellent for Christmas shopping. Shopping was different for some of the lesser traveled sailor because goods in Korea are bartered for, which is something many Americans rarely have a chance to do.

 

    Liberty is something that has been cherished by sailors since the Navy’s beginning, especially when out at sea for extended periods of time. Our rather extended sea period made Korea a more enjoyable port than usual and Subic Bay proved to be a very fast moving yet relaxing port itself. On the ship’s landing the merchants had a variety of goods displayed in open air shops. Prices were unbelievably low on leather products, brassware, hand carved wood items and beautiful hand sewn blankets and sweaters.

 

   The crew also had an opportunity to take several tours. One tour was a shopping tour. On this tour, we were taken to the actual factories who manufacture products for such big names as Adidas, Samsonite and Spalding. At these factories they had special rooms open for purchasing of their products below wholesale prices. Another tour took us around the City of Pusan, where we visited a Buddhist Monastery, hot springs, fish market and a United Nations 1ernorial Cemetery. The last, hut perhaps, the most interesting tour, was to the city of Kyongu, the splendid ancient capital of the Silla Dynasty.

 

    Coral Sea then set sail again, but this time, the ship sailed to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, the adopted overseas home of the Coral Sea” (Ref. The Voyager, U.S.S. CORAL SEA, January 1980, Vol. 8, No. 1– JOSA Doug Prent and SA Craig Erickson).

 

 

A6-E/KA-6D Grumman Intruder Jet Attack Bomber/Tanker refueling F-4N McDonnell-Douglas Phantom II Jet Fighter while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 12 December and a Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 13 December 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) made a port call at Athens, Greece from 8 to 13 December 1979” (Ref. 1206).

 

    “On 14 December 1979, USS Independence (CV-62) with CVW-6 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain Thomas Campbell ("Tom") Watson, Jr., USNA 1954, as Commanding Officer and Captain John F. Calhoun as Executive Officer, ending her 14th Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, on her first Indian Ocean deployment during the Iranian Crisis, steaming from the Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea, making her second Suez Canal transit, second Red Sea voyage steaming through the Bab el Mandeb by westerly and northerly courses from her second Gulf of Aden voyage en route from the Indian Ocean and upon departure from Norfolk, steamed through the Med, making her first Suez Canal transit, Red Sea, Bab el Mandeb and Gulf of Aden voyages en route to the Indian Ocean. In early December 1979, a blue water turnover was conducted with USS Forrestal (CV-59) and Independence headed for Norfolk. Ports of call included Naples the capital of Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy; Haifa, the largest city in northern Israel, and the third-largest city in the country; Palermo, a city in Insular Italy, the capital of both the autonomous region of Sicily and the Province of Palermo; Athens, the capital and largest city of Greece; Genoe or Genoa pron, the capital of Liguria and the sixth largest city in Italy; Toulon, a city in southern France and a large military harbor on the Mediterranean coast, with a major French naval base, located in the Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur region, Toulon is the capital of the Var department in the former province of Provence and Malaga, a city and a municipality, capital of the Province of Málaga, in the Autonomous Community of Andalusia, Spain. The Cruise and Ports of Call. Italy. Squadrons: VF-102, F-4J; VF-33, F-4J; VA-15, A-7E; VA-87, A-7E; VA-176, A-6E / KA-6D; VS-28, S-3A; VAQ-130, EA-6B; VFP-63 DET., RF-8G; VAW-124, E-2C and HS-5, SH-3H; reclassified to CV-62 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" 28 February 1973; made one Vietnam Combat cruise during the Vietnam Conflict/War and first deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, earning 1 battle star for service in Vietnam on her eighth deployment FWFD. Her 18th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission as a Forrestal Class Attack Aircraft Carrier at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard, New York, 10 January 1959 (28 June to 14 December 1979)” (Ref. 1-Independence, 72, 76, 325, 1148B & 1156A).

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv62-79/index_002.htm

 

Aircraft loss of CVW-8, suffering the loss of one pilot

 

    “Aircraft No. 612, an EA-6B (BuNo 158037) from VAQ-134) attached to CVW-8, experienced “fuel starvation” during an emergency divert to Palermo, Sicily. LT(JG) Robert W. Dark, the pilot, was killed during ejection on 16 December 1979” (Ref. 372A).

 

 

Crewmen inside the flight deck control center aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) use a table to simulate the arrangement of aircraft on the carrier's flight deck, December 15, 1979. US Navy photo by PHC Ken George (DVIC id: DN-SN-85-06358). NS026379 89k. Defense Visual Information Center http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026379.jpg

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5); a

Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk on 15 December and a Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered the ship on 16 December 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) crossed the equator

 

   “On 18 December 1980, the “renewed presence of pollywogs” on board USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) forced her shellbacks to perform another cleansing ceremony as the ship crossed the equator” (Ref. 383B).

 

 

A6-E/KA-6D Grumman Intruder Jet Attack Bomber/Tanker flying while USS Coral Sea (CV-43) was on her 13th “WestPac”

 

     “A Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 17 December and Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 18 December 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

CNO visits USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69)

 

   “On 19 December 1980, ADM Thomas B. Hayward, Chief of Naval Operations, visited USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69)” (Ref. 383B).

 

Disposition of Energy Quest

 

    By December 19, 1979 the Supply Department accepted $87.36 with an additional $104.52 owed for supplies utilized, totaling $191.88.

 

   The Legal Department dragged their feet for a month. Not having any witnesses or proof of where the books were printed stumped them. I never told the Legal Department or Ship’s Sectary where the book was printed and with no proof or witnesses as to the physical location where the book was Xeroxed, the Legal Department’s case sponsored by the Ship’s Sectary was week to say the least.

 

   The XO, the Senior Chaplin, Personnel in the Operations Department and Carrier Group Three knew of Energy Quest, but would not speak out. I merely had to wait until the XO could see me at Executive Officers Inquiry.

 

Coral Sea arrives Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines

 

   USS Coral Sea (CV-43) pulled in for a port call at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 20 December 1979. Subic Bay is important, this is where Coral Sea has her major supply replenishment; and any maintenance that’s needed is taken care of here also. So besides the after hours fun and relaxing there were plenty of busy days also(Ref. The Voyager, U.S.S. CORAL SEA, January 1980, Vol. 8, No. 1– JOSA Doug Prent and SA Craig Erickson).

 

     “A Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 20 December 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

New Carrier Air Wing Fourteen CO arrives aboard USS Coral Sea (CV-43)

 

     “Carrier Air Wing Fourteen, Captain David N. Rogers. As a Commander, Captain Rogers took charge of Air Wing 14 aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 10 July 1978. He was promoted to his present rank on the bridge of USS Coral Sea (CV-43) on 1 July 1979. He has flown forty different types of military aircraft and has made over 900 landings on 14 different carriers.

 

    Captain Rogers was relieved by Commander Vincent J. Huth on 21 December 1979.

 

    CDR Huth is from the staff of Carrier Group Seven.

 

    Air Wing 14 is presently composed of six squadrons and two detachments. VQ 1, an electronic surveillance squadron with several EA3 Skywarriors, will join the air wing out of Guam VMF 323 and VMFA-531 are based at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station near Santa Ana, Calif. Both are fighter attack squadrons and each has 12 F-4N Phantoms on board. The Phantom is 58 feet 3 inches in length and files faster than twice the speed of sound (Mach 2.0+). The F4 is a supersonic, long range, all weather fighters and is designed for intercepting enemy aircraft flying at high altitudes. Sidewinder and Sparrow missiles are its principal armaments(Ref. The Voyager, U.S.S. CORAL SEA, January 1980, Vol. 8, No. 1 – JOSA Doug Prent and SA Craig Erickson).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) anchored off Naples. Captain Batzler noted that “the worst weather we have ever seen” greeted the ship, with heavy seas and winds gusting to 75 knots that threatened to prohibit the ship from entering port and crewmembers from going home for holiday leave on 21 December 1979. As the storm passed, her crew flew successive trips to the airport to enable men to catch their Christmas Charter Flight. During this period, however, Iran’s pro-Western government collapsed, forcing the Shah into exile in the United States. Tensions among opposing groups produced a state of near-anarchy within the troubled land. One of the more radical groups, “Students Following the Imam’s Line,” blamed America for the discord, and sought to mobilize support for their policies by seizing the United States Embassy in Teheran on 4 November 1979. Receiving tacit approval from the Ayatollah R. Khomeini, the extremists continued to hold 52 hostages. America was outraged by the act, the government responding by ordering naval forces to the region. No sooner did crewmembers on leave begin going home then the Navy ordered Nimitz to relieve USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) in the Indian Ocean. The ship used much of her “standdown period” for taking on supplies and preparing for operations in that region” (Ref. 372A).

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) anchored off Naples

 

   USS Nimitz (CVN-68) anchored off Naples. Captain Batzler noted that “the worst weather we have ever seen” greeted the ship, with heavy seas and winds gusting to 75 knots that threatened to prohibit the ship from entering port and crewmembers from going home for holiday leave on 21 December 1979.

 

   As the storm passed, her crew flew successive trips to the airport to enable men to catch their Christmas Charter Flight. During this period, however, Iran’s pro-Western government collapsed, forcing the Shah into exile in the United States.

 

    Tensions among opposing groups produced a state of near-anarchy within the troubled land. One of the more radical groups, “Students Following the Imam’s Line,” blamed America for the discord, and sought to mobilize support for their policies by seizing the United States Embassy in Teheran on 4 November 1979.

 

    Receiving tacit approval from the Ayatollah R. Khomeini, the extremists continued to hold 52 hostages. America was outraged by the act, the government responding by ordering naval forces to the region. No sooner did crewmembers on leave begin going home then the Navy ordered Nimitz to relieve USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) in the Indian Ocean. The ship used much of her “standdown period” for taking on supplies and preparing for operations in that region” (Ref. 372A).

 

Jimmy Carter calls for sanctions against Iran to force the release of American hostages

 

      “Jimmy Carter calls for sanctions against Iran to force the release of American hostages and reads from Longfellow's poem I heard the bells on Christmas day December 21, 1979” (Ref. 12).

 

DOD announced a three-ship nuclear-powered carrier battle group from the Sixth Fleet would deploy to the Indian Ocean

 

   “On 21 December 1979, the Defense Department announced a three-ship nuclear-powered carrier battle group from the Sixth Fleet consisting of the nuclear-powered USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and her nuclear-powered escort ships. Nimitz would deploy to the Indian Ocean to relieve the Seventh Fleet carrier battle group led by USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63)” (Ref. Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk & 72).

 

 

USS John King (DDG 3)

http://www.destroyersonline.com/usndd/ddg3

 

 

Defense Visual Information Center - Oblique port bow view of (front to back) the aircraft carrier USS Constellation (CV-64), a Mars-class combat stores ship and the guided missile cruiser USS Leahy (CG-16) underway, December 1979. US Navy photo (DVIC id: DNST8511030). NS026443. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026443.jpg

 

 

The combat stores ship USS Niagara Falls (AFS-3), alongside the aircraft carrier USS Constellation (CV-64) and the guided missile cruiser USS Leahy (CG-16), underway in the South China Sea whilst part of Carrier Task Force 77.7. (This picture seems to have been taken at the same time as photo NS026443, above). NS026460 106k. Robert Hurst.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026460.jpg

 

New CO of USS Coral Sea (CV-43) arrives

 

   On 22 December 1979, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, Captain Richard M. Dunleavy, USN relieved Captain Stanley R. Arthur USN as USS Coral Sea (CV-43) CO to become the first Naval Flight Officer in history to command an aircraft carrier. Captain Arthur was assigned duty with Commander in Chief of the U.S. Pacific Fleet in Hawaii. Commander J. M. Curtain, USN, Ops Boss, became XO before we departed on “WestPac.” I remember Commander Curtain being frocked to Captain, but chose not to wear the eagle until it was official.  Shortly after the new Captain became accustomed to the ship, Captain Dunleavy began his berthing compartment inspections of the ship.

 

     “Captain Richard Michael Dunleavy assumed command of USS Coral Sea (CV-43), on 22 December 1979, relieving Captain Stanley Roger Arthur, 30th Commanding Officer, serving from 3 June 1978 to 22 December 1979 at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines” (Ref. 35A). 

 

    “Top of the day folks I have received the best Christmas gift ever; a fantastic crew and a super ship, USS CORAL SEA. Sure hope Christians was equally as good to each of you. The New Year, and the new decade, finds CORAL SEA super busy, which helps time fly. The i3attle group, for which CORAL SEA is an important part, is constantly engaged in training exercises, including daily flight operations for our Air Wing, underway replenishment of fuel and provisions, general quarters drill’s, and other related exercises vital to our mission. Sometimes we’ll even show our great Flag, the Stars and Stripes in some exotic ports. These are just some of the activities which keep our life at sea interesting and busy for ah hands. But one of the most important events in the daily routine is “Mail Call”. Getting the word from home is a mighty big morale boost, so please keep those letters corning. While we’re away 1 also encourage the wives of CORAL SEAMAN to join one of our wives clubs. In this way you get to meet new people and make many new friends, which helps your time to also fly. For the CORAL SEA families living away from the bay area and cannot attend the many club activities, it is still important to be in contact with the Coral Sea Ombudsman, Mrs. Janice Brown. She is our representative stateside and is always ready arid willing to assist CORAL SEA families. Give her a call if you have a moment, she would like to hear from you. Our cruise is off to a fast start, our schedule is busy and I’m really looking forward to a superb cruise with an outstanding group of young men, which are CORAL SEA” (Ref. The Voyager, U.S.S. CORAL SEA, January 1980, Vol. 8, No. 1 – JOSA Doug Prent and SA Craig Erickson).

 

Sincerely, R.  M. Dunleavy, Captain USN, Commanding Officer

 

New CO of USS Coral Sea (CV-43) inspects OS & OP Berthing Compartments

 

    As the Operation Department Yeoman it was my job to escort the Captain through Operations Departments Divisions compartments of 250 personnel.

 

   The Master-At-Arms walked behind the Captain, I in front leading the way with a clipboard in case of any discrepancies that the Captain may have found.

 

   Captain J. W. Taylor (Operations Department Head) followed the Master-At-Arms, while the OX, OS, OP and Intel Division Officers accompanied the CO to berthing compartments directly forward of the Master-At-Arms Shack on the Hangar Bay under Combat Information Center next to the Deck Department on one side and the Operations Department on the other side.

 

   I bunked in the Operations Specialist berthing compartment (OX Division had no berthing compartment consisting of three enlisted personnel).

 

    The Photographer Mates berthing compartment consisted of around 12 to 16-bunks in a compartment separate from the Operation Specialist berthing compartment.

 

   While walking up to the Photographer Mates berthing compartment I turned to go into the compartment, when I immediately did an about face, stepped into the passage way and slammed into the Captain, and I mean slammed.

 

    I immediately bent my head side ways and told the Master at Arms to enter the compartment. A few seconds later I apologized for slamming into the Captain and told him there was a Photographer Mates Third Class Petty Officer master bating spread eagle on the floor with his photo album open, totally naked.

 

   The Captain walked on by and I think he was happy he didn’t have to witness this Petty Officer jerking off; anyway it wasn’t a Captain’s Mast offense. Later on in the up coming cruise something would happen that would result in this Petty Officer’s transfer to an Air Squadron, cross decking with another Photographer Mate Third Class Petty Officer.

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 22 December and a Omani JAGUAR reconnaissance reconnoitered the ship the same day on 23 December 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

 

USS Henery B. Wilson (DDG 7)

http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/01007.htm

 

 

USS Reeves (CG-24)

http://www.navybuddies.com/cg/cg24.htm

 

A massive Soviet airlift of 5,000 Russian airborne troops and equipment into the Afghanistan capital of Kabul was conducted

 

    “On Christmas Eve, 24 December 1979, a massive Soviet airlift of 5,000 Russian airborne troops and equipment into the Afghanistan capital of Kabul was conducted. The U.S. protested the large influx of Soviet troops which the Soviet Union claimed were there at the request of the Afghanistan government” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk & 72).

 

     “The 6th Fleet carrier battle group consisted of the nuclear-powered USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and her nuclear-powered escort ships. However, on Christmas Eve on 24 December 1979, a massive Soviet airlift of 5,000 Russian airborne troops and equipment into the Afghanistan capital of Kabul was conducted. The U.S. protested the large influx of Soviet troops which the Soviet Union claimed were there at the request of the Afghanistan government” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk & 72)

 

     “A Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 24 December and the crew celebrated Christmas Day, December 25, 1979 in the northern Arabian Sea as flagship, Task Force SEVEN ZERO and Task Group SEVEN ZERO PT TWO (Battle Group Bravo) joining up with USS Midway (CV-41) and ships in company comprised Task Croup SEVEN ZERO PT ONE (Battle Group ALFA) on 3 December 1979. Continuous Soviet and other foreign surface surveillance; frequent Soviet and other foreign air surveillance” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 26 December and USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 27 December 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “On 27 December 1979, a Soviet-backed coup installed a new president in Afghanistan. Two carrier task forces centering around USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Midway (CV-41) continued contingency operations in the Northern Arabian Sea. A Soviet Navy IL-38 MAY reconnaissance reconnoitered Kitty Hawk the same day” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

Soviet-backed coup installed a new president in Afghanistan

 

     “On 27 December 1979, a Soviet-backed coup installed a new president in Afghanistan” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk).

 

 

USS Reeves (CG-24)

http://www.navybuddies.com/cg/cg24.htm

 

 

 

USS Krivak (FFG 693)

 

Two carrier task forces ordered to the northern Arabian Sea

 

   Two carrier task forces centering around USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Midway (CV-41) conducted contingency operations in the northern Arabian Sea commencing on  27 December 1979” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk).

 

     “On 29 December 1979, a VA-52 KA-6E 521 and its crew of CDR Walter D. Williams and LCDR Bruce L. Miller were lost at sea when the KA6E was launched off the ships forward port catapult number 2” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Navasota (TAO-106) on 30 December 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “From 3 December 1979 until the end of the year USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN stood ready to carry out U.S. policy in the Northern Arabian Sea vis-a-vis Iran. Throughout this period, the ship and air wing were under the constant surveillance of Soviet Navy units. Kitty Hawk, air wing aircraft also intercepted and escorted frequent Soviet, Iranian and Omani aircraft reconnoitering the Battle Group. The year ended with the American hostages remaining captive and the Kitty Hawk Battle Group on station. 140 shots had been fired and no bombs dropped in combat. No one knew what the New Year would bring, but every one knew the New Year would bring, but everyone knew the best aircraft carrier was on the scene ready to do whatever was necessary. Kitty Hawk’s Marine Detachment gave a total of 4,620.00 during the annual Combined Federal Campaign, an average of 75.00 per Marine a year” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

Thirteenth “WestPac” and first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea deployment (Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw during the Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis (Iran History, Air Arm) and Cheju-Do Islands in the Sea of Japan on the way home via Korea), operating with other Aircraft Carriers and upon completion conducted training operations and Carrier Qualifications (Iran History, Air Arm, Iranian revolution & Iran hostage crisis

(13 November 1979 to 30 June 1980)

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 1 – (13 to 30 November 1979)

Part 2 – (1 to 31 December 1979)

Part 3 – (1 to 31 January 1980)

Part 4 – (1 to 24 February 1980)

Part 5 – (25 February to 20 April 1980)

Part 6 – (21 to 24 April 1980)

Part 7 – (25 April to 30 June 1980)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXIV

Part 2 – (1 to 31 December 1979)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4