CHAPTER XXXV

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, Ca. conducting a $30 million modernization SRA (14 July to 10 October 1980) - U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (1980) - CV-43 Hawaiian Training Cruise (3 May to 6 June 1981)

Iran History, Air Arm & Iran hostage crisis and the Iraq and Iran War

(1 July 1980 to 19 August 1981)

Part 1 – (1 July 1980 to 21 December 1980)

Part 2 – (22 December 1980 to 3 May 1981)

Part 3 – (4 May to 19 August 1981)

 

 

 

NS024379 57k. USS Coral Sea (CV-43) in port, location unknown, probably in the late 1970s–early 80s. Tommy Trampa.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024379.jpg

 

    “USS Independence (CV-62) spent a brief period in June 1980 conducting Carrier Qualifications (CQ’s) for east coast squadrons, with Indy’s new skipper Captain R. E. Shanahan in command” (Ref. 1148B).

 

USS Independence (CV-62) departed Norfolk, Virginia, for the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in the Caribbean Sea, to begin Refresher Training (REFTRA)

 

    “In early July 1980, USS Independence (CV-62) departed Norfolk, Virginia, for the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in the Caribbean Sea, to begin Refresher Training (REFTRA), conducted by the Fleet Training Group out of the U. .S Naval Station Guantanamo Bay (NAVSTA GTMO) is the oldest US Navy base located outside the continental US. Situated on the south-east coast of Cuba, the base is about 500nm away from Miami, Florida. The naval station provides logistics support to the US Navy and Coast Guard ships and aircraft, as well as to the Joint Task Force-Guantanamo units. It is the only US naval station existing in a country that does not have diplomatic relations with the US. Guantanamo Bay is located in the Oriente Province on the south-east corner of Cuba. The base is accessed through the Windward Passage from the north or through the Caribbean Sea from the south. The 12 mile-long pouch-shaped bay extends from the north-east to south-west. It is camouflaged by the Cuzco Hills on the south and east, and by mountains. Refresher Training, conducted by the Fleet Training Group in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in the Caribbean Sea, consisted of a group of “blue suited” Navy professionals who would ultimately inspect the ship from stern to stern in a purposeful effort to reveal discrepancies in all areas, and would help the crew become the highly effective team the crew was meant to be” (Ref. 1148B & 1152).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) commenced a $30 million modernization SRA

 

    “The Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, completed Selective Restricted Availability (SRA) on 14 July 1980, Coral Sea underwent a $30 million modernization repair period to restore the ship to first-rate operating condition in all systems, and increase her value as a deployable carrier asset for years to come. Ship wide office IBM Mag Card Type Writers were replaced with New Xerox computers. Coral Sea departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California for Sea Trials following Availability period” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 43, 35 and 72).

 

The Navy changed the reporting period for Enlisted Performance Evaluations

 

    “During Coral Sea’s modernization repair period, Typing 250 enlisted evaluations quarterly for the Operations Department Personnel was the responsibility of the Operations Departmental Yeoman.

 

    When the Navy changed the reporting period, extending an evaluation period from 3-months to 6-months or 8-months in some cases (July 1, 1980 to February 28, 1981), Yeomen throughout the Navy were pleased. Unfortunately, the Navy changed the reporting period after all the enlisted evaluations were completed. It was a bad decision and hundreds of hours of work were lost in vain by everyone involved in the canceled reporting period” (Ref. 43).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from June to 14 July 1980” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 14 July 1980, with Captain Eddie Inman ("Hoagy") Carmichael, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 25th WestPac, her 18th South China Sea, on her sixth Indian Ocean deployment, her 20th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet,.on her second North Arabian Sea and first Arabian/Persian Gulf; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 23rd deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 29th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 41st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(14 July to 26 November 1980)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (2nd North Arabian Sea 1st Arabian / Persian Gulf) (20th Forward Deployed)

25th WestPac 18th SCS

6th IO

 

CVW-5

NF

14 Jul 1980

26 Nov 1980

Western Pacific

Indian Ocean

Middle East

North Arabian Sea Persian Gulf

42nd FWFD

136-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier

Iran, Yemen & Indian Ocean

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4J --> F-4S

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4J --> F-4S

VA-93

Ravens -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E /                     A6-E/KA-6D /  *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps - Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 610

RF-4B

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

HC-1 Det. 2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -  Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system

 

USS Independence (CV-62) pulled into St. Thomas, in the Virgin Islands

 

    “After weeks of intensive Refresher Training (REFTRA) in late July 1980, USS Independence (CV-62) pulled into St. Thomas, in the Virgin Islands, an island in the Caribbean Sea and with the islands of Saint John, Saint Croix, and Water Island a county and constituent district of the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), an unincorporated territory of the United States; located on the island is the territorial capital and port of Charlotte Amalie. The water was crystal clear, the sights impressive, and though the liberty lines were long at first, the beer was cold enough to make it worthwhile. The first two weeks were busy, as the crewed learned the hard way, about water conservation, and the crew put the new forward messdeck through its paces. Indy received the praise of the entire Fleet Training Team for its splendid progress and achievement. After three days of liberty, Indy was back at sea for more training, sometimes so much the crew swore there was no such thing as air conditioning. Though General Quarters (GQ’s) supposedly lasted only three hours or so, the crew knew they really lasted three hours longer than ones normal capacity, but a few more drills would not hurt much” (Ref. 1148B & 1152).

 

Iran History & President Carter Press Conferences

 

     “On July 27 1980, the shah died of cancer, but any hope that his death would improve the hostage situation proved futile In September, Ayatollah Khomeini, stated four conditions for the release of the hostages: the United States must return the shah's wealth; cancel all financial claims against Iran; free Iranian assets in the United States; and promise never to interfere in Iranian affairs. Notably absent was the earlier demand that the United States apologize for its past policies in Iran. Although negotiations were still required on all these points, their presentation offered the best hope yet that an end to the crisis was possible, even imminent” (Ref. 4).

 

 

At 0720 CDT on 29 July 1980 USS Midway (CV-41) collided with the 450-foot Panamanian freighter Cactus while transiting between the Palawan Island and North Borneo, 450 miles southwest of the U.S. naval base at Subic Bay, the Philippines. There was no significant damage to the carrier (catwalks and deck supports on the port side were damaged, an elevator jammed and three holes were punched in the ship's hull plates) but several parked F-4J and RF-4B Phantom II aircraft on the flight deck were damaged. Two sailors were killed and three injured onboard Midway. U.S. Navy photo taken on 31 July 1980. NS0241aa 169k. DefenseImagery.mil (#DN-SN-84-03467). http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/0241aa.jpg

 

 

On 29 July 1980, USS Midway (CV-41) collides with the Panamian freighter CACTUS while transiting the passage between Palawan Island and the coast of Northern Borneo 450 nautical miles off Subic Bay en route to Singapore in the Palawan Straits near the Philippines. NS0241aaa 89k. Chuck Cavanaugh, via Troy Prince, MidwaySailor.com.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/0241aaa.jpg

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) collides with the Panamian freighter CACTUS while transiting the passage between Palawan Straits near the Palawan Island and the coast of Northern Borneo 450 nautical miles off Subic Bay en route to Singapore on 29 July 1980. The Midway, the Navy says, sustained no serious damage although two US sailors were killed, three were injured, and three F-4 Phantom aircraft parked on the flight deck were damaged” (Ref. 84A).

 

Jimmy Carter discusses the Billy Carter/Libyan disclosures

 

     “On August 4, 1980 at a Press conference, Jimmy Carter discusses the Billy Carter/Libyan disclosures. Questions from Patrick Sloyan, Lesley Stahl, Terence Smith, Andrew Glass, John Wallach, Don Irwin, Chris Ogden, Fred Barnes, Lisa Myers, Harrison Rainie and David Green” (Ref. 12).

 

     “Excerpts from Jimmy Carter's hour-long press conference on his brother Billy and the Libyans August 5, 1980” (Ref. 12).

 

    “The crew of an F-4J assigned to VF-151 loses control of their plane during a touch-and-go aboard the USS Midway (CV-41) and ejects between Philippines and Borneo on 5 August 1980. Both are recovered safely” (Ref. 84A).

 

USS Independence (CV-62) arrived Norfolk, Virginia in early August 1980

 

    “USS Independence (CV-62) arrived Norfolk, Virginia in early August 1980, conducting Refresher Training (REFTRA) since her departure in early July, under the watchful eye of the Fleet Training Group out of the U. S Naval Station Guantanamo Bay (NAVSTA GTMO) is the oldest US Navy base located outside the continental U.S., situated on the south-east coast of Cuba in the Caribbean Sea, consisting of a group of “blue suited” Navy professionals who would ultimately inspect the ship from stern to stern in a purposeful effort to reveal discrepancies in all areas, and would help the crew become the highly effective team the crew was meant to be. The crew was tasked with learning damage control, battle stations, flight quarters, and just plain living at sea. The first two weeks were busy, as the crewed learned the hard way, about water conservation, and the crew put the new forward messdeck through its paces and then made a port call at in late July 1981 at St. Thomas, in the Virgin Islands, an island in the Caribbean Sea and with the islands of Saint John, Saint Croix, and Water Island a county and constituent district of the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), an unincorporated territory of the United States; located on the island is the territorial capital and port of Charlotte Amalie. The water was crystal clear, the sights impressive, and though the liberty lines were long at first, the beer was cold enough to make it worthwhile. After three days of liberty, Indy was back at sea for more training; sometimes so much the crew swore there was no such thing as air conditioning. Though General Quarters (GQ’s) supposedly lasted only three hours or so, the crew knew they really lasted three hours longer than ones normal capacity, but a few more drills would not hurt much. Indy received the praise of the entire Fleet Training Team for its splendid progress and achievement” (Ref. 1148B & 1152).

 

Jimmy Carter accepts the Democratic Nomination at the 1980 convention

 

     “Jimmy Carter's arrival at the Democratic Convention in New York August 13, 1980” (Ref. 12).

 

     “Jimmy Carter accepts the Democratic Nomination at the 1980 convention August 14, 1980” (Ref. 12).

 

    “USS Constellation (CV-64) on station in the Indian Ocean contingency was relieved by the USS Midway (CVW-41) on 17 August 1980, beginning another Indian Ocean deployment for the Midway, alongside the task group of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) still on contingency duty in the Arabian Sea. Midway spent a total of 118 days in the Indian Ocean during 1980” (Ref. 1-Constellation & Midway).

 

USS Independence (CV-62) made ready for Dependents Day Cruise and the next part of the cycle: Type I, II and III Training, flowed by the Operational Readiness Exercises (ORE) in late August 1980.

 

    “After a short in port period, the crew of USS Independence (CV-62) made ready for the next part of the cycle: Type I, II and III Training, flowed by the Operational Readiness Exercises (ORE). This time, the crew would be out longer, but the send off would be different with a Dependents Day Cruise for family to be together at sea a day before departure. For a full day family, friends, and loved ones enjoyed a day at sea with music, tours, displays, demonstrations, and the ever popular air show. Having other people for the crew to meet and see, fellowship with and spend the day with to really show them what sailors and airman do at sea was highly motivational for crew members. After all, the Navy exists to protect the American citizen and to keep the sea lanes of the world free for trade” (Ref. 1148B).

 

Carrier Group THREE shifted his flag from USS Coral Sea (CV-43) to

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63)

 

    “RADM L. C. Chambers, Carrier Group THREE shifted his flag from USS Coral Sea (CV-43) to USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 8 September 1980 and the Department of Defense Personnel Security Program came aboard for an oversight Visit. During a routine, annual food-handling physical on 8 September 1980 an MS3 from S-2 division developed a positive PPD of twenty millimeters induration and symtomology suspicious for tuberculosis. After chest X-ray revealed “pulmonary interstitial diseasen, the patient was medically evacuated to Naval Regional Medical Center, San Diego for further treatment” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Independence (CV-62) departed Norfolk, Virginia for more training, much like

Refresher Training (REFTRA)

 

    “In early September 1980, USS Independence (CV-62) departed Norfolk, Virginia for more training, much like Refresher Training (REFTRA). This was Type I Training. The General Quarters (GQ’s) didn’t seem quite as long: “there was no need for water hours, and significant progress was being made on the forward messdecks. “We began to see that we were operating more as a team each day,” as reported by the author of the Indy 1981 Cyclic report” (Ref. 1148B).

 

 

Neodesha (YTB-815) assisting USS Ranger (CV-61) out of her berth at Naval Station Pearl Harbor, HI, in September 1980. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, photo # 1996.488.064.042 – 140981508 - Mike Green.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/14/140981508.jpg

 

    “USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 embarked departed San Francisco Bay, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 10 September 1980, with Captain Roger Elden Box, USNA 1956, as Commanding Officer, on her 15th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet, her second Indian Ocean deployment and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East; reclassified to CV-61 on 30 June 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises during the Vietnam Conflict/War, earning 13 battle stars for service in Vietnam. She will under go her 17th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 August 1957” (Ref. 1-Ranger, 72, 1094A, 1095 & 1096).

 

USS Ranger (CV-61) with CVW-2 (NE)

(10 September 1980 to 5 May 1981)

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-1

Wolf Pack -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -

Jet Fighter

NE100

F-14A

VF-2

Bounty Hunters -            Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NE200

F-14A

VA-113

Stingers -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NE300

A-7E

VA-25

Fist of the Fleet -            Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NE400

A-7E

VA-145

Swordsmen -            Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -

Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NE500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2B

VAQ-137

Rooks - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -

Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-37

Sawbucks - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

HS-2

Golden Falcons - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

720

SH-3H

 

 

    “On 12 September 1980, a message from COMNAVAIPAC, San Diego revealed that the patient had a confirmed diagnosis of active, cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis. From 20 through 25 September ship’s company and air wing personnel were given PRD sensitivity skin tests to determine any further active cases. Twenty-five new converters were identified, but no further cases were found aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63)” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Independence (CV-62) entered Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 19 September 1980

 

    “On 19 September 1980, USS Independence (CV-62) entered Ft. Lauderdale, Florida and found that for sheer good times, American ports are hard to beat. Most of the crew came away with memories of great beaches, good times and wonderful people” (Ref. 1148B).

 

At a Press Conference, Jimmy Carter was asked questions on the

Iran hostage crisis

 

     “At a Press Conference, Jimmy Carter was asked questions on the Iran hostage crisis the presidential campaign tax cuts September 18, 1980” (Ref. 12).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Taluga (TAO-62) on 12 September and on 18 September, successfully passing a Combined Defense Nuclear Surety Inspection (DNSI)/Nuclear Technical Proficiency Inspection (NTPI) combination conducted from 15 to 20 September 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

    “Several days after 19 September 1980, USS Independence (CV-62) was back at sea again, Type II Training, more drills, flight operations, and everyday routine commenced” (Ref. 1148B).

 

    “After Type II Training and drills, USS Independence (CV-62) dropped anchor at St. Thomas, in the Virgin Islands, an island in the Caribbean Sea and with the islands of Saint John, Saint Croix, and Water Island a county and constituent district of the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), an unincorporated territory of the United States; located on the island is the territorial capital and port of Charlotte Amalie. The water was crystal clear, the sights impressive, and liberty was made even nicer by the use of local ferry boat that could take 350 crew members ashore at one time” (Ref. 1148B).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USNS Taluga (TAO-62) on 23 September and on 25 September 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returns to NASNI, San Diego, Ca. after completing training operations and Combined Defense Nuclear Surety Inspection (DNSI)/Nuclear Technical Proficiency Inspection (NTPI) in the SOLCAL OPERA

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returned to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 26 September 1980, conducting training operations in the Southern California operating area from 10 to 26 September 1980, conducting Combined Defense Nuclear Surety Inspection (DNSI)/Nuclear Technical Proficiency Inspection (NTPI) from 15 to 20 September 1980. A 3M inspection was conducted in September and again Kitty Hawk Communications answered all bells with an overall score of 90%” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

   “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained import Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 26 to 27 September 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted Family Day in the SOLCAL OPERA

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted Family Day Cruise in the Southern California operating area on 27 September 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

 Iran hostage crisis Continues

 

    “By October 1980, the Reagan-Bush campaign had organized an aggressive intelligence penetration of its own government. The agents who functioned in the most sensitive areas of the government -- the Pentagon, the intelligence agencies, the State Department, the White House -- were providing regular intelligence reports on the most highly classified policies and operations.

 

    Beginning in early October and rising to a climax in the weeks before the election, news reports asserted that military equipment was being assembled or was actually on its way to the Middle East as part of a last minute attempt for the release of the hostages.

 

     These and other similar reports were all characterized by a wealth of convincing details. In reality, nothing was moving and these reports were part of a deliberate program of disinformation fed to the media by credible anonymous sources as part of a propaganda campaign to keep public attention focused on a possible "October Surprise" by the Carter administration” (Ref. 4).

 

      “This campaign strategy worked in its primary objective in keeping the Carter administration off-balance and on the defensive. The White House was reduced to issuing constant denials that never managed to catch up with the many leaks to the Reagan-Bush campaign and the media. This strategy also succeeded in planting the notion in the public mind that the Carter administration was preparing a maneuver to free the hostages just before the election. On October 7, 1980, it was announced in the New York Times the creation of an "October surprise committee" by the Republican campaign staff.

 

      “The purpose of this committee, comprised of ten foreign-policy experts, was to be alert for any last minute surprises, including the possible release of the hostages, and to develop contingency plans to deal with them. In reality, the committee itself was part of the contingency plan. By dramatizing the possibility of a sudden move by Carter just prior to the election, the creation of the committee planted the idea in the public mind that any such move should be viewed as a desperate attempt by Carter to hold on to the presidency” (Ref. 4).

 

Onboard USS Coral Sea (CV-43) at NAS, Alameda, Ca. conducting a $30 million USS Coral Sea (CV-43) concluded a $30 million modernization SRA

 

    “The Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42, the 43rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 45th, commissioning on 1 October 1947, with her 1st CO Captain A. P. Storrs, III, in command, conducted Availability period from 14 July to 10 October 1980, conducting  a $30 million modernization repair period to restore the ship to first-rate operating condition in all systems, and increase her value as a deployable carrier asset for years to come. During Coral Sea’s modernization repair period Typing 250 enlisted evaluations quarterly for the Operations Department Personnel was a challenge. When the Navy changed the reporting period, extending an evaluation period from 3-months to 6-months or 8-months in some cases (July 1, 1980 to February 28, 1981), Yeomen throughout the Navy were pleased. Unfortunately, the Navy changed the reporting period after all the enlisted evaluations were completed. It was a bad decision and hundreds of hours of work were lost in vain by everyone involved in the canceled reporting period. Coral Sea departed Alameda for sea trials following availability period” (Ref. 34, 35, 43, 72 & 84A).

 

     During Coral Sea’s modernization repair period, crew members that lived on base or off were able to go home every day after four to five o’clock, although everyone stood duty on the ship at least once a week, remaining onboard over night. The SRA for a Yeoman was all about typing and delivering messages to Communications many times a day. Other crewmen repaired or conducted maintenance of equipments and or spaces. YN3 Henions work load was about the same as when the ship was deployed, but sleepless nights were no longer suffered out at sea, but Sea Trials, followed by Independent Steaming Exercises, with the ship preparing for Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE), Refresher Training and CQ’s would keep everyone busy and away from home weeks at a time.

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Operations Department Yeoman conducts a Top Secret visit to XEROX Corporation, San Francisco, Ca. during SRA

 

    The Availability period following Coral Sea’s 79/80WestPac” was busy for the crew and ship wide office IBM Mag Card Type Writers were replaced with New Xerox computers. The Operations Department Office and the Intelligence Division had many documents, most Top Secret recorded on Mag Cards.

 

    The Operations Department would have to have someone re-type countless files and manuals that were created during the last three years, mostly Secret to Top Secret Manuals, Messages, Letter of Instructions, Green Sheets, Personnel Evaluations, Forums and how to manuals for equipment, etc.

 

    As the Yeoman responsible for all the typing, YN3 Henion was scheduled for discharge in August 1981 or re-enlistment and shore duty in San Diego, California.  An assignment was given Petty Officer Henion which involved going to the Xerox Corporation to copy files from one disk to another floppy disk. His assigned mission took several days and was successful but eventful as told in Henion’s own words:

 

    I didn’t have the time or desire to re-type all these files do to the amount of responsibilities already given me, to include up coming evaluations and Officers FITREPS, so re-typing manuals, etc., just wasn’t feasible, so the order was given that something had to be done and I went to the Xerox Corporation with a Second Class Petty Officer from one of Operations Department Divisions, who was responsible for security, armed with a pistol. In took several days to transfer information from the Mag Cards to floppy disks and deleting information on Mag Cards.

 

    We met with the senior representative of Xerox Corporation in San Francisco and I went to work. In a café both days, the Xerox representative romanced this Second Class Petty Officer. The first day after work we both went as guests but only stayed a few minutes before heading back to the ship. The second day when we were finished, we went to the café for dinner After dinner the Second Class on security detail wanted to stay at the café for a few hours visiting with his new girlfriend and I assumed the security of the floppy disks from a distance, placing them in the trunk of my car in an under ground parking lot at the Xerox Corporations Office.

 

    This situation was not of my making and I was really scared and pissed because the Second Class Petty Officer didn’t leave with me as soon as the job was finished. The Second Class Petty Officer and Senior Xerox Corporation representative told me everything would be fine in this under ground parking lot.

 

    The only thing I could do was exchange the keys for the pistol. I would have shot someone had they broken into my car. Several hours later we left for the ship. I never reported the Second Class Petty Officer but to this day I’ll never forget the event. His reasoning was different then mine but it wouldn’t make either one of us look great had I reported the incident as everything turned out ok.

 

    I didn’t like the position I was left in by this Second Class Petty Officer nor was I impressed with this senior Xerox Corporation representative who romanced my security guard. The weapon made the difference because I knew I could defend the trunk of my car, hiding in the shadow away from the car. Movies portray Cops protecting people in there patrol cars outside a residence there suppose to be protecting. That’s a good way to get your throat cut in my view so I hid away from the car and kept the car in my sight at all times.

 

    It could have resulted in a serious incident had someone knew what we were doing and reported it to those seeking to under mine the security of the U. S. of America. I would have been dead and the floppy disks would have been in our enemies’ hands had I been over powered. Highly sensitive information which could have done severe damage to the U.S. Navy, had it fallen in the wrong hands was both our responsibility.

 

    This incident in my life made me more independent and less trusting of Leading Petty Officers. Today in a world of uncertain futures for so many throughout the world, and so many seeking to destroy us and our allies citizens, this event hidden in history, should suggest to all, the importance of being professional in the handling of sensitive materials on or off military installations.

 

    Today there are those who so easily sell sensitive information to anyone for a price, we defiantly need our service members and agents of the U. S. government handling sensitive information better then some of us in the past have done, although I was armed and in an under ground parking lot.

 

    “An A-6E is lost at night during approach after an engine failure and the subsequent single engine recovery attempt aboard USS Midway (CV-41) in the Indian Ocean on 2 October 1980. Both crewmembers were recovered safely” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted Maintenance and Material Management (3-M) Inspection from 29 September to 2 October 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

    “After several days of liberty, USS Independence (CV-62) departed St. Thomas, in the Virgin Islands, an island in the Caribbean Sea and with the islands of Saint John, Saint Croix, and Water Island a county and constituent district of the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), an unincorporated territory of the United States; located on the island is the territorial capital and port of Charlotte Amalie for Type III Training and Operational Readiness Exercises (ORE) which would tell just how battle ready the crew had become. The water was crystal clear, the sights impressive, and liberty was made even nicer by the use of local ferry boat that could take 350 crew members ashore at one time” (Ref. 1148B).

 

Iran hostage crisis Continues

 

    “By the middle of October 1980, the momentum of the campaign had shifted in Carter's favor. Carter's rivals realized they were at a tactical disadvantage. Although he was vulnerable on his handling of the hostage issue, Carter's challengers had to be careful in their criticisms or risk being perceived as undercutting the president during a national crisis. They also faced the reality that the rescue attempt, despite its failure, had demonstrated that President Carter was prepared, under certain circumstances to take great risks to resolve the hostage crisis. They worried that a sudden breakthrough in the negotiations, or some unexpected development concerning the hostages, could instantly divert public attention away from the campaign. The Republicans wanted to ensure that the Iranian hostage issue would not be used to promote the reelection of Jimmy Carter. They were particularly concerned about the possibility of an unexpected development, outside the control of the campaign that might shift public support to the President.  If the sudden release of the hostages in Iran happened at a sensitive moment in the campaign, the elation of the American people could relieve doubts about Carter's leadership and swing many voters to ensure Carter's reelection. It was therefore crucial for the Republicans to adopt a comprehensive strategy to defend themselves against a possible release of the hostages prior to the election” (Ref. 4).

 

USS Constellation (CV-64) with CVW-9 embarked returns to NASNI, San Diego, California from WestPac” and Indian Ocean deployment

 

    “On 15 October 1980, USS Constellation (CV-64) (Connie) with CVW-9 embarked arrived Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, with Captain Leon A. Edney, USN, as Commanding Officer, ending her 12th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet in the far east, RIMPAC'80, on her third Indian Ocean deployment and third Arabian Sea deployment during the Iranian Crisis on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea, remaining on station in the Indian Ocean for an exhausting 110 consecutive days. On 18 April 1980, Constellation and her battle group departed Subic Bay, the Republic of the Philippines, to relieve USS Coral Sea (CV-43), steaming westward to the Arabian Sea, where Gonzo Station had been established following the November 1979 takeover of the American Embassy in Tehran, Iran. Coral Sea with CVW-14 Air Wing and COMCARGROUP THREE embarked, was on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea 83 continuous days (February 4 1980 to 24 April 1980), when the top-secret mission called Operation Eagle Claw began at about dawn on 24 April 1980, in connection with the Iranian crisis, operating along side USS Nimitz (CVN 68), with her air wing (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard Brochure/March 1980-Vol 8; No. 2). Constellation reached the eastern Indian Ocean when the unsuccessful 24 April 1980 raid to free American hostages took place, and after cross decking supplies and spare parts, Constellation relieved Coral Sea with CVW-14 Air Wing and COMCARGROUP THREE embarked in the North Arabian Sea on 30 April 1980, departing the Arabian Sea, she was on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea 89 continuous days since Coral Sea’s arrival in the Indian Ocean on 1 February 1980, steaming through the Malacca Straits on 31 January 1980, and then on track to the Indian Ocean, departing Singapore Bay on 29 January 1980. Coral Sea departed the Arabian Sea on 30 April 1980, steaming through the Indian Ocean and Malacca Straits via the South China Sea en route to Subic Bay (13-days), arriving at Subic Bay, the Republic of the Philippines on 13 May 1980, to be the ship’s first stop on the way back to her home base, NAS Alameda, Ca., having been at sea 102 consecutive days” (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard Brochure/March 1980-Vol 8; No. 2). On 26 June 1980, Constellation collides with a Bangladesh merchant ship in the Arabian Sea. The U.S. Navy says there was minor damage to both ships. Constellation on station in the Indian Ocean contingency, relieved by the USS Midway (CV-41) on 17 August 1980, beginning another Indian Ocean deployment for the Midway, alongside the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) task group still on contingency duty in the Arabian Sea, Constellation headed home. Midway spent a total of 118 days in the Indian Ocean during 1980; reclassified to CV-64 on 1 July 1975; made seven Vietnam Combat Cruises in Vietnam, during the Vietnam Conflict/War, received a Presidential Unit Citation from President Nixon in 1973. Squadrons: VF-211, F-14; VF-24; F-14; VA-146, A-7E; VA-147, A-7E; VA-165, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-116, E-2C; VFP-63 Det. 3, RF-8G; VS-38, S-3 A; HS-6, SH-3H and VQ-1 Det. EA-3B. *VFP-63 disestablished on Jun.30, 1982. Her 14th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission at New York Naval Shipyard on 27 October 1961, with Captain T.J. Walker in command (26 February to 15 October 1980)” (Ref. 1-Constellation, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard Brochure/March 1980-Vol 8; No. 272, 76 & 84A).

 

 26/04/80 to 15/10/80

 AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

WEST COAST

Navy Expeditionary Medal

http://www.gruntsmilitary.com/navexpmed.shtml

http://www.history.navy.mil/medals/nem.htm

26/04/80 to 04/08/80; 12/08/80 to 19/08/80; Iran/Indian Ocean (21/11/79 to 20/10/81) – 3rd Award        

12th WestPac & RIMPAC'80 and the Iranian Crisis on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea

Ref. - 406A

 

USS Independence (CV-62) ran the gamut of Type I, II & III Training and Operational Readiness Exercises (ORE) from September to December 1980

 

    “Under the critical eye of the Fleet Training Group, USS Independence (CV-62) ran the gamut of Type I, II & III Training and Operational Readiness Exercises (ORE), drills, exercises, and war games and upon conclusion, Independence arrived Norfolk, Virginia. The Indy proved to be one of the highest rated carrier fighting teams in the fleet today. All the crews hard work had been worth it, as the crew received outstanding grades in Engineering, Communications, and numerous other areas. Indy’s combat airwing proved highly effective in both attacking and interception. Overall, the entire ship performed as a team, to achieve total operational readiness, and the successful completion of yet another part of the carrier cycle, with overall grades of out standing, highest of any East Coast carrier. Independence departed Norfolk, Virginia in early September 1980 for Type I, II & III Training and ORE. The General Quarters (GQ’s) didn’t seem quite as long: “there was no need for water hours, and significant progress was being made on the forward messdecks. “We began to see that we were operating more as a team each day,” as reported by the author of the Indy 1980 Cyclic report. On 19 September 1980, Independence entered Ft. Lauderdale, Florida and found that for sheer good times, American ports are hard to beat. Most of the crew came away with memories of great beaches, good times and wonderful people. Several days later Indy was back at sea again, for Type II Training, more drills, flight operations, and everyday routine commenced. After Type II Training and drills, Independence dropped anchor at St. Thomas, in the Virgin Islands, an island in the Caribbean Sea and with the islands of Saint John, Saint Croix, and Water Island a county and constituent district of the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), an unincorporated territory of the United States; located on the island is the territorial capital and port of Charlotte Amalie. The water was crystal clear, the sights impressive, and liberty was made even nicer by the use of local ferry boat that could take 350 crew members ashore at one time. After several days of liberty, Independence departed St. Thomas, in the Virgin Islands, for Type III Training and Operational Readiness Exercises (ORE) which would tell just how battle ready the crew had become” (Ref. 1148B & 1152).

 

    “Back at home, USS Independence (CV-62) Pre-Overseas Movement (POM) period began. Final preparations for the long cruise, making last minute repairs, on loading vast amounts of supplies, the embarkation of airwing personnel and all their gear. The crew was granted as much liberty as possible to spend time with family and friends, and time to prepare for a long but necessary separation. The uncertainty as to where Indy would deploy had resolved: the Iranian hostage crisis had not yet been settled” (Ref. 1148B).

 

     Beginning in November, shortly after SRA and Sea Trials, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, to conduct Independent Steaming Exercises, with the ship preparing for Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) scheduled for February 1981.

 

Iran hostage crisis Continues

 

     “As the Carter campaign was in the final stretch, just two days before Election Day, Carter received word from Iran that the Iranian parliament had chosen to approve the four points which were compatible with what Khomeini had announced in September 1980 Carter, after flying back to Washington from campaigning in Chicago, concluded that the differences were still quite significant, and could not accept their proposal without further discussions.

 

     In his announcement to the American people, he said that the proposal was a good and constructive move, and could lead to positive results. It was understood that the hostages would not be released before the election because of the intense negotiations required.

 

     The Carter administration was also aware of the potential backlash against the president that this latest announcement would have, but remained optimistic that a breakthrough had been made in the hostage crisis, which would ultimately bring about the liberation of the Americans.

 

     Hours before the polls opened, all three networks carried the latest news from Iran, stories from the campaign trail, with Carter and Reagan trying to avoid questions on the possible release of the hostages, and concluded not with stories about the Presidential election the next day, but with a commemoration of the anniversary of the captivity” (Ref. 7).

 

      “These included film clips of the President's announcements of the embassy takeover, the failed rescue mission, and the outrage of the American people. All three networks took their viewers on an emotionally wrenching review of the past year.

 

     Rather than drawing the contrasts between the two men who wanted to be President, the news was a strong reminder of the Carter administration's impotence in achieving an honorable release of the hostages” (Ref. 7).

 

    “Captain Daniel Arthur Pedersen assumed command of USS Ranger (CVA-61) on 20 October 1980, relieving Captain Roger Elden Box, USNA 1956, 21st Commanding Officer, serving from 28 May 1979 to 20 October 1980” (Ref. 1095 & 1096).

 

    “After the fall of the Shah of Iran in 1979, the United States assumed greater responsibility for the security of the Gulf. During the 1979-1981 Iranian hostage crisis, nearly 30 Navy ships were on constant patrol in the region, including one carrier battle group in the Indian Ocean or North Arabian Sea. In April 1980, the USS Nimitz (CVN-68) battle group served as a jumping off point for the joint service rescue attempt of the 52 American hostages. In 1980, the Carter Doctrine declared the Persian Gulf region to be a "vital" interest to the United States--one for which we were willing to fight. Events in the Middle East convinced President Carter that the United States required a means of rapid response to regional crises. In October 1980, a new unified Rapid Deployment Force (RDF) was created to meet that need. The RDE later evolved into Central Command, which marked the beginning of the capability to move large military forces into the Persian Gulf, the sine quo non of Desert Shield/Storm” (Ref. 1149).

 

    LCDR H. Meyers assigned to VA-56 is killed in a cat launch accident off USS Midway (CV-41) in the Indian Ocean on 4 November 1980” (Ref. 84A)

.

Iran hostage crisis Continues

 

    “On November 4 1980, a majority of voters expressed their displeasure by rejecting the president's bid for reelection. The Reagan-Bush campaign began to organize an extensive and sophisticated intelligence operation designed to penetrate key agencies of the United States government and to provide early-warning information to the campaign regarding any hostage developments.

 

     Many of them were angry, bitter, unemployed CIA covert-operations personnel, cut by Carter in the fall of 1977 in the wake of the worst scandals in the history of American intelligence.

 

    “Reagan's victory November 6, 1980 put additional pressure on Khomeini, who could hardly expect the incoming administration to offer as favorable deal as the outgoing Carter administration. After Carter's defeat, he demonstrated that he was still president for the next ten weeks, and that he had an agenda to pursue regardless of the election results.

 

     News from Iran continued to be encouraging as Khomeini gave permission to the militants holding the Americans to turn them over to the Tehran government. Prime Minister Mohammed Ali Rajai appointed a commission to work out the terms for the release of the hostages, using Algeria as Iran's intermediary with Washington” (Ref. 4).

 

     “The negotiations were long and complex. While the Tehran government wanted Washington to return the shah's wealth, the president did not have the legal power to do so” (Ref. 7).

 

     “The purpose of this committee, comprised of ten foreign-policy experts, was to be alert for any last minute surprises, including the possible release of the hostages, and to develop contingency plans to deal with them. In reality, the committee itself was part of the contingency plan. By dramatizing the possibility of a sudden move by Carter just prior to the election, the creation of the committee planted the idea in the public mind that any such move should be viewed as a desperate attempt by Carter to hold on to the presidency” (Ref. 4).

 

Pre-Deployment

http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv62-81/007.htm

 

    “Cdr/Captain James D. Joyner assumed command as Executive Officer of USS Independence (CVA-62) on 7 November 1980, relieving Captain John F. Calhoun, 22nd Executive Officer, serving from 10 June 1977 to 7 November 1980” (Ref. 1156A).

 

Ronald Regan wins the Presidency November 6, 1981 and

Iran hostage crisis Continues

 

    “USS Independence (CV-62) with CVW-6 and Carrier Group Eight, Rear Admiral James E. Service embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia 19 November 1980, with Captain Thomas Edward Shanahan, as Commanding Officer and Cdr/Captain James D. Joyner as Executive Officer, on her second Indian Ocean and first North Arabian Sea deployment in support of the Iranian Crisis, operating with the 7th Fleet, steaming through the Southern Atlantic around the tip of Africa around Cape of Hope, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Indian Ocean. Upon conclusion of Indian Ocean operations Indy will steam from the Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea, making her third Gulf of Aden voyage, on her third the Red Sea voyage, steaming through the Bab el Mandeb by westerly and northerly courses from the Gulf of Aden and will anchor just outside the Suez Canal, becoming the first aircraft carrier to make a south-to-north transit of the Suez Canal since it was reopened in response to the Israel and Syria Crisis, taking up station on “Bagel Station,” off the coast of Israel and Lebanon; on her 15th Mediterranean Sea deployment, operating with the 6th Fleet, steaming through the Atlantic where Board and Survey Inspection (INSURV) will be conducted, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet to the Mediterranean Sea; reclassified to CV-62 - "Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier" 28 February 1973; made one Vietnam Combat cruise during the Vietnam Conflict/War and first deployment operating with the 7th Fleet, earning 1 battle star for service in Vietnam on her eighth deployment FWFD. She will under go her 19th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission as a Forrestal Class Attack Aircraft Carrier at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard, New York, 10 January 1959” (Ref. 1-Independence, 72, 76, 325, 1148B & 1156A).

 

Chain of Command and Staff http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv62-81/index_004.htm

CRUISE MAP http://navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv62-81/007.htm

 

USS Independence (CV-62) with CVW-6

(19 November 1980 to 10 June 1981)

Iranian Crisis, operating with the 7th Fleet and Board and Survey Inspection (INSURV).

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-102

Diamondbacks -            Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

AE100

F-4J

VF-33

Tarsiers -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

AE200

F-4J

VA-15

Valions -                       Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AE300

A-7E

VA-87

Golden Warriors -                       Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

AE400

A-7E

VA-176

Thunderbolts -                       Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

AE500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-124

Bear Aces - Carrier Airborne Early Warning

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-131

Lancers -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-15

Red Lions - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610-615

SH-3H

VFP-63 DET.4 (*1)

Eyes of the Fleet -

Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

616-620

RF-8G

VS-28

Hukkers - Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

(*1) VFP-63 disestablished on Jun.30, 1982

 

   “An ecumenical worship service was held on Thanksgiving Day aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) on 22 November 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked returns to Yokosuka, Japan from her Indian Ocean deployment

 

    “On 26 November 1980, USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked arrived Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), with Captain Eddie Inman ("Hoagy") Carmichael, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, ending her 25th WestPac, her 18th South China Sea, on her sixth Indian Ocean deployment, her 19th deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet,.on her second North Arabian Sea and first Arabian/Persian Gulf. Midway collides with the Panamian freighter CACTUS while transiting the passage between Palawan Straits near the Palawan Island and the coast of Northern Borneo 450 nautical miles off Subic Bay en route to Singapore on 29 July 1980. The Midway, the Navy says, sustained no serious damage although two US sailors were killed, three were injured, and three F-4 Phantom aircraft parked on the flight deck were damaged. The crew of an F-4J assigned to VF-151 loses control of their plane during a touch-and-go aboard the Midway and ejects between Philippines and Borneo on 5 August 1980. Both are recovered safely. USS Constellation (CV-64) on station in the Indian Ocean contingency was relieved by Midway on 17 August 1980, beginning another Indian Ocean deployment for the Midway, alongside the task group of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) still on contingency duty in the Arabian Sea. An A-6E is lost at night during approach after an engine failure and the subsequent single engine recovery attempt aboard Midway in the Indian Ocean on 2 October 1980. Both crewmembers were recovered safely. LCDR H. Meyers assigned to VA-56 is killed in a cat launch accident off Midway in the Indian Ocean on 4 November 1980. Midway spent a total of 118 days in the Indian Ocean during 1980. Ports of calls include: Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines, U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, a bay forming part of Luzon Sea on the west coast of the island of Luzon in Zambales, Philippines, about 100 kilometers northwest of Manila Bay and is a major ship-repair, supply, and rest and recreation facility of the United States Navy located in Olongapo, Zambales, Philippines. Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. Her 22nd deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. Her 28th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. Her 41st Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II (14 July to 26 November 1980)” (Ref. 1-Midway, 72 & 84A).

 

 14/07/80 to 26/11/80

AWARD OR CITATION

AWARD DATES

7Th FLEET Forward Deployed

Navy Expeditionary Service Medal

Iran, Yemen & Indian Ocean

 

19 Aug to 13 Nov 1980*h

25th WestPac

18th SCS

6th IO

Middle East

2nd North Arabian Sea & 1st Arabian / Persian Gulf

Battle Efficiency Award (Navy "E" Ribbon), marking her as the outstanding carrier in the Pacific Fleet

Jul 1980 to Dec 1981

25th, 26th & 27th WestPac

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon

Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.svg

Aug 74 to Aug 91

same

 

“The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (SSDR) is a service award of the United States Navy which was established in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to August 1974. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces” (Ref..1081D).

Iran/Indian Ocean (21 NOV 79  ~  20 OCT 81)

Ref. 1081 & 1081/C

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked commenced Fleet Activities at Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) on 26 November 1981” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Independence (CV-62) crossed the Equator and conducted Polywog to Shellback Initiation on 29 November 1980, with over 4,000 polliwogs and only a few hundred shellbacks, it was hard to say who really had control over the initiation. Hundreds of American sailors gathered on the flight deck in the strangest of costumes. Some had on pirate costumes; others wore their pants inside out and backwards, all wore T-shirts sporting various shellback and pollywog slogans. Thousands of enlisted men, officers and civilians crawled through a gauntlet of hose-wielding shellbacks, Met with King Neptune’s Court, Royal Doctors, barbers and thee totally indescribable. It was all in good fun, and when it was over, Indy was entirely in the hands of Shellbacks” (Ref. 325).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) received many VIPs during her long sojourn at Bremerton, Washington

 

    “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) received many VIPs during her long sojourn at Bremerton, Washington, culminating in visits by Vice Admiral De Poix on 6 September 1980, Secretary of the Navy Edward Hidalgo on 25 September 1980, Admiral Thomas B. Hayward, CNO, on 24 October 1980, Vice Admiral R.F. Schoultz, AirPac, on 3 September and 6 November 1980, 26–27 January, 22–23 April, 15 July and 1 December 1981, and Admiral J.D. Watkins, CinCPac, on 3 September 1981.

 

    “This was also the first time in her history that the ship’s prototype nuclear reactor propulsion plant received a complete overhaul, the magnitude of the project later noted succinctly by her skipper: “Continued intricate testing of the ship’s reactor equipment extended the overhaul into 1982.” The total cost of her overhaul was approximately $276 million” (Ref. 362D).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) departed MODLOC in the Northern Arabian Sea

 

    USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) departed MODLOC in the Northern Arabian Sea en route Norfolk, VA on 1 December 1980” (Ref. 383C-1980).

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Operations Departmental Yeoman Recommended Yeoman Second Class

 

     YN3 Bruce Wayne Henion eniomnwas recommended for Yeoman Second Class on 1 December 1980.

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) departs NAS, NI, San Diego, Ca. for

Readiness Exercise 1-81in the SOLCAL OPERA

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained import Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 12 November to 4 December, departing on 4 December 1980, for Readiness Exercise 1-81.  The month of December allowed for the first of three READIEX’s scheduled prior to deployment where as Kitty Hawk assumed the challenging role of Communications Control Ship and acted in this capacity when engaged in Battle Group operations Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with USS Roanoke (AOR-7) the day of departure” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

    “USS Independence (CV-62) rounded the tip of Africa around Cape of Good Hope on 8 December 1980 and Indy relieved USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) the same day and a assumed duty patrolling “Gonzo Station.” Though the crew had been at sea for some time, by the time Ike reached Norfolk, Virginia, would be gone a record 252 days. The crew didn’t really want to break Ike’s record!” (Ref. 325 & 1148B).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) turned over with USS Independence (CV-62) in the Indian Ocean

 

    USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) turned over with USS Independence (CV-62) at sea from 8 to 9 December 1980, conducting an Open Ocean Turnover and then departed the 7th Fleet AOR and returned to the Atlantic Fleet, Out Chopping the Pacific and Seventh Fleet, steaming from the Indian Ocean through the Mazambique Channel to the bottom of South Africa, traveling around Cape of Good Hope through the South Atlantic In Chopping into the Atlantic Fleet on 9 December 1980” (Ref. 383B).

 

   “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) conducted UNREP with USS Wabash (AOR-5) on 14 December 1980. Heavy lift capability using a newly designed strongback for ship to ship transfer of aircraft engines was demonstrated on 11 and 14 December 1980 between USS Wabash (AOR-5) and Kitty Hawk, commencing Readiness Exercise 1-81, exercising the Mobile Sea Range Concept which required precise positioning of the ship by the Navigation Department on the 14th. This strongback enabled heavy engines (up to 9000 pounds) to be transferred between ships. However, even with the new strongback, the separation distance between ships cannot be more than 130 feet; greater distances allow the load to touch the side of the ship before being lifted over the edge. An 8700 pound weighted container was successfully transferred four times” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returns to NASNI, San Diego, Ca. after completing

Readiness Exercise 1-81 in the SOLCAL OPERA

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) returned to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on 16 December 1980, conducting training operations in the Southern California operating area from 4 to 16 December 1980, to include Readiness Exercise 1-81, exercising the Mobile Sea Range Concept which required precise positioning of the ship by the Navigation Department from 8 to 16 December 1980; embarking VADM Waller, Commander Third Fleet, for a visit of the ship on the 16th. Dec 80: Kitty Hawk provided weapons support for READIEX 1-81. Despite the ambitious pace of flying, the last quarter of the year proved to be most beneficial. The initial pace was set by ASWEX marked by seventy-two hours of continuous flight operations and multiplex followed with a requirement to operate a flex deck to meet the CAP relief on station. The deck multiple remained high; however, the “crunch raten remained at an all time low of 2.0 per 2,364 aircraft moves. The Air Department, despite its less than satisfactory manpower level, “Pays off on performance, not excuses” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) commenced SRA NASNI, San Diego, Ca.

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) commenced Selective Restricted Availability (SRA) on 16 December 1980” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

    The pilot of an A-7E assigned to VA-56 embarked aboard USS Midway (CV-41) operating off Ohshima Island, Japan on 17 December 1980, inadvertently shuts down the engine after a bolter. He ejects and is rescued” (Ref. 84A).

 

    “Crossing the Line" ceremonies. The first one was held in early May when over 5,000 pollywogs were mercifully cleansed of their dreaded condition. Due to the renewed presence of pollywogs, another cleansing ceremony as USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) crossed the equator was performed again on 18 December 1980 during the transit back to CONUS” (Ref. 383C-1980).

 

     “USS Independence (CV-62) arrived “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea, steaming through the Indian Ocean on 18 December 1980” (Ref. 1148B).

 

    ADM Thomas B. Hayward, Chief of Naval Operations, visited USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) on 19 December 1980” (Ref. 383B & 383C-1980).

 

Iran History

 

     “December 21, 1980, Iran demanded $24 billion for the captives to be deposited into Algeria, which was reduced on January 6 to $20 billion, and another reduction a week later to $8 billion. On Carter's last morning in office, the Iranians agreed to a deal that gave them $8 billion worth of Iranian assets that had been frozen, $5 billion of which was set aside to pay off Iran's debts to American and European banks, in return for the release of the hostages, who flew out of Tehran that day. After 444 days, Khomeini was left with a bankrupt and divided country that was involved in a dangerous and expensive war with Iraq” (Ref.4).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) returns to Norfolk, Va. from Indian Ocean and North Arabian Sea during the Iranian Crisis

 

     “On 22 December 1980, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) with CVW-7 embarked arrived Pier 12, Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia, with Captain George D. O’Brien, Jr., USN, in command, relieving James H. Mauldin on 8 October 1980, ending her first Indian Ocean and North Arabian Sea deployment in response to the Iran hostage crisis, dispatched by President Carter and participated in Exercise Beacon Compass, Exercise Gonzo 4-80/MultiplEx 1-80 and Exercise Gonzo 5-80, operating with the 7th Fleet, steaming to the Indian Ocean from the Southern Atlantic from the bottom of South Africa, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, traveling around Cape of Good Hope through the Mazambique Channel to the Indian Ocean.  Dwight D. Eisenhower crossed from the Atlantic to the 7th Fleet AOR on 29 April 1980. The Secretary of the Navy and Commander Naval Air Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet arrive on board the same morning t o welcome IKE and her Battle Group. Over 12,000 dependents and friends of IKE crewmembers waited anxiously in the cold winter wind as the brows were set in pace and the men began filing off the ship for holiday celebrations. USS Constellation (CV-64) reached the eastern Indian Ocean when the unsuccessful 24 April 1980 raid to free American hostages took place. Dwight D. Eisenhower Out Chopped Atlantic Fleet and In Chopped Pacific Fleet on 29 April 1980, with USS South Carolina (CGN-37) and USS Virginia (CGN-38), steaming to the Indian Ocean from the Southern Atlantic from the bottom of South Africa, traveling around Cape of Good Hope through the Mazambique Channel to the Indian Ocean crossing from the Atlantic to the Pacific and.7th Fleet AOR on 29 April 1980. Constellation cross decked supplies and spare parts, relieving USS Coral Sea (CV-43) with CVW-14 Air Wing and COMCARGRU Three embarked in the North Arabian Sea on 30 April 1980, departing the Arabian Sea, she was on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea 89 continuous days since Coral Sea’s arrival in the Indian Ocean on 1 February 1980, steaming through the Malacca Straits on 31 January 1980, and then on track to the Indian Ocean, departing Singapore Bay on 29 January 1980. Coral Sea departed the Arabian Sea on 30 April 1980, steaming through the Indian Ocean and Malacca Straits via the South China Sea en route to Subic Bay. Dwight D. Eisenhower) crossed the equator during early May 1980, allowing shellbacks among the crew to cleanse over 5,000 pollywogs of “their dreaded condition.” Dwight D. Eisenhower, South Carolina and Virginia relieved USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and her group, including guided missile cruisers California (CGN-37) and Texas (CGN-39) on 7 May 1980, after the crew endured 108 days, operating 144 of them continuously at sea, including 115 of Iranian contingency operations on station during Operation Evening Light in support of Operation Eagle Claw. CAPT James H. Mauldin, Nimitz, CO, established an almost weekly “CO’s Day” to allow the men to take time off and participate in “Flight Deck Olympics” and picnics. In addition, the Navy authorized a special ration of six cans of beer per man, which the captain dispensed in increments over a 60 day period. Coming about, Nimitz began her 11,500 mile voyage back to Norfolk, stopping en route off Ascension Island to embark inspectors. “…I told you that I had confidence in your high state of preparedness for any task which might be demanded of you,” ADM Hayward told the crew during their time in the Gulf. “You proved without question in the ensuing months that my confidence and that of your countrymen across America and your shipmates throughout the Navy was especially well placed…Your countrymen are very proud of you, and they have every right to be.” Dwight D. Eisenhower conducted operations in Northern Arabian Sea from 8 to 21 May 1980, GONZO 3-80 exercise in Northern Arabian Sea from 21 to 23 June 1980, conducting operations in Northern Arabian Sea from 24 June to 7 July 1980, commencing GONZO 4-80/MULTIPLEX 1-80 exercise in Northern Arabian Sea from 8 to 9 July 1980. Dwight D. Eisenhower departed MODLOC/en route to Singapore from 11 to 17 July 1980 after operating in the Northern Arabian Sea, steaming through the Indian Ocean and Malacca Straits via the South China Sea, pulling into Singapore, the "Lion City" on 17 July 1980, the first liberty for her crew after 152 days (or 5½ months) at sea without a port call, a new record, for a five day visit so IKE1s 5,500 man crew could enjoy a well deserved rest period. During that period, Sailors and Marines enjoyed 2 beers (1 time) after 45 days without a port call. This was the first legal consumption of alcohol by U.S. Sailors while underway aboard a U.S. Navy vessel in decades. Concluding her five-day stop over in Singapore from 17 to 22 July 1980, Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to the northern Arabian Sea via the Strait of Malacca and Indian Ocean.  The readiness of other mariners to obey rules of the road during her transits of the busy waterway surprised the ship’s navigation team, allowing them to maintain an average speed of 15–18 knots amid the crowded shipping with enough room to maneuver out of vessels passing close aboard. Dwight D. Eisenhower conducted KERMITEX Exercise on 27 July 1980, en route to MODLOC in Northern Arabian Sea from 22 to 30 July 1980, steaming through the South China Sea, Malacca Strait0s and Indian Ocean on station and ready to begin operations once again. Constellation on station in the Indian Ocean contingency, relieved by the USS Midway (CV-41) on 17 August 1980, beginning another Indian Ocean deployment for the Midway, alongside the Dwight D. Eisenhower and her task group still on contingency duty in the Arabian Sea. Midway spent a total of 118 days in the Indian Ocean during 1980. Dwight D. Eisenhower crew's morale continued to be a high priority item during the Indian Ocean deployment. An almost weekly I1CO's Day" was established which allowed the men of IKE to take time off to relax on the flight deck to acquire a tan, participate in the ship's first "Flight Deck Olympics" competition, and enjoy several picnics. Also of interest were the six cans of beer per person that was authorized by the Secretary of the Navy for having been at-sea for such a long period. The beer was dispensed in increments of sixty days. Boxing smokers were held frequently in the hanger bay, and several US0 shows were sponsored on board during the long eight-month deployment, the most notable of which occurred on 18 August 1980 when Miss America (Cheryl Prewitt of Mississippi) and her entourage performed for the men of IKE. During the southeast monsoon that swept through the northern Indian Ocean during the late summer, sea surges increased to 11 to 13 feet, causing problems during station keeping and flight operations. Submarine tender Emory S. Land (AS-39) operating off Diego Garcia provided calibrating capabilities to the Avionics Division. Dwight D. Eisenhower conducted operations in Northern Arabian Sea from 30 July to 2 September 1980, departing MODLOC in the Northern Arabian Sea en route to Diego Garcia B. I. 0. T. OPAREA from 2 to 6 September 1980, arriving Diego Garcia B. I. 0. T. OPAREA for Weapons Week on 6 September 1980, participating in Weapons Week in Diego Garcia B. I. 0. T. OPAREA from 6 to 9 September 1980. CVW-7 suffered the loss of an F-14 of VF-143 that entered a flat spin during an ACM engagement with an A-7E Corsair II, crashing into the sea a short distance from Dwight D. Eisenhower on 13 September 1980, en route to MODLOC in Northern Arabian Sea from 9 to 14 September 1980, participating in exercise GONZO 5-80 in the Northern Arabian Sea from 14 to 17 September 1980. In October 1980, a Douglas EA-3B from Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ) 2, unable to lower its tailhook during landing aboard Dwight D. Eisenhower and had to emergency divert ashore to Masirah. An SH-3H flew “troubleshooters” out to the island, who repaired the Skywarrior. Both aircraft returned that evening. Constant Russian surveillance in the Gulf of Oman forced the launch of two Lockheed S-3A Vikings from VS-31 and two A-6Es from VA-65 for three and a half hour sorties to work the “coastline or littoral regions.” During this deployment VS-31 discovered and tracked two Soviet Echo II-class submarines and a Foxtrot-class sub shadowing the carrier, intercepted over 50 Soviet aircraft of various types (in addition to15 Iranian Lockheed P-3F Orions), and maintained surveillance of an Iranian Saam-class guided missile frigate that loitered in the vicinity. The “added tension” of the Persian Gulf War between the Iranians and Iraqis exacerbated the strain on the crew, forcing them to be ever vigilant. The large number of flight hours produced an unusual number of AIM-9L Sidewinder air-to-air missile failures, however, prompting concerns about the missile’s reliability. Men requiring emergency leave had to fly to al Masirah Island, Oman, and thence to Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Territory, where USAF Lockheed C-141 Starlifters and C-5 Galaxies flew them on to Clark AFB, Philippines, where they embarked for other destinations, an exhausting series of flights. On 3 October 1980, General David C. Jones, USAF, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, arrived on board to give a speech to both praise IKE and thank her crew, embarked squadrons, and embarked staff for the "dedication to duty and professionalism exhibited throughout the deployment. On 8 October 1980, Captain George D. O’Brien, Jr. relieved Captain James H. Mauldin as commanding officer of Dwight D. Eisenhower. After the fall of the Shah of Iran in 1979, the United States assumed greater responsibility for the security of the Gulf. During the 1979-1981 Iranian hostage crises, nearly 30 Navy ships were on constant patrol in the region, including one carrier battle group in the Indian Ocean or North Arabian Sea. In April 1980, the USS Nimitz (CVN-68) battle group served as a jumping off point for the joint service rescue attempt of the 52 American hostages. In 1980, the Carter Doctrine declared the Persian Gulf region to be a "vital" interest to the United States--one for which we were willing to fight. Events in the Middle East convinced President Carter that the United States required a means of rapid response to regional crises. In October 1980, a new unified Rapid Deployment Force (RDF) was created to meet that need. The RDE later evolved into Central Command, which marked the beginning of the capability to move large military forces into the Persian Gulf, the sine quo non of Desert Shield/Storm. Dwight D. Eisenhower departed MODLOC in the Northern Arabian Sea en route Norfolk, VA on 1 December 1980, turning over with USS Independence (CV-62) at sea from 8 to 9 December 1980, conducting an Open Ocean Turnover and then departed the 7th Fleet AOR and returned to the Atlantic Fleet, Outing Chopping the Pacific and Seventh Fleet, steaming from the Indian Ocean through the Mazambique Channel to the bottom of South Africa, traveling around Cape of Good Hope through the South Atlantic In Chopping into the Atlantic Fleet on 9 December 1980. Crossing the Line" ceremonies followed: The first one was held in early May when over 5,000 pollywogs were mercifully cleansed of their dreaded condition. Due to the renewed presence of pollywogs, another cleansing ceremony as the ship crossed the equator was performed again on 18 December 1980 during the transit back to CONUS. On 19 December 1980, ADM Thomas B. Hayward, Chief of Naval Operations, visited Dwight D. Eisenhower. Many awards were acquired and records of a statistical nature were set by the Navy's largest nuclear powered carrier, her crew, her squadrons, and her embarked staff. During the longest deployment for a Navy ship since World War 11, daily flight operations led to thousands of accident-free flight hours. This accomplishment was a major reason for IKE winning the highly touted Flatley Award for Safety for the second year in a row. IKE also placed second in the annual Edward F. Ney award competition for excellence in food service operations for carriers. Overall, FY 80 was a very good year for IKE as far as awards were concerned. The ship as a whole won the Battle "E” for the second year in a row. Additionally, the following departments on board IKE also won awards: AIR, AIMD, Engineering (for damage control), Medical, Communications and Operations for excellence in their respective fields. All but AIMD and Communications were repeats from last year. Port of call: Singapore Bay and Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines. As a result of the tensions in the area, Dwight D. Eisenhower stayed on station off the coast of Iran for over 8 months, and was at sea for a total of 254 days in the North Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean. She returned home just in time for her air wing and crew to celebrate Christmas with their families. Her third Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 18 October 1977, Captain William E. Ramsey in command (15 April to 22 December 1980)” (Ref. 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard Brochure/March 1980-Vol 8; No. 2, 44, 72, 76, 84A, 383, 383B & 383C-1980).

 

End note: Un Official Navy Site list Naval Support Facility, Diego Garcia as a possible port Ike may have visited briefly with out allowing the crew to go ashore. Until the U. S. Navy releases deployment history of carriers there will not be an accurate accounting of carrier deployment history of hundreds of carrier deployments. Diego Garcia is an island considered the largest atoll, in terms of land area of the Chagos Archipelago, and is part of the British Indian Ocean Territories. The island is located in the Indian Ocean, about 1,600 km (1,000 mi) south of the southern coast of India” (Ref.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diego_Garcia). 

 

     “For over 20 years, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) held the record for the longest peacetime deployment for an aircraft carrier in history. Prior to this, her sister ship, the USS Nimitz (CVN-68), was the previous record holder. Dwight D. Eisenhower record was broken by another of her "sister ships," the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71)(Ref. 44, 72, 76, 84A, 383 & 383B).

 

    “Christmas would prove difficult to endure at sea for USS Independence (CV-62) on “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea, Chief of Chaplin’s, Rear Admiral Ross H. Trower brought kind and reassuring words as he toured thee ship, greeting and talking with sailors in all departments. Christmas services on thee hangar deck brought the crew together singing, thanksgiving and prayers for families at home. By far the best diversion from loneliness was a visit by the Department of Defense sponsored band “Baseline,” consisting of four band members and two dazzling young ladies were the combination that came to rock, sing, dance, and otherwise delight the hangar bay crowds throughout the Christmas holidays” (Ref. 1148B).

 

Chapter XXXV

Appendix I

 

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) remained import Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 16 to 31 December 1980. The year ended much the same as it had begun, with the Americans still hostage in Iran and Kitty Hawk making ready for another deployment to the Western Pacific/Indian Ocean beginning in April 1981. The ship had a new Captain and half of the crew was also new to Kitty Hawk. However, over the year the ship and air wing developed into a highly skilled team of professionals who were willing to "Steam, Fly, Fight and Winn as the ship's motto says - as they did in the past and will continue to do in the future. From 1 July through 31 December, Kitty Hawk underwent extensive training which included several evolutions in restricted waters and high density traffic areas. This involved ten precision anchorings, several low visibility piloting exercises and several man overboard drills. Kitty Hawk recovered “Oscar” in record time for a carrier during the graded REFTRA man overboard drill. OJT was conducted in all S-1 billets: SUADPS, Purchase, DCU, SRS, TRU, etc. Cross training of key personnel was also completed to ensure that all jobs would be covered in spite of routine absences of key personnel. One problem of 1980 was an acute manpower shortage especially in the SK rate. S-1 was also severely hampered in inventory and financial management due to chronic U1500 hardware problems. As the year ended S-1 continued to support habitability projects, process off line stock records for critical items and to prepare in earnest for the upcoming 1981 deployment and SMI schedule for February 1981. As of 31 December 1980, S-6 had attained 99 percent range and 90.2 percent depth in CLAMP which is considered well ahead of schedule. To better support the Air Wing, the CCS of Supply and production control of AIMD were combined. This should provide customers with one point of contact and reduce manpower requirements in areas such as reconciliation. During the early stages, this combination has proven highly successful and is recommended to improve aviation support efficiency. After the SRA, S-8 Division initiated inventories in all COSAL storerooms. This task was started in August and completed in November and was assisted by members of the ISSOT team who inventoried repair parts storerooms 40, 41, 42, and 43. Thirteen other storerooms were inventoried by the S-8 special inventory team. The AVCAL material onload began in August and with the cooperation of FALSC personnel and the ISSOT team. The onload went very smoothly and was completed well ahead of schedule. Learning from Indian Ocean operations, S-8 reorganized the shipping section in 1980 to improve efficiency. All basic packing materials, equipments and forms required for extended deployment were brought on board. Additionally, the long time broken INSTAPAC machine was repaired. A specialist from FRAA Naval Station, San Diego fixed the machine and demonstrated its use. During 1980, S-8 Division also developed an aggressive inventory/QA team responsible for trouble-shooting NIS problems, relocating of materials and conducting spot inventories and wall to wall/location audits to improve S-8’s inventory effectiveness” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

    “The following major accomplishments highlight USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) performance in CY 1980:

 

THOUSANDTH CARRIER LANDINGS

DATES

TRAPS

WIRE

TIME

A/C

SIDE

PILOT

SQUAD / WING

13/01/80

189,000

-

1745

A-7

401

Lt Whitford

VA-94

02/02/80

190,000

-

17-04

F-14

106

Lt Doerr

VF-51

15/07/80

191,000

2

1312

S-3

707

Lt Langley

VS-29

30/07/80

192,000

3

1136

A-7

405

Cdr Edwards

CVW-15

08/08/80

193,000

2

0137

F-14

111

Lcdr Cima

VF-124

09/09/80

194,000

2

2258

S-3

712

Ltjg Murphy

VS-29

23/09/80

195,000

3

1548

A-7

303

Lt Safford

VA-22

25/10/80

196,000

4

2045

F-14

666

Ltjg Sarok

VF-124

04/12/80

197.000

4

1534

S-3

703

Lcdr Mcmahon

VS-29

No combat or combat support sorties were flown from USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) during 1980.

 

    While on extended deployment in the Indian Ocean, the Kitty Hawk /CVW-15 team conducted the intercept and escort of fourteen Soviet aircraft (CUBS/MAYS). The flying tempo was high throughout the extension and 2,246 launches were logged in the Indian Ocean and transit to the United States. Catapult and arresting gear statistics demonstrate the emphasis on flying.

 

CATAPULT STATISTICS

CAT NO.

CRUISE

WORK - UPS

TOTAL

SHIPS/TOTAL

1

947

4,189

5.136

71,421

2

389

2,130

2,519

59,557

3

575

843

1,407

45,392

4

335

724

1,059

38,362

 

ARRESTING GEAR STATISTICS

CAT NO.

CRUISE

WORK - UPS

TOTAL

SHIPS/TOTAL

1

95

467

562

28,571

2

433

1,933

2,366

60,216

3

1,050

3,064

4,115

68,966

4

480

1,732

2,218

39,951

To accomplish the statistics above Kitty Hawk received 12,295,270 gallons of JP-5

and issued 10,436,061 to the embarked airplanes along with 18,000 gallons of lube

oil for catapults.

 

      During deployed operations in the Indian Ocean, AIMD monthly items processed peaked at 3500 items - an indicator of the level of effort required to support air wing Indian Ocean operations. The Communications Department supported the communications requirements of the ship, CVW-15 and CTE’ 77 while deployed to the Indian Ocean.

 

1. (U) The following statistical data for Weapons Department is submitted.

 

a. (U) Ammunition received from 01 Jan 80 to 31 Dec 80 via nine NREPS/VERTREPS totaled 818.512 short tons.

b. (U) Ammunition received from 01 Jan 80 to 31 Dec 80 via four INREPS totaled 214.428 short tons.

c. (U) Fleet return ammo/retrograde backloaded from 01 Jan 80 to 31 Dec 80 totaled 1017.307 short tons.

d. (U) Ammunition expended by CVW-15 during 01 Jan 80 to 26 Feb 80 totaled 36.904 short tons.

e. (U) Ammunition expended by CVW-15 during 10-26 Sept 80 totaled 139.506 short tons.

f. (U) Ammunition expended by CVW-15 during MRCIJWEPTRAEX from 29 Oct 80 to 1 Nov 80 totaled 79.992 short tons.

g. (U) Ammunition expended by CVW-15 during READIEX 1-81 from 4 Dec 80 to 15 Dec 80 totaled 38.867 short tons.

h. (U) Ammunition expended by CVW-15 from 1 Jan 80 to 31 Dec 80:

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) amo disclosure

NOMENCLATURE

QTY

SHORT TONS

MK 76 Practice Bomb

2,604

35.130

MK 106 Practice Bomb

213

.754

MK 82 GP Bomb (Live)

339

87.264

MK 82 GP Bomb (Inert)

353

90.868

MK 83 GP Bomb (Inert)

6

2.976

MK 84 GP Bomb (Live)

4

4.124

20 MM Gun Ammunition (RE1 & TP)

12,800

4.773

MK 45 Parachute Flare

1,098

18.837

MK 25 Marine Marker

180

.405

AIM 7E4 Sparrow

4

.987

AIM 7F Sparrow

3

.799

AIM 9L Sidewinder

3

.435

MK 46 Torpedoes

12

5.058

MK 50 Series Mines

44

42.068

Total

N/A

294.478

Grand total of all ammunition received via UNREP/VERTREP and INREP from 01 Jan 80 to 31 Dec 80: 1032.940 short tons.

Transferred NATO Sea Sparrow Missile System to the Operations Department to evaluate the merits of a Combat Systems approach for CV implementation.

 

    “In December 1980, the entire FOX Division was transferred from Weapons Department to Operations. This move provides for a closer and more effective interface of the NATO Sea Sparrow Missile System (NSSMS) with the Combat Information Center. During the work up periods following SRA, Kitty Hawk was involved in testing the carrier adaptability of new aircraft and weapons’ systems:

 

a. (U) NASA’s Quiet Short-Haul Research Airplane (QSRA).

b. (U) COMOPTEVFOR testing of the BQM-74C retrievable target drone.

c. (U) Medium range air-to-surface missile.

d. (U) A-6/Harpoon carrier launch/recovery suitability.

e. (U) Mobile Sea Range (MSR).

 

     Two Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) for REFTRA, Carrier Qualification (CQ) or CARQUALS evolutions were successfully completed, as was the Operational Propulsion Plant Examination (OPPE) and the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) visit. The year ended with READIEX 1-81, Kitty Hawk first integrated Battle Group Operations since returning from “WestPac” in February” (Ref. 331B-1980).

 

CHAPTER XXXV

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, Ca. conducting a $30 million modernization SRA (14 July to 10 October 1980) - U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (1980) - CV-43 Hawaiian Training Cruise (3 May to 6 June 1981)

Iran History, Air Arm & Iran hostage crisis and the Iraq and Iran War

(1 July 1980 to 19 August 1981)

Part 1 – (1 July 1980 to 21 December 1980)

Part 2 – (22 December 1980 to 3 May 1981)

Part 3 – (4 May to 19 August 1981)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter XXXV

 Part 1 - (1 July to 1980 to 31 December 1980)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4