CHAPTER XXXIII

U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (Indian Ocean operations keeping the peace in the Middle East during which time riots against the shah's regime took place in several Iranian cities, resulting in the Iranian revolution with control of Iran shifting to Ayatollah Khomeini; followed by the Shah of Iran’s admission into the U. S. (22 October 1979) for medical treatment which touched off a huge demonstration in Tehran demanding his extradition and on the morning of 4 November 1979, exactly one year before the United States Presidential election, a mob of around 3,000 students stormed the U.S. embassy gate in Tehran, overran the guards, and took the sixty-six people inside hostage, in the name of Ayatollah Khomeini) - $80,000,000 11 month overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Washington and sailed for Alameda, Ca. 8 February 1979, arriving the next day; underwent overhaul on 6 March 1978, during which the last of her 5-inch battery and all gun directors were removed, followed by Refresher Training and CarQuals with Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN (CVW-14) embarked, visits at North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, Ca.

Iran History & Air Arm

 (1 January 1978 to 12 November 1979)

Part 1 – (1 January to 14 May 1978)

Part 2 – (15 May to 31 November 1978)

Part 3 – (1 December 1978 to 8 March 1979)

Part 4 – (9 March to 25 October 1979)

Part 5 – (26 October to 12 November 1979)

 

 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) docking at North Island NAS on 2 December 1978, as seen from USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). USS Belleau Wood (LHA-3) is in background. NS0265ak 110k. Richard Stiles. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/0265ak.jpg

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) arrived NAS, NI, California for a brief visit

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) pulled in for a  brief stop at Naval Air Station, North Island, California on 2 December 1978” (Ref. 362D).     

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) made a brief stop at Naval Air Station, North Island, California from 2 to 4 December. Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 16 La Jolla Junior High School students and 12 adults’ escorts’ for a tour of the ship on 3 December 1978” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 125 San Diego area businessmen for lunch and a tour of the ship on 5 December 1978” (Ref. 331B-1978).

 

    CVW-11 flew on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 6 December 1978, conducting refresher operations” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “Off Baja, Calif., USS Ranger (CV-61) experiences an explosion and flash fire during fleet exercises 6 December 1978, which result in minor burns to nine crewmen” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “On 6 December 1978, visitors aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) included: Mr. Tadashi Kume, President, Honda Research and Development; Mr. Kinya Nakadawa, President, Honda of California; Mr. Yutaka Ikeda, Honda Design Engineer” (Ref. 331B-1978).

 

 

Underway off Southern California, 11 December 1978. Enterprise was conducting carrier qualifications and refresher operations for Carrier Air Wing 11 (CVW-11); the ship also completed her mine readiness certification two days later. Photographed by PH3 Ted Kappler. Official U.S. Navy Photograph (# KN-27606). NS026534 104k. Scott Dyben.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/026534.jpg

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. for ISE

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 1 to 11 December, departing Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 12 December 1978, for Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE)” (Ref. 331B-1978).

 

     “On December 12, 1978, Jimmy Carter gives a press conference on energy, Middle East, Congress, Nicaragua, Namibia, political conventions, national health care, oil prices, economy, Ted Kennedy, Iran, SALT. Broadcast on ABC TV” (Ref. 12).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) completed her mine readiness certification on 13 December 1978” (Ref. 362D).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returns to NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. after completing ISE

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returned to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 14 December 1978, conducting Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) from 12 to 14 December 1978” (Ref. 331B-1978).

 

     “On December 15, 1978, Jimmy Carter announces full diplomatic relations with the People's Republic of China and the closing of relations with the government of Taiwan. Reporters Walter Cronkite, Bernard Kalb, and Marvin Kalb also discuss the new relationship with China” (Ref. 12).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returns to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California after completing CARQUALS in the SOLCAL OPERA

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California for the holidays on 16 December 1978, conducting carrier qualifications in the southern California operating area from 28 November to 15 December 1978, with a brief stop at North Island over the 2nd to 4th. CVW-11 flew on board on 6 December, conducting refresher operations, the ship also completing her mine readiness certification on the 13th” (Ref. 362D).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 350 Navy League and Association of Naval Aviation members for a commemorative ceremony of the 75th anniversary of the Wright brothers flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina on 17 December 1978, with a tour of the ship, and refreshments. With the holiday season rapidly approaching, the officers and men of Kitty Hawk could be proud of their 1978 achievements, knowing they were true professionals, each ready to "PRESS ON" into the New Year” (Ref. 331B-1978).

 

    “Rear Admiral W. H. Rogers, United States Navy (Retired) visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 21 December and Kitty Hawk hosted approximately 1500 dependents (550 children and 950 adults) for a Christmas Party on the hangar Deck on 25 December. Kitty Hawk remained inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 15 to 31 December 1978” (Ref. 331B-1978).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked arrived from WestPac

 

    “On 23 December 1978, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Thomas Francis Brown III, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 21st WestPac and her 15th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 18th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 24th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 37th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (9 November to 23 December 1978)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

 09/11/78 to 23/12/78

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Battle Efficiency Award (Navy "E" Ribbon), marking her as the outstanding carrier in the Pacific Fleet

Jul 1977 to Dec 1978

21st WestPac

Navy Unit Commendation

Indian Ocean

01 Jan 78 to 30 Jun 79

same

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

same

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location” (Ref. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted approximately 1500 dependents (550 children and 950 adults) for a Christmas Party on the hangar Deck on 25 December. Kitty Hawk remained inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 15 to 31 December 1978” (Ref. 331B-1978).

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) and her escort ships were directed to the vicinity of Singapore in response to the internal crisis in Iran

 

     “On 27 December 1978, USS Constellation (CV-64) and her escort ships were directed to the vicinity of Singapore in response to the internal crisis in Iran and because of vital U.S. interests in the Arabian/Persian Gulf area” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet 1978 Aircraft Carriers scheduling of deployments, resulted in one CV deployment extending into 1979:

 

Chapter XXXIII

Appendix II

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Constellation (CV-64) - 7th (1st Gulf of Aden)

11th WestPac       9th SCS            2nd IO

CVW-9

NK

26 Sep 1978

17 May 1979

Western Pacific

Middle East

Iranian Crisis

234-days

RIMPAC 79 and deployment extended when she and her escorts were ordered to the Gulf of Aden via the Indian Ocean on 7 March 1979 in response to the conflict between North and South Yemen.

 

Ports of call include:

 

CVW-9 Squadrons: VF-211, F-14; VF-24; F-14; VA-146, A-7E; VA-147, A-7E; VA-165, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-126, E-2C; VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VAQ-132, EA-6B; VS-37, S-3 A; HS-6, SH-3H and COD, US-3A.

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet Aircraft Carriers Deployments for 1979 are:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Midway (CV-41) - 7th  (16th Forward Deployed)

22nd WestPac

CVW-5

NF

11 Jan 1979

20 Feb 1979

Western Pacific

41-days

Ports of call not reported.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G.

USS Ranger (CV-61) - 7th

14th WestPac

CVW-2

NE

21 Feb 1979

22 Sep 1979

214-days

USS Midway (CV-41) - 7th Forward Deployed)

23rd WestPac 16th SCS

4th IO

CVW-5

NF

7 Apr 1979

18 Jun 1979

Western Pacific

Indian Ocean

73-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier

 

Ports of calls include: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines and Diego Garcia, a tropical, footprint-shaped coral atoll located south of the equator in the central Indian Ocean. It is part of the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT).

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) – Pacific Fleet & 7th (2nd Arabian Sea, extending ops. To North  and North Western Arabian Sea)

12th WestPac

11th SCS

3rd Indian Ocean

CVW-15

NL

30 May 1979

25 Feb 1980

WestPac

Middle East

Persian Gulf

Iran Hostage Crisis

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet

En route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Kitty Hawk conducted TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase I; TRANSITEX 8-79 II; MIDPAC operations and MISSILEX Barking Sands; followed by NSSMS shoot Barking Sands and SINEX of opportunity; TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase II: two ASW TACREAD’s; TRANSITEX 8-79 Phase III: ten ASW TSCWD’s and one ASLW TACREAD exorcises tested and developed Battle Croup AAW posture, enhanced ASW teamwork, and identified and rectified communications link shortcomings; FORTRESS WARRIOR; NOTNOEX, BEAVER SNARE, MINEX ALFA in the Bananga Bay; TORPEX in the Subic OPAREA; Beaver Snare in the South China Sea; READIEX LOADEX the South China Sea; air wing/refresher operations, extended range AAWEX’s associated with Exercise COPE THUNDER 79-8 in the South China Sea and Vietnamese refugee search and assistance operations; Exercise Fortress Cale; Exercise MISSILEX Poro Pt. in the South China Sea; Exercise BUZZARDEX 3-79 in the South China Sea on 20 August 1979 (Although the modified exercise provided the ship and air wing team’s first ASU training since the transit and included a well-executed anti-missile BUZZARDEX, no close air support training was accomplished during the exercise); Exercise Fortress Cale, a large-scale amphibious exercise in the Okinawa area for which the Kitty Hawk battle Group was tasked to provide air support; USN/ROKN MINEX/EODEX K4-79; operations in the East South China Sea and Philippine Sea, en route to the Philippines; MMR-1 economizer fire; MISSILEX Poro Pt.; Exercise BUSY STORM, an ASW encounter which provided valuable free play and tactical planning opportunities; MISSILEX Poro Pt.; Exercise NEWBOY 79-4 while at Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; operations in the South China Sea and Philippine Sea en route to Yokosuka; CONRECEX 80-1, demonstrating the teamwork of the ship, Fleet Intelligence Support Center Western Pacific, Cubi Point, Republic of Philippines, and Fleet Air - Photo Lab, Cubi Point, operating in the Philippine Sea from 3 to 7 October, commencing AWEX80-1 in the South China Sea; BUZZAROEX 4-79 and AWEX 80-1 in the South China Sea; operations in the Philippine Sea and East China Sea; Air Wing FIFTEEN provided area surveillance support to MISSILKEX 2-80, an exercise including live missile firing by surface combatants in the Philippine Sea en route to Pusan Korea; MULTIPLEX 1-80 (The Korean contingency operations did force the cancellation of MULTIPLEX 1-80, scheduled for 27 to 31 October 1979, after only ten hours of Blue-Orange interaction. Celebrated Christmas Day, December 25, 1979 in the northern Arabian Sea as flagship, Task Force SEVEN ZERO and Task Group SEVEN ZERO PT TWO (Battle Group Bravo) joining up with USS Midway (CV-41) and ships in company comprised Task Croup SEVEN ZERO PT ONE (Battle Group ALFA) on 3 December 1979.

 

Kitty Hawk conducted cross-deck and relief operations with USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and CVW-8 on 23 January 1980. Battle Group Bravo was centered upon three carriers: Kitty Hawk, Nimitz, and USS Midway (CV-43), together with 12 escort and support ships. The next day, Kitty Hawk came about from “Camel Station,” beginning her eastward transit to the U.S.

 

Ports of call included: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Pattaya, Thailand; Hong Kong Pusan, Korea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Yokosuka, Japan; Pusan, Korea; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines and Pearl Harbor.

 

Air Wing FIFTEEN was equipped with what were then the Navy's newest aircraft: the F-14 Tomcat, S-3 Viking, the A-6E version of the Intruder and the E-2C version of the Hawkeye.

Squadrons: VF-51, F-14A; VF-111, F-14A; VA-22, A-7E; VA-94, A-7E; VA-52, A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-114, E-2C; VFP-63 DET.1, RF-8G; VAQ-135, EA-6B; VS-21, S-3A/US-3A; HS-8, SH-3H and VQ-1 Det., EA-3B.

USS Independence (CV-62) – 2nd, 6th & 7th  (1st & 2nd Red Sea & Gulf of Aden)

Lant

14th Med

1st Suez Canal

1st  IO

2nd Suez Canal

Med

Lant

CVW-6

AE

28 Jun 1979

14 Dec 1979

Europe

Middle East

Indian Ocean

170-days

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in response to the Iran Hostage Crisis

 

Ports of call included Naples, Italy; Haifa, northern Israel; Palermo, Insular Italy; Athens, Greece; Genoe, Italy; Toulon the Autonomous Community of Andalusia, Spain.

 

Squadrons: VF-102, F-4J; VF-33, F-4J; VA-15, A-7E; VA-87, A-7E; VA-176, A-6E / KA-6D; VS-28, S-3A; VAQ-130, EA-6B; VFP-63 DET., RF-8G; VAW-124, E-2C and HS-5, SH-3H.

USS Midway (CV-41) - 7th (Forward Deployed)

WestPac

CVW-5

NF

20 Aug 1979

14 Sep 1979

Western Pacific

26-days

Iranian Hostage Crisis in Iran, operating on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea.

 

Ports of call not reported.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

*USS Nimitz

(CVN-68) – 2nd, 6th & 7th

(1st North Arabian Sea  & Gulf of Oman)

NorLant

3rd Med

Lant

SoLant

1st Cape of Good

1st IO

2nd Cape of Good

SoLant

Lant

Med

Lant

CVW-8

AJ

10 Sep 1979

26 May 1980

Europe

Middle East

North Arabian Sea

Gulf of Oman

Iran Hostage crisis

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, to strengthen the U.S. Naval presence in the crucial Indian Ocean area as tensions heightened over Iran's taking of 52 American diplomats’ hostage.

 

Played a key role in CrisEx-79, a joint naval amphibious exercise with the Spaniards that envisioned a scenario to repel invaders from gaining a foothold along the Spanish Mediterranean Sea coast; operating closely with Spanish destroyer SPS Mendez Nuńez (D-63), which she integrated into her screen, while the evolution involved more than two dozen ships and submarines and 35,000 troops; MultiPlEx, an exercise incorporating two carrier task forces in combined operations in the Mediterranean Sea, and then will steam from the Med to the Southern Atlantic via Cape of Good Hope operating under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, on her first Indian Ocean, sailing in the North Arabian Sea and into the Gulf of Oman to a staging area off the southeast Coast of Iran operating with the 7th Fleet, to strengthen the U.S. Naval presence in the crucial Indian Ocean area as tensions heightened over Iran's taking of 52 American diplomats hostage, in what would turn out to be Operation Eagle Claw (Operation Rice Bowl and Operation Evening Light), the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran.

 

Ports of call include: Rota, Spain; Naples, Italy; Alexandria, Egypt; Naples, Italy; Naples, Italy; Tunis, Tunisia and Naples, Italy; Athens, Greece and Naples, Italy.

 

“…I told you that I had confidence in your high state of preparedness for any task which might be demanded of you,” ADM Hayward told the crew during their time in the Gulf. “You proved without question in the ensuing months that my confidence and that of your countrymen across America and your shipmates throughout the Navy was especially well placed…Your countrymen are very proud of you, and they have every right to be.”

 

VADM George E.R. Kinnear, II, Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic, held a high level planning conference concerning the ship’s deployment to the Indian Ocean, on board Nimitz off Naples on 3 January 1980.

 

Nimitz anchored off Naples then headed for the Indian Ocean via Cape of Good Hope.

Nimitz sailed in response to the Iranian crisis, leading a nuclear-powered battle group including California and Texas from the Mediterranean Sea to the Indian Ocean on 4 January 1980. The three ships stood out of separate Italian ports and rendezvoused, sailing at a speed of advance of 25 knots around Africa via the Cape of Good Hope and into the Indian Ocean to “Gonzo Station” (derisively named by sailors serving there, supposedly deriving the term from Gulf of Oman Naval Zoo Operation).

 

CVW-8 Squadrons include: VF-41 “Black Aces,” F-14A; VF-84 “Jolly Rogers,” F-14A; VA-82 “Marauders“A-7E; VA-86 “Sidewinder,” A-7E; VA-35 “Black Panthers,” A-6E/KA-6D; VFP-63 DET. 5 (*1) “Eyes of the Fleet,” RF-8G; VAQ-134 “Garudas,” EA-6B; VS-24 “Scouts,” S-3A; HS-9 “Sea Griffins,” SH-3H and VAW-112”Golden Hawks,” E-2B.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet, Commander, Carrier Strike Force Sevent Fleet, Admiral Robert E. Kirksey, USN and Chief of Staff , Captain C. W. Streightiff and Captain J. S. Donnell; Commander, Battle Group Two, Rear Admiral James R. Sanderson, USN and Chief of Staff, Captain W. V. Garcia.

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), USS South Carolina (CGN-37) and USS Virginia (CGN-38) relieved Nimitz and her group, including guided missile cruisers California (CGN-37) and Texas (CGN-39) from 7 to 8 May 1980, after the crew endured 108 days, operating 144 of them continuously at sea, including 115 of Iranian contingency operations on station during Operation Eagle Claw (Operation Rice Bowl and Operation Evening Light), the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran in the Indian Ocean, North Arabian Sea and into the Gulf of Oman to a staging area off the southeast Coast of Iran referred to as “Gonzo Station.”

 

The carrier operated principally under Battle Group 2, commanded by RADM James R. Sanderson. A goodly company of ships assembled under TG 70.1 for several hours of formation steaming and station keeping, comprising: aircraft carriers Nimitz, USS Midway (CV-41) and USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63); guided missile cruisers USS Bainbridge (CGN-25), USS California (CGN-36), USS Jouett (CG-29) and USS USS Texas (CGN-39); guided missile destroyers USS Berkeley (DDG-15) and USS Parsons (DDG-33); frigates USS Knox (FF-1052) and USS Stein (FF-1065); replenishment oilers USS Roanoke (AOR-7) and USS Wabash (AOR-5); and oilers USS Mispillion (AO-105) and USS Passumpsic (AO-107).

 

USS California (CGN-36), USS South Carolina (CGN-37), USS Texas (CGN-39) and USS Reeves (CG-24) joined Nimitz as part of her task force with CVW-8 embarked.

USS Midway (CV-41) -7th (1st North Arabian Sea) (1st North Arabian Sea) (19th Forward Deployed)

24th WestPac 17th SCS

5th IO

 

CVW-5

NF

30 Sep 1979

20 Feb 1980

Western Pacific

Indian Ocean

Middle East

North Arabian Sea

41st FWFD

144-days

Iranian Hostage Crisis in Iran, operating on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea.

 

Ports of call not reported.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) - 7th           (1st North Arabian Sea)

13th WestPac

1st IO

CVW-14

NK

13 Nov 1979

11 Jun 1980

Middle East

212-days

Iran Hostage crisis

Tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, to strengthen the U.S. Naval presence in the crucial Indian Ocean, sailing in the North Arabian Sea and into the Gulf of Oman to a staging area off the southeast Coast of Iran operating with the 7th Fleet, to strengthen the U.S. Naval presence in the crucial Indian Ocean area as tensions heightened over Iran's taking of 52 American diplomats hostage, in what would turn out to be Operation Eagle Claw (Operation Rice Bowl and Operation Evening Light), the attempt to rescue the US Embassy workers being held hostage in Tehran, Iran, while operating on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea.

Cheju-Do Islands in the  Sea of Japan

 

Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Subic Bay, R.P.; Pattaya Beach, Thailand and Singapore.

 

COMCARGRU THREE, R.L. Chambers and CVW-14 Squadrons include: VMFA-323 “Death Rattlers,” F-4N; VMFA-531 “Grey Ghosts,” F-4N; VA-97 “Warhawks,” A-7E; VA-27 “Royal Maces,” A-7E; VA-196 “Main Battery,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-113 “Black Eagles,” VFP-63 DET. 2 “Eyes of the Fleet,” RF-8G and HC-1 DET. 3 “Pacific Fleet Angels,” SH-3G.

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) began 1979, its eighteenth year of service to the nation, in its homeport of San Diego, California under the command of Captain W. Lewis Chatham, USN. Routine activities in port and local work-up operations in preparations for a scheduled overseas deployment consumed the first five months of the calendar year. The requisite qualifications inspections and exercises culminated in the April to May time frame with successful completion of the operational readiness and command inspections” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

President Carter directed USS Constellation (CV-64) and her escort ships to remain on station in the South China Sea and not enter the Indian Ocean

 

     “President Carter directed USS Constellation (CV-64) and her escort ships to remain on station in the South China Sea and not enter the Indian Ocean on 2 January 1979” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in port Naval Air Station, Alameda, California for the holidays from 16 December 1978 to 9 January 1979” (Ref. 362D).    

 

Iran History and Iranian Revolution

 

    Iran and neighboring countries, is one of the only places in the world where oil is the natural resource of countries and religion is politics. Iran was in turmoil over who should lead the Iranian people. In the Persian Gulf region, Iran was a strategic asset for the United States. The two nations had common interests relating to the oil industry and security matters evolving from Soviet expansion in the area. However, the regime of the shah of Iran, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, was repressive and corrupt. Large numbers of devoted Shiite Muslims were vigorously opposed to the Western-oriented rule of the shah and were determined to remove him from his throne and establish a fundamentalist Islamic republic.

 

      During 1978 and into early 1979, riots against the shah's regime took place in several Iranian cities. The distant leader of this revolutionary overture was the Ayatollah Khomeini, a well-known Muslim leader, who had been exiled by the shah on and was now living in Paris, France. Khomeini issued proclamations calling for the downfall of the Pahlavi regime and demanding a revolution by the poor and oppressed Iranians. These proclamations were distributed throughout Iran and soon the exiled ayatollah became a legendary folk hero to his people. In his attacks of the shah, the ayatollah simultaneously attacked the United States for its support of the Iranian police state. “Khomeini campaign from abroad culminated in his return to claim his spot as the new spiritual (and de-facto) political leader. The tone was not only deeply religious, but also increasingly anti-American” (Ref. 6- Ultimate Anti-Americanism: The Iran Hostage Crisis)” (Ref. 4).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departs NAS, Alameda, Ca. for COH at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash.

 

    USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in port Naval Air Station, Alameda, California for the holidays from 16 December 1978 to 9 January 1979, departing with 2,200 officers and men and 500 temporarily embarked dependents, to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash. on 9 January, arriving the ship yard on 11 January 1979. Immediately upon arrival, she entered Dry Dock No. 6 for a 30-month Comprehensive Overhaul (COH)” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72 & 76).

 

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. for aircraft shipboard trials in the SOCAL OPERA

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 1 to 10 January 1979, departing on 11 January 1979 with COMCARGRU SEVEN embarking on the 11th, for A-4M Skyhawk and F-4s Phantom aircraft shipboard trials in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 23 December 1978 to 11 January 1979” (Ref. 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked departs for an Underway Period

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 11 January 1979, with Captain Thomas Francis Brown III, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 22ndWestPac and  her 16th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 19th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 25th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 38th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(11 January to 20 February 1979)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4J

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4J

VA-93

Ravens - Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles - Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VMAQ-2 Det.

Playboys - Marines Electronics Warfare

Grumman - Intruder -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

(CY) 620

EA-6A

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

 

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) commenced A-4M Skyhawk and F-4s Phantom aircraft shipboard trials in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA and conducted UNREP with USS Roanoke (AOR-7) on 14 January 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

      “On January 15, 1979, Jimmy Carter speaks at the memorial services for Martin Luther King, Jr. saying that he will not hesitate to call another Middle East summit if it will help the cause of peace. Broadcast on ABC-TV” (Ref. 12).

 

Iran History and Iranian Revolution

 

      “Sensing defeat and a potential bloodbath of a civil war, the shah and his wife and family and a small group of aides boarded the royal Iranian Boeing 707 aircraft on January 16, 1979, and flew out of the country, never to return. After all, the U.S. had always sided with the Shah, and most Iranians believed it would try and restore him to power (like it did in 1953).

 

      It was almost universally believed in Iran that the CIA would attempt a repeat performance of 1953, restoring the Shah to power.  Actually, Carter had no intention of trying to restore the shah, and formally recognized the new Islamic government. The Iranians, however, could not believe that the United States would abandon the shah, and as long as he was alive, they anticipated another CIA coup.

 

       Once the shah fled the country, the Iranian revolution became a full-blown affair. Interests in the Persian Gulf region were clearly threatened. Quickly the United States lost access to Iranian oil and saw the cancellation of $7 billion of uncompleted arms contracts” (Ref. 1-Constellation, 4 & 72).

 

       “On January 17, 1979, Jimmy Carter discusses the budget Iran energy firing of advisor on women's affairs China tobacco and SALT on his’s forty-second press conference. Broadcast on CBS-TV” (Ref. 12).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returns to NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. after completing aircraft shipboard trials in the SOCAL OPERA

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with COMCARGRU SEVEN embarked returned to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 18 January 1979, underway from 11 to 18 January 1979, conducting A-4M Skyhawk and F-4s Phantom aircraft shipboard trials in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA from 14 to 18 January 1979. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Pyro (AE-24) on 17 January and USS Roanoke (AOR-7) on 18 January 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

Iran History and Iranian Revolution

 

     “On January 19, 1979 millions of marchers rallied to back Khomeini, who announced from France that he was forming a new government” (Ref. 151- Super70s.com).

 

     “The image of Iran in the West became that of a very fundamentalist, contra western country” (Ref. 18).

 

     “On January 23, 1979, Jimmy Carter speaks on the economy government politics and the SALT treaty at a State of the union address 1979” (Ref. 12).

 

      “On January 26, 1979 at a Press conference, Jimmy Carter discusses China; SALT Kennedy Resolution; Iran; 1980 campaign student aid budget; energy; Nixon and defense. Broadcast on CBS TV” (Ref. 12).

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) and her escorts were released from contingency operations in the South China Sea

 

     “USS Constellation (CV-64) and her escorts were released from contingency operations in the South China Sea on 28 January 1979” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted Mr. Roger Veach and his family for a tour of the ship on 30 January 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

U.S. government dependents and nonessential American citizens were ordered to evacuate Iran

 

     “Due to the uneasy situation in Iran all U.S. government dependents and nonessential American citizens were ordered to evacuate the country on 30 January 1979” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

Iran History and Iranian Revolution

 

     “The Regency and Supreme Army Councils established for the Shah's absence proved unable to function, and Prime Minister Shahpur Bakhtiar was unable to effect compromise with his former National Front colleagues or with Khomeini. Crowds in excess of 1,000,000 demonstrated in Tehran, proving the wide appeal of Khomeini, who arrived in Iran amid wild rejoicing on February 1, 1979” (Ref. 22).

 

      “In the midst of the revolutionary chaos the Ayatollah Khomeini returned and became the nation's new leader, Emam (Supreme Leader).  Khomeini seen as a Shi'a clergy used the situation to install itself in power, and declare the "Islamic Republic of Iran” (Ref. 16 & 72).

 

       “Ten days later Bakhtiar went into hiding, eventually to find exile in Paris” (Ref. 22).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. for ASWEX AIREM DELTA-79 in the SOCAL OPERA

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained in port Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 19 January to 1 February 1979, departing on 2 February 1979 with COMCARGRU SEVEN embarking on the 2nd, for ASWEX AIREM DELTA-79, operating in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) completed $80,000,000 11 month overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Washington and sailed for Alameda, Ca.

 

   “The Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, completed $80,000,000 11 month overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Washington and sailed for Alameda, Ca. 8 February 1979, arriving the next day; underwent overhaul on 6 March 1978, during which the last of her 5-inch battery and all gun directors were removed” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 35 and 72).

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-15 embarked, conducted an intensive workup cycle, Refresher Training and CarQuals, to include many visits at North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, Ca. commencing February 1979” (Ref. 43).

 

     “On February 12, 1979 at a Press conference, Jimmy Carter discusses relations with Mexico Iran Taiwan China Russia Middle East and energy taxes federal debt and oil companies” (Ref. 12).

 

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) island structure at dusk, circa early 1979, at NAS North Island. NS0263ag 77k. Robert Hurst. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/0263ag.jpg

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Taluga (TAO-6 2) on 3 February and USS Pyro (AE-24) on 6 February and USNS Taluga (TAO-6 2) on 7 February. CQINAVAIRPAC and thirty-five guests visited Kitty Hawk on 8 February 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returns to NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. after completing ASWEX AIREM DELTA-79 in the SOCAL OPERA

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with COMCARGRU SEVEN embarked returned to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 12 February 1979, conducting ASWEX AIREM DELTA-79 operating in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA from 5 to 8 February 1979. COM,NAVAIRPAC and thirty-five guests visited Kitty Hawk on 8 February and Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USNS Taluga (TAO-6 2) on 3 February and USNS Taluga (TAO-6 2) on 12 February 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. for CARQUALS in the SOCAL OPERA

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 13 February 1979, departing on 14 February 1979, for CARQUALS, operating in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

Iran History and Iranian Revolution

 

     “Within Iran, anti-American tempers continued to erupt. On Valentine's Day February 14th, 1979, revolutionary forces in Tehran overran the United States embassy, seizing seventy employees for more than two hours” (Ref. 4).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Taluga (TAO-6 2) on 17 February 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked arrived from an Underway Period

 

    “On 20 February 1979, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Thomas Francis Brown III, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 22nd WestPac and  her 16th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet. Ports of call not reported. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4J; VF-151, F-4J; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A-6A / KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VMAQ-2 Det., EA-6A and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 19th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 25th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 38th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (11 January to 20 February 1979)” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

 11/01/79 to 20/02/79

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

15th SCS

3rd IO

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deployable unit (e.g., a ship, aircraft squadron, detachment, battalion, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 12 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location” (Ref.. 1181D).

Ref. 1181 & 1181C

 

    “An SH-3D (BuNo 154111), LT Michael T. Fuqua, 28, LT(JG) Jerome L. Kauphusman, 27, AW2 Albert C. Blondeel-Tmmerman, and AW3 Robert J. Cook, HS-8 attached to CVVW-15, launched at 0743, 21 February 1979. When three nautical miles off the starboard bow of USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), sudden engine and/or main transmission difficulties necessitated an immediate “autorotation to water.” Entering the sea at 32º9’7”N, 118º32’1”W, the Sea King floated for almost 62 minutes, rolling over at 0830 and sinking at 0858. An SH-3H, LCDR Robert F. Duggan, LT(JG) Donald E. Pletcher, AW2 Stephen Strait, and AWAN Steven Walker, HS-8, rescued the SH-3D’s entire crew by 0812. The SAR crew was backed up by an H-46, HS-10, inbound from North Island, which orbited the downed crew” (Ref. 331A).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returns to NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. after completing CARQUALS in the SOCAL OPERA

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returned to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 21 February 1979, conducting CARQUALS operating in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA from 13 to 21 February 1979. Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USNS Taluga (TAO-6 2) on 17 February and conducted UNREP with USNS Taluga (TAO-6 2) on 21 February 1979. An HS-8 SH-3H helicopter 723 (SH-3D (BuNo 154111)) down in water during test flight. Helicopter sank, but crew recovered safely on 21 February 1979. LT Michael T. Fuqua, 28, LT(JG) Jerome L. Kauphusman, 27, AW2 Albert C. Blondeel-Tmmerman, and AW3 Robert J. Cook, HS-8 attached to CVVW-15, launched at 0743, 21 February 1979. When three nautical miles off the starboard bow of Kitty Hawk, sudden engine and/or main transmission difficulties necessitated an immediate “autorotation to water.” Entering the sea at 32º9’7”N, 118º32’1”W, the Sea King floated for almost 62 minutes, rolling over at 0830 and sinking at 0858. An SH-3H, LCDR Robert F. Duggan, LT(JG) Donald E. Pletcher, AW2 Stephen Strait, and AWAN Steven Walker, HS-8, rescued the SH-3D’s entire crew by 0812. The SAR crew was backed up by an H-46, HS-10, inbound from North Island, which orbited the downed crew” (Ref. 331A & 331B-1979).

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked departs on “WestPac”

 

    “USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked departed San Francisco Bay, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 21 February 1979, with Captain Thomas G. Moore, NAVCAD 1953, as Commanding Officer, on her 14th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet; reclassified to CV-61 on 30 June 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War, earning 13 battle stars for service in Vietnam. She will under go her 16th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 August 1957” (Ref. 1-Ranger, 72, 1094A, 1095 & 1096).

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2

(21 February to 22 September 1979)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-154

Black Knights -            Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NE100

F-4J

VF-21

Free Lancers -            Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NE200

F-4J

VA-113

Stingers -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NE300

A-7E

VA-25

Fist of the Fleet -            Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NE400

A-7E

VA-145

Swordsmen -            Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NE500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2B

RVAH-7 (*1)

Peacemakers - Reconnaissance Attack Squadron

North American -             Jet Attack Fighter Reconnaissance

610

RA-5C

VAQ-137

Rooks - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-29

Dragon Fires - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

HS-4

Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

730

SH-3H

 (*1) disestablished on Sep.28, 1979

 

Iran History and Iranian Revolution

 

     “On 26 February 1979, the State Department announced the evacuation of the families of all embassy personnel and urged any Americans remaining in Iran to leave as soon as possible” (Ref. 4).

 

     “On February 27, 1979 at a Press conference, Jimmy Carter discusses Mid East peace; oil prices and shortage; diplomatic weakness; Billy Carter's reputed anti-semitism; rationing gasoline; Jerry Brown a constitutional convention; inflation; conservation; Iran and farmers' demonstration in Washington” (Ref. 12).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) hosted 80 students and 6 adults from Los Angeles and 50 Medical lab technologists of California on 27 February 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

Iran History and Iranian Revolution

 

     “On 28 February 1979, the US government placed an embargo on further arms deliveries to Iran. The remaining 31 F-4Es and 16 RF-4E on the contract were never delivered.  At this time, Iran had almost 223 operational Phantoms. Contrary to Western reports, F-4 squadrons managed to maintain their combat effectiveness despite widespread political upheavals and personnel purges. Technical malfunctions, often appearing during flight preparation, would reduce the flight packages, but missions were seldom aborted for this reason” (Ref. 20).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 3 March 1979 (Based on at sea periods this UNREP was conducted while inport.)” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. for WEPTRAEX and COMPTUEX 3A-79 in the SOCAL OPERA

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained inport Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 22 February to 5 March 1979, departing on 7 March 1979, for WEPTRAEX and COMPTUEX 3A-79 operating in Southern California (SOCAL) OPERA” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “COMCARGRU SEVEN embarked USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 7 March 1979” (Ref. 331B-1979).

 

     “USS Constellation (CV-64) was originally scheduled to end in March but after participating in RIMPAC exercises, her deployment extended when she and her escorts were ordered to the Gulf of Aden via the Indian Ocean on 7 March 1979 in response to the conflict between North and South Yemen. The Gulf of Aden and the Arabian/Persian Gulf were considered vital waterways for the passage of petroleum products to the U.S. and her allies” (Ref. 1-Constellation & 72).

 

CHAPTER XXXIII

U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (Indian Ocean operations keeping the peace in the Middle East during which time riots against the shah's regime took place in several Iranian cities, resulting in the Iranian revolution with control of Iran shifting to Ayatollah Khomeini; followed by the Shah of Iran’s admission into the U. S. (22 October 1979) for medical treatment which touched off a huge demonstration in Tehran demanding his extradition and on the morning of 4 November 1979, exactly one year before the United States Presidential election, a mob of around 3,000 students stormed the U.S. embassy gate in Tehran, overran the guards, and took the sixty-six people inside hostage, in the name of Ayatollah Khomeini) - $80,000,000 11 month overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Ship Yard, Bremerton, Washington and sailed for Alameda, Ca. 8 February 1979, arriving the next day; underwent overhaul on 6 March 1978, during which the last of her 5-inch battery and all gun directors were removed, followed by Refresher Training and CarQuals with Carrier Air Wing FIFTEEN (CVW-14) embarked, visits at North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, Ca.

Iran History & Air Arm

 (1 January 1978 to 12 November 1979)

Part 1 – (1 January to 14 May 1978)

Part 2 – (15 May to 31 November 1978)

Part 3 – (1 December 1978 to 8 March 1979)

Part 4 – (9 March to 25 October 1979)

Part 5 – (26 October to 12 November 1979)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XXXIII

Part 3 - (1 December 1978 to 8 March 1979)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4