CHAPTER XXXI

U.S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA CORAL SEA

EXTENDED SELECTED RESTRICTED AVAILABILTY (ERSA) at

NAVAL SHIPYARD, LONG BEACH, CA. SEA TRIALS AND TRAINING

Iran History & Air Arm

(1 January to 31 December 1976)

Part 1 – (1 January to 3 July 1976)

Part 2 – (4 July to 3 November 1976)

Part 3 – (4 November to 31 December 1976)

 

 

 

A series of photos of USS Coral Sea (CV-43) taken while in port in San Francisco on Bicentennial Day, 4 July 1976. NS024376 119k. John Skill. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376.jpg

 

 

NS024376a 124k. A-7E Corsair II, VA-94 "Shrikes." Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 15.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376a.jpg

 

 

NS024376b 111k. F-4J Phantom II, VF-191 "Satan's Kittens." Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 15.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376b.jpg

 

 

NS024376c 158k. Skyline. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376c.jpg

 

 

NS024376d 153k. Flight deck, island. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376d.jpg

 

 

NS024376e 159k. Partial view of island, from elevator. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376e.jpg

 

 

NS024376f 177k. Island. F-4J Phantom II, VF-194 "Red Lightnings," Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 15.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376f.jpg

 


NS024376g 147k. RF-8G Crusader, VFP-63 "Eyes of the Fleet." Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 15.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376g.jpg

 

 

A-7E Corsair II, VA-22 "Fighting Redcocks." Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 15. NS024376h 149k. NS024376h 149k. John Skillman.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376h.jpg

 

 

NS024376i 159k. E-2B Hawkeye, VAW-114 "Hormel Hogs." Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 15.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376i.jpg

 

 

NS024376j 169k. F-4J Phantom II, VF-194 "Red Lightnings." Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 15.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376j.jpg

 

 

NS024376k 151k, A-6E Intruder, VA-95 "Green Lizards." Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 15.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376k.jpg

 

 

NS024376l 166k. Island. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376l.jpg

 

 

NS024376m 172k. Island. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376m.jpg

 

 

NS024376n 138k.USS Coral Sea (CV-43). San Francisco, 4 July 1976.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376n.jpg

 

 

NS024376o 152k. USS Coral Sea (CV-43). San Francisco, 4 July 1976.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024376o.jpg

 

    “On 4 July 1976, USS Constellation (CV-64) celebrated America's Bicentennial by hosting a nationally-telecast TV special from her flight deck. The special featured many major celebrities and guests” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

    USS Constellation (CV-64) continued workups after the 4th of July 1976, when problems were uncovered” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

     The USS Coral Sea (CV-43) would one day cross deck with the USS Constellation (CV-64) in the Indian Ocean.

 

     “During the Bicentennial Fourth of July weekend, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) hosted more than 275,000 people for the open house festivities at the San Francisco pier from the 3, 4 and 5 July 1976.  During that weekend, the Pipes and Drums of the Coral Sea, the only official bagpipe band in the U. S. Navy, performed to cheering crowds” (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure & 1275W4).

 

    “Bi-Monthly NAVSEA COH Progress Briefing for USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was attended by RADM R. L. WALTERS, Deputy Commander Naval Sea Systems Command on 7 July 1976” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “In 1976, USS Ranger (CV-61) suffered a serious fire (class delta, aircraft flare) in the O3 level while in port at Subic Bay, Philippines, no fatalities. Information by Alan Bedard, former Ranger crewmember who helped fighting the fire” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 22 June to 9 July 1976” (Ref. 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked departs on her 12th South China Sea Cruise, forward deployed at Yokosuka, Japan

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 9 July 1976, with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer, on her 16th WestPac, her 12th South China Sea deployment and ninth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her ninth deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 12th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 18th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 31st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(9 July to 4 August 1976)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /    KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VMAQ-2 Det.

Playboys - Marines Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King –       Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

 

 

    “On 12 July 1976, USS Ranger (CV-61) and her escort ships entered the Indian Ocean and were assigned to operate off the coast of Kenya in response to a threat of military action in Kenya by Ugandan forces” (Ref. 1-Ranger & 72).

 

    “While operating in the Indian Ocean, responding to the Entebbe/Uganda incident July/August 1976, USS Ranger (CV-61) suffered a class Bravo fire in one of her shaft allies that disabled her port outboard shaft for 4 days until replacement parts could be flown in and installed. Sabotage was suspected.  Information by Alan Bedard, former Ranger crewmember” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) new CO: Captain Joseph F. Frick, USNA arrived on 18 July 1976” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) with CVW-14 embarked departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 30 July 1976, with Captain Carol C. Smith, Jr. as the Commanding Officer, serving in the dual role as Task Group Commander and the ship’s skipper, on her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, conducting numerous AAW, strike and ASW exercises en route Hawaiian waters, culminating in CompTuEx 1-7T, an exercise in the Hawaii area involving air intercepts, ASW, marine carrier landings and a BPDMS firing, a 4,000-mile transit to southern Australian waters for Kangaroo II, MultiPlEx 1-77 and MissilEx 1-77, ReadiEx 1-77 exercise area in the Philippine Sea and steaming to the Indian Ocean on her 5th deployment and sixth voyage since her commission, operating off the east African coast in response to public derogatory remarks against the U.S. by the President of Uganda and his order that all Americans in Uganda meet with him, on 27 February 1977, participating in Operation Exercise Merlion III, on her seventh Indian Ocean voyage, followed by Operation Houdini, aimed at evading the close surveillance of Kynda class No. 822. She will under go her 15th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission November 25, 1961, with Captain V. P. de Poix in command” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 84A, 329B-1976/1977 & 362C).

 

    “Mission and Function of Command. The mission of Enterprise as delineated in NWIP 11-20(B), is "to support and operate aircraft, to engage in attacks on targets afloat and ashore which- threaten our control of the sea, and to engage in sustained operations i n support of other forces". Delineated tasks are:

 

1. To operate offensively by means of embarked aircraft, capable of delivering nuclear and non-nuclear weapons, against targets afloat and ashore which threaten our control of the sea.

2. To operate offensively by means of embarked aircraft, capable of delivering nuclear and non-nuclear weapons, against targets afloat and ashore in support of other forces.

3. To defend against airborne, surface and sub-surface attack by means of embarked aircraft as part of a coordinated defense systems.

4. To control aircraft.

5. To defend against airborne attack by means of ship's armament as part of a coordinated air defense system.

6. To provide command facilities and accommodations for a task force cornmander and staff” (Ref. 329B-1976).

 

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet

Conducting numerous AAW, strike and ASW exercises en route Hawaiian waters, culminating in CompTuEx 1-7T, an exercise in the Hawaii area involving air intercepts, ASW, marine carrier landings and a BPDMS firing, a 4,000-mile transit to southern Australian waters for Kangaroo II, MultiPlEx 1-77 and MissilEx 1-77, ReadiEx 1-77 exercise area in the Philippine Sea and steaming to the Indian Ocean operating off the east African coast in response to public derogatory remarks against the U.S. by the President of Uganda and his order that all Americans in Uganda meet with him, on 27 February 1977, participating in Operation Exercise Merlion III and Operation Houdini.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-1

Wolf Pack -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NK100

F-14A

VF-2

Bounty Hunters -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NK200

F-14A

VA-97

Warhawks -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NK300

A-7E

VA-27

Royal Maces -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NK400

A-7E

VA-196

Main Battery -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NK500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-113

Black Eagles -

Carrier Airborne Early

Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

600

E-2B

RVAH-1

Tigers - Reconnaissance

Attack Squadron

North American -

Jet Attack Fighter Reconnaissance

610

RA-5C

VAQ-134

Garudas -

Tactical Electronics

Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-29

Dragon Fires - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

HS-2

Golden Falcons - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

720

SH-3D

VQ-1 DET.

World Watchers -

Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Special electronic installation

(PR) 004, 005

EA-3B

F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

    “USS Long Beach (CGN-9) and USS Truxtun (CGN-35) joined USS Enterprise (CVN-65) as part of her task force” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “In July 1976, the community was introduced to a miniature USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). The model of the carrier Kitty Hawk is 18 feet long and weighs 600 pounds. Able to travel in the water when using an outboard motor the model was used in Port Orchards Dinghy Derby during that community's Fathoms of Fun celebration. Later the mini- Kitty Hawk became a float loaded on a trailer for use in Seattle’s Seafair Parade. Accompanying the model was the ship's ten-foot wooden Kitty Hawk” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “On 4 August 1976, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) crewmembers contributed over $12,000.00 to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Navy Relief Fund drive. This was the largest amount ever received from a ship at Bremerton. One-hundred percent of Kitty Hawk’s personnel contributed to the drive” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked arrived from her 12th South China Sea Cruise, forward deployed at Yokosuka, Japan

 

    “On 4 August 1976, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer, ending her 16th WestPac, her 12th South China Sea deployment and ninth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her ninth deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 12th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 18th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 31st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (9 July to 4 August 1976)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

09/07/76 to 04/08/76

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

16th WestPac       12th SCS

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The SSDR is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.

 

When a ship's crew qualifies for the SSDR, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.

 

When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the SSDR, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar/office spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) commencing on 4 August 1976” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) hosted high-ranking visitors during this period, including Rear Admiral J.W. Moreau, Commandant, 14th Coast Guard District, and Major General W.A. Boyson, U.S.A., Tripler Army Hospital, the Army’s senior medical officer, who visited the ship on 7 August 1976” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Twenty-three officers participating in the Senior Officers Material Readiness Course visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 11 August 1976” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “Admiral Thomas B. Hayward relieved Admiral Weisner as CinCPac, in a ceremony held on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 12 August 1976, in the presence of the CNO and Com7thFlt” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “While steaming westward, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Ranger (CV-61) came under surveillance by “two separate waves” of Bears, five Tu-95s all told being intercepted by the ship’s Tomcats and Corsair IIs while in the vicinity of the task group” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “In 1976, USS Ranger (CV-61) suffered a serious fire (class delta, aircraft flare) in the O3 level while in port at Subic Bay, no fatalities.  Information by Alan Bedard, former Ranger crewmember who helped fighting the fire” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 4 August to 21 August 1976” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 21 August 1976, with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer, for operations off the coast of Korea, separated from Japan to the east by the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan (East Sea)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(21 August 1976)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs -Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -     Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /    KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye -Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VMAQ-2 Det.

Playboys - Marines Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder -     Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

 

 

    “Admiral J, L. Holloway, III, Chief of Naval Operations and RADM A. J. Monger, Commander Carrier Group ONE on 25 August 1976” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “Lake Washington was the next public display for the scaled down vessel as she appeared prior to the Seattle hydroplane racing competition. Eight thousand people on the average visited the Kitsap County Fair and Rodeo, held from 25 to 29 August1976. Many of these people viewed the mini- Kitty Hawk while they strolled through the fairgrounds. The Public Affairs Office personnel manned the display 12 hours a day i n order to answer questions” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “ComCarStrFor7thFlt’s InChopEx commenced with the arrival of Rear Admiral Harris, TF-77, on 31 August 1976. InChopEx challenged the USS Enterprise (CVN-65) task group with “numerous hostile” submarines, ships and aircraft belonging to Orange” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “While operating in the Indian Ocean, responding to the Entebbe/Uganda incident July/August 1976, USS Ranger (CV-61) suffered a class Bravo fire in one of her shaft allies that disabled her port outboard shaft for 4 days until replacement parts could be flown in and installed. Sabotage was suspected.  Information by Alan Bedard, former Ranger crewmember” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) transit differed from previous ones in that routine “open ocean” flight operations were conducted during periods when no divert fields were available. The composition of CVW-14 remained the same, with VQ-1 Det C arriving on board later, on 31 August 1976, and VS-38 to embark during 1977. She conducted numerous AAW, strike and ASW exercises en route Hawaiian waters, culminating in CompTuEx 1-7T, an exercise in the Hawaii area involving air intercepts, ASW, marine carrier landings and a Ballistic Point Defense Missile System (BPDMS) firing.

 

    Attack submarines Scamp (SSN-588) and Tautog (SSN-639) “contributed greatly” to evaluations of the SH-3D, S-3A and TSC as “an ASW team.” Japanese destroyers USS Akigumo (DD-120) and Aokumo (DD 119), supported by a Japanese maritime patrol squadron equipped with Lockheed P-2 Neptunes, joined Enterprise for the latter exercises” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Hancock (CVA-19), former, CVA-19, CV-19 & fourth Ticonderoga was sold for scrap by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) 1 September 1976; decommissioned a third time and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register (Navy List) on 31 January 1976” (Ref. 1-Hancock, 30 & 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrved Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) September 1976, with Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, as Commanding Officer, conducting operations off the coast of Korea, separated from Japan to the east by the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan (East Sea),  beginning on 21 August 1976. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4N; VF-151, F-4N; VA-93, A-7A; VA-56, A-7A; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G (21 August 1976)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) moored to Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines on 6 September 1976” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Captain M. A. Peelle, USN assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Constellation (CV-64), relieving Captain Lowell F. Eggert, USN, 13th Commanding Officer, serving from September 1974 to September 1976” (Ref. 406A).

 

     “A newly refurbished, USS Constellation (CV-64) departed Long Beach Naval Shipyard, Calif. and continued workup cycle with participation in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) multinational exercises held in and around the Hawaiian Islands” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked arrived from “WestPac”

 

    “On 7 September 1976, USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked arrived San Francisco Bay, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, with Captain John Lewis Nicholson, Jr., as Commanding Officer, ending her 13th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet, her first deployment in the Indian Ocean, her 12th South China Sea deployment, on her second Vietnam Peace Keeping Cruise and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. On 28 May 1976, while on deployment, helicopters crews from HS-4 aboard Ranger, detachments from HC-3 on USS Camden (AOE-2), USS Mars (AFS-1) and USS White Plains (AFS-4), and helicopters from NAS Cubi Point, Republic of the Philippines, assisted in Philippine disaster relief efforts in the flood ravaged areas of central Luzon. Over 1,900 people were evacuated; more than 370,000 pounds of relief supplies and 9,340 gallons of fuel were provided by Navy and Air Force helicopters. In 1976, Ranger suffered a serious fire (class delta, aircraft flare) in the O3 level while in port at Subic Bay, no fatalities.  Information by Alan Bedard, former Ranger crewmember who helped fighting the fire. On 12 July 1976, Ranger and her escort ships entered the Indian Ocean and were assigned to operate off the coast of Kenya in response to a threat of military action in Kenya by Ugandan forces. While operating in the Indian Ocean, responding to the Entebbe/Uganda incident July/August 1976, Ranger suffered a class Bravo fire in one of her shaft allies that disabled her port outboard shaft for 4 days until replacement parts could be flown in and installed. Sabotage was suspected. Information by Alan Bedard, former Ranger crewmember. Ranger was awarded the Humanitarian Service (25 May 1976 - 1 June 1976 (Typhoon Olga - Subic Bay, PI) and Sea Service Ribbon (August 1974 thru January 1993). Her 15th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 August 1957 (30 January 1976 to 7 September 1976)” (Ref. 1-Ranger, 72, 84A, 1094A, 1095 & 1096).

 

30/01/76 to 07/09/76

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

Humanitarian Service

25 May 1976 - 1 June 1976 (Typhoon Olga - Subic Bay, PI)

Vietnam War

2nd Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise

South East Asia

13th WestPac

12th SCS

Indian Ocean

15th FWFD

222-days

Sea Service Ribbon

August 1974 thru January 1993
(11 Awards)

Same

Ref. 1094

 

    “A newly refurbished, USS Constellation (CV-64) departed Long Beach Naval Shipyard, Calif. after a 26-day dry-docking in late 1976 and continued workup cycle with participation in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) multinational exercises held in and around the Hawaiian Islands” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) planned three week “sojourn” was cut short by Typhoon Iris, that forced the ship to anchor in the center of Subic Bay to prevent damage from 14 to 16 September 1976” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Captain Douglas Robert McCrimmon, USNA 1955 assumed command of USS Ranger (CVA-61) on 17 September 1976, relieving Captain John Lewis Nicholson, Jr., 17th Commanding Officer, serving from 22 November 1974 to 17 September 1976” (Ref. 1095 & 1096).

 

    “When the weather permitted it, after Typhoon Iris, a Filipino delegation, led by General Romeo C. Espino, Defense Chief of Staff, Major General Fidel V. Ramos, Chief of Constabulary, Brigadier General F. Afat, Commanding General, Army, Brigadier General S. Sarmiento, Commanding General, Air Force, and Commodore E. Ogbinar, Flag Officer in Command, Navy, toured USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 25 September 1976. Enterprise got underway from Leyte Pier, NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines later that day for her 4,000-mile transit to southern Australian waters for Kangaroo II” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Bi-Monthly NAVSEA COH Progress Briefing for USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was attended by RADM R. L. Walters, Deputy Commander Naval Sea Systems Command on 25 September 1976” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “Dry Dock Number Six at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), Bremerton, Washington was flooded and USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was floated out and the following day, moored to Pier Six on 26 September 1976” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “On 28 September 1976, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was undocked from Dry Dock Six and moved, by tugs, to Pier Six to complete her overhaul” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “Following twenty-five years of service, Oriskany (CV-34) former CVA-34 & CV, the 34th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by hull no. was decommissioned on 30 September 1976” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) relaxed cyclic air operations a week later for “Crossing the Line” and an afternoon firepower demonstration by New Zealand frigate Otago (F-111). She conducted refresher training and dissimilar ACM between CVW-14’s Tomcats and RAAF Mirage IIIs from 9 to 11 October 1976” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Kangaroo II began with a “bang” with the ship commencing 55 hours of continuous air strikes and defensive operations against the RAAF Williamtown target complex, on 12 October 1976. The Australians “enlivened” the 600-mile transit northward toward the Rock Hampton area with “continual harassment,” aircrews flying from USS Enterprise (CVN-65) responding with “equal vigor”” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “The 1976 Navy Birthday honoring the Navy's 201st birthday (13 October 1775) was celebrated at the Kitsap County Administration Building in Port Orchard and on board USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). At Port Orchard, people were treated to a pictorial display of the Navy - past and present. Available as handout was condensed information on the Navy's prior history. Crewmembers and guests were invited to partake of birthday cake and a holiday meal. A display table with reading material and posters was set up in the ship‘s Hangar Bay and later a slide show entitled "200 Years Before the Mast" was shown as a fitting conclusion to October 13, 1976” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “Emergencies punctuated the fast-paced training. A marine embarked in Okinawa suffered a concussion on the evening of 17 October 1976 and required immediate transfer to an Australian hospital. Coming about to within helicopter range, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) launched a helo that retrieved the patient and transported him ashore for urgent care” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “On 18 October 1976, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) contributed $31,114.00 to the 1977 Combined Federal Campaign, CDR Manus Farren, the ship's campaign general chairman, credited the tremendous effort and cooperation of both officers and enlisted personnel in exceeding the ship's goal. The original Kitty Hawk goal was $27,032.00. Records show that 65 percent of the ship's personnel participated in this successful drive. The Kitty Hawk Marine Detachment had 100 percent participation, as did Executive, OA, OC, OP, G, S-2 and S-6 Division. Additionally, Medical, Dental and

AIMD also reached the 100 percent mark” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “Captain Donald Linn Felt, USNA '53, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CV-41) on 20 October 1976, relieving Captain Lawrence Cleveland Chambers, USNA '52, 29th Commanding Officer, serving from March 26, 1975 - October 20, 1976” (Ref. 1178-G). 

 

    “On 22 October 1976, an HS-2 suffered engine failure on takeoff and made a forced landing approximately one mile from the ship. The crew made “numerous attempts” to get the helo airborne.  The crew was finally forced to deploy flotation gear, securing the engine. The ship had meanwhile lowered a motor whaleboat that retrieved the men and helped maneuver the helo alongside USS Enterprise (CVN-65), where it was raised by the ship’s crane. That afternoon (22 October 1976), a VA-27 Corsair II pilot spotted 15 Taiwanese fishermen stranded on a small island, where they had been for four days in the wake of their boat being holed by a coral reef. Enterprise launched a helo that rescued them and brought them out to the ship for medical examination, after which they were flown on to Australia” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “The final phase of Kangaroo II consisted of operations designed to support the task force as it reinforced an amphibious landing, concluding with a conference on board Australian carrier HMAS Melbourne on 25 October 1976” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “RADM W. R. Dowd, Jr., Commander Naval Supply Systems Command visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 25 October 1976” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “On 27 October 1976, the COMTHIRTEEN Talent Contest was held at Naval Support Activity, Seattle. USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) Barbershop Quartet, "The Ahbernaires" was awarded second place” (Ref. 311B-1976).

 

    “On 29 October 1976, hundreds of pleasure boats met USS Enterprise (CVN-65) at the mouth of the Derwent River, escorting her to her anchorage at Hobart, Tasmania (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 21 August to 1 November 1976” (Ref. 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked departs on her 13th South China Sea deployment, forward deployed at Yokosuka, Japan

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 1 November 1976, with Captain Donald Linn Felt, USNA '53, as Commanding Officer, on her 17th WestPac, her 13th South China Sea deployment and tenth Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, on her tenth deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 13th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 19th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 32nd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(1 November to 17 December 1976)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4N

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4N

VA-93

Blue Blazers -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7A

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7A

VA-115

Arabs - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6A / A-6B /    KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VMAQ-2 Det.

Playboys - Marines Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -       Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

 

 

CHAPTER XXXI

U.S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA CORAL SEA

EXTENDED SELECTED RESTRICTED AVAILABILTY (ERSA) at

NAVAL SHIPYARD, LONG BEACH, CA. SEA TRIALS AND TRAINING

Iran History & Air Arm

(1 January to 31 December 1976)

Part 1 – (1 January to 3 July 1976)

Part 2 – (4 July to 3 November 1976)

Part 3 – (4 November to 31 December 1976)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXI

Part 2 - (4 July to 3 November 1976)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4