CHAPTER XXXV

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, Ca. conducting a $30 million modernization SRA (14 July to 10 October 1980) - U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (1980) - CV-43 Hawaiian Training Cruise (3 May to 6 June 1981)

Iran History, Air Arm & Iran hostage crisis and the Iraq and Iran War

(1 July 1980 to 19 August 1981)

Part 1 – (1 July 1980 to 21 December 1980)

Part 2 – (22 December 1980 to 3 May 1981)

Part 3 – (4 May to 19 August 1981)

 

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet 1980 CV Deployments and carriers from the 6th Fleet operating with the Seventh Fleet resulted in two CV’s extending into 1981, operating under the direction of the Seventh Fleet in the western pacific or Far East:

 

Chapter XXXV,

Appendix I

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Ranger (CV-61) - 7th

15th WestPac    2nd IO

CVW-2

NE

10 Sep 1980

5 May 1981

Middle East

238-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

 

CVW-2 Squadrons include: VF-1 “Wolf Pack,” F-14A; VF-2 “Bounty Hunters,” F-14A; VA-113 “Stingers,” A-7E; VA-25 “Fist of the Fleet,” A-7E; VA-145 “Swordsmen,” 6E/KA-6D; VAW-117 “Wallbangers,” E-2B; VAQ-137 “Rooks,” EA-6B; VS-37 “Sawbucks,” S-3A and HS-2 “Golden Falcons,” SH-3H.

*USS Independence (CV-62) - 2nd, 6th & 7th (1st Arabian Sea & 13th & 14th Red Sea & Gulf of Aden)

NorLant

16th Med

13th Suez Canal

6th IO

14th Suez Canal

Med voy.

NorLant

CVW-6

AE

 

19 Nov 1980

10 Jun 1981

Europe

Middle East

204-days

Iran Hostage crisis, while operating on "GONZO" Station in the North Arabian Sea.

 

CVW-6 Squadrons include: VF-102 “Diamondbacks,” F-4J; VF-33 “Tarsiers,” F-4J; VA-15 “Valions,” A-7E; VA-87 “Golden Warriors,” A-7E; VA-176 “Thunderbolts,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-122 “Steeljaws,” E-2C; VAQ-131 “Lancers,” EA-6B; HS-15 “Red Lions,” SH-3H; VFP-63 DET.4 (*1) “Eyes of the Fleet,” RF-8G and VS-28 “Hukkers, S-3A. (*1) VFP-63 disestablished on Jun.30, 1982.

*East Coast

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

The US Navy's Pacific and Seventh Fleet CV Deployments and carriers from the 6th Fleet operating with the Seventh Fleet during 1981 are:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

 AIR WING

TAIL CODE

DEPART

RETURN

Days at

Sea

USS Midway (CV-41) - 7th

(3rd North Arabian Sea & 2nd Arabian / Persian Gulf) (21st Forward Deployed)

26th WestPac 19th SCS

7th IO

CVW-5

NF

23 Feb  1981

5 Jun  1981

Western Pacific

Indian Ocean

Middle East

Persian Gulf

103-days

Ports of call not reported.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system.

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) – Pacific Fleet & 7th (3rd Arabian Sea, extending operations to the North Arabian Sea)

13th WestPac

4th Indian Ocean

CVW-11

NH

1 Apr 1981

23 Nov 1981

WestPac

Middle East

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

BEAREX off the Hawaiian Islands, highlighting ASW training during the deployment was the successful localization and tracking of a patrolling Soviet submarine by the embarked VS Squadron aboard Kitty Hawk, with subsequent hot contact turnover to land based maritime patrol forces on 4 April 1981, while VS and HS forces participated in SHAREM 43 in Hawaiian waters; successful exercise missile firings (15-foot miss) against drone and towed targets; MIDPAC operations included ASW Exercise (SHAREM 43) and COPE RAINBOW; Combat Readiness Assessment Exercise (CRAE) 81-3; MISSILEX / MINEX/TORPEX Operations in the Subic OP areas; while the westerly transit en route Subic Bay took nine days and included an air defense exercise (ADEX) with the returning USS Ranger (CV-61) and Soviet TU-95 BEAR reconnaissance in the vicinity of Wake Island; operations and the conduct of a combat readiness assessment exercise (CRAE) in the vicinity of Guam; and Fortress Warrior/l NCHOPEX 81-6 (BEAVER SNARE) exercise near the Philippines. The first inport period in Subic Bay found the Supply Department busy loading materials for the next at-sea period; MlSSlLEX 81-6, MlNEX 81-3 and Contingency Reconnaissance Exercise (CONRECEX) 1- 81 while operating in the Subic Bay OPAREA; turnover operations and ADEX 81-3 with USS America (CV-66); Soviet Ocean Surveillance System (SOSS) Stimulation Operations; in a multi-phase large scale exercise (GONZOEX 81-4); Australian Beacon South Operations which exercised air to ground weapons delivery systems; Indian Ocean. "Weapons Week" conducted in the vicinity of Diego Garcia for four days and consisted of a MINEX, SAREX, ALPHA strike, aerial reconnaissance, war-at-sea exercise (WASEX) and other weapons delivery training; a the two day U.S./Australia Beacon South" exercise which included air-to-ground weapons delivery on the Lancelin gunnery range north of Perth, air-defense exercises and alpha strikes off the Western Australian coast; SOAF PASSEX 81-4 in the Northern Arabian Sea MODLOC; ASWEX 81-9U; GONZOEX 81-5 and turnover operations with USS America (CV-66); NOREX; ADEX with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) and MINEX with EOD Mine Recovery Operations. Marine Detachment received hands on demolition training the field via the embarked EOD Team and carrier landing qualifications commenced on 24 October 1981.

 

Kitty Hawk completed passages through severely restricted waters including two passages through the Straits of Malacca and San Bernardino Straits, and anchorages in the following ports: Singapore (2); Fremantle, Western Australia; and Hong Kong.

 

Ports of call visited in order of arrival include: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Subic Bay, Philippines; Fremantle, Australia; ubic Bay, R.P.; Hong Kong; Subic Bay, R.P. and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

CVW-15 Squadrons include: VF-51 “Screaming Eagles,” F-14A; VFP-63 DET.1 (*1) “Eyes of the Fleet,” RF-8G; VF-111 “Sundowners   ,” F-14A; VA-22 “Fighting Redcocks,” A-7E; VA-94 “Shrikes,” A-7E; VA-52 “Knightriders,“ A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-114 “Hormel Hogs,” E-2C; VAQ-135 “Black Ravens,” EA-6B; HS-4 “Black Knights;” SH-3H; VS-29 “Dragonfires,” S-3A and VRC-50 DET. “Foo Dogs,” C-2A. (*1) VFP-63 disestablished on Jun.30, 1982.

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) task group ships, those of COMDESRON SEVEN and ships Kitty Hawk conducted UNREP with include: USS Hoel (DDG-13); USS Henry B. Wilson (DDG-7); USS Mt. Hood (AE-29); USS Wabash (AOR-5); USS Kansas City (AOR-3); USNS Taluga (T-AO-62); USS Fanning (FF-1076); USS Leftwich (DD-984); USS Cushing (DD-984); USNS Hassayampa (T-AO-145); USS Berkeley (DDG-15); USS White Plains (AFS-4); USS Mt. Baker (AE-29); USS Shasta (AE-33); USS Rigel (T-AF-58); USS Navasota (T-AO-106) on 12 July and USS Berkeley (DDG-15); USNS Mississinewa (T-AO-144); USNS Mispillion (T-AO-105); USNS Passumpsic (T-AO-107); USS Seattle (AOE-3); USS Fanning (FF-1076); USS Roanoke (AOR-7) and USS Kiska (AE-35)” (Ref. 331B-1981).

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) – Pacific Fleet & 7th (3rd Arabian Sea, extending operations to the North Arabian Sea)

13th WestPac

4th Indian Ocean

CVW-11

NH

1 Apr 1981

23 Nov 1981

WestPac

Middle East

NATO Exercise "Daily Double," with the amphibious assault ship USS Nassau (LHA-4), as well as with Greek and Italian Navy units, operated in the Indian Ocean, on "Gonzo Station," for the first time between 12 May and 3 June 1981 and "Weapons Week."

 

Visited Palma de Mallorca, Spain; Port Said, Egypt; Singapore; Fremantle, Australia and Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

 

CVW-11 Squadrons include: VF-114, F-14A; VF-213, F-14A; VA-192, A-7E; VA-195, A-7E; VA-95, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; VAQ-133, EA-6B; VS-33, S-3A; HS-12, SH-3H; VQ-2 Det., EA-3B and VR-24 Det., C-2. “USS California (CGN-36) and USS Preble (DLG-46) are part of USS America (CV-66) task force as escorts.

*USS America (CV-66) - 2nd, 6th & 7th

(1st & 2nd Red Sea, Gulf of Aden voy. & 1st North Arabian Sea dep.)

NorLant

8st Med

1st Suez Canal

1st Indian Ocean

2nd Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-11

NH

14 Apr 1981

12 Nov 1981

Europe

Middle East

Iran hostage crisis

North Arabian Sea

Indian Ocean

15th FWFD

213-days

NATO Exercise "Daily Double," with the amphibious assault ship USS Nassau (LHA-4), as well as with Greek and Italian Navy units, operated in the Indian Ocean, on "Gonzo Station," for the first time between 12 May and 3 June 1981 and "Weapons Week."

 

Visited Palma de Mallorca, Spain; Port Said, Egypt; Singapore; Fremantle, Australia and Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

 

Squadrons: VF-114, F-14A; VF-213, F-14A; VA-192, A-7E; VA-195, A-7E; VA-95, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-123, E-2C; VAQ-133, EA-6B; VS-33, S-3A; HS-12, SH-3H; VQ-2 Det., EA-3B and VR-24 Det., C-2.

 

“USS California (CGN-36) and USS Preble (DLG-46) are part of USS America (CV-66) task force as escorts.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) - 7th

EestPac

CVW-14

NK

3 May 1981

6 Jun 1981

Training

35-days

Hawaii Operating Area

 

CVW-14 Squadrons include: VF-154 “Black Knights,” F-4N; VFP-63 DET.2 “Eyes of the Fleet,” RF-8G; VF-21 “Free Lancers,” F-4N; -97 “Warhawks,” A-7E; VA-27 ”Royal Maces,” A-7E; VA-196 “Main Battery,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-113 “Black Eagles,” E-2B and-1 DET. 3  and “Pacific Fleet Angels,” SH-3G.

USS Midway (CV-41) - 7th (Forward Deployed)

WestPac

CVW-5

NF

26 Jun 1981

16 Jul 1981

Cruise

21-days

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) - 7th     (2nd Arabian Sea)

14th WestPac 11th SCS

2nd IO

CVW-14

NK

20 Aug 1981

23 Mar 1982

Middle East

Indian Ocean

216-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

 

Coral Sea visited a succession of familiar ports - Pattaya, Thailand, Subic Bay on 24 September 1981 (for upkeep) and Hong Kong-before she operated in the Sea of Japan and subsequently visited Sasebo, Hong Kong.

 

CVW-14 Squadrons include: VF-154 “Black Knights,” F-4N; VFP-63 DET.2 (*1) “Eyes of the Fleet,” RF-8G; VF-21 “Free Lancers,” F-4N; VA-97 “Warhawks,” A-7E; VA-27 “Royal Maces,” A-7E; VA-196 “Main Battery,” A-6E/KA-6D; VAW-113 “Black Eagles,” E-2B; HC-1 DET. 3 and “Pacific Fleet Angels,” SH-3G.

USS Midway (CV-41) - 7th (22nd Forward Deployed)

27th WestPac

CVW-5

NF

3 Sep 1981

6 Oct 1981

Western Pacific

34-days

Ports of call not reported.

 

Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked Midway.

 

Squadrons: VF-161, F-4S; VMFP-3 Det., RF-4B; VF-151, F-4S; VA-93, A-7E; VA-56, A-7E; VA-115, A6-E/KA-6D / *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D; VAW-115, E-2B; VAQ-136, EA-6B and HC-1 Det. 2, SH-3G. *AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system.

USS Constellation (CV-64) - 7th

13th WestPac        4th IO

CVW-9

NK

20 Oct 1981

21 May 1982

Western Pacific

213-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

 

Ports of call include: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; Alava Pier, Subic Bay, Republic of Philippines; Kenya, Mombasa, East Africa; Perth, sea port of Fremantle, Australia; Singapore; Diego Garcia and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

Squadrons: VF-211, F-14; VF-24; F-14; VA-146, A-7E; VA-147, A-7E; VA-165, A-6E / KA-6D; VAW-112, E-2C; VAQ-134, EA-6B; HS-6, SH-3H; VS-38, S-3 A and VQ-1 Det. B EA-3B.

 

Constellation battle group consisted of CVW-9 and Commander, Carrier Group Seven, Rear Admiral George A. Aitcheson and Chief of Staff, Captain William C. Carson. “USS California (CGN-36) and USS Preble (DLG-46) are part of USS America (CV-66) task force as escorts.

South China Sea deployment (SCS)

*East Coast - The first United States Navy carrier to steam through the Suez Canal since USS Intrepid (CVA-11) had made the passage shortly before the Arab-Israeli "Six-Day War" of 1967

(Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources)

 

President of the United States Ronald Reagan’s inauguration, minutes after President Jimmy Carter leaves office and, the hostages were freed after 444 days in Iranian detention

 

    “The unsuccessful Hostage attempt Operation Eagle Claw in conjunction with Operation Evening Light, resulted in the Iranians not releasing the hostages until after Secretary Christopher signs the accord at 3:35 E.S.T., 19 January 1981 and on 20 January 1981, the day of President of the United States Ronald Reagan’s inauguration, minutes after President Jimmy Carter leaves office, and after last-minute delays over fund transfers, the United States released almost $8 billion in Iranian assets and, the hostages were freed after 444 days in Iranian detention; the agreement gave Iran immunity from lawsuits arising from the incident” (Ref. 10-See G. Sick, All Fall Down (1985) - The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Copyright © 2003 Columbia University Press & 11).

 

    “An Algerian aircraft carries the 52 remaining Americans from Iran, ending the 444-day ordeal. The plane takes off immediately after Ronald Reagan is sworn in as president on January 20, and it lands in Algiers, before heading to the U.S. Air Force Base at Wiesbaden, West Germany” (Ref. 4).

 

The United States assumed greater responsibility for the security of the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf

 

    “After the fall of the Shah of Iran in 1979, the United States assumed greater responsibility for the security of the Gulf. During the 1979-1981 Iranian hostage crises, nearly 30 Navy ships were on constant patrol in the region, including one carrier battle group in the Indian Ocean or North Arabian Sea. In April 1980, the USS Nimitz (CVN-68) battle group served as a jumping off point for the joint service rescue attempt of the 52 American hostages. In 1980, the Carter Doctrine declared the Persian Gulf region to be a "vital" interest to the United States--one for which we were willing to fight. Events in the Middle East convinced President Carter that the United States required a means of rapid response to regional crises. In October 1980, a new unified Rapid Deployment Force (RDF) was created to meet that need. The RDE later evolved into Central Command, which marked the beginning of the capability to move large military forces into the Persian Gulf, the sine quo non of Desert Shield/Storm” (Ref. 1149).

http://www.jcs-group.com/military/navy/1991desert.html

 

    “USS Independence (CV-62) was on “Gonzo Station” in the Indian Ocean when Iran released the American hostages on 20 January 1981, arriving on 18 December 1980, standing by ready to provide air support. Although it seemed to relieve a great amount of pressure from Indy crew members, they still knew there presence was required in the Indian Ocean to keep the world’s trade lines open, but at least now they would be able to seek a liberty port, while in January a port call to Singapore was canceled. The promise of “Two beers for 60 days at sea” was nice, but the promise of liberty was much nicer” (Ref. 1148B).

 

President Carter committed himself to the safe return of the hostages while protecting America's interests and prestige

 

      “Jimmy Carter addresses a mass rally in the rain in Plains, Georgia, hours after becoming a private citizen again January 20, 1981” (Ref. 12).

 

     “Citizen Jimmy Carter and speaks bitterly on the behavior of the Iranians in an interview condemning Iran's treatment of the hostages before boarding a plane for Weisbaden, West Germany to meet with the hostages January 21, 1981” (Ref. 4; 11 & 12).

 

     “President Carter committed himself to the safe return of the hostages while protecting America's interests and prestige. He pursued a policy of restraint that put a higher value on the lives of the hostages than on American retaliatory power or protecting his own political future. The toll of patient diplomacy was great, but President Carter's actions brought freedom for the hostages with America's honor preserved” (Ref. 7).

 

    At a cost of 8 billion dollars, nothing compared to the lives of so many Americans, yet this must be the first government paid ransom or settlement with terrorist.

 

    This notion that America’s honor was preserved after paying ransom is not so. It was only do too the strength of the character of Ronald Regan that resulted in the Iranians change of mind that preserved the honor of America but to the Iranians America became the enemy and has been at war beginning in 1980 with the U.S.

 

    In my view, the U.S. Navy’s aircraft carrier air wings aircraft during Operation Eagle Claw, showed an armed force of strength of attack aircraft against 75 or so Iranian Aircraft, forcing the planes to land where they flew from, two to one, up held the honor of America while the Navy’s aerial superiority protected the Army Rangers at Desert One, themselves Heroes for there service to our country.

 

    And that’s the way its suppose to be. Had one Iranian Jet fired on an American Jet, the air battle would have resulted in devastation of the Iranian Air Force and the government of Iran 32-years ago.

 

    Iran is determined to obtain NUKES OR WAS IT NUCLEAR ENERGHY FOR ELECTRICTY?

 

    Beginning in November, shortly after SRA, USS Coral Sea (CV-43) began Sea Trials, followed by Independent Steaming Exercises, with the ship preparing for Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE).

 

 

A starboard beam view of the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43) underway off the coast of California during an operational readiness evaluation, February 1981. US Navy photo (DVIC id: DNSN9300760). NS024323 37k. Defense Visual Information Center. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024323.jpg

 

    USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) conducted Operational Readiness Evaluation in February 1981 off the coast of California.

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departs NAS, Alameda, Ca for Refresher Training and CQ’s in the SOCAL AOR

 

     “USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California in November 1980, for Sea Trials in mid October, followed by Independent Steaming Exercises, with the ship conducting Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) in February 1981, Refresher Training and CQ’s (CarQuals) in the SOCAL AOR would keep everyone busy and away from home weeks at a time” (Ref.1-Coral Sea, 2-USS Coral Sea “Welcome Aboard” brochure, 34, 43, 35 and 72).

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) arrived NASNI, Ca.

 

    When USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) visited Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California, the crew was allowed liberty. There were many activities on base to include the Gym, running along side the air field or beach that ends at the base.

 

    Coronado on the Silver Strand and San Diego across the bridge offered many attractions and activities.

 

    “USS Independence (CV-62) departed Perth, Australia and returned to “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea via the Indian Ocean after several days of liberty, in port from 2 to 7 February 1981” (Ref. 1148B).

 

USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) Operations Department Yeoman activities next to the

NAVPHIBASE, Coronado on the silver strand

 

    USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) visited Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California on many occasions during Refresher Training and Carrier Qualifications (CQ’s) underway periods.

 

    Coronado and San Diego, Ca. offered many attractions and activities for the crew. Petty Officer Yeoman Third Class Bruce Wayne Henion, Operations Departmental Yeoman, went back to water skiing like he has in the past when the ship visited, his water skies on his shoulders, he walked to down town Coronado and then jumped on a bus headed to Imperial Beach, on the south side of NAVPHIBASE, Coronado on the silver strand.

 

 “All it took was a case of beer to anyone of a dozen boaters,” said Henion. “Boaters would take me out for an hour at a time. I never fail, using two skis.” exclaimed Henion. Further comments from the Ops Yeoman.”

 

    “Other activities I routinely engaged in while at North Island was running on the Coronado Beach and going down town to the Park where there always seem to be crafts and pictures on display for sell.

 

    I remember a small hamburger restaurant not any bigger then 12 feet in width that stayed open late

 

    “USS Independence (CV-62) returned to “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea, steaming through the Indian Ocean on 22 February 1981” (Ref. 1148B).

 

     “RADM Lawrence C. Chambers, ComCarGru-3, completed USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) 200,000th landing, in Aircraft No. 201, a Lockheed S-3A Viking, VS-29 attached to CVW-11, catching the No. 3 wire at 1103, 23 February 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Midway (CVA-41) with Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked conducted Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) from 26 November 1980 to 23 February 1981” (Ref. 72).

 

    “USS Midway (CV-41) with Commander, Battle Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-70), Carrier Strike Force Seventh Fleet (CTF-77), Surface Combatant Force, Seventh Fleet (Task Force 75) & Carrier Group Five, Commander DESRON 15 and Commander, Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW-5) embarked departed Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) 23 February 1981, with Captain Robert Spencer Owens, NAVCAD, as Commanding Officer, on her 26th WestPac, her 19th South China Sea, on her sixth Indian Ocean deployment, her 21st deployment as the U. S. Navy’s forward-deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet,.on her third North Arabian Sea and second Arabian/Persian Gulf; redesignated CV-41, reclassifying a Multi-Purpose aircraft carrier on 30 June 1975. She will under go her 24th deployment since her second recommission on 31 January 1970, following completion of a four-year conversion-modernization at the San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, arriving on 11 February 1966, ending the year of 1965 upon arrival from her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her first Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East; making three Vietnam Combat Cruises operating with the 7th Fleet during the Vietnam Conflict/War; ending her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, on her third South China Sea deployment, her third Vietnam Combat Cruise in the Far East. She will under go her 30th deployment since her first recommission upon completion of SCB-110 (August 1955 to 30 September 1957), decommissioning in August 1955 upon completion of her World Cruise for a five month SCB-110 modernization that included new innovations such as an enclosed bow and an angled flight deck to be installed at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington; redesignated CVA-41 on 1 October 1952. She will under go her 43rd Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 10 September 1945, having the destination of being the lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of lead ship of her class, and the first to be commissioned after the end of World War II” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 (NF)

(23 February to 5 June 1981)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Midway (CV-41) – 7th (3rd North Arabian Sea & 2nd Arabian / Persian Gulf) (21st Forward Deployed)

26th WestPac 19th SCS

7th IO

CVW-5

NF

23 Feb  1981

5 Jun  1981

Western Pacific

Indian Ocean

Middle East

Persian Gulf

43rd FWFD

103-days

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier

Iran, Yemen & Indian Ocean

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-161

Chargers -                    Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF100

F-4S

VMFP-3 Det.

Eyes of the Corps – Marines Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

(RF) 115-120

RF-4B

VF-151

Vigilantes -                  Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

NF200

F-4S

VA-93

Ravens -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF300

A-7E

VA-56

Champions -                Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

NF400

A-7E

VA-115

Eagles -                    Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NF500

A-6E /

A6-E/KA-6D /  *A-6E TRAM/KA-6D

VAW-115

Liberty Bells -               Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

601-604

E-2B

VAQ-136

Gauntlets - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

HC-1 Det.2

Pacific Fleet Angels - Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

722-727

SH-3G

*AN/AAS-33 TRAM (Target Recognition and Attack, Multi-Sensor system

 

     “An A-7E Corsair II Jet attack aircraft, LT(JG) Louis D. Eames, Jr., VA-94 attached to CVW-11, was lost at sea. LT(JG) Eames was not recovered on 24 February 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

The Navy changed the reporting period for Enlisted Performance Evaluations

 

    During Coral Sea’s modernization repair period, Typing 250 enlisted evaluations quarterly for the Operations Department Personnel was the responsibility of the Operations Departmental Yeoman.

 

    When the Navy changed the reporting period, extending an evaluation period from 3-months to 6-months or 8-months in some cases (July 1, 1980 to February 28, 1981), Yeomen throughout the Navy were pleased.

 

    Unfortunately, the Navy changed the reporting period after all the enlisted evaluations were completed. It was a bad decision and hundreds of hours of work were lost in vain by everyone involved in the canceled reporting period” (Ref. 43).

 

Enlisted Service Members Evaluation for the period: 01/07/80 to 28/02/81

 

Rate/Rank: YN3 Bruce Wayne Henion

 

Scale from 4.0; 3.8; 3.6; 3.4; 3.2; 3.0; 2.8. 2.6; 2.4 and 2.2

 

Professional Performance: 3.8

 

Member’s skill and Efficiency in performance of assigned duty:

 

Extremely effective and reliable. Works well independently.

 

Military Behavior: 3.6

 

How well member accepts authority and conforms to standards of military behavior.

 

Willingly follows commands and orders.

 

Leadership and Supervisory Ability: 3.6

 

Members ability to plan and assign work to others and effectively direct there activities:

 

Handles personnel very effectively.

 

Military Appearance: 3.6

 

Member’s military appearance and neatness in person and dress

 

Smart, Neat and correct in appearance.

 

Adaptability: 3.8

 

How well member gets along and works with others.

 

Gets along exceptionally well. Promotes good morale.

 

DESCRIPTION OF ASSIGNED TASKS:

 

Assigned to Ops Office. Duties include the typing and filing of correspondence, messages, memorandums, LOI’s, Green Sheets, notices, instructions and other duties normally associated with the Yeoman rating. Collateral duties include: Divisional Supply Petty Officer, DCPO and Repair 7 Forward Damage Control Team. Stands Ops Duty Yeoman for Ops Department at sea and in port.

 

EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE (Includes comments on: Members performance in the area of equal opportunity; also, member’s assigned Jury to overseas or CONUS BASE; deploying units which result in inner actions with foreign nationals should be evaluated in this area.) *Comments must be justified of specifically.

 

Petty Officer Henion continuously demonstrates a high degree on initiative and enthusiasm in carting out his daily assignments. He is an extremely industrious individual, always on the alert for possible ways to improve the efficiency of the office on a day to day basis. He is very versatile and adapts himself rapidly to any new task, requiring a minimum of supervision and working well on his own or as a part of the group. Petty Officer Henion was of tremendous assistance to his supervisor in the total revamping of the Ops Department Office Files, including all classified files and pubs in the office safe. His ability to complete any assignment quickly and efficiently has made him an asset to the Ops Department. Petty Office Henion is recommended for advancement and retention.

 

J. W. TAYLOR, CAPT, USN

02/03/81 – Special Evaluation

 

Enlisted Service Members Evaluation for the period: 01/03/81 to 30/06/81

 

Rate/Rank: YN3 Bruce Wayne Henion

 

Scale from 4.0; 3.8; 3.6; 3.4; 3.2; 3.0; 2.8. 2.6; 2.4 and 2.2

 

Professional Performance: 3.8

 

Member’s skill and Efficiency in performance of assigned duty:

 

Extremely effective and reliable. Works well independently.

 

Military Behavior: 3.6

 

How well member accepts authority and conforms to standards of military behavior.

 

Willingly follows commands and orders.

 

Leadership and Supervisory Ability: 3.6

 

Members ability to plan and assign work to others and effectively direct there activities:

 

Handles personnel very effectively.

 

Military Appearance: 3.8

 

Member’s military appearance and neatness in person and dress

 

Impressive. Wears the Naval uniform with pride.

 

Adaptability: 3.8

 

How well member gets along and works with others.

 

Gets along exceptionally well. Promotes good morale.

 

DESCRIPTION OF ASSIGNED TASKS:

 

Assigned to Ops Office. Duties include the typing and filing of correspondence, messages, memorandums, LOI’s, Green Sheets, notices, instructions and other duties normally associated with the Yeoman rating. Collateral duties include: Divisional Supply Petty Officer, DCPO and Repair 7 Forward Damage Control Team. Stands Ops Duty Yeoman for Ops Department at sea and in port. Repeated from previous evualation.

 

EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE (Includes comments on: Members performance in the area of equal opportunity; also, member’s assigned Jury to overseas or CONUS BASE; deploying units which result in inner actions with foreign nationals should be evaluated in this area.) *Comments must be justified of specifically. History lost.

 

 

J. W. TAYLOR, CAPT, USN

30/06/81

 

USS CORAL SEA (CV-43) with CVW-14 (NK)

(1 to 10 March 1981)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) Pacific

EastPac

CVW-14

NK

1 Mar  1981

10 Mar  1981

Training Ops

 

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-301

Devil's Disciples -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

  NK100

F-4S / F-4N

VF-302

Stallions -

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Phantom II Jet Fighter

  NK200

F-4S / F-4N

VA-303

Golden Hawks -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

  NK300

A-7B

VA-304

Firebirds -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

  NK400

A-7B

VA-305

Lobos -

Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet Attack Aircraft

  NK500

A-7B

VFP-306

Peeping Toms -

Photomasters - Light Photographic and Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

 

RF-8G

VAQ-309

Axemen - Carrier Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron or Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Douglas - Skywarrior - Tanker

 

A-3 - KA-3B

VAK-308

Griffins - Tactical Aerial Refueling Squadron

Grumman Intruder - Special electronic installation

 

EA-6A

VAW-88

Cotton Pickers  - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

 

E-2C

HS-

Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Helicopter Combat Support Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King -

Anti-submarine

 

SH-3D

Ref. 34, 35, 39, 41 & 76

 

 

A close-up view of the island of the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CV-43) as three Attack Squadron 305 (VA-305) A-7B Corsair II aircraft fly in formation overhead. The Coral Sea was taking part in carrier qualifications off the coast of southern California. March 10, 1981. US Navy photo by ENS A. Legare (DVIC id: DNSN9300848). NS024324 27k. Defense Visual Information Center

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/024324.jpg

 

     “On 16 March 1981, an A-6 Intruder from VA-115 aboard USS Midway (CV-41) sighted a downed civilian helicopter in the South China Sea. Midway immediately dispatched HC-1 Det. 2 helicopters to the scene. All 17 people aboard the downed helicopter were rescued and brought aboard the carrier. The chartered civilian helicopter was also plucked out of the water and lifted to Midway's flight deck” (Ref. 1-Midway & 72).

 

     “USS Independence (CV-62) operated on “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea from 22 February to 25 March 1981. Forty-five days out of Perth, Australia, to break the routine the crew was given there second ration of beer. There were also visits from the USO band “Happiness” and the Seventh Fleet band “Orient Express”” (Ref. 1148B).

 

Operations Department Sailor of the Month

 

                                                                                          USS. CORAL SEA (CV-43)

                                                                                          CV-43:03:JWT::bwh

                                                                                          1650

                                                                                          26 March 1981

 

Mr. & Mrs. David C. Henion

Route 2, Box 307

Jefferson, Oregon 97352

 

Dear Mr. & Mrs. Henion:

 

    It is a pleasure to inform you that your son Bruce, has been selected as the Operations Department “Sailor of the Month” for February 1981. Bruce has demonstrated outstanding professional performance as Operations Department Yeoman, displaying initiative and ability normally associated with more senior personnel. In this regard, he was extremely successful in training and assisting the younger, inexperienced men in the division to attain high degree of professional proficiency. Bruce has never hesitated to accept new challenges and responsibilities, perform rig commendably in all respects. His willingness to spend nanny long hours, often extending after liberty call, t0 ensure that assignments were completed correctly and efficiently, attests to his unfailing dedication and reliabi1ty. Bruce’s high standard of conduct, sharp persoia1 appearance and fine military bearing, personify the best traditions of the naval service. Bruce is one of cur most valued men and it is an honor to have him in the Operations Departrnent. His distinguished achievement certainly reflects high credit upon his family.

 

Sincerely,

 

J. W. TAYLOR, CAPT, USN

Captain U. S. Navy

Operations Officer

 

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) OPS Yeoman Reenlisted after President Reagan was shot– 30 March 1981

 

    YN3 Henion reenlisted when he heard “John Hinckley Jr., welding a .22 caliber "Saturday-night special," shot President Reagan in the chest outside the Washington Hilton Hotel March 30, 1981, the 25-year-old drifter with a history of psychological problems also shoots the president's press secretary, James Brady, in the incident. The president is rushed to George Washington University hospital and quickly recovers, although the gunman's bullet inflicts severe damage on Brady” (Ref. 386).

 

    The President is rushed to George Washington University hospital and quickly recovers, although the gunman's bullet inflicts severe damage on Brady” (Ref. 5).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with CVW-11 embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California 1 April 1981, on her 13th “WestPac” deployment and third Northern Arabian Sea

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with CVW-11 embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California 1 April 1981, with Captain Foster S. Teague as Commanding Officer, on her 13th “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, conducting AdEx 82-3, an air defense exercise with USS Constellation (CVA-64), both ships being shadowed by Russian Tu-95 Bears, protecting oil tankers and maintaining a two carrier task force presence in the Arabian Sea, extending operations into the Northern Arabian Sea, on her third deployment in the area of Iran, on her fourth Indian Ocean. Reclassified a CV-3 “Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier” on 29 April 1973, inaugurated her new role as CV on 1 July 1975. She will undergo her 14th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission on 29 April 1961 at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, with Captain William F. Bringle in command and was the first of the Kitty Hawk class (the only other two being the USS Constellation (CVA-64) and USS America (CVA-66)” (Ref. 1-Kitty Hawk, 72, 331A & 331B-1981).

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with CVW-11 (NH) 

(1 April 1981 to 23 November 1981)

Indian Ocean Contingency Carrier.

BEAREX off the Hawaiian Islands, highlighting ASW training during the deployment was the successful localization and tracking of a patrolling Soviet submarine by the embarked VS Squadron aboard Kitty Hawk, with subsequent hot contact turnover to land based maritime patrol forces on 4 April 1981, while VS and HS forces participated in SHAREM 43 in Hawaiian waters; successful exercise missile firings (15-foot miss) against drone and towed targets; MIDPAC operations included ASW Exercise (SHAREM 43) and COPE RAINBOW; Combat Readiness Assessment Exercise (CRAE) 81-3; MISSILEX / MINEX/TORPEX Operations in the Subic OP areas; while the westerly transit en route Subic Bay took nine days and included an air defense exercise (ADEX) with the returning USS Ranger (CV-61) and Soviet TU-95 BEAR reconnaissance in the vicinity of Wake Island; operations and the conduct of a combat readiness assessment exercise (CRAE) in the vicinity of Guam; and Fortress Warrior/l NCHOPEX 81-6 (BEAVER SNARE) exercise near the Philippines. The first inport period in Subic Bay found the Supply Department busy loading materials for the next at-sea period; MlSSlLEX 81-6, MlNEX 81-3 and Contingency Reconnaissance Exercise (CONRECEX) 1- 81 while operating in the Subic Bay OPAREA; turnover operations and ADEX 81-3 with USS America (66); Soviet Ocean Surveillance System (SOSS) Stimulation Operations; in a multi-phase large scale exercise (GONZOEX 81-4); Australian Beacon South Operations which exercised air to ground weapons delivery systems; Indian Ocean. "Weapons Week" conducted in the vicinity of Diego Garcia for four days and consisted of a MINEX, SAREX, ALPHA strike, aerial reconnaissance, war-at-sea exercise (WASEX) and other weapons delivery training; a the two day U.S./Australia Beacon South" exercise which included air-to-ground weapons delivery on the Lancelin gunnery range north of Perth, air-defense exercises and alpha strikes off the Western Australian coast; SOAF PASSEX 81-4 in the Northern Arabian Sea MODLOC; ASWEX 81-9U; GONZOEX 81-5 and turnover operations with USS America (CV-66); NOREX; ADEX with USS Coral Sea (CV-43) and MINEX with EOD Mine Recovery Operations. Marine Detachment received hands on demolition training the field via the embarked EOD Team and carrier landing qualifications commenced on 24 Oct. 1981.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-51

Screaming Eagles -          Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NL100

F-14A

VFP-63 Det. 1 (*1)

Eyes of the Fleet -

Light Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Vought - Crusader -

Jet Fighter - Reconnaissance

115-117

RF-8G

VF-111

Sundowners -          Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -   Jet Fighter

NL200

F-14A

VA-22

Fighting Redcocks -                     Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NL300

A-7E

VA-94

Shrikes -                     Attack Squadron

Vought - Corsair II -

Jet attack aircraft

NL400

A-7E

VA-52

Knightriders -                     Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NL500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-114

Hormel Hogs -           Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600-603

E-2C

VAQ-135

Black Ravens -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

604-607

EA-6B

HS-4

Black Knights - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine

610

SH-3H

VS-29

Dragonflies - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron

Lockheed - Viking - Anti-Submarine

700

S-3A

VRC-50 Det.

Foo Dogs - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound - Transport

(RG) 425

C-2A

 (*1) VFP-63 disestablished on Jun. 30, 1982

Air Wing ELEVEN was equipped with what were then the Navy's newest aircraft: the F-14 Tomcat, S-3 Viking, the A-6E version of the Intruder and the E-2C version of the Hawkeye.

 

   “USS Independence (CV-62) anchored at Port Louis, Mauritius on 2 April 1981, for the crews’ second port visit of the deployment” (Ref. 1148B).

 

     “USS Independence (CV-62) made a port call at Port Louis, Mauritius from 2 to 6 April 1981. Although high winds made it impossibly for liberty the first day in, the weather was beautiful the rest of the port visit. Special Services offered various tours. On 7 April 1981, Indy lifted anchor and headed back to “Gonzo Station” in the Indian Ocean after a brief to trip for weapons exercises near Diego Garcia. For its role in the Iran / Afghanistan operations, Indy was awarded the Navy Expeditionary Medal” (Ref. 1148B).

 

   “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was underway in the Eastern & Western Pacific and South China Sea from 1 to 14 April 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

     “USS Independence (CV-62) crossed the Equator and conducted Polywog to Shellback Initiation on 14 April 1981” (Ref. 325).

 

    “A delegation led by Secretary of the Navy John Lehman visited USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) while she was at sea en route to the Philippines, 0830 to 1530 15 April 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

     “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) encountered a Bear Ds and Il-38 Mays which shadowed the ship while operating in the Indian Ocean on 17 April 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

     “USS Independence (CV-62) returned to “Gonzo Station” in the North Arabian Sea, steaming through the Indian Ocean on 20 April 1981. Back on “Gonzo Station” in the Indian Ocean, the crew had little time to relax, as the crew no only had to perform regular flight operations but prepare for the up coming Board and Survey Inspection (INSURV). All over the ship, men were grinding, scraping, painting and correcting discrepancies to make Indy ready for inspection, by not only the INSURV Team, but the crews families and loved ones upon return home to Norfolk, Virginia” (Ref. 1148B).

 

    “On 21 April 1981, Soviet Tu-95 Bears reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), once on each date, the second incident while the ship conducted an air defense exercise with USS Ranger (CV-61) near Wake Island, as the latter returned from a WestPac tour” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “Soviet Tu-95 Bears reconnoitered USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), once on 21 and 23 April 1981, the second incident while the ship conducted an air defense exercise with USS Ranger (CV-61) near Wake Island from 21 to 23 April, as the latter returned from a “WestPac” tour” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) encountered a Bear Ds and Il-38 Mays which shadowed the ship while operating in the Indian Ocean on 25 April 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

    “Russian AGI Nikolay Zubov (SSV-468) shadowed USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) while the carrier conducted operations near Guam from 26 to 28 April 1981” (Ref. 331A).

 

CHAPTER XXXV

USS Coral Sea (CV-43) at Naval Air Station, Alameda, Ca. conducting a $30 million modernization SRA (14 July to 10 October 1980) - U.S. Aircraft Carriers “WestPac,” Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea Deployments (1980) - CV-43 Hawaiian Training Cruise (3 May to 6 June 1981)

Iran History, Air Arm & Iran hostage crisis and the Iraq and Iran War

(1 July 1980 to 19 August 1981)

Part 1 – (1 July 1980 to 21 December 1980)

Part 2 – (22 December 1980 to 3 May 1981)

Part 3 – (4 May to 19 August 1981)

CHAPTER XXXV

 Part 2 - (1 January 1981 to 30 April 1981)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy - Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw -

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4