CHAPTER XXXIII

U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (Indian Ocean operations keeping the peace in the Middle East during which time riots against the shah's regime took place in several Iranian cities, resulting in the Iranian revolution with control of Iran shifting to Ayatollah Khomeini; followed by the Shah of Iran’s admission into the U. S. (22 October 1979) for medical treatment which touched off a huge demonstration in Tehran demanding his extradition and on the morning of 4 November 1979, exactly one year before the United States Presidential election, a mob of around 3,000 students stormed the U.S. embassy gate in Tehran, overran the guards, and took the sixty-six people inside hostage, in the name of Ayatollah Khomeini) - $80,000,000 11 month overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Washington and sailed for Alameda, Ca. 8 February 1979, arriving the next day; underwent overhaul on 6 March 1978, during which the last of her 5-inch battery and all gun directors were removed, followed by Refresher Training and CarQuals with Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN (CVW-14) embarked, visits at North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, Ca.

Iran History & Air Arm

 (1 January 1978 to 12 November 1979)

Part 1 – (1 January to 14 May 1978)

Part 2 – (15 May to 31 November 1978)

Part 3 – (1 December 1978 to 8 March 1979)

Part 4 – (9 March to 25 October 1979)

Part 5 – (26 October to 12 November 1979)

 

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) and her escorts were ordered to the Gulf of Aden via the Indian Ocean in response to the conflict between North and South Yemen

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 9 March 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “On March 10, 1979, Jimmy Carter addresses the Egyptian parliament, with Anwar Sadat and a translator” (Ref. 12).

 

     “On March 12, 1979, Jimmy Carter addresses the Israeli Knesset with Menachem Begin and Shimon Peres. In English and Hebrew” (Ref. 12).

 

     “On March 13, 1979, Jimmy Carter declares that Menachem Begin and Anwar Sadat have come to full agreement on all the main ingredients for a peace treaty” (Ref. 12).

 

     “On March 13, 1979, Jimmy Carter gives a joint statement with Menachem Begin at the end of negotiations on an Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty” (Ref. 12).

 

     “On March 14, 1979, Jimmy Carter says that he is optimistic upon his return from the Middle East meetings with Menachim Begin and Answar Sadat” (Ref. 12).

 

     “During the midwatch, on 11 March 1979, AA John Scott, V-3 Division, fell overboard, being rescued by an HS-8 Sea King: LTs Robert J. Vernon and David A. Dahmen, AW2 Phil Guinn, and AW3 Ken Fletcher” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USCGC Rush (WHEC-723) on 12 March 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

 

Two crewmen move Mk-82 500-pound bombs past two parked A-6 Intruder attack aircraft during flight deck operations aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), 1979. US Navy photo by ENS A. Legare (DVIC id: DN-SN-85-11093). NS026378 98k. Richard Stiles.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026378.jpg

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returns to NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. after completing WEPTRAEX and COMPTUEX 3A-79 in the SOCAL OPERA

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with COMCARGRU SEVEN embarked (7 to 15 March 1979) returned to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 15 March 1979, conducting WEPTRAEX and COMPTUEX 3A-79, operating in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA from 7 to 15 March 1979, departing her home port on the 7th. COMCARGRU SEVEN embarked Kitty Hawk on 7 March 1979 and conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 9 March 1979.  During the midwatch, on 11 March 1979, AA John Scott, V-3 Division, fell overboard, being rescued by an HS-8 Sea King: LTs Robert J. Vernon and David A. Dahmen, AW2 Phil Guinn, and AW3 Ken Fletcher USCGC Rush (WHEC-723) on 12 March 1979 and USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 14 March 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 85 prospective doctors, nurses, and dentists from Navy Recruiting Area 7, Dallas, Texas and Bryan Co. of Los Angeles on 20 March 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 10 businessmen and wives from Oregon on 21 Mach and 15 officers and 22 enlisted Canadian Air Force on 22 March and 22 members of California Agriculture Aviation Association on 24 March 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Ranger (CVA-61) suffers a main engine turbine casualty requiring extensive repair

 

    “On 29 March 1979, USS Ranger (CVA-61) suffers a main engine turbine casualty requiring extensive repair while training in the Subic Bay operations area” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 70 physicians and nurses from Pollard, Oregon Navy Recruiting Area 8 on 31 March 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

Iran History

 

     “The republic ... On April 1 1979, after a landslide victory in a national referendum (in which only one choice was offered and the balloting was not secret), Khomeini declared an Islamic republic, subsequently invested with a new constitution reflecting his ideals of Islamic government. Fundamentalist measures followed, and revolutionary committees patrolled the streets enforcing Islamic codes of behaviour and dress. Efforts were made to suppress Western influence, and many of the Western-educated elite fled the country” (Ref. 22).

 

“On April 2, 1979, Jimmy Carter talks to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania residents about the meltdown of the nuclear reactor at Three Mile Island. Broadcast on ABC TV News” (Ref. 12).

 

     “On April 5, 1979, Jimmy Carter delivers an economic message on national energy policy his fourth news special” (Ref. 12).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 55 mentally gifted children from Imperial County School District on 3 April and 28 students and adults from Beale Elementary School on 4 April 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) collides with the Liberian tanker FORTUNE

 

    “Near the eastern approaches to the Straits of Malacca, USS Ranger (CV-61) collided with the Liberian tanker FORTUNE on 5 April 1979, suffering substantial damage but no injuries while the tanker is holed in the port side from the main deck to the waterline.  Following the collision Ranger 's CO was relieved by Capt. Roger E. Box, USN” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 20 February to 7 April 1979” (Ref. 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked departed for an Underway Period

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 7 April 1979, with Captain Thomas Francis Brown III, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 23rdWestPac, her 16th South China Sea, on her fourth Indian Ocean deployment and her 17th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 20th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 26th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 39th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(7 April to 18 June 1979)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4J

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4J

VA-93

Ravens - Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VMAQ-2 Det.

Playboys - Marines Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

 

 

USS Midway (CV-41) relieved USS Constellation (CV-64) as the Indian Ocean contingency carrier

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) relieved USS Constellation (CV-64) as the Indian Ocean contingency carrier on 16 April 1979. Midway and her escort ships continued a significant American naval presence in the oil-producing region of the Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

    “An F-4 suffers a complete hydraulic failure. The crew is ordered to do a controlled ejection 5 miles from the USS Midway (CV-41) operating in the Indian Ocean on 16 April 1979. After the ejection the plane turns towards the carrier but finally crashes one mile away. Both crewmembers of the F-4 are recovered safely” (Ref. 84A).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. for ORE in the SOCAL OPERA

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 16 March to 17 April 1979, departing with COMCARGRU ONE and COMDLSRON TIIIRTEEN embarked on 18 April 1979, for Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE), operating in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA. Senators Thurmond and Lanier visited the same day” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Sacramento (AOE-1) on 19 April and COMASWWINGPAC visited on 20 April 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

      “On April 30, 1979 at a Press conference, Jimmy Carter discusses Soviet dissidents, SALT, Jim Fellows, wage/price guidelines, oil decontrol windfall profits tax, housing starts, Israel, and Rhodesia” (Ref. 12).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Fanning (FF-1076) on 22 April and USS Sacramento (AOE-1) on 23 April 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returns to NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. after completing ORE in the SOCAL OPERA

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with COMCARGRU ONE and COMDLSRON THIRTEEN embarked (18 to 26 April 1979) returned to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 26 April 1979, conducting Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE), operating in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA from 18 to 26 April 1979. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Sacramento (AOE-1) on the 26th” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. for Dependant Day Cruise

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 27 April 1979, departing for a Dependant Day Cruise on 28 April 1979, operating in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA, Kitty Hawk returned the same day” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “C0MCARGRRU ONE arrived USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) to conduct a command inspection from 8 to 10 May 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) held COMCARCRU ONE Change of Command ceremony aboard on 11 May 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) with CVW-9 embarked arrived from “WestPac”

 

    “On 17 May 1979, USS Constellation (CV-64) (Connie) with CVW-9 embarked arrived Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, with Captain Paul F. McCarthy Jr., USN, as Commanding Officer, ending her 11th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the far east participating in RIMPAC 79, on her 9th South China Sea South deployment, her second Indian Ocean deployment and first Gulf of Aden deployment (at-sea period would last a record-setting 110 days), having been directed, along with her escort ships on 27 December 1978 to the vicinity of Singapore in response to the internal crisis in Iran and because of vital U.S. interests in the Arabian/Persian Gulf area, President Carter directed Constellation and her escort ships to remain on station in the South China Sea and not enter the Indian Ocean on 2 January 1979, being released from contingency operations in the South China Sea on 28 January, when the crisis in Iran abated when the Shah of Iran departed for exile on 16 January. Due to the uneasy situation in Iran all U.S. government dependents and nonessential American citizens were ordered to evacuate the country on 30 January. Constellation was originally scheduled to end her deployment in March but after participating in RIMPAC exercises, her deployment extended when she and her escorts were ordered to the Gulf of Aden via the Indian Ocean on 7 March 1979 in response to the conflict between North and South Yemen. The Gulf of Aden and the Arabian/Persian Gulf were considered vital waterways for the passage of petroleum products to the U.S. and her allies. USS Midway (CV-41) relieved Constellation as the Indian Ocean contingency carrier on 16 April 1979. Midway and her escort ships continued a significant American naval presence in the oil-producing region of the Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf (awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Expeditionary Medals). Ports of call include: Squadrons: VF-211, F-14; VF-24; F-14; VA-146, A-7E; VA-147, A-7E; VA-165, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-126, E-2C; VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VAQ-132, EA-6B; VS-37, S-3 A; HS-6, SH-3H and COD, US-3A; reclassified to CV-64 on 1 July 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises in Vietnam, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, received a Presidential Unit Citation from President Nixon in 1973. Her 13th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at New York Naval Shipyard on 27 October 1961, with Captain T.J. Walker in command (26 September 1978 to 17 May 1979)” (Ref. 1-Constellation, 72, 76 & 84A).

 

 26/09/78 to 17/05/79

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

Meritorious Unit Commendation (MU)

meritorious Unit Commendation

12/01/79 to 19/04/79 –

3rd Award

11th WestPac &  conflict between North and South Yemen

Navy Expeditionary Medal

http://www.gruntsmilitary.com/navexpmed.shtml

http://www.history.navy.mil/medals/nem.htm

12/03/79 to 19/04/79; Iran/Indian Ocean (06/12/78 to 06/06/79) –

2nd Award

One award per period (Iran)

same

Ref. - 406A

 

    “USS Constellation (CV-64) conducted a turnaround cycle upon return from her 11th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the far east, operating in the South China Sea, and Gulf of Aden via the Indian Ocean” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

    “Captain Roger Elden Box, USNA 1956 assumed command of USS Ranger (CVA-61) on 28 May 1979, relieving Captain Van Franklin Westfall (XO, acting CO), AOC 1957, 20th Commanding Officer, serving from 22 May 1979 to 28 May 1979” (Ref. 1095 & 1096).

 

    “On May 29, 1979 at a Press conference, Jimmy Carter talks about votes SALT II, nuclear weapons, the Near East, and Bert Lance” (Ref. 12).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with CVW-15 embarked departs on “WestPac”

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with CVW-15 embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California 30 May 1979, with Captain W. Lewis Chatham as Commanding Officer, on her 12th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, scheduled to participate in MultiPleEx 1-80 Fortress Gale, a large-scale amphibious exercise in the Okinawa area, on her third Indian Ocean and second Arabian Sea deployment, extending operations North Western Arabian Sea do to un for seen events in the Middle East. Reclassified a CV-3 “Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier” on 29 April 1973, inaugurated her new role as CV on 1 July 1975. She will undergo her 13th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 29 April 1961 at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, with Captain William F. Bringle in command and was the first of the Kitty Hawk class (the only other two being the USS Constellation (CVA-64) and USS America (CVA-66)” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk, 72, 331A & 331B-1979)..

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) with CVW-15 (NH) 

30 May 1979 to 25 February 1980

En route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Kitty Hawk conducted TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase I; TRANSITEX 8-79 II; MIDPAC operations and MISSILEX Barking Sands; followed by NSSMS shoot Barking Sands and SINEX of opportunity; TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase II: two ASW TACREAD’s; TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase III: ten ASW TSCWD’s and one ASLW TACREAD exorcises tested and developed Battle Croup AAW posture, enhanced ASW teamwork, and identified and rectified communications link shortcomings; FORTRESS WARRIOR; NOTNOEX, BEAVER SNARE, MINEX ALFA in the Bananga Bay; TORPEX in the Subic OPAREA; Beaver Snare in the South China Sea; READIEX LOADEX the South China Sea; air wing/refresher operations, extended range AAWEX’s associated with Exercise COPE THUNDER 79-8 in the South China Sea and Vietnamese refugee search and assistance operations; Exercise Fortress Cale; Exercise MISSILEX Poro Pt. in the South China Sea; Exercise BUZZARDEX 3-79 in the South China Sea on 20 August 1979 (Although the modified exercise provided the ship and air wing team’s first ASU training since the transit and included a well-executed anti-missile BUZZARDEX, no close air support training was accomplished during the exercise); Exercise Fortress Cale, a large-scale amphibious exercise in the Okinawa area for which the Kitty Hawk battle Group was tasked to provide air support; USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX K4-79; operations in the East South China Sea and Philippine Sea, en route to the Philippines; MMR-1 economizer fire; MISSILEX Poro Pt.; Exercise BUSY STORM, an ASW encounter which provided valuable free play and tactical planning opportunities; MISSILEX Poro Pt.; Exercise NEWBOY 79-4 while at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; operations in the South China Sea and Philippine Sea en route to Yokosuka; CONRECEX 80-1, demonstrating the teamwork of the ship, Fleet Intelligence Support Center Western Pacific, Cubi Point, Republic of Philippines, and Fleet Air - Photo Lab, Cubi Point, operating in the Philippine Sea from 3 to 7 October, commencing AWEX80-1 in the South China Sea; BUZZAROEX 4-79 and AWEX 80-1 in the South China Sea; operations in the Philippine Sea and East China Sea; Air Wing FIFTEEN provided area surveillance support to MISSILKEX 2-80, an exercise including live missile firing by surface combatants in the Philippine Sea en route to Pusan Korea; MULTIPLEX 1-80 (The Korean contingency operations did force the cancellation of MULTIPLEX 1-80, scheduled for 27 to 31 October 1979, after only ten hours of Blue-Orange interaction. Before cancellation, however, significant long range AAW training was accomplished), canceling her participation of MultiPleEx 1-80 barely 10 hours into the exercise, coming about and steamed to a position in the East China Sea off Cheju Do, southwest coast of the Korean in response to the assassination of South Korean President Park Chung Hee; CASEX (Okinawa) and USN/ROKIN MINEX “B”/EODEX K1-80; released from contingency station and commenced participation in a USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX KI-80; READIEX ALFA (Power Projection).

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-51

Screaming Eagles -          Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NL100

F-14A

VF-111

Sundowners -          Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NL200

F-14A

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks -                     Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NL300

A-7E

VA-94

Shrikes -                     Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NL400

A-7E

VA-52

Knightriders -                     Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NL500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-114

Hormel Hogs -           Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

VFP-63 Det. 1

Eyes of the Fleet -

Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

610

RF-8G

VAQ-135

Black Ravens Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

624-627

EA-6B

VS-21

Fighting Redtails - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed -Viking - Anti-Submarine & Utility

700

S-3A / US-3A

HS-8

Eightballers - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -Anti-submarine

720

SH-3H

VQ-1 Det.

World Watchers - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior -

Jet Attack Fighter

(PR) 001, 007

EA-3B

Air Wing FIFTEEN was equipped with what were then the Navy's newest aircraft: the F-14 Tomcat, S-3 Viking, the A-6E version of the Intruder and the E-2C version of the Hawkeye.

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 1 June 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “En route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase I from 30 May to 4 June 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 1 June 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “En route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase I from 30 May to 4 June 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “COMTHIRDFLT visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) en route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 4 to 5 June and conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 6 June 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “En route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted TRANSITEX 8-79 II, MIDPAC operations and MISSILEX Barking Sands from 5 and 8 June 1979. Kitty Hawk (CV-63) en route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 4 to 5 June and Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 6 June and Wabash (AOR-5) on 8 June 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “En route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted TORPEX Barster Range from 6 and 8 June 1979; followed by NSSMS shoot Barking Sands and SINEX of opportunity on the 8th” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) visits Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) pulled in for a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 9 June 1979, conducting TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase II: two ASW TACREAD’s from 30 May to 9 June 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 12 June 1979, import from 9 to 11 June 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 14 June 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “On 18 June 1979, Jimmy Carter and Leonid Brezhnev sign the SALT II treaty. Tom Brokaw comments on the treaty and General Harold Brown comments on the loss of US monitoring stations in Iran” (Ref. 12).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked arrived from an Underway Period

 

    “On 18 June 1979, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Thomas Francis Brown III, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending 23rdWestPac, her 16th South China Sea, on her fourth Indian Ocean deployment and her 17th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Midway relieved USS Constellation (CV-64) as the Indian Ocean contingency carrier on 16 April 1979. Midway and her escort ships continued a significant American naval presence in the oil-producing region of the Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf. An F-4 suffers a complete hydraulic failure. The crew is ordered to do a controlled ejection 5 miles from the Midway operating in the Indian Ocean on 16 April 1979. After the ejection the plane turns towards the carrier but finally crashes one mile away. Both crewmembers of the F-4 are recovered safely. Ports of calls include: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines and Diego Garcia, a tropical, footprint-shaped coral atoll located south of the equator in the central Indian Ocean. It is part of the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT). Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 20th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 26th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 39th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (7 April to 18 June 1979)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 84A & 1182A).

 

 07/04/79 to 18/06/79

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Navy and Marine Corps Expeditionary Service Medal

Iran, Yemen & Indian Ocean

15 Apr to 6 Jun 79*f

 

23rd WestPac

16th SCS

4th IO

Navy Unit Commendation

Indian Ocean

1 Jan 78 to 30 Jun 79

same

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

same

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces” (Ref. 1181D).

*f = Iran/Indian Ocean (06 DEC 78  ~  06 JUN 79)

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 19 June 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “On 20 June 1979, Lt. Donna L. Spruill became the first Navy woman pilot to carrier qualify in a fixed-wing aircraft. Lt. Spruill piloted a C-1A Trader to an arrested landing aboard USS Independence (CV-62)” (Ref. 1-Independence).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced overhaul at the

Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash

 

    “On 21 June 1979, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced overhaul at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash., sustains a two-hour Class Alpha fire in a catapult room, machine shop, and passageway” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72 & 76). 

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase III: ten ASW TSCWD’s and one ASLW TACREAD exorcises tested and developed Battle Croup AAW posture, enhanced ASW teamwork, and identified and rectified communications link shortcomings from 12 to 21 June 1979, in chopping COMSEVENFLT OPERA on the 21st. Commander Third Fleet considered this training exceptionally well executed.  On both 19 and 20 June 1979, immediately prior to in chopping to COMSEVENFLT, Kitty Hawk and embarked Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN detected and intercepted Soviet TU-95 Bear reconnaissance aircraft. This was the first of many overt reconnaissance events conducted by Soviet naval and air elements throughout the ship’s deployment” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “En route to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 23 June. VQ-1 Det. B flew aboard on 24 June 1979. Between 25 and 23 June 1979, Kitty Hawk and Air Wing team expended a CUF, package in the Guam operating area while en route to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) dropped CRAE Package and ran GARF range (Guam)

 

     “En route to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) dropped CRAE Package and ran GARF range (Guam) from 25 to 27 June 1979 and conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 27 June 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Independence (CV-62) with CVW-6 embarked departs for the Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean deployment

 

     “USS Independence (CV-62) with CVW-6 embarked departed Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia 28 June 1979, on her 15th Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the United States Sixth Fleet (6th Fleet), steaming through the North Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea, on her fifth Indian Ocean deployment during the Iranian Crisis. Prior to her deployment conducted carrier qualifications when on 20 June 1979, Lt. Donna L. Spruill became the first Navy woman pilot to carrier qualify in a fixed-wing aircraft (Lt. Spruill piloted a C-1A Trader to an arrested landing), while earlier she conducted training operations near Roosevelt Roads Area off Puerto Rico when a brief control room fire began resulting in thirty people suffering from minor smoke inhalation on 28 March 1979, putting to sea upon completion of Yard Period and Major Overhaul in 1978, upon return from her 14th Mediterranean Sea deployment. Reclassified to CV-62 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" on 28 February 1973; made one Vietnam Combat Cruise during the Vietnam Conflict/War and first deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, earning 1 battle star for service in Vietnam, returning from the South China Sea off the coast of Vietnam, via the straits of Malacca, Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea, making two Suez Canal transits, steaming from the Gulf of Aden, Red Sea, to and from the Mediterranean Sea on 10 May 1965; ending her third Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the Sixth Fleet in support of President John F. Kennedy's firm stand on Berlin during a reoccurrence of stress in a critical area, on her fourth deployment. Independence will steam through the Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet, making her 11th Suez Canal transit, 11th Red Sea and Gulf of Aden voyage en route to the Indian Ocean and then will return through the Gulf of Aden 12th voyage) and through the Bab el Mandeb by westerly and northerly courses and enter the Red Sea, on her 12th Red Sea voyage making her 12th Suez Canal transit to the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming through the Atlantic on her way home. She will under go her 18t Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission as a Forrestal Class Attack Aircraft Carrier at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard, New York, 10 January 1959” (Ref. 1-Independence, 72 & 325).

 

USS Independence (CV-62) with CVW-6

(28 June to 14 December 1979)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-102

Diamondbacks -            Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

AE100

F-4J

VF-33

Tarsiers -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

AE200

F-4J

VA-15

Valions -                       Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AE300

A-7E

VA-87

Golden Warriors -                       Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AE400

A-7E

VA-176

Thunderbolts -                       Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AE500

A-6E / KA-6D

VS-28

Hukkers - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

600

S-3A

VAQ-130

Zappers - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

700

EA-6B

VFP-63 Det.

Eyes of the Fleet -

Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

xxx

RF-8G

VAW-124

Bear Aces - Carrier Airborne Early Warning

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

xxx

E-2C

HS-15

Red Lions - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -Anti-submarine

xxx

SH-3H

 

 

     “CTF SEVEN Commander Task Force SEVEN SEVEN (Commander Carrier Group FIVE) and staff embarked USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 29 June 1979, conducting UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5), while en route to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines and FORTRESS WARRIOR on 29 June; with NOTNOEX following on the 30th” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

“On June 29, 1979 at a Press Conference in Tokyo, Jimmy Carter condemns the OPEC decision to raise oil prices” (Ref. 12).

 

     “En route to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted BEAVER SNARE on 1 July 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     En route to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) encountered Typhoon Ellis on 3 July 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was en route to the Philippines from 21 June to 4 July 1979, arriving Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on the 5th, delayed by Typhoon Ellis, evading the storm from 3 to 4 July 1979. The Marine Detachment provided color guard during Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron One Three Five Change of Command ceremony on 5 July 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

    “On July 15, 1979, Jimmy Carter made an energy address covering oil imports and alternative energy sources and conservation.  Jerry Brown and John Connally comment on Jimmy Carter's energy speech. Jerry Brown and John Connally comment on Jimmy Carter's energy speech. Brown and Connally argue about the necessity for nuclear power” (Ref. 12).

 

 “On July 16, 1979, Jimmy Carter made a speech on energy to the National Association of Counties in Kansas City. Broadcast on NBC and John Dancy discusses President Carter's Kansas City energy speech. With John Hart and Andrea Mitchell. Broadcast on NBC TV” (Ref. 12).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines on 17 July 1979, inport from 5 to 17 July 1979, for operations in the South China Sea, conducting UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) the day of departure” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “En route to Pattaya, Thailand, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) commenced Exercise COPE THUNDER 79-8 in the South China Sea on 17 July 1979” (Ref. ” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “En route to Pattaya, Thailand, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted MINEX ALFA in the Bananga Bay; TORPEX in the Subic OPAREA on 18 July and UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 19 July 1979” (Ref. ” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “En route to Pattaya, Thailand, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted Beaver Snare in the South China Sea on 20 July, UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 22 July and READIEX LOADEX and UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 26 July 1979 in the South China Sea” (Ref. ” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted Search and assistance operations for Vietnamese "boat people" from 24 to 28 July 1979

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted Search and assistance operations for Vietnamese "boat people" from 24 to 28 July 1979. This humanitarian search and assistance action was ordered by the Commander in Chief, President Jimmy Carter, for the express purpose of aiding Vietnamese refugee “boat people” who were escaping the tyranny and oppression of communism in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. There was a great deal of sympathy among the crew of the Kitty Hawk for the plight of these courageous people. As a result, a high state of vigilance was maintained and a total of 114 people were ultimately rescued through the efforts of the ship and air wing” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was underway in the South China Sea en route to Pattaya, Thailand, conducting operations that included air wing/refresher operations, extended range AAWEX’s associated with Exercise COPE THUNDER 79-8 in the South China Sea from 17 to 28 July 1979, and Vietnamese refugee search and assistance operations. The Marine Detachment provided color guard during Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Eight Change of Command ceremony on 28 July 19” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) visits Pattaya, Thailand

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) pulled in for a port call at Pattaya, Thailand, dropping anchor in the port on 29 July 1979, conducting refugee search and assistance operations in the South China Sea while en route from 17 to 29 July 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) raised anchor and departed Pattaya, Thailand on 1 August 1979, inport from 29 July to 1 August 1979. On the 29th, drug overdose death of ADAN Alfred Schuler occurred. Kitty Hawk will continue refugee search and assistance operations in the South China Sea while en route Hong Kong. Kitty Hawk hosted 65 Thai military personnel and family from 27 July to 1 August 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

Iran History, Air Arm and Iranian Revolution

 

     “The embargo the U. S. placed on Iran was to have a especially severe long-term effect on the Tomcat fleet, since the embargo prevented the delivery of any spares. In addition, by August of 1979, all 79 of the F-14A Tomcats had supposedly been sabotaged so that they could no longer fire their Phoenix missiles. According to various accounts, this was done either by departing Grumman technicians, by Iranian Air Force personnel friendly to the US shortly after the fall of the Shah, or even by Iranian revolutionaries in an attempt to prevent operations by an Air Force perceived to be too pro-Western” (Ref. 28).

 

     “President Carter’s administration hardly knew what to make of the ayatollah. Accustomed, like its predecessors, to thinking exclusively in terms of the Cold War, it was unable to adjust to a fundamentalist religious revolution that denounced the United States and the Soviet Union equally and therefore feared that Khomeini would allow a Soviet penetration of Iran, and eventually, the entire Middle East. That fear was heightened by the United States' surrender of sensitive listening posts along the Iranian border with the Soviet Union, used to monitor Soviet Missiles” (Ref. 4).

 

     “While in port Yokosuka, Japan, a fire caused by a broken acetylene line breaks out aboard USS Midway (CV-41), killing one worker and injuring 17 sailors on 9 August 1979” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 4 August 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted Correspondents: Alice Villadolid, N.Y. Tines Joe Cantrell, Time; Hike Baltye, Reuters; Peter Yu, NBC; Eddie Martinez, NBC; Young Sang, NBC; Katoumi Yokobori, Asaki and Shimbun (Bangkok) from 2 to 6 August 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 9 August 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

    “While in port Yokosuka, Japan, a fire caused by a broken acetylene line breaks out aboard USS Midway (CV-41), killing one worker and injuring 17 sailors on 9 August 1979” (Ref. 84A).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrives Hong Kong

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) pulled in for a port call at Hong Kong, dropping anchor in the port on 10 August 1979, conducting refugee search and assistance operations in the South China Sea while en route from 1 to 10 August 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs Hong Kong

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) raised anchor and departed Hong Kong on 10 August 1979, inport from 10 to 15 August 1979. American Consul General, Hong Kong visited on the 14th. The 14th ended with sadness with the loss of CWO2 Neil Peters as a result of cardiac arrest. Kitty Hawk hosted 25 Hong Kong businessmen and public officials from 10 to 15 August 1979 and commenced exercise Fortress Cale upon departure” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 16 August and Exercise MISSILEX Poro Pt. in the South China Sea on 17 August 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

    “A fire caused by a broken acetylene line breaks out aboard USS Midway (CV-41) killing one worker and injuring 17 sailors in port Yokosuka, Japan on 19 August 1979” (Ref. 84A).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 20 August 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted Exercise BUZZARDEX 3-79 in the South China Sea on 20 August 1979. Although the modified exercise provided the ship and air wing team’s first ASU training since the transit and included a well-executed anti-missile BUZZARDEX, no close air support training was accomplished during the exercise” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 18 June to 20 August 1979” (Ref. 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked departs for an Underway Period

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 20 August 1979, with Captain Thomas Francis Brown III, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, for an underway period and her 18th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 21st deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 27th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 40th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(20 August to 14 September 1979)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4J

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4J

VA-93

Ravens - Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VMAQ-2 Det.

Playboys - Marines Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

 

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) commenced Exercise Fortress Cale, a large-scale amphibious exercise in the Okinawa area for which the Kitty Hawk battle Group was tasked to provide air support commencing on 23 August. Admiral Davis (CINCPACFLT) and Vice Admiral Foley (COMSEVENTHFLT) were aboard to present the coveted NEY Award to USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 23 August 1979. This award was won for having the best food services among all aircraft carriers in the Pacific Fleet” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

Super Typhoon Judy

 

    “Super Typhoon Judy “disrupted” Fortress Gale, a large-scale amphibious exercise in the Okinawa area, forcing USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) to evade the storm beginning on 23 August 1979” (Ref. 331A).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 26 August and held CTG SEVEN SEVEN/COMCARGRU FIVE Change of Command ceremony aboard on 27 August 1979. Evasion of Super-Typhoon Judy disrupted the first half of exercise Fortress Cale, a large-scale amphibious exercise in the Okinawa area for which the Kitty Hawk battle Group was tasked to provide air support from 23 to 29 August 1979. The Marine Detachment provided color guard during Commander Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet Change of Command ceremony on 27 August. On 28 and 29 August 1979, Kitty Hawk and Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN participated in USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX K4-79 before commencing a five day Pusan, Korea import periods. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 29 August 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrives Pusan, Korea

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) pulled in for a port call at Pusan, Korea, dropping anchor on 30 August 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “On September 1, 1979, Jimmy Carter tells reporters that he has no information that anyone bugged Andrew Young's apartment, and denies impropriety in the Vesco case. Broadcast on CBS TV” (Ref. 12).

 

    “Captain Eddie Inman ("Hoagy") Carmichael, NAVCAD, assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Midway (CVA-41) on 7 September 1979, relieving Captain Thomas Francis Brown III, NAVCAD, 31st Commanding Officer, serving from February 27, 1978 - September 7, 1979” (Ref. 1178-G & 1182A).

 

     “En route to Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted MMR-1 economizer fire on 4 September and MISSILEX Poro Pt. on 8 September 1979; encountering a transiting Soviet task group led by a Sverdlov-class cruiser from 4 to 8 September 1979” (Ref. 331A).

 

 

     “Old Nick 203 (NL-203), an F-14A Tomcat Jet Fighter (BuNo 160672), LT Lloyd A. Vermillion, and LT(JG) Richard W. Cummings, VF-111 attached to CVW-15, launched at 1933, 8 September 1979 for a night carrier qualifications, while USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) steamed in the South China Sea. About 27 seconds into the flight, the “classic thump bang” and a series of flashes on the starboard side of the Tomcat indicated an engine fire. Unable to regain control, both men ejected, being recovered by a SAR helo” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1979).

 

    “While steaming toward Subic Bay, Philippines from 4 to 8 September 1979, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) encountered a transiting Soviet task group led by a Sverdlov-class cruiser” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) with CVW-8, Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet, Commander, Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet, Admiral Robert E. Kirksey, USN and Chief of Staff , Captain C. W. Streightiff and Captain J. S. Donnell; Commander, Battle Group Two, Rear Admiral James R. Sanderson, USN and Chief of Staff, Captain W. V. Garcia embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 10 September 1979, with Captain John R. Batzler, USN, as Commanding Officer and Captain Richard C. Macke, USN, as Executive Officer, on her third Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming through the Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea to play a key role in CrisEx-79, a joint naval amphibious exercise with the Spaniards that envisioned a scenario to repel invaders from gaining a foothold along the Spanish Mediterranean Sea coast; operating closely with Spanish destroyer SPS Mendez Nuńez (D-63), which she integrated into her screen, while the evolution involved more than two dozen ships and submarines and 35,000 troops; MultiPlEx, an exercise incorporating two carrier task forces in combined operations in the Mediterranean Sea, and then will steam from the Med to the Southern Atlantic via Cape of Good Hope operating under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, on her first Indian Ocean, sailing in the North Arabian Sea and into the Gulf of Oman to a staging area off the southeast Coast of Iran refreed to as “Gonzo Station,” operating with the 7th Fleet, to strengthen the U.S. Naval presence in the crucial Indian Ocean area as tensions heightened over Iran's taking of 52 American diplomats hostage, in what would turn out to be Operation Eagle Claw (Operation Rice Bowl and Operation Evening Light), the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran; reclassified CVN-68 on 30 June 1975. She will under go her fourth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at Norfolk, Va. on 3 May 1975, with Captain Bryan W. Compton, Jr., the ship’s first CO, assuming command of the Nimitz Precommissioning Unit on 12 July 1972” (Ref. 4, 72, 371, 372A & 1200).

 

Mediterranean and Indian Ocean Cruise Book 1979-80 – Ref. 1202

Command and Staff – Ref. 1203

Pre-Deployment – Ref. 1204

The Cruise and Ports of Call – Ref. 1205

Ports of call and GONZO Station – Ref. 1206

Cruise Map – Ref. 1207

Change of Command – Ref. 1207A

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) with CVW-8 (AJ)

(10 September 1979 to 26 May 1980)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-41

Black Aces -             Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

AJ100

F-14A

VF-84

Jolly Rogers -             Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -     Jet Fighter

AJ200

F-14A

VA-82

Marauders -                 Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AJ300

A-7E

VA-86

Sidewinders -                 Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AJ400

A-7E

VA-35

Black Panthers -                 Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AJ500

A-6E / KA-6D

VFP-63 Det. 5 (*1)

Eyes of the Fleet -           Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

600

RF-8G

VAQ-134

Garudas - Carrier

Tactical Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

610

EA-6B

VS-24

Scouts - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

HS-9

Sea Griffins -                   Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -Anti-submarine

730

SH-3H

VAW-112

Golden Hawks -              Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

010

E-2B

 (*1) VFP-63 disestablished on Jun.30, 1982

 

    “USS California (CGN-36), USS South Carolina (CGN-37), USS Texas (CGN-39) and USS Reeves (CG-24) joined USS Nimitz (CVN-68) as part of her task force with Carrier Air Wing 8 embarked” (Ref. 84A & 1200).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked arrived from an Underway Period

 

    “On 14 September 1979, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Eddie Inman ("Hoagy") Carmichael, NAVCAD, relieving Captain Thomas Francis Brown III, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending an underway period and her 18th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Ports of calls include: Hong Kong, situated on China's south coast and, enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 21st deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 27th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 41st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (30 September 1979 to 20 February 1980)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72, 84A, 1082A & 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard Brochure/March 1980-Vol 8; No. 2).

 

 20/08/79 to 14/09/79

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

WestPac

26-days

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) turned over with USS America (CV-66) occurred while en route to the Mediterranean Sea

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) turned over with USS America (CV-66) occurred while en route to the Mediterranean Sea on 15 September 1979. Both ships steamed slowly westward, several hundred miles west of the Iberian Peninsula, accomplishing a unique “Blue Water” procedure” (Ref. 372A).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) pulled in for a port call at Rota, Spain on 18 September 1979” (Ref. 1206).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) made a port call at Rota, Spain from 18 to 21 September 1979” (Ref. 1206).

 

USS Ranger (CVA-61) with CVW-2 embarked arrived from “WestPac”

 

    “USS Ranger (CVA-61) with CVW-2 embarked arrived San Francisco Bay, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 22 September 1979, with Captain Roger Elden Box, USNA 1956, as Commanding Officer, relieving Captain Van Franklin Westfall (XO, acting CO), AOC 1957, 20th Commanding Officer, serving from 22 May 1979 to 28 May 1979, ending her 14th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East, suffers a main engine turbine casualty requiring extensive repair while training in the Subic Bay operations area 29 March 1979, when only a few days later near the eastern approaches to the Straits of Malacca, Ranger collided with the Liberian tanker FORTUNE on 5 April 1979, suffering substantial damage but no injuries while the tanker is holed in the port side from the main deck to the waterline (following the collision Ranger 's CO was relieved by Capt. Roger E. Box, USN); reclassified to CV-61 on 30 June 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War, earning 13 battle stars for service in Vietnam. Her 16th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 August 1957 (21 February to 22 September 1979)” (Ref. 1-Ranger, 72, 84A, 1094A, 1095 & 1096). 

 

21/02/79 to 22/09/79

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

Sea Service Ribbon

August 1974 thru January 1993
(11 Awards)

14Th WestPac

16th FWFD

214-days

Ref. 1094

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) pulled in for a port call at Naples, Italy on 27 September 1979” (Ref. 1206).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) made a port call at Naples, Italy from 27 to 29 September 1979” (Ref. 1206).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained in Dry Dock No. 6 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash. from 11 January to 30 September 1979, then moving to Pier 3” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 14 September to 30 September 1979” (Ref. 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked departs for an Underway Period

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 30 September 1979, with Captain Eddie Inman ("Hoagy") Carmichael, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 24th WestPac, her 17th South China Sea, on her fifth Indian Ocean deployment and her 19th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet, on her first North Arabian Sea deployment; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 22nd deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 28th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 41st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(30 September 1979 to 20 February 1980)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4J

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4J

VA-93

Ravens - Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VMAQ-2 Det.

Playboys - Marines Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

 

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) and its battle group responded to the mining threats of theStrait of Hormuz” (Ref. 1082A).

 

     “On October 1, 1979, Jimmy Carter addresses the nation, calling for calm and patience over the presence of Russian troops in Cuba” (Ref. 12).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines

 

     “Following an almost month long mid-deployment upkeep period in Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, inport from 9 September to 4 October 1979, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed on 4 October bound for Yokosuka, Japan for operations in the South China Sea and Philippine Sea en route to Yokosuka” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 7 October and CONRECEX 80-1, demonstrated the teamwork of the ship, Fleet Intelligence Support Center Western Pacific, Cubi Point, Republic of Philippines, and Fleet Air - Photo Lab, Cubi Point, operating in the Philippine Sea from 3 to 7 October, commencing AWEX80-1 in the South China Sea on 8 October 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “On October 9, 1979 at a Press conference, Jimmy Carter discusses SALT II, Soviet troops in Cuba, defense budget, the economy, US vs Soviet values, the Pope's visit to the United States, Ted Kennedy, and the PLO” (Ref. 12).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted BUZZAROEX 4-79 on 9 October and AWEX 80-1 in the South China Sea from 8 to 10 October 1979. During operations on 11 October 1979, an engineering casualty forced the temporary diversion of airborne Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN aircraft to MCAS lwakuni, Japan” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) engineering casualty forced aircraft aloft to divert to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan on 11 October 1979” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) arrives Yokosuka, Japan

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) pulled in for a port call at Yokosuka, Japan on 12 October 1979” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1979).

 

Super Typhoon Tip slammed across the Northern Pacific

 

     “Super Typhoon Tip slammed across the Northern Pacific, passing within 90 nautical miles of Yokosuka, Japan on 13 October 1979. At one point, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) endured winds as high as 45 knots (gusting to 65) belying earlier criticism of her construction by suffering no damage. The crew estimated that she could experience 20–25% higher winds with “no appreciable difficulties” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained in port and no damage was suffered as a result of Super Typhoon Tip, so the crew dressed the ship up and welcomed more than 32,090 visitors during Japanese-U. S. “Friendship Day” while in port Yokosuka, Japan on 14 October 1979. Marine Detachment helped the USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) host over 35,000 Japanese visitors on Naval Station Yokosuka, Japan Annual Friendship Day on 14 October 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

    “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) pulled in for a port call at Alexandria, Egypt on 17 October 1979” (Ref. 1206).

 

Super Typhoon Tip slammed across the Northern Pacific

 

    “Super Typhoon Tip slammed across the Northern Pacific, passing within 90 nautical miles of Yokosuka, Japan while USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) lay moored at that port from 12 to 19 October 1979. At one point, the ship endured winds as high as 45 knots (gusting to 65) belying earlier criticism of her construction by suffering no damage. The crew estimated that she could experience 20–25% higher winds with “no appreciable difficulties”” (Ref. 331A).

 

     “Commander Naval Air Pacific (COMNAVAIRPAC), Vice Admiral Coogan visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) to present the ship the “Blue H” on 19 October 1979. This award recognized the aircraft carrier made the greatest improvements in overhaul ship habitability during the competitive cycle” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

   “USS Nimitz (CVN-68) made a port call at Alexandria, Egypt from 17 to 20 October 1979” (Ref. 1206).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed Yokosuka, Japan

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departed Yokosuka, Japan on 22 October 1979, in port from 12 to 22 October 1979, for operations in the Philippine Sea and East China Sea en route to Pusan Korea. Kitty Hawk hosted 50 officers, Japanese Self-Defense Forces. 30,003 Japanese and Americans visited the ship for "Friendship Day;" 30 members of the Japanese media and 25 members of Japanese basketball team 12 to 22 October 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “Departing Yokosuka, Japan on 22 October 1979, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) Air Wing FIFTEEN provided area surveillance support to MISSILKEX 2-80, an exercise including live missile firing by surface combatants in the Philippine Sea en route to Pusan Korea” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

CHAPTER XXXIII

U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (Indian Ocean operations keeping the peace in the Middle East during which time riots against the shah's regime took place in several Iranian cities, resulting in the Iranian revolution with control of Iran shifting to Ayatollah Khomeini; followed by the Shah of Iran’s admission into the U. S. (22 October 1979) for medical treatment which touched off a huge demonstration in Tehran demanding his extradition and on the morning of 4 November 1979, exactly one year before the United States Presidential election, a mob of around 3,000 students stormed the U.S. embassy gate in Tehran, overran the guards, and took the sixty-six people inside hostage, in the name of Ayatollah Khomeini) - $80,000,000 11 month overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Washington and sailed for Alameda, Ca. 8 February 1979, arriving the next day; underwent overhaul on 6 March 1978, during which the last of her 5-inch battery and all gun directors were removed, followed by Refresher Training and CarQuals with Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN (CVW-14) embarked, visits at North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, Ca.

Iran History & Air Arm

 (1 January 1978 to 12 November 1979)

Part 1 – (1 January to 14 May 1978)

Part 2 – (15 May to 31 November 1978)

Part 3 – (1 December 1978 to 8 March 1979)

Part 4 – (9 March to 25 October 1979)

Part 5 – (26 October to 12 November 1979)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXIII

Part 4 - (9 March to 25 October 1979)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4